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Cacophonix
28th Jul 2011, 05:41
The case of this mother prosecuted in Marietta Atlanta led me to ask myself when I last caught the bus and I just couldn’t remember. I often catch the Tube when commuting in London but not the bus.

Still, I am not as bad as an acquaintance of mine who is so used to catching black cabs that when he did catch the bus he gave the bus driver a tip when he disembarked.

In our car centric culture it is very easy to forget that others do use busses etc. and should be accorded respect and rights too.

However it seems that a little bit of the old South is still extant when reading about this case though.

Mum Sentenced Over Son's Hit-And-Run Death - Yahoo! (http://uk.news.yahoo.com/mum-sentenced-over-sons-hit-run-death-111744335.html)

A mother has been convicted of killing her four-year-old son after he died in a hit-and-run in the US because she crossed the road with her children at the wrong place.

Raquel Nelson had faced up to three years in prison - longer than the driver responsible for her child's death who served only six months behind bars.

However, the 30-year-old received a 12-months probationary sentence after the case caused public uproar in America.

Ms Nelson's son was killed in April last year when he was knocked down by a van after slipping from his mother's grasp as they crossed the road to get from a bus stop to their apartment building in the city of Marietta , north of Atlanta.

The distraught mum was also injured in the incident along with her young daughter.

Ms Nelson was subsequently prosecuted under the offence of jaywalking, which dictates that it is illegal to cross the road anywhere other than at a designated crossing point.

She was convicted by the all-white jury of second-degree vehicular homicide and other offences.

Her lawyer, David Savoy, said the driver was drinking and had taken painkillers on the night of the accident and was mostly blind in one eye.

He also had a prior conviction for a hit-and-run accident.

Rollingthunder
28th Jul 2011, 05:46
Buses...sigh... buses

Cacophonix
28th Jul 2011, 05:49
Rolling

You will find that both busses and buses are acceptable...

Bus | Define Bus at Dictionary.com (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/bus)

We will have to appeal to Chuks on this one. ;)

UniFoxOs
28th Jul 2011, 06:33
We generally use buses or busses in large towns in the UK (we've both got passes so they're free) and as it is generally a city break it's nice to use it as a sightseeing opportunity. If I lived in a town I would use them most of the time.

When abroad we'll use buses if convenient (last ones I remember as an example were along the strip in Vegas, and hotel to Pearl Harbour) but usually between airport and hotel, hotel and restaurant at night, it will be taxis. Rarely hire a car abroad, now as we don't do touring holidays.

Never used a bus where we live - service is minimal.

Trains - only for a day trip to London, too much hassle otherwise.

Planes - any trip outside the UK.

sitigeltfel
28th Jul 2011, 06:38
She was convicted by the all-white jury What has that got to do with it? Is there a suggestion of some degree of racism with the jury?

Cacophonix
28th Jul 2011, 06:45
What has that got to do with it? Is there a suggestion of some degree of racism with the jury?


Who knows but you have to say that an all white jury certainly has a certain cadence given the history of certain places?

Personally I would suggest that the jury, while not racist, may not have had the faintest clue about the issues a mom with kids may face in a pedestrian unfriendly environment when disembarking from a bus!

tony draper
28th Jul 2011, 07:07
Was on a Bus just yesterday,stops right outside the Post Office which is handy but my calculations show that for short trips mile for mile it costs five times as much to travel by Bus than by Concorde.
:uhoh:

stuckgear
28th Jul 2011, 07:16
zyYfBS2Y1xQ

Cacophonix
28th Jul 2011, 07:19
stuckgear

You post is as bereft of comment as some roads are of pedestrian crossings!

Load Toad
28th Jul 2011, 07:22
The public transport system in HK is cheap & mostly an absolute joy to use (rush hour accepted).

Capetonian
28th Jul 2011, 07:31
I try to use public transport where feasible, which it often isn't. It depends very much on where I am and what the choices are.

In the UK and continental Europe I nearly always use trains for long distance travel as I find them by far the most enjoyable way of travelling. I sit and relax with reading material and a meal and watch the scenery go by. In the UK they are often good value if booked in advance, but can be horrendously expensive for short distances, for example a few weeks ago I had to go from Basingstoke to Bristol and paid about £60 for a return, whilst last summer I got a one way from Inverness, via London, to Guildford, in 1st. class, for abut £90. When I have to go into London, which I loathe, from the 'commuter' areas I find the trains squalid, overcrowded, overpriced and uncomfortable, the only exception being a certain line into Marylebone which is expensive but of a good standard.

You wouldn't get me on a coach for love nor money, nor on the Tube as I suffer from ochlophobia. So if I have to travel within a city I use taxis or as a last resort, the bus.

Locally, wherever I am, I try to use local bus and train services as in many places they are much improved in recent years and I believe we should use them, or we will lose them.

