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alwayzinit
3rd Aug 2011, 05:12
Just seen on Bloomberg that China has just about completely banned the export of Rare Earth, vital for modern electronics both Mil and Civ.

One of its largest Rare Earth mining companies has stopped production by order of the government.

So what do you think?

con-pilot
3rd Aug 2011, 05:16
I don't know, ask Jane. :p

Slasher
3rd Aug 2011, 05:31
You mean things like Lithium?

Can't blame China wanting to hog it all - if you are a peasant
stuck in China wouldn't you want as much as the stuff as you
could get?

But Stateside I think everyone will need a dose or twenty once
the implications of O'Bummer's new credit card top-up sink in.

Maybe the Prez could do a special trade deal?

rh200
3rd Aug 2011, 05:43
Don't they make every thing that uses it anyway:E. Just buy the goods and recycle the good stuff for your needs, might be cheaper.

Cacophonix
3rd Aug 2011, 06:29
Start of WW3?

No but rare minerals (if not earths) have been the cause of ongoing wars in many 3rd world countries like the Congo/Zaire for example. The wars and genocide in central Africa have partly been predicated upon the world's greed for these minerals in some cases.

http://tnahistoryoftechnology.wikispaces.com/Rare+Earth+Metals+and+Congo

The US allowed its rare earth mines to close and is presently restarting them. Australia is also a huge potential source of these minerals.

tony draper
3rd Aug 2011, 06:32
Wont effect us we dont make anything in the UK now.:)

Slasher
3rd Aug 2011, 06:44
That's true Drapes, ever since Kenya banned Hot (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/africa/8251510.stm) which was
once a real export earner.

Does old Blighty make any reliable rubber these days?

Lon More
3rd Aug 2011, 07:36
Does old Blighty make any reliable rubber these days?
The London Rubber Company. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Durex)

Slasher
3rd Aug 2011, 09:23
Thanks Lon. I forgot about Durex - those Fetherlites are damn
good when one is forced into the equivalent of having to wear
socks while taking a nice warm wet and delightful shower.

One certainly wouldn't make use of any of the real tiny skinny
rubbery devices (http://articles.latimes.com/2010/jan/21/world/la-fg-china-condoms21-2010jan21) made in my neck of the woods thats for sure.

arcniz
3rd Aug 2011, 10:34
alwayzinit POST 3rd Aug 2011 04:12

Export Ban from China of Rare Earth Minerals.......start of ww3?
Just seen on Bloomberg that China has just about completely banned the export of Rare Earth, vital for modern electronics both Mil and Civ.

One of its largest Rare Earth mining companies has stopped production by order of the government.

So what do you think?

THINK THIS MAY BE A WEE BIT OF A TROLL

Off by a year, maybe. Spring last year China made some noises about stopping all rare earth exports to Japan - in the midst of a spat about territorial fishing waters, after the Japanese boarded a Chinese boat.

Somewhat later they announced that they were going to sharply restrict exports generally for rare earths -- which were selling moderately cheap -- and the prices went up.

After a bit the WTO got in the loop, pointed out that trade is reciprocal, and those who do not play nicely get their fingers rapped. A quiet period ensued, during which China published some not totally onerous quotas and trade resumed .

Couple weeks ago, China pulbished the Second Annual one of that, which actually raised some quotas.. the details are there for them that wants 'em.

Rare earths are not so rare, and not all in China. They inherited the market by patiently mining and producing from their own reserves, however, and cannily bought up most of the processing equipment from US companies who couldn't afford to compete with coolie labor. Now various companies are making new equipment, finding and opening up various new deposits, and building a process that will - in a few years, be comparable in capacity to what the Chinese presently offer. A little healthy competition will ensue, and the world will be happier for it.

Lithium ain't so rare, Slash, but beware. A bit of that on the regular and you'll be less stressed, but looking back in time for those "consummations devoutly to be wished".

RegDep
3rd Aug 2011, 10:41
Slasher, Lon,

I think we are safe (re China), as the largest natural rubber (latex) producing countries are Thailand, Indonesia (2.4 Megatons :eek:) and Malaysia, in addition to Kerala.

Visited in the 80s the (at the time) world's largest condom factory in Kerala, India. BTW: The management explained matter-of-factly that the export versions were 2" bigger than the ones for domestic market.

Slasher
3rd Aug 2011, 11:02
That's ok RegDep because matter-of-factly mine is a damn good
2 & 7/8ths ins larger than the biggest-sized cheap locally made
variety around here (5" Rough Riders).

I'll keep using those Durex thingys (if I can find any) whenever
I'm forced at gunpoint to shoehorn one on - which thank christ
only occurs very rarely.

tony draper
3rd Aug 2011, 11:07
Condoms in Africa? now that's a good idea.:rolleyes:

Parapunter
3rd Aug 2011, 11:55
Condoms in Rome would be a better one.:hmm:

Rollingthunder
3rd Aug 2011, 12:07
Then there is the old joke that during the cold war when the Soviets were short of condoms, they ordered supplies fron the US, specifying 10" X 5". The US duly made them and stamped the boxes - "MED".

Slasher
3rd Aug 2011, 12:18
And there's another where a drunk GI in Seoul pulled one out
of a condom-vending machine, unwrapped it, put the thing in
in his mouth a few seconds, then spat it out yelling "Oh christ
that's the fcuking worst chewing gum I ever tasted!"

