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Rollingthunder
27th Aug 2010, 15:14
Hey, I didn't start the fire.....( Billy Joel..all rights reserved)

Cumberland sausages, eggs over easy, fried tomatoes between slices of whole wheat toasted bread, HP sauce, strong coffee with cream.

No granola.

G&T ice n slice
27th Aug 2010, 15:19
At L'espresso in the marketplace in W/haven the extra all day breakfast is
2 fried eggs, 2 rashers bacon, 3 soss, 2 hash browns, fried toms, fried mushrooms, baked beans, 1slice fried bread plus 2 slices toast plus coffee or tea

yummmm - extra cholesterol

goudie
27th Aug 2010, 15:19
Just to set the pace.
Here's one I posted earlier

pork and leek sausages
field mushrooms,
tomatoes –
smoked dry cured back bacon
black pudding, sliced
baked beans
scrambled eggs,
fried bread
fried potatoes
smoked haddock
pork chop
minute steak

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 15:27
Coffee

Yogurt with cereal tossed inside
OR
Bagel (plain and dry)
OR
Muffin (not Muppet)

That's it.

green granite
27th Aug 2010, 15:30
Don't forget the Kippers with strawberry jam.

Gainesy
27th Aug 2010, 15:30
What's that got to do with breakfast?

Rollingthunder
27th Aug 2010, 15:32
OKs.. takes time out to shudder...kippers with jam!

tony draper
27th Aug 2010, 15:33
More likely to be a perfect soft boiled brown egg in me blue and white china egg cup and some brown bread soldiers these days,not that one would say no to a full English if someone would cook it for me.
A full fry up would be lunch for me now rather than brecky.
:)

Rollingthunder
27th Aug 2010, 15:36
A good full English or Irish would carry one through lunch quite happily.

MagnusP
27th Aug 2010, 16:07
One tends not to do brekky these days. Once all the tablets and water have settled down, a mid-morning coffee with the first half of the lunch sarny is enough. Weekends are different. Saturday's usually duck-eggy rolls with coffee and Sunday is bacon ditto. A fry-up is an occasional teatime treat, or if I'm in a hotel.

goudie
27th Aug 2010, 16:29
A good full English or Irish
I once made the crass error of asking for a full English breakfast in a Dublin hotel.
The waitress replied, ''you''ll have a full Irish breakfast and like it,''...it was delicious.

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 16:45
I like breakfast themed posts.

Had my daughter's parents in law stay for Chrissie a while back. As they are a bit furrin, daughter put in a request for at least one proper breakfast, to enlighten them.

I concocted one with twelve ingredients, not including tea or coffee or juices.

Anybody care to guess what the twelve elements were? (Toast with jam or marmelade or whatever else only counts as one; likewise porridge does not count, although there was some of course - I am talking of what is piled on your main brekky plate)

A small prize will be awarded to the closest answer.


T'was I who started the theme on the boring thread. See above.

I am perplexed by notions of kippers and strawberry jam. Or plain dry bagels.

goudie
27th Aug 2010, 16:57
Kippers with strawberry jam.

My old man used to talk about kippers and jam. He was in the RN where, apparently, they ate lots of kippers. They used to eat bread and jam afterwards to take the taste (and smell) away.

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 17:01
OK, but what is this idea of eating dried out dogs?

Sorry, upon re-reading it said bagel, not beagle.
Taste is probably similar.

pigboat
27th Aug 2010, 17:23
Toasted white bagel with a schmear and Wilkin's & Sons strawberry preserves, fresh strawberries and peaches, extra large St. Denis Kenyan blend with cream. :ok:

Gainesy
27th Aug 2010, 17:30
See? Yer let the colonials in an yer up to yer ass in stewed beech trees & stuff.
:)

CUNIM
27th Aug 2010, 17:40
Now for something completely different. Set off the fried bread with fried tomato. A cooked tomato contains more lycopene than raw ones. Now you can enjoy a healthy fry up:ok:

On Sunday morning Mrs Cunim and I have a fry up which sets us up for the day and comprises bacon, sausages, fried potato slices, mushrooms, tomato - for me for my fried bread, eggs, fried apple and black pudding again for me. Accompanied by tea and toast.