I enjoy using public transport particularly in the Netherlands and Switzerland as it is all so beautifully organised, clean, punctual, and reliable.

When none of the above fit, then I drive. It's my least preferred option but for some journeys particularly when there are several points on an itinerary, the only one.

The SSK
28th Jul 2011, 09:44
Having (figuratively) torn up my drivers licence a year ago due to encroaching glaucoma, I have had to re-learn public transport. Here in Brussels it mostly works brilliantly, a regular weekly crosstown journey at 18:00 involves tram, metro, tram, bus and I can do it in 45 minutes, far quicker than the drive would be.

Every stop in the city has a unique name, which makes journey planning relatively easy, buses metro and some trams have indicators of what is the next stop and/or announcements in French, Dutch and English. Many stops and stations have electronic displays of how long the wait will be and every stop has an easy-to read timetable. Most metro stations have major artwork installations (some worth the trip to see) and all have decent piped music which switches to classical after 9pm.

And all for a maximum of €2 for an hour’s unlimited travel over the system, just over half that if you buy a 10-ride card.

Sorry, Capetonian, I know you loathe and despise Belgium, but some of us quite like it here

stuckgear
28th Jul 2011, 09:48
In the UK and continental Europe I nearly always use trains for long distance travel as I find them by far the most enjoyable way of travelling. I sit and relax with reading material and a meal and watch the scenery go by. In the UK they are often good value if booked in advance, but can be horrendously expensive for short distances, for example a few weeks ago I had to go from Basingstoke to Bristol and paid about £60 for a return, whilst last summer I got a one way from Inverness, via London, to Guildford, in 1st. class, for abut £90. When I have to go into London, which I loathe, from the 'commuter' areas I find the trains squalid, overcrowded, overpriced and uncomfortable, the only exception being the Chiltern Line which is expensive but of a good standard.



hating on the english again ? :E;):p:}


( sorry oke, couldn't resist that )

MadsDad
28th Jul 2011, 09:59
I quite often use the bus for a quick 'pop into town' to get a loaf or use a cash machine. The bus station is central so normally I can get a bus in, do the bits I want to and get the next bus back (usually the one I went in on). Tales about 45 minutes return, is free (crumblies bus pass) and saves the hassle of getting the car out, driving, parking etc.

And I hate to say this Stuckgear but I can't disagree with anything Capetonian wrote about the UK train system. Currently it's a total and utter shambles.

stuckgear
28th Jul 2011, 10:05
And I hate to say this Stuckgear but I can't disagree with anything Capetonian wrote about the UK train system. Currently it's a total and utter shambles.


neither do I, at all. however it was a tongue in cheek joke about another thread and another poster.. i'm sure our bru will get the reference. ;)

Octopussy2
28th Jul 2011, 10:12
From Wiki:

Ochlophobia and demophobia are terms for types of social phobia or social anxiety disorder whose sufferers have a fear of crowds. Sufferers may offer various rationalizations of the phobia, such as the fear being trampled in a crowd, getting a deadly disease from people within the crowd, getting lost in the crowd, or feeling insignificant when surrounded by a crowd.

People who are shy and introverted are most likely to experience ochlophobia. But not all introverted people have anxiety problems. Ochlophobic people are often unable to handle situations involving parties, going to theaters, going to movie theaters, going to sports games, or going to the mall.

Just curious, but why would this prevent travel on a tube train, but not on an overground train?

Cacophonix
28th Jul 2011, 10:18
Just curious, but why would this prevent travel on a tube train, but not on an overground train?


Can't speak for anybody else or phobias but I must admit that I find travelling on the London Tube at rush hour as close to my own definition of hell on earth as is possible!

I have had to detrain on a couple of occasions because of my limited tolerance for overcrowding!

Octopussy2
28th Jul 2011, 11:45
Agreed, but actually many of the overground trains have exactly the same level of overcrowding (try Wimbledon to Waterloo in rush hour, particularly if the previous train has gone out of service).

So I'm curious as to what makes the difference.

sitigeltfel
28th Jul 2011, 12:19
Trains, planes...yes, but buses :mad:

GcmM28zd0vU

Worrals in the wilds
28th Jul 2011, 12:43
The public transport system in HK is cheap & mostly an absolute joy to use (rush hour accepted).

Agreed. It's a fabulous system. FWIW I found the UK regional trains and London tubes great, efficient and reasonably pleasant...which possibly goes to show what the local system is like :uhoh:.

The tubes were a bit sardine can like at peak hour but when you're travelling that's all part of the 'big smoke' fun (dunno if I'd want to deal with it every day). I did like the sarcastic announcements and the fact that you didn't need a timetable because they came so frequently. :ok:

Busses on the other hand...:ugh:Every time I catch one (whether at home or overseas) it seems to be infested with weirdos, breaking down, crashing into something, getting lost or just very, very smelly.