Windy Militant
3rd Aug 2011, 13:22
Then of course there's the joke about the WI visiting the rubber Glove factory. ;)
Can't see how banning the export of a seventies funk band is much of a problem. Mind you I might consider buying shares in Cornish tin mines. :}

11Fan
3rd Aug 2011, 22:00
OH MY GOD ! What are we gonna do?

What?

Where?

Nebraska?

Well.....um......never mind.

Reports suggest that the southeastern Nebraska hamlet may be sitting on the world’s largest untapped deposit of “rare earth” minerals, which have proved to be indispensable to a slew of high-tech and military applications such as laser pointers, stadium lighting, electric car batteries and sophisticated missile-guidance systems.

Neb. mine find to challenge China (http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2011/aug/2/rush-for-rare-earth-may-create-nebraska-boomtown/)

Slasher
4th Aug 2011, 06:00
What the hell has Nebraska got to do with condoms?


:confused:


Ok I'll give you the recent Omaha fashion show (http://stage.nap.org/news/project-condom-fashion-show-2011/) then.... ;)

11Fan
4th Aug 2011, 06:09
What the hell has Nebraska got to do with condoms?

Jeez Slasher......

Slowly now, scroll back to the first post.....

There goes a good lad.

aviate1138
4th Aug 2011, 06:11
Of course the Green Negatives will claim it's not practical to extract but when there's a price to pay…….

Rare Earth Elements (REEs) (http://www.groundtruthtrekking.org/Issues/MetalsMining/RareEarths.html)

Yamagata ken
4th Aug 2011, 06:18
As arcniz writes, it's old news. There's a certain amount of bite-yer-own-bum about this, because China's electonics industries are very heavily dependent on components manufactured in Japan. Don't let the politicians and central planners know this, though.

arcniz
4th Aug 2011, 07:20
There's a certain amount of bite-yer-own-bum about this...

One has no direct knowledge of the setup, but the on-off embargo seems a bit like it may have roots in the classic story of some hardworking close-to-earth folks, out in the middle of nowhere, who have puzzled out how they can make a fortune in short order if they single-handedly capture the rare-earls market, throttle the global supply to squeaking, and then play the biz for all the price it's worth. So then they start by emailing press releases to the global media. A bit later, the inspired author of the plan puts in a call to their Minerals Bureau Central Manager in Beijing to share the good news.

At other end of the phone wire, hundreds or thousands of km away, is a chain-smoking bureaucrat who's had little excitement for a long while and spends much time counting the dwindling string of days til his pension kicks in. Even while he's talking with the folks at the mines on the black phone, the red one from his Minister's office comes to life, tersely saying "FIX IT....NOW", followed by a click.

Would that Gilbert & Sullivan were around... to spin their tale into three entertaining acts, with "The Premium for Neodymium" as operatic centerpiece, and the gloating "Holmium in One" as a patriotic finale.

Yamagata ken
4th Aug 2011, 11:41
Would that Gilbert & Sullivan were around... to spin their tale into three entertaining acts, with "The Premium for Neodymium" as operatic centerpiece, and the gloating "Holmium in One" as a patriotic finale. Excellent. :thumbsup: On a more serious note, even here in the sleepy far north we are locked into the manufacturing machine. We have a local company which builds machines which make microchips. There are other tiny companies with unfeasably sophisticated equipment making sub-components for the electronics industry. Typically these are staffed by greybeards with centuries of collective experience, not only how to make the part, but why it should be made that way. The knowledge is not something that can be imposed from above. It has to be learned, and that is why Korea and China still source many of their components from Japan.

arcniz
4th Aug 2011, 12:23
...greybeards with centuries of collective experience, not only how to make the part, but why it should be made that way. The knowledge is not something that can be imposed from above. It has to be learned....

You have presented a marvelous description of the complex but essential interdependencies that provide essential support to most advanced technologies -- based on an experienced artisan-craftsman layer of seasoned practitioners in a vast diversity of techniques, methods, and arts to make, with hand tools on a wood bench in a shed, the seed machines and fixtures and appliances and jigs that are directly applied to create successively more mechanized and automated layers of high-performing production tools and machines that now are the externally visible source of our most advanced modern technologies.

I became intimately acquainted with this type of industrial ecology in the Western US during the 60's and 70's, used it to compete with billion$$ corporations on a near-equal footing (in specific situations) and then watched with great sadness as it virtually ceased to exist over a span from the late 80's into the 00's. Tens of thousands of uniquely capable small-business resources just dried up in the winds of time and change, for lack of the trickle of revenue work that previously sustained them.

That here-before, gone-today phenomenon is one reason for despair that California will ever manage to put itself back to the robust economic norms of times past, rather than just becoming an impoverished northern summer camp for vacationing liberals from the more southerly Americas.

alwayzinit
4th Aug 2011, 12:58
Sorry Chaps and chapesses..............On hols in spice islands.

No the tread is not a troll, it was / is a question from a bod. ME, just asking for thoughts..............

Nothing more...........Now off to crack another cold one:ok:

bnt
4th Aug 2011, 13:59
Of course the minerals will be exported in the end: they just won't be exported raw. There will be Neodymium in the magnets of every Chinese loudspeaker; there will be Scandium in your Chinese CFL bulbs; and so on.