Failing that in the Netherlands I have an uitsmijter which am lekker. But the tea is hopeless.

Lance Murdoch
27th Aug 2010, 17:44
The only breakfast that I like more than a full English is a full Scottish. A full Scottish is like a full English but with haggis.:O

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 17:46
See? Yer let the colonials in an yer up to yer ass in stewed beech trees & stuff


Our mistake was to exchange views on proper breakfasts after they woke up.
We will soon be knee deep in Belgian Waffles, French Toasts and English Muffins, all of which totally unknown in their alleged country of origin.

Next time we will have a good exchange of points of view under cover of darkness, (west of 30 degrees that is)

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 17:52
The only breakfast that I like more than a full English is a full Scottish. A full Scottish is like a full English but with haggis.http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/embarass.gif


You have hit upon one of my twelve elements cited above.

Do not scorn a full Irish either. Their sausages are sublime, and the bacon exquisite.

beaufort1
27th Aug 2010, 17:57
You must have Joeys. ;)

(The first mackerel of the season, no bigger than about six inches long, very sweet, good on BBQ's as well):)

tony draper
27th Aug 2010, 18:06
A plate of Finnan Haddie makes a change.:)

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 18:13
Haggis. Bacon. Sausage. A proper English breakfast. Or Scottish. Or Irish.

I wonder if there's any correlation between what constitutes a "proper" breakfast
and the statistic that heart disease is the number 1 killer, of all people, in the UK?

Nah. Couldn't be.

Ancient Observer
27th Aug 2010, 18:14
Someone's making a meal of this.

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 18:18
A little clue to those who want to win the mini test I set is that anything which has ever been near water is off limits.

So no kippers, kedegeree (or whowever the bugger is spelled), smoked herring, young, middle aged or well past their prime mackerel, no salmon, smoked, boiled, fried, or poached.

NO fish.

Is that clear?

RedhillPhil
27th Aug 2010, 18:23
Proper grilled manx kipper with buttered Hovis followed by a croissant with butter and red jam, coffee. Sets you up nicely.

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 18:25
No fish.

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcThCTz6v3DwRdInyOZGQGSAgOaK9XIp1Rr_zN1V5Sm 5z8VaUMI&t=1&usg=__0g2mUCeiAAC5kEUPH2x8iCbWhNE=

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 18:26
I wonder if there's any correlation between what constitutes a "proper" breakfast
and the statistic that heart disease is the number 1 killer, of all people, in the UK?



We all have to die of something, and we tend not to be shot.

V2-OMG!
27th Aug 2010, 18:59
:eek:.......I can't eat anything first thing in the morning.

Sucking a lollipop or an orange-juice popsicle when it's hot helps me ease into the day, though.

hellsbrink
27th Aug 2010, 19:15
All this talk is making me hungry....

Mmmmmmm, kangaroo for brekkie. Nothing gives you a jump-start in the morning like a bit of Skippy......


Bush hat, billy can, etc..........

Tankertrashnav
27th Aug 2010, 19:19
Toasted white bagel with a schmear and Wilkin's & Sons strawberry preserves, fresh strawberries and peaches, extra large St. Denis Kenyan blend with cream. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif


When I read posts like these I realise what a cultural gap has opened up in the last 240 years or so. To me breakfast is all about savoury, even bitter marmalade being preferred to jam. Over your side it seems to be about sweet (danish pastries, strawberry jam, peaches, maple syrup etc).

btw Have you ever noticed on films, tv etc, the "cool" character never eats breakfast, making do with a fag (sorry cigarette) and a black coffee? Guess I am incurably uncool - I love brekky - the only meal that never disappoints:ok:

btw Rgbrock youre probably right, but having had cancer myself and seen my old man drop dead with a heart attack ( the two main choices) I know which one I'm going for. Bring on the fry-ups!

larssnowpharter
27th Aug 2010, 19:24
When in the UK I have to admit I do love an occasional Scottish, Irish or English breakfast.

However, I have to confess that my satndard breakfast consists of:

Double shot of espresso

Plate of mixed fruit. Normally: mango (prefereably a Cebu variety), fresh pineapple and jackfruit. Perhaps some fresh durian if in season.