Ancient Observer
28th Jul 2011, 12:59
Mr Cape.
You will be arrested and shot for mentionning in a public place our secret little railway system. The one that is expensive and reliable. We don't want the buggers from "last useless western" to discover it.

Buses in london are much better than they used to be. I have no idea how they fund it, but Boris and his predecessor have increased bus frequency and bus lanes so that buses are now worth taking again.

One day the UK system will be half as good as Sin.s or HKG.s. They took what the UK did and massively improved on it.

Capetonian
28th Jul 2011, 13:01
The SSK
Sorry, Capetonian, I know you loathe and despise Belgium, but some of us quite like it here
Strange comment, please remind me where I stated that I loathe and despise Belgium. Then, unless you can find it, you may wish to apologise for putting words into my mouth that I never spoke. You could also offer me a Belgian beer but I'm not a great fan of them, mostly too heavy and malty for my plebeian taste.
What I probably have said somewhere is that it's a dull little country, with the exceptions of the lovely towns of Ghent and Brugge, and it's a bit of an oddity in that it purports to be at the head of Europe and yet it doesn't even have a proper government of its own.

Octopussy2
I find the experience of going down those awful escalators and tunnels to get to the Tube as offputting and frightening as the actual ride. I just see thousands of people swarming into them like rats down a sewer and I freeze, or turn away. Even at night when it's not busy it gives me the creeps, I've been on it once in the last 4 or 5 years and it worried me.

I won't get on a crowded overground train either from choice, but as long as I can stand near a door or window it doesn't worry me as much as the Tube.

As with most phobias, there is no logical explanation, and you're right ..... I can't handle situations involving parties, going to theaters, going to movie theaters, going to sports games, or going to the mall.

Ancient Observer I have modified my original posting to preserve our secret!

By the way public transport in SA is not really an option although I do use the suburban railway between Fishoek and Town sometimes. Often I'm the only white person and that never worries me. Buses, or busses, are a serious no-no! (Why isn't the plural of bus 'bi'?)

Worrals in the wilds
28th Jul 2011, 13:11
Let's not forget the ubiquitous bemos/tuk tuks etc that keep Asia moving...
http://www.wired-destinations.com/images/guides/thailand/New%20Photos/Tuk-tuk/TukTuk1_jpg.jpg
As noisy and smelly as Hell itself, but very cheap and efficient once you get over the "OMG I'm going to die plastered all over the front of a truck" feeling.

Ancient Observer
28th Jul 2011, 13:17
Worrals - that must be a publicists photo. I've never seen one of those things so clean.

The SSK
28th Jul 2011, 13:36
The country is a waste of time and space. The Dutch don't want the Flemish part and adding the Walloon part to France would only further weaken the gene pool in France and they'd all end up with two heads and 6 toes on each foot.

[snip some trifling 'when I wouked in Brussels' stuff]

The only good thing about Belgium is that it's small enough to get through, or round, it pretty fast…

Still waiting for that apology? Keep waiting

stuckgear
28th Jul 2011, 13:36
[thread drift /on]

it's a bit of an oddity in that it purports to be at the head of Europe and yet it doesn't even have a proper government of its own.


cape thats not irony, it's symbolism !



[thread drift /off]

Capetonian
28th Jul 2011, 13:50
The country is a waste of time and space. The Dutch don't want the Flemish part and adding the Walloon part to France would only further weaken the gene pool in France and they'd all end up with two heads and 6 toes on each foot.

The only good thing about Belgium is that it's small enough to get through, or round, it pretty fast…

And that means loathing and despising? Oh well, have it your own way if you want to take yourself so damned seriously. I'm sure you're right.

OFSO
28th Jul 2011, 14:00
Public Transport.

Just booked the October train tickets to Paris from Perpignan, €27 on the idTGV, takes five hours, mostly at in excess of 300kph - and that's FIRST CLASS.

French public transport ? Can't beat it !

I must add a comment from a friend of mine from the Republic of Yorkshire:

(Looking out of train window heading into Paris from CdeG) "You know, R., the French don't deserve public transport as good as this !"

Blacksheep
28th Jul 2011, 14:24
...it costs five times as much to travel by Bus than by Concorde...I have a bus pass, but where would one have obtained a Concorde pass? ;)

tony draper
28th Jul 2011, 14:40
I don't have a bus pass though one is entitled to one,one uses buses so seldom tiz just not worth getting orf one's arse to seek out out.
Tiz a bit of a shock when one gets on the same bus one used in sproghood where a return ticket to the Toon and back cost tuppence to be charged £1.30 for a ride of about 500 yards.
:uhoh:

G-CPTN
28th Jul 2011, 15:12
I encourage you to acquire your bus pass, Herr D. The benefits of being able to undertake short and long journeys at no cost has encouraged me to travel around the region.

