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View Full Version : I've got some heroes at last !


OFSO
25th Jul 2011, 10:22
Whenever I'm asked who my heroes are my answer is that they are inevitably from a past generation - and mostly literary:

Kipling, Conan-Doyle, Wells, Rider-Haggard, Samuel Johnson. And explorers/empire builders like "Rajah" Brooke, Wilfred Thesiger.

But after sitting in front of the TV the past three weeks I've got some new ones: Cadel Evans, the Schleck brothers, Little Tommy Voekler, Contador and the rest.

Not just fit (with or without performance-enhancing drugs, who knows ?) but courageous, strong-willed and loyal to their teams.

Great guys, all of them. Wish I had some of their characteristics in my own personality.

Fores and Againsts, anyone ?

sitigeltfel
25th Jul 2011, 10:27
Which drug company came out tops?

Cacophonix
25th Jul 2011, 10:37
To quote or misquote The Stranglers, "No more Heroes Any More". I suspect that drugs and performance enhancing "elixirs" have been part of cycling (amongst many other sports) since day one.

Anybody remember Oddball Oates...?

Oddball Oates (http://www.internationalhero.co.uk/o/oates.htm)

tony draper
25th Jul 2011, 10:37
The lass that falls down must be on summat good.
:rolleyes:
This Is What Determination Looks Like Video (http://www.break.com/index/this-is-what-detirmination-looks-like-2086438)

wiggy
25th Jul 2011, 11:24
Which drug company came out tops?

I think it was Omega Pharma ( as in Omega Pharma Lotto)...:rolleyes:

As for doping, who knows - average speeds for the Tour have been coming down over the last few years so whilst you'll never stop it completely in any sport maybe there's hope for pro-cycling at long last.

Now about the British Athlete who tested postive about a week back.......

Oh as for original question I'm torn between Tommy V and Cav....

Lon More
25th Jul 2011, 11:33
Hero to zero in 0 secs flat when caught out though.

SMT Member
25th Jul 2011, 14:24
If one was to pick a hero off the 2011 TdF riders, it would probably have to be a guy like Lars Bak. He's been sitting out front on all the flat stages, working his butt off day after day in order to deliver Cavendish at the right speed and the right time, for him to take the victory. On the mountains he's been working even harder, "carrying" Cavendish over the peaks.

And for all of that he managed to come very close to last in the overall standings, and never came even close to winning a stage, or even having a chance of winning a stage. But the next day he was out in front again, giving it all for the team and "sacrificing" himself in the process. Don't see much of that in other sports.

Loki
25th Jul 2011, 15:25
Voeckler, for hanging in there despite knowing he'd lose yellow in the mountains.

Rolland, for giving France hope for the future.

Cavendish, for providing the excitement.

Renshaw, for repeatedly putting Cavendish in the perfect spot.

sitigeltfel
25th Jul 2011, 15:41
This is probably a heresy, but thank :mad: it didn't come anywhere near here this year.

A week of chaos for fifteen minutes of action.

KAG
25th Jul 2011, 16:06
Saint Exupery (pioneer aviator and writer)

Mermoz (pioneer aviator)

Marie Curie (whitout who our modern world and medecine wouldn't exist)

Montgolfier brothers (first manned flight of human history -1782-)

Felix du Temple (the first flight of a powered aircraft of any sort of human history -1857-)

Felix du Temple again (for the first powered aircraft manned flight of human history -1874-)

Lon More
25th Jul 2011, 17:34
Felix du Temple again (for the first powered aircraft manned flight of human history
Careful KAG The Yanks, Russians and the Brits will all have black helicopters out looking for you

KAG
25th Jul 2011, 17:41
;););)

------------------------------------------------------------------------

Danscowpie
25th Jul 2011, 19:45
In no particular order...

Fran Cotton.

Eric Morecombe.

The narration talents of Richard Burton.

The literary talents of John Le Carre.

Anyone who achives their goal in life, however unexpected, by their own initiative and hard work.

Slasher
25th Jul 2011, 19:53
Clive "Killer" Caldwell
Bluey Truscott
Douglas Bader
Charlie Lindbergh
Alcock & Brown
Ren & Stimpy

racedo
25th Jul 2011, 21:27
Agree with you OFSO

It was a good Tour and really enjoyable and I do think that most of the druggies have been moved on.

Though he never won the Tour my favourite rider is Sean Kelly who does the commentaries for Eurosport now.

Tankertrashnav
25th Jul 2011, 21:58
Cadel Evans, the Schleck brothers, Little Tommy Voekler, Contador and the rest.



Thanks to later posters for giving me the hint that these are bicycle riders - wouldnt have known otherwise. Just goes to show, one man's heroes can mean nothing to someone else.

Fran Cotton? Dunno about him being a hero, but I'm wearing a pair of his 12.50 trousers at the moment, and they're pretty good :ok:

Douglas Bader? We could do a whole thread on him! I'll go for Leonard Cheshire in his place.

Airborne Aircrew
25th Jul 2011, 22:15
Sir Winston... Head and shoulders above many.

Cacophonix
26th Jul 2011, 08:12
My mom (RIP)

For putting up with me at the time. :ok:

Alan Turing

Mohammed Ali

Jim Clark

Sailor Malan ...

Hell I could go on all day.The world truly is an heroic place!

blue up
26th Jul 2011, 11:37
When I first saw this thread I could have sworn it said "I've got some herPes at last !".


Anyway, for me it has to be the guy in the London marathon, in a wheelchair, going like the clappers, no legs below the knees, no arms below the elbows. The commentator said that he'd asked the guy before the race just who it was he was raising money for. "For people less fortunate than myself".

rmcb
26th Jul 2011, 12:05
John Appleby - The world's first test pilot and employee of Sir George Cayley.

Loki
26th Jul 2011, 12:20
Isembard Kingdom Brunel (despite being half French)

larssnowpharter
26th Jul 2011, 12:23
Douglas Bader? We could do a whole thread on him! I'll go for Leonard Cheshire in his place.

I could not agree more.

In July 1964 I was returning from a CCF camp on Dartmoor via Bristol to Dublin on an Aer Lingus DC3. Fate took a hand and I was seated next to this old bloke with a long face. To me, he was instantly recognisable. My Dad was an RAF pilot and my Christmas gift each year was a bound copy of 'RAF Flying Review'.

We chatted. I don't recall all of the conversation. Parts of it were an encouragement to continue with my ambition to fly. I recall other parts were deeper than I was able to understand.

However, as a teenager I was a constant volunteer at local Cheshire Homes. This was a habit that continued through my life. He, and his wife, Sue Ryder, are two human beings who really did make a difference.

A great hero and a great role model.

corsair
26th Jul 2011, 13:29
I don't do heroes, however much I admire certain people.

Intrigued by this, In July 1964 I was returning from a CCF camp on Dartmoor via Bristol to Dublin on an Aer Lingus DC3. That would be the Dublin unit of the CCF, then?:confused: On reflection I imagine you went to a boarding school in the UK. As a teenager I often wished there was a similar outlet for teenagers in Dublin. As it is the only option was to fake your DOB and join the army reserve. I met 14 year olds, in my unit, most were 16.

But I agree with you on Leonard Cheshire, a great man. One of his homes is not too far away from here. Quite a legacy to leave.

yotty
26th Jul 2011, 18:08
Is this what you mean Lon? :eek: ‪Capricorn One (1978)‬‏ - YouTube