Slice of toasted homemade bread, 6 crereal and sometimes with cornmeal, buttered with Marmite.

Also a good kedgeree on occasions.

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 19:27
Tanker:

And eating lots of sweet things for breakfast tends to lead to things like this:

http://hotlard.files.wordpress.com/2007/12/fat-woman-outside.jpg

Or, worse, this:

http://tnation.tmuscle.com/forum_images/f/a/fa26a-FatGirl.jpg

So, ladies and Gents (and children of all ages) the next time you reach for a dozen pastries or, god forbid, Dunkin Donuts, keep the above images in mind.

YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 19:35
Compatriots by any chance?

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 19:38
Sorry wings folded. They may be "compatriots" but since YOU PEOPLE (!!!!!) gave us this:

http://anybody.squarespace.com/storage/boyle.jpg?__SQUARESPACE_CACHEVERSION=1240437376660

You have nothing to say!

However, you also gave the world this:

http://www.gossipcheck.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2009/05/elizabeth-hurley.jpg

Therefore, go in peace wings. Thy sins have been forgiven.

goudie
27th Aug 2010, 19:40
I recall going to breakfast meetings in the States, to be confronted by a table piled high with danish pastries, pancakes dripping with maple syrup and crap coffee. Not a bacon sarnie or tea urn in sight. When my US colleagues came over here I made a point of piling on the bacon, toast etc. They loved it!

Rollingthunder
27th Aug 2010, 19:41
Ohh, how to spoil a thread! Got uglies?

wings folded
27th Aug 2010, 19:52
Therefore, go in peace wings. Thy sins have been forgiven.

I had nothing to do with any of them.

I do like a proper breakfast every now and then however, and do not mix bacon with pancakes and gluey sweet resinous substances.

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 20:01
Rollingthunder:

Uglies? Yes, the first in my picture pictorial.

However, certainly not the second on display. Elizabeth Hurley? Are you kidding?
She, to me anyway, is the most beautiful woman on the face of the planet. No one comes close.

(Except for my wife of course who is actually the most beautiful woman on the planet.
See dear? See what I wrote about you? You're even more beautiful than Elizabeth Hurley!!!)

She's gone now. As I was saying.......

Maxbert
27th Aug 2010, 20:02
I'm with V2-OMG! on this.

Breakfast = large coffee (immaterial whether instant or real, just as long as the spoon will stand up in the mug) and a cigarette- When in a hurry, one can dunk the cigarette in the coffee and chew while running to catch the bus / train / carpool wallah.

At a pinch, the ciggie alone will do the trick if no time for coffee.

(although these days I need the coffee to wash down the statins and the blood-pressure pills :( )

Maxbert

tony draper
27th Aug 2010, 20:42
How come my generation brung up on fried breakfasts bread and dripping milk puddings every thng cooked in its own honest fat didn't end up like the waddling obscenites pictured above?,tiz a puzzle,
I reckon the generations born after mine have bad genes and should be removed from the gene pool for the good of the race.
There are enough of us crumblies left from my generation to regenerate the race,though we will probably have to be allowed a lie down in the afternoons.
:rolleyes:

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 20:48
Because you actually moved a bit Tony?

Because you weren't harnessed to the sofa, remote in hand whilst the other hand dipped into a waiting carton of steamy-hot and gloriously golden-brown....... McDonald's french fries?

Because you actually, gasp, walked to the corner market to pick up your needs instead of hopping in the car for that lengthy 1/2 mile round trip?

Because you actually walked to school Tony? Instead of waiting for the bus to take you 500' to school?

Juliet Sierra Papa
27th Aug 2010, 20:59
Talkin about Liz Hurley I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned crumpets for brekkies. :ooh:

rgbrock1
27th Aug 2010, 21:00
What do crumpets have to do with the delectable Liz? I don't get it.

V2-OMG!
27th Aug 2010, 21:12
I'm with V2-OMG! on this.

Breakfast = large coffee (immaterial whether instant or real, just as long as the spoon will stand up in the mug) and a cigarette- When in a hurry, one can dunk the cigarette in the coffee and chew while running to catch the bus / train / carpool wallah.