I even take the bus into town (not the Toon) to buy milk at £1 for 4 pints instead of the ridiculous price charged locally. Gives me the chance to stock up on cheap groceries from the German supermarket too.

I even take the odd trip into the Toon (all for nowt). 4 buses each hour . . . 3 via the Metrocentre.

tony draper
28th Jul 2011, 15:18
One avoids such places as the Toon and Metro Center wherever possible Mr G-C,autograph hunters,need one say more.
:rolleyes:

B Fraser
28th Jul 2011, 15:35
Does flying on a scheduled airline count as public transport in these hallowed pages ?

Tankertrashnav
28th Jul 2011, 15:48
Assuming economy class I'd say yes it does count, and as far as I'm concerned by far the worst form of public transport with the exception of long distance coach/bus.

Always used to use the tube in London until I started to learn the bus routes. Much more fun and from the top deck a great free way to see the metropolis (did I say I have a bus pass?).

Agreed that the fare structure on the railways is a total mess, but with a bit of forward planning there are some great bargains. TGVs are always quoted when comparing the French system with ours, and I agree they are fantastic. However cross country travel off the TGV routes can be slow, with infrequent trains and poor connections.

btw buss (vt) to kiss

I buss
You buss,
He, she busses etc

I suppose you can buss on a bus - I have!

Shack37
28th Jul 2011, 15:50
I'm a little confused here (nothing new of course).

A little boy is killed crossing the road which is tragic. The thread is titled "Do you use public transport"? Don't see the connection. This then leads to a debate on the relative merits of trains/buses/taxis etc.

What difference does it make if he was run down after disembarking from any of the above or a space shuttle? It's still a young life snuffed out much too soon.

con-pilot
28th Jul 2011, 16:12
What's Public Transportation? :p

G-CPTN
28th Jul 2011, 16:19
When I first visited Hong Kong I was confused by the term 'Mass Transit System'.

When I realised that it was a sort of railway, I was further confused that 'no luggage was to be carried'.

Krystal n chips
28th Jul 2011, 16:35
I do use public transport because at times, it makes economic sense to do so.

A bus costs me either £3.50 or £5.20 rtn ( the latter is because I cross the Staffs border ) to either of two large(ish) towns..journey is 14 / 20 miles rtn respectively....then finding a parking space and fee etc. Buses are every 30mins.

Trains..agree 100% with TTN about bargains...last weekend, single to Staines £10 !..plus £4 Tube....single rtn leg £23.50...road mileage about 360 miles...easy maths there with fuel costs. Time not really an issue either at w/ends. However....and here I do feel sorry for overseas visitors, the National Rail website is a :mad: disgrace...it is, in my less than modest opinion, deliberately complex to deter people from searchng ( and here time is essential, as is knowing how to navigate round a website..because it is far from easy ) and also, quelle surprise, tends to direct you towards Great Branson and Souter Railways. But you really do have to search and book well in advance which, of course, isn't always possible.

Long distance coaches are an unknown however...as yet.... given they might be worth a look as an experiment in the future.

radeng
28th Jul 2011, 16:46
As my nearest bus stop is 35 minutes walk ( and I don't walk too well) and the buses are now about every 2 hours, there's not much point either in a bus pass or attempting to use the bus.

Gertrude the Wombat
28th Jul 2011, 16:49
The public transport system in HK is cheap & mostly an absolute joy to use (rush hour accepted).
That's what I thought on a recent visit.

Nonetheless one of the people I met wouldn't be seen dead on a train and travelled everywhere by taxi.

tony draper
28th Jul 2011, 16:54
I think not to far in the future a lot more people will be using public transport than now,twill be the bus or shanks pony.
:uhoh:

G-CPTN
28th Jul 2011, 18:04
one of the people I met wouldn't be seen dead on a trainWinston Churchill travelled by train (but he was dead . . . ).

The train was also pulled by Winston Churchill.

Rollingthunder
28th Jul 2011, 22:10
http://www.semgonline.com/misc/pics/rmp_34051-2.jpg

G-CPTN
28th Jul 2011, 22:25
That picture says 'Golden Arrow' to me . . .

Tankertrashnav
29th Jul 2011, 09:25
Anoraks corner

I've got a photo of Churchill's funeral train somewhere. IIRC the loco was the rebuilt B of B class Winston Churchill and did not have the original airsmoothed casing as above.

oops - memory failure again, sorry rollingthunder, it was in the original form

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-NCn4Mxc_Y

radeng
29th Jul 2011, 09:40
It is in the NRM at York, and was not rebuilt.

bnt
29th Jul 2011, 10:06
Was on a Bus just yesterday,stops right outside the Post Office which is handy but my calculations show that for short trips mile for mile it costs five times as much to travel by Bus than by Concorde.
:uhoh:
Well, if you think about how a bus is operated in a city, and what's technically involved: you're not really paying for the miles, you're paying for the stops.

