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TWT
7th Aug 2011, 00:40
How Arctic leader shot dead killer polar dear - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/8686910/How-Arctic-leader-shot-dead-killer-polar-dear.html)

They seem to have taken the necessary precautions with a perimeter trip wire alarm and firearms but it wasn't enough to avert a tragedy.Not something I'd be comfortable with,a tent being the only protection between me and a polar bear

ILoadMyself
7th Aug 2011, 00:48
We don't shoot drunk-drivers, tho!

Bears sh*t everywhere - not just in the woods!

11Fan
7th Aug 2011, 01:17
I'm sorry?

How Arctic leader shot dead killer polar dear

That would be Bambi the Barbarian then?

That said, and obvious typo aside, some days you get the bear......some days....

birrddog
7th Aug 2011, 01:26
The difference between the bull and bear...

The bull, no matter how pampered, feed beer and special massages (Kobe) will always be food.

The bear, no matter how mangy and tough a time, will always feed.

This is applicable to many of the current threads.

Cacophonix
7th Aug 2011, 03:06
I take my hat off to these young men. I hope this event will not stop this kind of activity (one can almost hear the spiritless Health and Safety merchants in the UK beginning to stir).

As a young boy I was always inspired by the stories of explorers and the novels of Willard Price and his two young protagonists Hal and Roger Hunt. Anybody remember African Adventure, Amazon Adventure, South Sea Adventure, Elephant Adventure etc? In each case the formula was the same but the voracious animal was different. The impetuous younger brother Roger was always being saved from lions, anacondas, elephants and the evil villain Merlin Kaggs. It was gripping stuff!

Sadly reality is harsher than fiction as the dreamer Timothy Treadwell and his girlfriend (in her case tragically) found to their cost. Yet it appears that these boys were no dreamers and they lived the dream and ultimately isn't that life at its best?

Merlin Kaggs - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Merlin_Kaggs)

Timothy Treadwell Incident--A Full Report and Examination (http://www.yellowstone-bearman.com/Tim_Treadwell.html)

Caco

ehwatezedoing
7th Aug 2011, 03:26
The thing with Polar Bears is no matter what, they have absolutely no fear!
Try stopping this kind off animals without bullets..:eek:

Slasher
7th Aug 2011, 05:40
Well I guess that means one less polar bear for
the Al Gore proselytising sect to worry about.

compressor stall
7th Aug 2011, 05:51
I too hope that this does not deter young adventurers in that part of the world.

The first night I slept with a gun in my tent for polar bear protection, I must say that every slight wind gust that rippled the tent fabric sent my heart rate up. Eventually got to sleep though :ok:

SpringHeeledJack
7th Aug 2011, 05:58
When doing outdoor stuff on Svalbard, it is mandatory to have a rifle to discourage bears from coming too close and of course other precautions when making camp (keeping provisions in a sealed container away from the tents etc). It's their territory, the polar bears that is and we are just seen as providers of food or simply food.

I knew two brothers who went there one summer with their father for a month of mountain climbing and kayaking and one night after returning very tired to their base camp and whilst preparing dinner a huge white furry head poked into their tent entrance, the nearer brother screamed like a girl and punched the bear full force in the nose and the shocked bear moaned and withdrew quicksmart. The father, who had the rifle, fired a shot to encourage the beasty to leave the area and a very sleepless night was had by all. The brother had reacted before thinking and was somewhat shaken and shocked afterwards, one never knows how we will react in these situations :eek: They had luck on their side, the poor sods who got mauled and killed sadly didn't.



SHJ

MountainBear
7th Aug 2011, 06:26
I know I'm going to get flamed but I have strong feelings on matters like these. When I was younger I spent a lot of time in the wilderness. While I never was in polar bear country I did sleep plenty of nights in grizzly bear territory as well as among black/brown bears.

If you are at the stage where you have to kill the bear that is the human being's fault and not the bears. I feel sorry for the bear; it did not deserve to die like that.

the nearer brother screamed like a girl and punched the bear full force in the nose and the shocked bear moaned and withdrew quicksmart.That is the correct and proper response.

I was once resting after a hike with my back against a big redwood tree watching a dear feed no more than a dozen paces from me. Suddenly the deer perked up, hesitated a moment and then dashed away. Curious, I shifted my body to peek around the tree trunk wondering what had caused the deer to flee only to find myself nose to nose with an adult black bear. There was no more than a foot between my nose and his snout.

We are apes and so I went ape. I jumped up and screamed as loud as I could. I honestly don't know who was more surprised him or me. He turned tail and ran, I chased him for more than a quarter of a mile until he ducked into a ravine. I then started throwing rocks at him because I wanted to put the fear of God into him.

