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SpringHeeledJack
29th Aug 2010, 09:55
I was reading the findings of this article and found myself agreeing with the broad premise that the purchasers of said fakes were very unlikely to purchase the real thing, therefore no business had been lost, apart from someone making a pretty penny off your intellectual property. This was countermanded with the assertion that the fakes actually spread the brand awareness to a much wider audience than the real thing, thus 'adding value'.

I've never knowingly bought a fake anything, well apart from that Rolex watch in Bangkok when i was 20 years old. It stopped working as soon as it breathed cold air :} I just don't see the point in pretending to myself or others that my clothing etc is the real deal when it is not. Maybe it's because i prefer understatement to extravagance, who knows, but 'shouty' labels and designs never did it for me.

When the real problem fakes, such as medecines and mechanical parts are still getting through the system into our lives with, perhaps, serious consequences, the matter of fake luxury goods pales into the background.

Fake goods are fine, says EU study - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/newsbysector/retailandconsumer/7969335/Fake-goods-are-fine-says-EU-study.html)



SHJ

Capetonian
29th Aug 2010, 10:20
There are many facets to this argument, but this is just another futile timewasting load of sanctimonious and illconsidered rubbish from the Bungling Bureautwats of Brussels.

The makers of those goods are legally entitled to protection as they have paid for patents, branding, and so on, so why should they see their name used and abused on inferior goods.

One also has to question the conditions under which the fake goods are made, the labour practices and what happens to the money. The 'genuine' manufacturers may not much better but there would be some minima imposed.

That said, most people who wear designer labels are fake and shallow themselves, and if they choose to wear gaudy replicas and further cheapen themselves, fine. I'm all for that freedom.

A friend of mine has a fake Rolex which is not only almost indistinguishable, according to a jeweller, from the real thing, but comes with packaging, labelling, and a guarantee which would fool most people unless put side by side with the genuine article.

How far does this go? Maybe there's no harm in buying a fake pair of Armani sunglasses, until you realise a year later that they've screwed up your eyes. Would you buy fake medication, cheap fake disc pads for your car, or for that matter, a fake Ferrari (I believe the Chines are doing fake 'prestige' cars.)

My mother in law has a ghastly cheap looking Luis Vuitton bag. When I asked her which street market she got it from I was informed it was genuine. If that's the genuine article, who the hell would want a fake one?

I never have and never will buy designer labels, fake or real.

tony draper
29th Aug 2010, 10:25
A Panorama? program claimed that a lot of the high value fakes are made in the factories in China that actually manufacture the real thing for the European companies,ie mobile phones,100 units for them 10 for us a 100 units for them 10 for us ect ect.
:rolleyes:

airborne_artist
29th Aug 2010, 10:48
Bought a fake Rolex Datejust in Phuket about 25 years ago. Kept perfect time (less than a second every two months) and looked the part unless you knew that auto movements have a smooth sweep second hand, wheras quartz ones have a second hand that jumpes from second to second.

It was stolen when we were burgled. I'd have loved to have seen the face of the person who forked out úlarge for it in some pub when they found it was a fake.

Lon More
29th Aug 2010, 11:13
It was stolen when we were burgled.

Did you you claim against the insurance as you were sure it was the real thing? :E

Groundgripper
29th Aug 2010, 11:23
A group of us were in Seoul many years ago and we paid several visits to Itaewon, the local tourist street for those who don't know it. One of us wanted a watch so we went into one of the many fake watch sellers and he started browsing. The shopkeeper asured us that they were all 'genuine fakes with genuine Seiko movements'.

'OK,' said my mate, 'what's that?'
It's a Dunhill' replied our shopkeeper.

'And that?'
'Gucci'

'And that?'
'Seiko'

'So it's a fake Seiko with a real Seiko movement?'
'Yes!!'

:uhoh:'Thanks, I think I'll have a look elsewhere'

Exit shop leaving bemused shopkeeper who couldn't see the joke.