I like public transport, and I've even used it in places that you wouldn't normally expect it to work, such as Houston, Texas. Home of the Oil industry, sprawling, no urban planning at all ... and $1.50 gets you anywhere in Harris County, an area about 3x the size of Greater London.

(The only problem I had was that my friends live in neighbouring Montgomery county, with has no public transport system at all - which leaves you at the mercy of Greyhound and other Interstate services - or car.)

The thing that annoyed me about that part of the USA, as opposed to New York, was the way public transport is associated with class. There weren't many white people on the bus in Houston. As if people would only use public transport if they couldn't afford any kind of car i.e. really poor. A bit alien to a city dweller such as myself ... :hmm:

CATIII-NDB
29th Jul 2011, 10:30
Weirdos,the elderly,the just plain lost. Yep as a thoroughly one of the former, I use these ill ventelated & expensive contraptions of the Devil regularly.

I wonder if any research has been done, to quantify the effectiveness of bus travel; as a vector in the spread of chest desease.

To any one outside the UK, our public road transport; with a few exeptions is, espcially in the big cities, crowded and filthy.

CAT III

Ancient Observer
29th Jul 2011, 10:38
Someone asked about a Concorde pass.
I had one, or something like it once upon a time.

The wheeze was to live in a feeder city in the 90s. I lived just outside bru.
BA could never fill Concorde, at some times of year, so as an incentive for us feeder types, travelling Club, if we were flying transatlantic from Bru via Lhr, we could do one leg on Concorde. (Thankyou, I mean one transatlantic leg, not the Bru-lhr leg!!)

Thus, as and when I needed to be in the States, BA gave a freebie pass on Concorde.

PS I still have my silver Concorde biro, as does a mate. despite trawling all the best pen shops in London, neither he nor I can get a re-fill that fits. any ideas?

Carry0nLuggage
29th Jul 2011, 10:41
I commute by train because it's

Quicker (About evens in the morning but in the evening the train journey is over before a car would have covered the first miles and a half)
More reliable (Boss thinks I'm fiddling my flexi time it's so regular)
Cheaper (Even before fuel started to really increase in price)
I don't have to worry about some other driver trying to destroy it or chav to nick it
I can sleep off a hangover on the way to work :ok:

And this is in SE England.

vulcanised
29th Jul 2011, 12:01
I haven't travelled on a bus or a train for many years but I still wish to know.

Why did the nutters always sit next to me?

phnuff
29th Jul 2011, 13:11
...it costs five times as much to travel by Bus than by Concorde...

Yes, but these days busses are more common and quicker than Concorde

CATIII-NDB
29th Jul 2011, 13:47
Do you mean the one like me with the "Blue Glasses" and the manic look in their eyes. I can beat that any time - I won't go into the details here, but yes I know what you mean.

It gets a whole lot worse when out comes the "Old Testament"

CAT III.

RedhillPhil
29th Jul 2011, 14:26
Weirdos,the elderly,the just plain lost. Yep as a thoroughly one of the former, I use these ill ventelated & expensive contraptions of the Devil regularly.

I wonder if any research has been done, to quantify the effectiveness of bus travel; as a vector in the spread of chest desease.

To any one outside the UK, our public road transport; with a few exeptions is, espcially in the big cities, crowded and filthy.

CAT III

You're sounding like a Daily Mail leader writer. Public transport in the last fifteen years has come on in leaps and bounds. Anyway, if the bus/tube/train/tram is dirty - who's made it dirty?

RedhillPhil
29th Jul 2011, 14:28
I commute by train because it's

Quicker (About evens in the morning but in the evening the train journey is over before a car would have covered the first miles and a half)
More reliable (Boss thinks I'm fiddling my flexi time it's so regular)
Cheaper (Even before fuel started to really increase in price)
I don't have to worry about some other driver trying to destroy it or chav to nick it
I can sleep off a hangover on the way to work :ok:

And this is in SE England.

You forgot the no parking/congestion charges bit.:)

CATIII-NDB
29th Jul 2011, 14:40
Daily Mail Leader Writer !!. - Chance would be a fine thing. Some public transport has come on in leaps and bounds but so to has the costs.

Where I live its a near private monopoly with financial assistance through subsiities on some routes.

Service has deterioated recently - Hourly after 7 PM and nothing after 9 PM.

The busses are modern but greatly overcrowded during the rush hour.

