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Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 00:32
SUCK (a quote)

Big shame.

Can anyone tell me why this staple is so bad way down under?

RJM
28th Aug 2010, 01:33
What specific spuds are you buying and how old are they when you eat them?

Peter Fanelli
28th Aug 2010, 01:40
Can anyone tell me why this staple is so bad way down under?


Can you be more specific about your concerns?

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 01:48
Apparently just talking generally.

Just looked up Canadian Potato varieties....must be a couple of thousand....prefer Yukon Gold.

girl with a stick
28th Aug 2010, 01:51
They taste floury, we seem to lack variety, at least here in Sydney. I only have success with Dutch cream, which require a trip to Harris Farm.

RJM
28th Aug 2010, 04:15
Have a look around the spud area in your local supermarket - they might have helpful leaflets telling you which variety of potato to use for which purpose. You may be trying to mash a roasting spud or vice versa.


the town is located in a former volcanic crater

Poor ol' Thorpdale. With the potato nematode disease and the declining population, you'd wonder how much more bad luck a little town could have ...

Art Smass
28th Aug 2010, 05:09
GWAS

You are quite correct -Aussie spuds are very tasteless on the whole - we have been here for over 15 years now and still long for a plate of fresh Jersey's - just wonderful.

The best tasting ones we have found here are the Kipfler variety.

cheers

AS

parabellum
28th Aug 2010, 06:31
I live just a few miles from Thorpdale, buy seed from The Diggers Club and if in Melbourne, buy them new at the Victoria market, so I strongly dispute that you can't get good spuds in Oz. Just about everything is available, the Dutch are really creamy, (some varieties very similar to Jerseys), Desiree are a very good roasting and boiling/mashing spud and King Edwards, new, boiled with a sprig of mint and served with butter and cracked black pepper are a real treat. Another advantage to Australia is that we have an extended growing season. I would say that if you haven't found good spuds in Oz then you need to look a bit harder, supermarkets being the last resort.
(Son of a poultry farmer and marketable quantities of potatoes in Hampshire, UK).

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 08:18
She's working on it......me 10,000 miles away with Yukon Golds.... a fine potato.

goudie
28th Aug 2010, 08:59
I find Charlotte potatoes are the tastiest here in UK. Not sure if you can get them in Oz. Jersey's aren't what they used to be, for some reason.

Showa Cho
28th Aug 2010, 09:08
Stayed with a friend in Tassie who's dad is a travelling fruit and vegetable salesman. He brought some Bintje potatoes for dinner one night. We were having a BBQ, so I sliced them into rounds and grilled them. The best tasting spud I have ever had. Give them a try if you can find them. Wiki says they're good for frying and in salads too:

Bintje potato - Recipes Wiki (http://recipes.wikia.com/wiki/Bintje_potato)

Arigato,

Showa Cho.

ShyTorque
28th Aug 2010, 12:44
The reason we banished people to Oz in the first place was to get undeservers away from our nice English potatoes (it was probably the only bad thing about going there).

Davaar
28th Aug 2010, 15:14
Interesting.

I find that potatoes in Canada, even the fabled Yukon Gold, are just rank, so I have to differ. Le soggy pomme de terre.

We have gone from Loblaw, to Independent, to Farm Boy and no matter which variety we buy or where they do not approach the range of quality they enjoy in Scotland or Germany. I thought it was just a conspiracy to guarantee income to Prince Edward Island. Maybe it is.

I went out eventually to the Department of Agriculture Experimental Farm to explore all this, but they have no experts in Ottawa. The chap I did manage to speak to agreed they are typically substandard and offered the view that the genetic development is, as he put it, "in the hands of MBAs nowadays, not farmers or agrarians".

We have virtually quit eating potatoes, and if occasionally we do buy some, and they do turn out to be"fluffy" and tasty, we are agreeably astonished.

Storminnorm
28th Aug 2010, 16:20
I'm surprised potatoes grow at all in Australia.
They always plant them upside down.

tony draper
28th Aug 2010, 16:24
Mashed tattie tip,when you have peeled the beasts wash them of course,but when you have chopped em up into smaller lumps for the boiling do not wash them again, as most folks do as this washes off a the starch, and tiz this starch that contributes to the fluffyness of yer mash.
Tip given to me by a chef that is.
I am told that Jerseys no longer have that unique taste is because the EU ratbastards in Brussels forbid them being grown under seaweed, so now they are grown under plastic sheets.
Plastic tatties for plastic Europeans,tiz fitting
:(

Firestorm
28th Aug 2010, 16:58
Grow yer own. It's the way ahead. Unless you've got heavy clay soil like I have, then it's a bit harder work.

larssnowpharter
28th Aug 2010, 17:37
They taste floury, we seem to lack variety, at least here in Sydney

The potatoes we grew on Grandad's farm in Ireland were quite 'flowery'. I still love going back there and eating them.