Maxbert, glad someone's with me on this. Men seem to love brekkie - not that there's anything wrong with that - maybe it takes longer for a woman's digestive juices to get going.

I sometimes make a pot of strong coffee the night before, add evaporated milk and Splenda, refrigerate it, then dump it into a stainless-steel beverage container in the morning and sip it on the way to wherever. Saves oodles of money too - keeps me out of Starbucks.

I don't sip it with a ciggie, though. Give those things up.....pleeeeeze.

tony draper
27th Aug 2010, 21:12
One sees by your age you will probably be alright when we commence the removal of the fat gene Mr Rock,but if my men do pick you up try and get into the right hand line.
:rolleyes:

treadigraph
27th Aug 2010, 23:26
Breakfast? Favourite subject...

Eggs, several, scrambled. Toast. Bacon smoked, several rashers. Sausages.Two. Walls Cumberland current favourite. Black pudding or white pudding. Mushrooms and baked beans optional. Hash browns = nasty imported habit.

To drink, lashings of tea, glass of orange juice.

Mmmmmm....

Caboclo
27th Aug 2010, 23:26
How come my generation brung up on fried breakfasts bread and dripping milk puddings every thng cooked in its own honest fat didn't end up like the waddling obscenites pictured above?

I wonder how much of it is to do with the substitution of high fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated vegetable oil for the old-fashioned sugar and bacon grease. Just a guess...

Lon More
27th Aug 2010, 23:35
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned crumpets for brekkies. .... or the contintal euivalent; a roll in bed with a little honey.

I remember getting fried bread and fried fruit slice or Christms Cake in digs in Prestwick many years ago

Krystal n chips
28th Aug 2010, 08:00
Awarded the K n C ***** star rating.....a far superior rating than the Michelin one I modestly add......for real breakfasts....ie those that contravene all the idealogical bolleaux trotted out by the Food Police brigade....and the hectoratrix on the BBC News..... who gave us a pious lecture about "unhealthy eating" a short while ago as I recall..."in moderation".... not being part of her vocabulary it would seem.:E

M6 A5 Hollies Truck Stop Transport Cafe Lorry Park 24 hours Cannock west Midlands (http://www.transportcafe.co.uk/a5cafe1.html)

Midway Truckstop - Home Page (http://www.midwaytruckstop.co.uk/home.htm)

Royal Hotel, Aberdeen Scotland - hotel accommodation in Aberdeen city centre (http://www.royalhotelaberdeen.co.uk/menu2.htm)

You get chips with the last one as well....;)

Cardinal Puff
28th Aug 2010, 08:19
Steak
Boerewors
Pork sausages
Liver
Kidneys
Kippers
Kedgeree
Scrambled egg with salmon
Fried tomato
Fried banana
Beans
Black pudding
Fried potato
Fried mushrooms
Fried halloumi cheese
Ratatouille
Home made fruit bread toast with brandy marmalade
Huge pot of tea
Pint of dark ale




Comatose on the couch for rest of the day.

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 08:21
There is such a thing as over-doing it!

sitigeltfel
28th Aug 2010, 08:27
The best breakfasts I ever had were at the Dunkeld House Hotel when it was run by Reo Stakis and managed by the amazing Dick Beech. All good local produce with a bottle of Grouse sitting next to the porridge pot.
Then Hilton took it over and fouled it all up.

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 08:31
Stayed in Issouden for two weeks in a hotel with a three star restaurant attached and only got a soft boiled egg and pastries and coffee.

Fliegenmong
28th Aug 2010, 09:15
Came back from Flying this Morning, and Mrs Fliegs and I 'Brunched' outside ny the pool, it was about 10:00-10:30, Sauteed mushrooms, grilled tomato, easy over eggs, bacon, wholemeal toast black coffee, listening to the waterfall in the pool, as lorikeets screeched about and the distant hums of saturday morning lawnmowers, interwined with the scent of freshly mown lawm........, not bad for the last weekend of winter:ok:

tony draper
28th Aug 2010, 09:17
"Whoever looks at a plate of ham and eggs lustfully has already committed breakfast with them in his heart."
C S Lewis
:)

Metro man
28th Aug 2010, 12:11
Sorry about the size but there are some slight differences in the "FULL" version of the breakfast breakfast.