CAT III

uffington sb
29th Jul 2011, 14:45
Mrs Uffers and I have just returned from a trip to BCN by train, sleeper and day train (as shown in Seat61.com).
PBO - KGX by East Coast Class 91. On time, clean and free Wi-Fi and on time at KGX (it will be a nice staion in a couple of years when the refurbs finished). A short walk across to SPX. Bright 'new' station with all the usual facilities. On time departure by Eurostar to Paris Nord, no Wi-Fi. Arrived on time at Nord and took the RER to Gare de Lyon for the short walk to Gare d'Austerlitz for the Elipsos Trenhotel (sleeper) to BCN. The RER train was a double decker, grubby, most windows scratched and covered in graffiti, not very impressed. The 'Joan Miro' sleeper train in Grande Class was resonable, although it needs a refurb and didn't have Wi-Fi. I was surprised that the toilets empty onto the track like most trains in the UK. We were almost 120 down arriving at BCN due to late running engineering works.
On our return we left from BCN Sants station on a newish 'Alvia' international train to Figueres Vilifant where a double unit TGV was waiting.
Although the TGV was very nice, it wasn't exactly speedy, with five minute stops at the many stations. It didn't pick up any speed until after Avignon where it joined the high speed TGV line and non-stop to Paris. Again no Wi-Fi and 40 down on arrival at Gare de Lyon. We took the RER to Paris Nord and it was as above.
On time departure by Eurostar and arrival at SPX. Another 91 from KGX and on time and as above to PBO.
I know we all like to knock the British transport system, but overall I wasn't that impressed with the French railway's. None of the stations were anything up to the standard of the London terminals, nothing seems to have been done to the train shed at Austerlitz since the fifties, and all three were pretty shabby and n particular, the Eurostar facillity at du Nord is totally inadequate for the amount of passengers.
And if you think there's a lot of graffiti on the railway in London, you aint seen the approach to BCN. Some call it 'street art' I call it a mess!
How did it compare to flying. It was obviously longer and more expensive, but we got to see the countryside, spent some time in Paris, had a cosy en-suite cabin on the sleeper with dinner, wine etc and breakfast, and counted it as part of the holiday. Check in half an hour before departure and minimum fuss and security. SWMBO liked it so much she wants to go to Venice by train next.

radeng
29th Jul 2011, 15:37
Swiss railways are impressive. Expensive perhaps by European, but not British standards, immaculate time keeping.

Capetonian
29th Jul 2011, 15:43
in particular, the Eurostar facillity at du Nord is totally inadequate for the amount of passengers.

It's a disgrace, in every sense of the word, specially when you compare it to the cleanliness and efficiency of St. Pancras. I use TGV/Eurostar quite often and in order to avoid the squalor and overcrowding of the Paris Nord Terminal, I try to find trains that connect through Lille on the northbound sector. Southbound it doesn't matter as you don't go through the queuing when you leave.

ORAC
29th Jul 2011, 16:00
Armstrong and Miller - Train Song And I raise you..... :)

U6OHD2uCpfU

I sold my car about 6 months ago (It had been sitting getting covered in Guano for the 6 before). I commute from Brighton to London via rail, then out to Uxbridge on the Tube, daily.

Monthly season ticket - rail plus zones 1-6 inc weekends - is just over 400 pounds. Petrol would be more, excluding all the other running costs.

uffington sb
29th Jul 2011, 17:26
radeng. With regard to time keeping, for how long do Swiss trains stop at stations. We went from Brussels Centraal to Bruges last year, and the train stopped at numerous stations for five minutes each, so therefore any delay could be absorbed but the slack in the timetable.
By contrast, FCC trains from Peterborough are given five minutes to make PPM at KGX. 76 miles and up to 14 stops with the stops being on average only 45 seconds. I don't think that commuters would accept almost an hour being put on their journey time just so the trains 'ran on time'.
Even the new 'Flying Scotsman' running the 393 miles from Edinburgh to KGX is timetabled for 4 hours and is only allowed 10 minutes to make PPM (after that it's officially late) and it usually makes it inspite of it being mainly two track north of Peterborough, and mixing it with other traffic. I think that's pretty good.

tony draper
29th Jul 2011, 18:55
Takes a lot of backroom staff to keep public transport running efficiently.:rolleyes:

http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/tramstaff-1.jpg

uffington sb
29th Jul 2011, 21:12
Is that you holding the horses Mr D?

tony draper
29th Jul 2011, 21:54
In a previous life perhaps, but I was probably the bloke with the bowler hat and watchchain,reckon that was about 1900,the horses were replaced by steam trams a couple of years later.
:rolleyes:

Worrals in the wilds
29th Jul 2011, 22:20
Anyway, if the bus/tube/train/tram is dirty - who's made it dirty?