No idea of the variety but, mixed with flour, they made the greatest Irish Potato Bread you have ever tasted!

PS: Boil and mash them first.

green granite
28th Aug 2010, 17:43
I remember reading an article on the various spud varieties, one entry read, Majestic, most commonly grown variety of potato, floury, of no culinary merit.

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 17:49
I've been told to find out WHY they are so lousy!!! Before I ship a boatload of Yukon Golds over there! Smuggled in as Englishmen.

Jeez, can't grow decent brussel sprouts as well? (halved. par-boilded and fried with garlic and onions.

Do love a smuggled brussel sprout.

Um... lifting...
28th Aug 2010, 18:28
con-pilot should be along any moment to quash mention of brussels sprouts.

Idaho Potato Commission (http://www.idahopotato.com/)

Maine Potato Board (http://www.mainepotatoes.com/)

When it comes to praties... you lot are amateurs... most of my people left Erin during The Famine... we would know.

Tankertrashnav
28th Aug 2010, 18:42
Just wondering, are there any poisonous potatoes in Australia?

After all, just about everything else there is!

(Over to you, RJM ;))

G-CPTN
28th Aug 2010, 20:01
All potatoes contain substances known as glycoalkaloids. The most common in potatoes are solanine and chaconine.
Light reacts with these substances to turn potato flesh green.
The green parts of a potato are a guide to where these substances tend to accumulate which is just below the potato skin.
Ingested in large quantities these toxic compounds could lead to coma or even death.
In smaller quantities the most likely effects are diarrhoea, headaches and stomach cramps.

RJM
28th Aug 2010, 22:49
Just wondering, are there any poisonous potatoes in Australia?

Yep, there sure are! :ok:

G-CPTN has mentioned the toxic green skin, but the leaves of both the potato and another family member, the tomato, are poisonous, and so are the fruit and leaves of the common potato vine.

Apart from the hordes pf things in Australia that are faster than you and will eat you, or a fair bit of you, lots of things will kill you if you eat them!

We've got the world's most toxic mushroom, the amusingly named Angel of Death or Death Cap mushroom. It looks very like an edible mushroom too.

About 2000 of our plants are deadly, including a lot of native tubers, which need to be prepared carefully so as not to kill the entire family.

Then there are nasty Swooping Magpies and the notorious Killer Bees...

tony draper
28th Aug 2010, 22:59
True, those vegetarianists would have us believe the vegetable kingdom is benign and fluffy and for the most part smells nice and tiz the animal kingdom with fang sting and spur that will cause you grief,not so, the most lethal toxins known to nature grow among the daisies and buttercups,that's why a man should regard salads with suspicion and eat but sparingly of them.
:uhoh::rolleyes:

RJM
28th Aug 2010, 23:04
Yup, it's red in tooth and claw alright, especially down here in the Australian Badlands. :p

tony draper
28th Aug 2010, 23:09
Does not the good book warn us thusly?,twere not the sarpent twere were the apple that was to be avoided.
:)

RJM
28th Aug 2010, 23:21
I think there was an implied suggestion to avoid Eve too, but no-one's taken any notice. :E

Peter Fanelli
29th Aug 2010, 02:14
Jeez, can't grow decent brussel sprouts as well?


There is no such thing as a good Brussels Sprout.

No argument!

:yuk:

V2-OMG!
29th Aug 2010, 08:18
Potatos give me gas, I'm afraid.

The same thing with brussel sprouts. :uhoh:

Old Hairy
29th Aug 2010, 10:07
Sometime ago,there was a thread on Jersey spuds. I lugged four barrow loads of seaweed up from the beach and dug it in.This year.Interesting flavour ,definately different.But I wonder if I have the right type of seaweed?
Its the iodine in the weed I think,possibly they used kelp rather than the stuff that grows in shallow water.We will persevere.perhaps it takes time to accumulate in the soil.

tony draper
29th Aug 2010, 10:19
Hard to describe the taste of the proper Jerseys we used to get,sort of more earthy than other species of new spuds, still occasionaly get one on your plate that has a hint of the old flavour.
I always buy Jersey Royals when they are available and live in hope.
:)

parabellum
29th Aug 2010, 10:48
Sorry the Desiree didn't come up to scratch Basil. Down here they are pretty reliable. So much has changed since our youth. Growers want the maximum weight per plant and at the optimal size and that is what they grow. Ideally grow your own and experiment with variety, you don't need a large garden, they can be grown in a barrel, bit like strawberries etc.

This spud, the Maris Piper, used to be quite popular:

Maris Piper - Potato Council (http://www.lovepotatoes.co.uk/maris-piper/)

(V2, is it the potatoe or what you put on them?!)

hellsbrink
29th Aug 2010, 11:16
Potatos give me gas, I'm afraid.