Irish has black pudding and potato bread
http://www.rossroelodge.com/sites/133/full%20irish%20breakfast.JPG

English has the standard ingredients, add chips if in a transport cafe.
http://media-cdn.tripadvisor.com/media/photo-s/01/2b/ee/9d/the-perfect-full-english.jpg

Scottish has haggis
http://lh4.ggpht.com/_fMrB2jkPuCU/SJ8h46a9uhI/AAAAAAAAEbw/_pZUL71sqP4/DSC00219.JPG

Tankertrashnav
28th Aug 2010, 12:50
Those breakfast pics look a lot more delectable than Liz Hurley to me. Passably good looking but anyone who can say she'd rather die than be as fat as Marilyn Monroe has to be a bit deficient in the brain cell department.

I'm sure Mrs Rgbrock outstrips her in looks and brains ;)

RedhillPhil
28th Aug 2010, 12:55
Surely the Irish version of heart attack on a plate has white rather than black pudding. It did when I was in Clare a few years ago - the county although there was a girl there called "Clare" but that involves a different white pudding!

wings folded
28th Aug 2010, 14:35
Now, whilst "Breakfast in America" was a very pleasant tune by Supertramp, breakfast in America, meaning taking the first meal of the day in the USA, caused such trauma the first time (and to be sincere every time since), that I am not sure I will ever get over it.
The routine goes like this ("M" means me; "W" means waiter or waitress):
I arrive in the hotel restaurant for breakfast.
W:"How are you doin?"
M:"How am I doing what?"
W:"Is it one for breakfast today sir?"
M:"No, actually it is for next Thursday, but I do like to be early"
I sit down and am handed a menu which details dishes which I have never encountered in their alleged country of origin, such as Belgian waffles, French toasts, English muffins, Danish globs of hydreganated palm oil and over refined sugars, known as "pastries"
I know what I want. A sausage, a bit of bacon, a fried egg, and a bit of toast.
So I announce my wishes.
Then begins the interrogation process which would make the most hardened Soviet spy crack into a gibbering wreck.
W:"Link sausage?"
M:"Linked to what? The local phone exchange?"
W:"So that will be Canadian bacon, right?"
M:"I am not a fussy customer, its nationality is of no real importance to me"
W:"Egg over easy or sunny side up?"
M:"No, just fried, please"
W:"Well, sir, I need to know whether you want it over easy or sunny side up"
M: But I really have no idea what you are talking about. Please explain the differentiation you require me to make.
W:Well, sir sunnyside up would be one way of doing the egg, and over easy would be another, now which do you want?
M:I do not want to be difficult, but I just want the chef to drop an egg into a pan, and fry it.
W:Toast?
M:Yes please
W:White, brown, wholemeal, rye, bagel (what the fcuk is that I ask myself).
M: White
I think I am home and dry. But no, back he or she comes with further interrogatories.
W: Doyou want low fat butter, full fat butter, or (and the they go off into a series of brand names I have never heard of)
M; Just normal butter.
W:Tea or coffee?
(Now bear in mind I have gone through all this without a single sip of coffee.)
M:Coffee please
Mistake.
W: Double latte with a dash of caribou piss, triple expresso with a hint of cinnamon.....
M:Just a cup of coffee. Nothing added. Just coffee.
W:Juice?
M: I think long and hard at this juncture - could open up further interrogations) "No thanks"
W:It's included in the meal, so now which do you want?
M: I think orange is safe) "Orange, please"
W:No, sir, we have cranapple, pineberry, and all kinds of fruit totally unknown to me. Which do you want?
M: I am now an hour late for my appointment, starved of a decent cup of coffee, and totally bewildered)
M:Just give me what you would choose.
W: With the coffee, do you want skimmed milk, semi skimmed milk, full fat milk, Blue Whale milk....
M: No milk.
A long pause..........
The plate arrives.
A pile of alleged pancakes, covered in dubious resin, with a little heap of carbonised pig alongside it.
I don't even complain. I am too late, too jetlagged. Just cannot be bothered.
Several visits later to the USA, I am starting to get the hang of it.
I prepare my breakfast checklist the night before. I rehearse my speech in front of the bathroom mirror in the morning.
I go into the restaurant.
"Breakfast for one today, sir?"
Oh, here we go again.