The nasty little bogan feral (chav for the UK readers) who graced the seat before me. I always take my rubbish with me and assume that feet are for floors. The same nasty little bogan feral who puts their feet on the seats, plays loud music, swears loudly (including repeated uses of the dreaded 'C' word) and aerosols inane messages on the doors before rapidly exiting without buying a ticket. :ugh:

The last local train I caught was during last year's local Flood Crisis when people were advised against driving across town. I caught a train to help out at the city animal shelter complete with broom, mop etc. Swilling done, I travelled back in front of three charming little delinquent brats who swore, shouted and carried on in front of various children, grandmothers etc until a blessed woman (I later found out she was a teacher) stood up, said "I'm sick of you worthless little bastards carrying on with your crap" and bullied the guard into throwing them off. Fight fire with fire...:\

If only nice considerate people with a basic understanding of civilized behaviour used public transport it would be okay. Unfortunately that's not the case, hence the rubbish, smell and graffiti.

Tankertrashnav
29th Jul 2011, 22:22
Re Flanders and Swann

Pleased to say that "from St Erth to St Ives" is still running, so that's one that Dr Beeching missed. Pity its not still a GWR prairie or pannier tank as I remember it, though.

ShyTorque
29th Jul 2011, 22:59
A strange crew in that photo, to be sure!

The man to the left of the man in the bowler is wearing a clown nose. And to the left of him is a chap with a halo around his willie ;)

tony draper
29th Jul 2011, 23:19
Strange lot horse engineers were.:)

Krystal n chips
30th Jul 2011, 08:06
Ahem, re chavs / "nutters"..etc, etc. Lets dispel this perception based on recent and past journeys.

Last weekend...sitting in Virgin cattle at rear of train..enter "madam"..a classical Sloane stereotype who regaled us ( madam's dulcet gob was in the upper decibel range ) with her social diary and such gems as " babe, dude, dinkies and dinnseys" etc ad vomit. Euston Station, 1 mile...best sign in the world at that time.

Sunday...0745 train Staines to Reading..."educated " yobs, limited vocabulary, offering us all their perceptions as to cricket, the military, society in general...four seats further on...two more plus several empty cans / bottles/...note time here.

Weekend before...en route to Nottingham..get to Tamworth...on get a gang of footie fans..two dressed in a Fox outfit ( one with a cigarette behind it's ear and its copy of the Sun ) the rest dressed a la "country pursuits " style...haven't a clue as to what this is all about until later...they started on the cans before Burton on Trent....the singing / swearing began in earnest after Derby...there were normal people on that train...and by the way, the clothes this lot were wearing looked decidely pricey.

"nutters"...eccentrics any time in comparison to the aforementioned ( insert term of choice here )

Two years ago...Euston heading North...."terribly, terribly important business person " well he clearly thought he was...one did not...sits down at table, proceeds to empty contents of briefcase / open lap top and cover the whole table with his work...one wishes to have a coffee / snack...NO room at all so one asks, politely, can he move some of his stuff..please ( see You know you are in England thread here ) ..response "can't you see I'm busy !!! "...response from moi..."take it you've paid for three other seats for all you rubbish on the table then.."slight pause " and of course, you do realise that despite the upgrade, there are still places on this line where the track isn't that smooth.." holding coffee in a prominent position here ....we arrived at a" mutual undstanding" at that point....:E

radeng
30th Jul 2011, 08:28
Uffington,

The longest station stop I've had on Swiss trains was three minutes, because we were nearly 2 minutes early...Don't know if the driver miscalculated or the timing was generous although it didn't strike me as particularly so. Never tried them in the winter, though. I've got a trip from Geneva to Biel in September, so I'll see how that goes.

The best one for recovery time has to be Amtrak's 'California Zephyr'. When I rode it, it was allowed 2hrs 45 minutes for the last 30 miles.....


About 26 years ago when we were looking for a house, we put in a bid for the house that used to be the pub at Uffington station......didn't get it because they wanted to sell an industrial unit with it, and we couldn't afford to buy that. I think we've ended up better off in a bungalow, though.

RedhillPhil
30th Jul 2011, 08:47
It's easy to make trains run on time - you just extend the running times. That was what happened when the railways went private. Long long ago when I still had hair I was a Guard based at Paddington when the HSTs were introduced. The start to stop time for the 36 miles to Reading was 22 minutes. Now, the line has been resignalled in the London area, Westbourne Park overground station has been removed and the curve there eased so now the start to stop time is....24 minutes! Mind you Worst Great Western still manage to run late.

radeng
30th Jul 2011, 12:36
In 1936, with a Fowler 2-6-4, there was a Euston - Bletchley commuter run, first stop Watford in 18 minutes. In 1973, with electrification, the fastest run on a first stop Watford was 22 minutes.

San Jose to San Francisco was also a lot faster pre war with steam than it is now.

Storminnorm
30th Jul 2011, 13:38
I've just realized that could well be ME holding the horses in
the picture, but before I grew my beard.

tony draper
30th Jul 2011, 13:44
Note they are all wearing good pottering about trousers except the bloke in the bowler.
They knew how to make pottering about trousers in those days.
:)
Bet they horses didn't come from Japan or China as well.