GG

Rollingthunder
29th Aug 2010, 11:34
Once spent TWO years educating the entire company about bogus (aircraft) parts, how to ID them, what is correct paperwork certification and what to look for to find them. These kind of fakes are plane dangerous.

crippen
29th Aug 2010, 11:40
A lot of fake 'ladies' round this area. Verey dangerous.:E

airborne_artist
29th Aug 2010, 12:04
Did you you claim against the insurance as you were sure it was the real thing? http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/evil.gif

I'd have needed a receipt, I guess :=

Um... lifting...
29th Aug 2010, 13:07
Bought a fake Rolex Datejust in Phuket about 25 years ago. Kept perfect time (less than a second every two months) and looked the part unless you knew that auto movements have a smooth sweep second hand, wheras quartz ones have a second hand that jumpes from second to second.

Depends upon your definition of smooth. Some quartz movements move the hand perfectly smoothly, some move it in second-long ticks. A mechanical movement will move it in increments, but they will generally be quite small increments and give the appearance of smooth motion. Depends entirely upon the watch. Viewing my auto movement watch just now through a magnifier, it ticks... as it does when you listen to it... granted, it's got to be quiet, and you've got to have it up to your ear to hear it. At a casual glance at the wrist, it appears to move smoothly.

etrang
29th Aug 2010, 13:11
(I believe the Chines are doing fake 'prestige' cars.)

Are the "Chines" fake Chinese?

a lot of the high value fakes are made in the factories in China that actually manufacture the real thing

I have heard this too. During the day the factory manufactures for the prestige European brand customer, then the factory manager has the staff come in for a night shift where they churn out the same stuff to be sold on the side. Which raises the question of whether the night shift stuff is fake or real?

Um... lifting...
29th Aug 2010, 13:18
Many years ago, bought a leather shaving kit from a very prestigious maker's own shop. Cost a ridiculous amount (for some reason I wanted it). They carefully wrapped it in tissue, put it in an elegant carry bag, and sent me on my way.

I had it about two weeks and the carrying handle pulled out under very little load indeed. It was then I stopped believing much in labels. Still like nice stuff, but I'll run a salesman through his paces, check stitching, material, etc... and if I don't like what I hear, I walk. I figure if Louis Vuitton or Ralph Lauren or whoever wants me to carry his name around, he can pay me to do it.

There's an excellent vignette in George MacDonald Fraser's 'Mr. American' where the subject of the novel goes shopping for clothing and personal furnishings with an expert London valet he's hired for precisely that purpose. It's enlightening.

Davaar
29th Aug 2010, 13:21
Are the "Chines" fake Chinese?

Ashore perhaps, not in boats when they are "hard".

Metro man
29th Aug 2010, 13:31
If I buy a pair of jeans I expect to get the genuine article. I'll make my choice based on quality, comfort and durability which I'm happy to pay for. I don't expect a cheap pair to last as long as an expensive pair. As long as I get what I've paid for I'm happy.

Where do you draw the line ? Is a pair of Calvin Klein jeans considered luxury, but Lee jeans aren't.

Dunhill cigarettes vs Benson & Hedges ?

Calloway golf clubs ?

Sony vs Panasonic ?

Which brand of perfume ?

Loose rivets
29th Aug 2010, 18:45
From a while ago.

http://www.pprune.org/search.php?searchid=6832291


I really looked carefully at the details. The way the numbers were stamped out of the metal etc., there was not a hint of quality workmanship, yet the general appearance was astonishing.

Um... lifting...
29th Aug 2010, 18:53
LR-
In the right light... a not particularly pretty woman who knows how to present herself can look stunning.

MM-
Fascinating book came out a few years ago... talks about how the line of luxury products has blurred and shifted... how else do you justify $500 for a single golf club?

Amazon.com: Trading Up: The New American Luxury (9781591840138): Michael Silverstein, Neil Fiske: Books (http://www.amazon.com/Trading-Up-New-American-Luxury/dp/1591840139)