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Rollingthunder
31st Aug 2010, 12:43
Is not going to print anymore. All will be on-line. Not sure I'm happy with that. It is a venerable institution of history and perhaps deserves preserving. I have walked in their headoffice, down a tangle of streets in Oxford town centre.

Storminnorm
31st Aug 2010, 12:45
Perhaps the other lot at Cambs will come up with an alternative version?
I could never follow the plot in the Oxford one.

Bruce Wayne
31st Aug 2010, 13:14
I use Chambers English Dictionary in print form as well as Chambers Thesaurus too.

As an alternative to OED on-line, there's always Engrish.com (http://www.engrish.com/)

Senior Paper Monitor
31st Aug 2010, 13:18
One will be purchasing the current one on next shopping trip - one likes dictionaries (and atlases)

Rollingthunder
31st Aug 2010, 13:21
Drop in the Covered Market and pick up a nice slab of bacon

Loose rivets
31st Aug 2010, 13:27
Living in Texas - or any part of the USA come to that...Dictionary - Bacon. Bacon - Dictionary. No contest...BACON!


I hauled an entire set of Britannica back to the UK. Bloke said they'd cost him $9,000. I paid 400, plus shipping. Looked nice on me book sheves, along with The Complete Wives' How to be a house slave set. Gave them to me SIL when sold up. They're in a big pile in their little house.

Software. Tis the only way for new stuff.

Bruce Wayne
31st Aug 2010, 13:32
http://www.engrish.com//wp-content/uploads/2010/03/fried-crap.jpg

Rollingthunder
31st Aug 2010, 13:35
Is Bruce Wayne an SFB or just a slight aberation?

Bruce Wayne
31st Aug 2010, 13:40
Is Bruce Wayne an SFB or just a slight aberation?

I've been called an aberration before.. (P.2 Chambers English Dictionary) :E

Tankertrashnav
31st Aug 2010, 14:18
One will be purchasing the current one on next shopping trip - one likes dictionaries (and atlases)



One has obviously more dosh than I have. I think the current set will set you back around 850, although I have seen over 1000 quoted! My daughter who is currently doing a D.Phil at Oxford has a free subscription to the online version, which I have shamelessly borrowed on occasion, but otherwise you have to pay.

mixture
31st Aug 2010, 16:02
Is not going to print anymore. All will be on-line. Not sure I'm happy with that. It is a venerable institution of history


Much like the "venerable institution" of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, it was going to happen eventually.

Given how easy it is to find definitions of things online, and given how easy it is to get online these days, I suspect their sales figures have probably plummeted.

I'd much rather carry an iPod/iPad with me than lug around a dictionary.

RJM
31st Aug 2010, 16:41
I once bought the 1933 Oxford English Dictionary in 13 volumes. It seemed cheap.

Each volume weighed as much as a small collection of paperbacks.

After moving house three times with the dictionary I finally sold it. The buyer thought it seemed cheap. :E

Here it is, with four supplements. The car, shown for scale, is behind the books.

http://i36.tinypic.com/30hxw0n.jpg

cdtaylor_nats
31st Aug 2010, 17:06
you can buy the whole thing on CD

OUP: Simpson: The Oxford English Dictionary Second Edition on CD-RO - Oxford University Press (http://ukcatalogue.oup.com/product/9780199563838.do)

Pugilistic Animus
31st Aug 2010, 20:35
it because I once posted in R&N that the Oxford English Dictionary is on the ground and therefore useless to pilots:}:}:}

Loose rivets
31st Aug 2010, 21:16
What will be the prize in Countdown??!! :(


Mind you, I'm not sure I care now that Carole has gorn.

Tankertrashnav
31st Aug 2010, 21:51
Mind you, that new girl has got a quite spectacular bum, LR ;)

"bum n. Brit Slang the buttocks or anus [c14 of uncertain origin]"

(just in the interest of staying on thread!).

mixture
31st Aug 2010, 22:10
it because I once posted in R&N that the Oxford English Dictionary is on the ground and therefore useless to pilots

Who needs OED when we've got JAM !

(Jepp's A.M. for the unitiated)

BlueWolf
1st Sep 2010, 09:35
Once mankind's accumulated knowledge of the ages is no longer stored on paper, it becomes very vulnerable to vanishing in a puff of EMP....which may not be very helpful to those survivors of any holocaust, natural or otherwise, attempting to rebuild.

mixture
1st Sep 2010, 09:42
Once mankind's accumulated knowledge of the ages is no longer stored on paper, it becomes very vulnerable to vanishing in a puff of EMP

Oh yes, and paper is well known to be invincible to fire, flood and other forms of tempest that have been with us since the dawn of civilisation ? :ugh:

It's easier to do disaster recovery with electronic means then it will ever be with paper. Data can be copied accross the world in less time than it takes you to print another copy.

BlueWolf
1st Sep 2010, 10:03
Yeah OK, I'll bite; there's been a bit of a tiff between [insert names of any two opposing nuclear powers] and quite a bit of EMP has been caused by nukes being chucked about.

All around the world, communications satellites have been fried, the phone system is offline maybe for the forseeable future, and all major power grids have been knocked out, including where you are.

You don't have a functioning computer, cellphone, phone, fax, email, electricity, GPS, TV, or radio, and probably no water or sewerage either, especially if you live in a city or depend on one.

Betcha books will still work, but.
:)

Blacksheep
1st Sep 2010, 10:23
One doesn't speak Orxfod Eenglish so one tends towards Collins. Webster is handy for translating American into English. There is of course, only one true English dictionary:

"any request for "The Dictionary" would bring forth Johnson and none other.' 'One asked for The Dictionary,' writes Winchester, 'much as one might demand The Bible."