Storminnorm
30th Jul 2011, 13:51
Just as well the petrol engine became so popular after WW 1.
There weren't that many horses left in the country.
Most of them had been shot and/or eaten.

sea oxen
30th Jul 2011, 16:44
Storminnorm
There weren't that many horses left in the country.
Most of them had been shot and/or eaten.
The idea of trying to eat a horse that's not been shot already freaks me out a bit. Won't they run away when you're chewing on their fetlocks?

Some people don't mind the Jeremy Kyle element on trains, but I'll only go first class in Britain. Never wear a suit on the Underground - you might as well writhe on the floor of a pub. We take a taxi to the Proms rather than risk sitting on a damp seat.

The public transport in Germany isn't as good as it's made out, although they had a delayed train a couple of weeks ago and laid on a spare to take up the slack. Could anyone imagine that happening here?

Using a bus in London is either ecstasy or agony. It can get you that mile you need to cross in a quarter of the time you'd need on foot, or you could encounter a menagerie straight from the Zoo, with primaeval types pumping out the rhythms from their cheap telephones as they argue or contrive to make life a misery for everyone else.

Give these people a disapproving look? 'What u lookin at?' is the result. I have stared down one of these morons only once. I got away with it, but my sense of self-preservation has taken over ever since.

The Boris bikes are a revelation. Self-determination, responsibility, and an element of danger. Bliss.

SO

Rwy in Sight
30th Jul 2011, 20:30
I find the public transport efficient if under no time pressure. For the odd night out in downtown (not for a date situation) it is very good since I live in an area served by the virtually only 24 hours bus line.

I am very impressed the public transport in London. In my last visit there was a message for severe delays and the next train arrived within a minute or so. At the same time a friend of mine with inexistent self esteem managed to use the bus schedule for a route she has not used before.


Rwy in Sight

BombayDuck
30th Jul 2011, 21:02
Pleased to say that "from St Erth to St Ives" is still running, so that's one that Dr Beeching missed. Pity its not still a GWR prairie or pannier tank as I remember it, though.

Did that last weekend. One of the prettiest journeys I have had the pleasure of taking. :ok: Got a few cracking photos at St. Ives too!

mixture
30th Jul 2011, 23:37
I am very impressed the public transport in London.

Cue the sound of x million Londoners and/or people who go there frequently laughing at you.

There is very little to be impressed with about the state of public transport in London.

In my last visit there was a message for severe delays and the next train arrived within a minute or so.

Believe me, very much the exception rather than the rule. Once they admit they have "severe delays" you know it's not worth even considering taking that method of public transport. Normally they still announce "Good Service" when tubes are going every 10 minutes and stopping/starting in tunnels, and making generally lousy progress all the way to your destination.

Slasher
31st Jul 2011, 04:26
Used the MRT in Singapore a lot and used the bus for certain
destinations. Found both ok. The local taxis are affordable but
overpriced.

Tried busses in Malaysia/Thailand/Vietnam and got lost since
the route (and even the destination) can vary - one has to be
accompanied by a local so as to not end up in woop woop. A
train in Malaysia is tolerable but subject to lots of delays as in
Thailand.

Beijing I'm not impressed with at all (who is?) but Shangers
is pretty top notch in all pubic transport departments.

ZFT
31st Jul 2011, 06:42
Intercity buses in Thailand are I think pretty good in terms of schedule frequency and reliability. Long distance trains really aren't that bad and run to (a sort of) schedule give or take an hour, just a tad on the slow side. Both are excellent value for money.

Bangkok's MRT and BTS are superb

Rwy in Sight
31st Jul 2011, 08:54
mixture,

Ever since my first serious visit in 1994, England gives the impression of failing apart but still provides good services not as good as most of us would like but still quite acceptable. This is something to be considered when judging England the difference between reality and image.

Slasher,

Public transport in warmer places is a great place to evaluate local ladies. I am surprised you didn't mention it.

Rwy in Sight

Davaar
31st Jul 2011, 15:22
Buses .... sigh .... buses

Are you so sure, Rollingthunder? So very sure?

What of A J Godley, 1914?:

What is this that roareth thus?
Can it be a Motor Bus?
Yes, the smell and hideous hum
Indicat Motorem Bum!
Implet in the Corn and High
Terror me Motoris Bi:
Bo Motori clamitabo
Ne Motore caedar a Bo---
Dative be or Ablative
So thou only let us live:---
Whither shall thy victims flee?
Spare us, spare us, Motor Be!
Thus I sang; and still anigh
Came in hordes Motores Bi,
Et complebat omne forum
Copia Motorum Borum.
How shall wretches live like us
Cincti Bis Motoribus?
Domine, defende nos
Contra hos Motores Bos!

tony draper
31st Jul 2011, 16:11
:)
mVHbF0jAzMw

Davaar
31st Jul 2011, 16:49
Oh very well, then! Touche!