The key to dealing with wild animals successfully is to deal with them at their own level. With very few exceptions human beings are not "on the menu". If you have to shoot a wild animal other than for food in this day and age you've done something wrong. These people are no heros to me. They are damn fools who got caught with their pants down and got spanked.

When I was young the official advice when faced with a bear was to run. Now, the official advice is to show respect and if necessary to fight. It shows that at least in this little way there is progress.

Worrals in the wilds
7th Aug 2011, 06:38
Interesting. I must say the whole bear concept scares the crap out of me, and probably most people who haven't grown up with them. :eek:

As a young boy I was always inspired by the stories of explorers and the novels of Willard Price and his two young protagonists Hal and Roger Hunt. Anybody remember African Adventure, Amazon Adventure, South Sea Adventure, Elephant Adventure etc?
They were awesome, I must have read them all about a hundred times each (except Whale Adventure, which didn't age well :sad::}). I still re-read them occasionally.

sitigeltfel
7th Aug 2011, 08:00
Well I guess that means one less polar bear for
the Al Gore proselytising sect to worry about.

I couldn't give a toss about Al Bore but I am annoyed that there is now one less bear out there.

The dead polar bear, which at 550lb was considered to be underweight for a male adult This WILD animal was protecting its own territory and foraging for food in its own back yard when these "adventurers" decided to set up camp. They seem not to have taken adequate precautions, such as a night sentry, and this tragedy happened. I make no apology in directing the majority of my sympathy towards the bear.

Cacophonix
7th Aug 2011, 08:53
I couldn't give a toss about Al Bore but I am annoyed that there is now one less bear out there

Sadly, as is often the case when man and wildlife meet, whatever else happens, wildlife loses that life.

Caco

Trim Stab
7th Aug 2011, 10:41
If you are at the stage where you have to kill the bear that is the human being's fault and not the bears. I feel sorry for the bear; it did not deserve to die like that.


I wholeheartedly agree. Carrying a rifle on an adventure holiday to "protect" yourself against bears is the wrong approach and cowardly. If you are not prepared to accept the risks of venturing into polar bear's territory, then don't go.

The only exceptions should be parties that are entering bear territory for valid and approved scientific research.

Um... lifting...
7th Aug 2011, 10:49
Polar bears are the iconic symbol of Svalbard, and one of the main tourist attractions.[98] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svalbard#cite_note-97) While protected, anyone outside of settlements is required to carry a rifle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rifle) to kill polar bears in self defense (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Self_defense), as a last resort, should they attack.[99] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Svalbard#cite_note-Umbriet_2005:_132-98) Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Franz_Joseph_Land) share a common population of 3,000 polar bears, with Kong Karls Land being the most important breeding ground.

Actually, carrying a rifle is required on Svalbard outside of the settlements, so all that risk acceptance stuff without one is academic. The way to avert this really would have been to not go.

corsair
7th Aug 2011, 11:03
With tragic irony, apparently the reason for this 'expedition' was to investigate the effects of climate change. :ugh:

green granite
7th Aug 2011, 11:10
If an army patrol sleeps over night in hostile territory where some one might sneak up and kill them, they have a sentry on duty all night to warn them of the approach of the enemy, a group of people in polar bear country should do the same, or the alternative is to have designated camping areas with large bear proof cages to pitch your tent in.


~I too feel sorry for the polar bear who was only looking for a meal.

Incidentally how do the Inuit avoid being a polar bear's lunch when away hunting?

aviate1138
7th Aug 2011, 11:16
I read that the safety trip wire was frozen….. so much for global warming.

Why not carry some thunderflashes in each bum/kit bag? Much louder than a gun and no bullets flying about.

Al Fakhem
7th Aug 2011, 11:23
Was this a team competing for this year's Darwin Awards?

Trim Stab
7th Aug 2011, 12:31
The way to avert this really would have been to not go.

I agree. They shouldn't have been there. It sickens me to see that the UK gutter press are calling the gunman a "hero".

Interesting comment in the Daily Express from the BBC film team who spent a couple of years in the area filming the bears for an excellent wildlife documentary. They regarded as camping in tents as asking for trouble. They took sensible precautions during their two year stay, succeeded in making a very valuable documentary, and didn't kill any bears despite on occasions being stalked.
Express.co.uk - Home of the Daily and Sunday Express | UK News :: ‘Never camp in polar bear territory. One tried to smash into my shack and kill me’ (http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/263456/-Never-camp-in-polar-bear-territory-One-tried-to-smash-into-my-shack-and-kill-me)-

Storminnorm
7th Aug 2011, 12:47
I still have my Teddy Bear.
It's a bit tatty now, but so am I.

Lon More
7th Aug 2011, 13:22
Couldn't thet import some of the bears into Tottrnham. Put coppers' helmets on them with a tracking device and a tazer inside to keep them within the area. Two birds, one stone.