Rhayader
28th Aug 2010, 14:47
Breakfast before a morning departure on Eurostar.

Upstairs at the champagne bar in St Pancras: Plate of smoked salmon, brown bread and butter, two glasses of fizz. Or, downstairs in Yo Sushi for a selection of fishy things and green tea.

:ok:

Matari
28th Aug 2010, 14:47
Wings Folded:

Pity the whole world isn't just like old blighty.

Couldn't you have been a bit more understanding and courteous? Would have made the whole experience much more pleasant for you.

Matari
28th Aug 2010, 15:18
Tacos Al Pastor for breakfast, available from most any taqueria or taco truck in South Texas:

http://26.media.tumblr.com/RlLgU5cwmmkt84uesSniFDHUo1_400.jpg

Um... lifting...
28th Aug 2010, 16:24
A Spanish colleague (from Granada) was telling me once about his early days in the U.S. in his 20s. One must keep in mind that Spaniards mostly eschew breakfast in all its forms except a chocolate & churro.

While his English is now pretty nearly flawless, he informed me that such wasn't always the case. While going through pilot training at a USAF base in Texas, he saw a sign on the road that said: "International House of Pancakes". He thought "That's me!" and claims to have eaten every meal there for his first week or so.

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 17:36
IHOP does tend to sucker them in

wings folded
28th Aug 2010, 17:48
Couldn't you have been a bit more understanding and courteous? Would have made the whole experience much more pleasant for you.

Understanding:

I was a total novice in America. I had not grasped American food speak.

But for the record, we are not talking here of some middle America modest hotel. It used to be snuggled under the twin towers in New York. It is of course no longer there. But it put itself forward as a world class hotel.

Courtesy:

My notion of courtesy in the food trade is for somebody whom I pay to render a service is the one who should follow my expressed wishes, if they are not unreasonable.

A heap of of pancakes with maple syrup when I ordered eggs and bacon is not my notion of courteous service..

It is not my notion of service at all.

How much courtesy does it take after all the interrogataries I went through, to be served what I asked for?

flying lid
28th Aug 2010, 18:00
Try a Wigan Kebab (or two) for breakfast. Carefull with that gravy, Eugene !!

http://farm1.static.flickr.com/23/38024129_e04286ef1f.jpg

Delicious

Lid

Um... lifting...
28th Aug 2010, 18:12
One expects you grumpy b*stards wouldn't think much of Sam Choy's.

Sam Choy's, Restaurant, Hawaii, Guam, Big Island, Food, Cook Books, Catering, Hawaiian Cooking, Recipes, Sauces, Weddings, Conventions, Hawaii Visitors, Fine Dining, Hee Hing Restaurant, Breakfast, Lunch and Crab, Diamond Head, Chinese Food, Famous C (http://www.samchoy.com/restaurants_bigaloha.html)

Rollingthunder
28th Aug 2010, 18:15
Yups, pineapple with spam on toast and two fried eggs over easy.

Um... lifting...
28th Aug 2010, 18:19
Two scoop rice... side mahi...

Matari
28th Aug 2010, 18:41
wings folded:

A New York waitress? Why didn't you say so? You're lucky you didn't get the plate dumped in your lap.

Sirikit
28th Aug 2010, 20:22
Just for wings folded:E:-

C3pl7Psb5ic&feature=related

V2-OMG!
29th Aug 2010, 05:29
Well, I finally hauled one in. (A Northern bushpilot, that is).

So....if the way to a man's heart is through his stomach, I make him brekkie.

Note the attention to detail: toast cut out from an airplane cookie cutter; King salmon butter spreader, granny's silver, and the Beaver floatplane mousepad turned OJ coaster. I thought this would make him feel "at home" away from home....if you catch my drift. I was so damn proud of it that I just had to take a pix.