The OED relies verbatim upon Johnson for a huge number of definitions. Look for the source marked simply as "J"

For any investigation of our native language the preferred source would of course be Bede.

tony draper
1st Sep 2010, 10:25
Yer, and he were a Geordie,we were the only people who could still read and write after the Romans buggad orf,them southeners just went back to living in the trees and grunting.
:rolleyes:

MagnusP
1st Sep 2010, 10:46
Got the 20-volume OED next to the desk here at work, plus the 2-vol compact, a Chambers and the Historical Thesaurus of the OED. It helps me cheat outrageously on the "Last 2 letters" thread. :E

radeng
1st Sep 2010, 10:48
Bluewolf

If paper and pencil had just been invented, they would be hailed as the new super data storage medium!

Optimists trust electronics. Those of us who have made a living out of designing and maintaining it for very nearly the last fifty years are more cynical and dubious about it.

Dorfer
1st Sep 2010, 10:58
Who decides what words will be omitted in the 2 vol. edition. We need to be told.

mixture
1st Sep 2010, 11:31
there's been a bit of a tiff between [insert names of any two opposing nuclear powers] and quite a bit of EMP has been caused by nukes being chucked about.

Oh, that old doomsday spiel ?

I suspect the ability to sit down and read your beloved paper matter might be the least of your worries in such a scenario. :ok:

G-CPTN
1st Sep 2010, 12:12
I have reams of photographs, including from the very early 20th Century.
I also have volumes of electronic images on CDs as well as on hard drives.

After I have gone my family will inherit all these.

I believe they will pore over the paper photographs, riffling though them and passing them around and turning them over to read the notes written on the back, but I'm uncertain whether they will be motivated to sit down and roam through hours of electronic images, and, even if they do, whether they will save any for further viewing. They will either be kept as they were found (and will subsequent generations have the ability to view them?) or discarded as ephemera (so many sources - too little time).

MagnusP
1st Sep 2010, 12:23
I scanned some early c20 photographs at the weekend, including portraits that had been printed as postcards to be sent far and wide. The advantage was that I also scanned what was written on the back which, of course, wouldn't be seen if the photographs were just put into albums.

probes
1st Sep 2010, 12:24
Got the 20-volume OED next to the desk here at work, plus the 2-vol compact, a Chambers and the Historical Thesaurus of the OED. It helps me cheat outrageously on the "Last 2 letters" thread. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/evil.gif


That's called practical application of educational devices :8.
Took ME a while to vaguely remember there used to be book-dictionaries...

tony draper
1st Sep 2010, 12:27
SIL does that with Crosswords,she even has a electronic device that gives all variation and meanings of words and phrase,cheating I calls it,she still has to call me for answers on the intercom every now and again.
:rolleyes:

Blacksheep
1st Sep 2010, 13:43
I believe they will pore over the paper photographs, riffling though them and passing them around and turning them over to read the notes written on the back, I've scanned all our photos too, including those left in the shoe box by our Mam. They're all neatly archived in dedicated folders so I can find the right one easily any time I like...




...but I haven't thrown any away.

I've even put some new notes on the back of some of them.

TerminalTrotter
1st Sep 2010, 18:26
A dictionary on an electronic book would suit me. A reasonable compromise between walking up and down the shelf and looking on-line. For those archiving their memories electronically, you should seriously look at the shelf-life of the medium you choose to store it on. Some recordable discs have very short life expectancies, much less than paper, others are better, but no one knows for sure how much better, they haven't been around long enough for anyone to tell. And of course, there's the hardware. Cassette tape recorders are nearly gone, Video tape recorders likewise, who knows if anyone in days to come will be able to play back your treasures even if they survive. Scientists are still reading more and more of notes written on scraps of bark and dumped in a midden near Hadrian's Wall hundreds of years ago. Worth a thought. Copying onto acid free paper may yet be the way to go.

TT

tony draper
1st Sep 2010, 19:02
I cannot take in reams of information on screen for some reason ie me new posh TV came with the manual on DVD fortunatelly one seldon needs instruction manuals, if I did I would have to get it printed out,one suspects there are many like me,a sheaf of printed pages can be quickly turned back if need be and the bit you need to read again quickly found, scrolling text on screen I just find frustrating.
Mebee it is just me.:(

G-CPTN
1st Sep 2010, 19:53
Yesterday I visited a new-car dealer (to research on behalf of my son).
They were unable to provide a printed brochure, directing me instead to the internet ("Everyone's got a computer these days").
The result is unhelpful as I, too, find on-screen images of text less appealing than a hard-copy on paper . . .

Tankertrashnav
1st Sep 2010, 20:53
When the US became the world's predominant English-speaking country some 65 years ago, Merriam-Webster began to assume the mantle of authoritative source and repository for matters of the English language.

Really? Maybe from an American point of view, but the English language has now fragmented into so many variants (Indian, Caribbean, African, Singaporean and Antipodean etc) that no one culture can now rightfully claim an overall authority over the language. The Americans may still claim predominance in numerical terms (although Indian English speakers may well outnumber them) but I doubt if Websters could claim to be the authoritative source for any version other than US English.

TerminalTrotter
1st Sep 2010, 22:35
Like the old 'English-French, French-English' dictionary, you mean, only slightly clumsier. One volume of English and one volume of American, instead of all in the one binding? It'll never catch on.

TT