The same thing with brussel sprouts.

And bread? (see "Bread" thread)

Is there some foodstuff that does not give you gas, and is this production of noxious emissions the reason you do not smoke?

wings folded
29th Aug 2010, 13:17
Is there some foodstuff that does not give you gas, and is this production of noxious emissions the reason you do not smoke?

I also was curious about that.

But, if one produces copious amounts of methane, it is probably wise not to have any sources of ignition in proximity.

By the way, what happened to the good old word "fart"?

Chaucer used it lovingly.

I suppose it was banned by some eurofart in Brussels.

V2-OMG!
29th Aug 2010, 20:17
(V2, is it the potatoe or what you put on them?!)

parabellum, the potato - too starchy.

Is there some foodstuff that does not give you gas....

hellsbrink, dill pickles (as long as they do not have garlic), Oreo cookies (the chocolate, not vanilla ones) and Folgers coffee. (Other coffee brands give me gas and diarrhoea.)

You'll find copious amounts of all three in my pantry.

BlueWolf
29th Aug 2010, 22:48
Most of Oz is just too damned warm to grow decent spuds, however Tasmania and Victoria should be able to produce a jolly fine potato.

niknak
29th Aug 2010, 23:01
Many early crops in the UK either failed or were of poor quality because, on the whole many parts of the country were affected by the prolonged spell of cold weather.
Athough all the bugs and beasties were killed off the soil was just too cold for the early crops to mature and produce anything.

The inverse argument would apply down under, if the soil remained warm for an extensive period it would have killed off any early crops just it would had you put them in a bed of unrotted manure.
This years Jersey Royals have suffered for much the same reason.

Being a smart arse, I planted main crop tatties and, more by luck than good judgement, they're pretty fandidliastic.

sea oxen
29th Aug 2010, 23:38
BlueWolf
Most of Oz is just too damned warm to grow decent spuds, however Tasmania and Victoria

Bloody Victoria? They've either ten inches of snow or scorching their bums off.

If you want to whinge about potatoes, try a German spud. :yuk:

SO
Most Victorians I have met have been rather nice, actually.

ShyTorque
30th Aug 2010, 00:20
(Other coffee brands give me gas and diarrhoea.)

You'll find copious amounts of all three in my pantry.

What, coffee, gas and diarrhoea? :yuk:

:E

PLovett
30th Aug 2010, 06:09
If you want a good spud in Oz you need to come to Tassie. :ok:

In particular you need to try the Pink Eye variety which is such a best kept secret it doesn't have a Wiki entry. Getting more particular, if you can get a pink eye spud grown in the South Arm district near Hobart you will have the best. Tis' best steamed in its skin. :8

notmyC150v2
30th Aug 2010, 06:59
Had a pink eye once. Took some medication and it went away eventually...

PLovett, you don't happen to have any shares in the local potato farm now do you????

All potatoes taste the same to me. The only way to eat them is in a lovely mash or crispied up as part of a roast.

Now the real question should be, "Where have you had the best mashed taters and how were they made"?

Mine was at my nanna's many moons ago. She always put in real butter, full cream milk and schallots. yummmmm

tony draper
30th Aug 2010, 09:36
Tis' best steamed in its skin.
As were missionaries in that part of the world.
:uhoh:

lasernigel
30th Aug 2010, 09:55
Most of Oz is just too damned warm to grow decent spuds, however Tasmania and Victoria

Cyprus and Eygpt have good new spuds and they're not what I'd term as cold countries. Soil quality in Cyprus isn't fantastic either.
Must be something to do with Oz!:ok:

My favourite variation is mustard mash at the moment. A good dollop of English or Dijon stirred in.:ok:

V2-OMG!
30th Aug 2010, 16:17
Has anyone outside the U.S. heard of "hash browns?"

Never forget a hash-brown casserole in a diner somewhere outside of Nashville, TN. I think the recipe went something like this..... Creamy Hash Brown Casserole Recipe : Paula Deen : Food Network (http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/paula-deen/creamy-hash-brown-casserole-recipe/index.html)

If you live in the land of the tasteless potato, this would be a good way to dress it up. (You can make your own "hash browns" by shredding or dicing the potato).

Tankertrashnav
30th Aug 2010, 16:30
I've spent many a happy hour here slagging off American food so I am delighted to redress the balance. We do have so-called hash browns here (UK) but in this country they seem to consist of some congealed lump instead of the finely loose shredded potato that appears on the American breakfast table. How it underwent this transformation crossing the Atlantic beats me!

Ned Parsnip
30th Aug 2010, 17:03
Potatoes are the highest value horticultural crop grown for consumption in Australia. (http://www.anra.gov.au/topics/agriculture/pubs/national/potatoes.html)
The main growing areas for fresh potatoes are in wet temperate coastal regions in northern Tasmania, Victoria and south-east South Australia. These areas have annual rainfall of 800-1000 mm, cool summers and relative freedom from frost (mean annual maxima of 18-20C, minima 7-10C).


7lbs for two bob at the Queen Vic - sounds pretty good to me.
http://search.museum.vic.gov.au/collections/itemimages/243/294/243294_medium.jpg

Um... lifting...
30th Aug 2010, 17:04
How it underwent this transformation crossing the Atlantic beats me!If you keep letting the same guys who cook your peas (meat, spinach, cakes, pies, choose whatever... do you people boil everything in tea?) until they're a grey mucilage cook your hash browns, you're going to have to expect this.

Ned, them 'taters may be new... but the photo be old...

Ned Parsnip
30th Aug 2010, 17:17
Ned, them 'taters may be new... but the photo be old...

Yer right mate - 1969 @ Melbourne's Queen Victoria Market.

Bit of a puzzlement the stallholder quoting in the old money - I thought it was streng verboten after the decimal $$ was introduced in 1966. Feb 14 IIRC. Or was that the end of the six O'Clock swill?

Um... lifting...
30th Aug 2010, 17:24
Ned-

Been to the QVM on an occasion or two, but that's well before my time. Didn't get to Oz before the age of plastic folding money and large jet liners (even got sprayed in the cabin once, but gather that's done now).

QVM's a small slice o' heaven... along with La Boqueria in Barcelona, and many others.

AlpineSkier
30th Aug 2010, 17:25
@Tonydraper

i remember you mentioning the "EU prohibition" on using seaweed on potatos in another thread and you were put right by someone ( claiming to be from Jersey ) and now you repeat the same thing.

Any reason for not believing them ?

vulcanised
30th Aug 2010, 18:10
Has anyone outside the U.S. heard of "hash browns?"


Don't they give you gas?

tony draper
30th Aug 2010, 18:54
Yes I hate loath and despise the EU and ascribe everything bad in this world to them.
:rolleyes:

Bubble and Squeek,need one say more:)

Tankertrashnav
30th Aug 2010, 19:30
If you keep letting the same guys who cook your peas (meat, spinach, cakes, pies, choose whatever... do you people boil everything in tea?) until they're a grey mucilage cook your hash browns, you're going to have to expect this.



The hand of friendship offered on the subject of hash-browns was not an invitation to general abuse of British food, and is therefore withdrawn. :=

And what is it with you Americans and spinach? Popeye has a lot answer for.

Um... lifting...
30th Aug 2010, 20:02
I've spent many a happy hour here slagging off American food so I am delighted to redress the balance.

The hand of friendship offered on the subject of hash-browns was not an invitation to general abuse of British food, and is therefore withdrawn.

Hand? Or backhand?

V2-OMG!
30th Aug 2010, 23:06
Don't they give you gas?

In that case, just a minimal amount of flatulence because the dish was so rich - loaded down with sour cream, cheese, bacon and topped with an inch of buttered breadcrumbs - I could only eat half a cup, but it was memorable.

In comparison, something like a huge baked potato would be sheer agony.

So, less in = less out. The situation is manageable.

Rollingthunder
30th Aug 2010, 23:14
There are at least a couple of types of hash browns. One with grated potato and lighty fried (usually in bacon fat if you want nice ones), diced par-bolied potatoes also fried and then there's the other, seen with breakfasts quite often in restaurants, a little preformed atrocity also fried or even baked, usually available in your grocer's bad frozen foods aisle.

Prefer homemade potato cakes made with a bit of parsley and onion.

parabellum
31st Aug 2010, 02:55
If you go to Zurich try the Rosti:

Potato Rosti Recipe - Taste.com.au (http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/10901/potato+rosti)

Tankertrashnav
31st Aug 2010, 10:18
Potatoes are an almost complete food source, with Vitamin C, protein and essential minerals.


Amen to that, which is why I cannot understand why after 400+ years of basing our diet on this marvellous versatile vegetable, which can be cooked in so many ways, many Brits seem to have decided instead to fill themselves with mounds of pasta which can be boiled, or, er, boiled! Make it into as many amusing shapes as you will, it's still the same boring old stuff.

Those preformed atrocities you speak of are what passes for hashbrowns in the UK Rollingthunder - the proper ones are rarely seen.

tony draper
31st Aug 2010, 10:36
True, I hate pasta in all it's forms, tasteless pap.:)

parabellum
31st Aug 2010, 12:38
Agree with Drapes, Pasta is a pain, but so 'in'!:rolleyes:

Mashed potato: Boil potatoes, have ready fresh cream, butter, two eggs, a quantity of chopped onion or shallot, (to taste), pepper and salt, (salt optional).

Drain potatoes, break in eggs, add some butter, onion or shallot, cream, seasoning and mash to a pulp, stick sausages in at funny angles if required, eat whilst still hot.