Anticipating a lot of ooohing and ahhhing, I sashay from kitchen to dining room and place it before him. Dead silence....then "What's that weed on my plate?"

"Haven't you ever seen parsley before?" I inquired?

"Nope." (Should I be surprised? The only fresh thing at Tags Food and Gas is the herring roe).

To make an agonizing story short, I burned the sausages (and I didn't have any more in the fridge) so thought I'd hide the black with the green.

Stay tuned for lunch......

http://pic80.picturetrail.com/VOL1942/12014112/21556821/391319226.jpg

Um... lifting...
29th Aug 2010, 08:55
Does breakfast also give you gas? I think I'm beginning to understand the smokes and coffee thing... but that's no olfactory paradise, either.

Tankertrashnav
29th Aug 2010, 09:51
V2-OMG - Dr Johnson said that cucumber should be peeled, thinly sliced, sprinkled with salt and pepper, and then thrown upon the floor!

As far as I'm concerned, the same applies to parsley, and your bush pilot obviously agrees. Oh and junk the cookie cutter please. Quite like slightly burnt sausages though and granny's silver is impressive:ok:

V2-OMG!
29th Aug 2010, 20:45
Does breakfast also give you gas? I think I'm beginning to understand the smokes and coffee thing.....

Umm...see the potatoe thread. (BTW, I don't smoke).

Tankertrash, well, it's been awhile since I cooked for a man. I forgot most don't usually like anything "green" but eat like a horse.

I don't think he was impressed by the airplane-shaped toast either. After two bites, those airplanes were gone. Then he asked if I had an extension cord! (I was wonderin' why....he said he leaves the loaf of bread and toaster right on the table "at home.") I guess things aren't too fancy "at home." So, I got the extension cord and plugged it into the wall, then took the toaster and bread and plunked it beside him and he proceeded to toast himself four more slices of bread. Then he asked if I could put another two eggs in the frying pan to go with the bread.

He liked the burned sausages too. He said burning them would kill the "parasites." (These were beef sausages from Safeway, but he makes venison sausages "at home" and wild game have parasites, apparently).

You could say this breakfast was a "learning experience" for a city-bred gal.

Lon More
29th Aug 2010, 21:07
Flying Lid I looked up "Wigan Kebab" in the Urban Dictionary (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=wigan%20kebab&defid=1050388) and now rather wish I hadn't :ugh:

Flying Lawyer
30th Aug 2010, 09:39
wings folded I was a total novice in America. I had not grasped American food speak.So you criticise the waiter? :confused:
Pleased to read you're now getting the hang of it,
but I pity the waiter who offers you grits and/or biscuits & gravy if you find yourself ordering breakfast in the Southern states. ;)

Matari Wings Folded:
Pity the whole world isn't just like old blighty.Thankfully it's not.
We're improving slowly but the British idea of variety/choice is a long way behind the American.

http://www.carnegiedeli.com/_images/Carnegie_Web_Page_2.jpg

wings folded
30th Aug 2010, 13:18
Thanks Mr Lawyer, but a couple of things spring to mind:


So you criticise the waiter?

... for delivering something so unlike what I ordered, yes.

If I had been handed the menu you kindly posted, I would probably have run away.

But something intrigues me. Why does "3" have to be spelled out as "Three" (as in eggs), but "side of link sausage (2) " does not?

Actually 2 (two) things intrigue me.

The other is the supplement of $1 (one dollar) for egg whites.

In most of the countries I have been to, eggs tend to consist of three elements: a handy packaging, known as a shell, a yellowish sphere, known as a yoke, and a clear glutinous bit which turns white when heat is applied, therefore known as "white".

Your extensive and full of choices menu appears to announce that to get the whole egg (well, at least, without the shell bit), you have to pay a 1 (one) dollar supplement.

But I expect that you are going to tell me that "egg whites" is a universally recognised delicacy, and I am to blame for not knowing that.

Firestorm
30th Aug 2010, 13:30
The only things that should go on toast at breakfast time are either Marmalade or Marmite, and Marmite is only just allowed. With the main course black pudding should be compulsory otherwise the dish is virtually continental.

Kedgeree is very pleasant for breakfast when in the Tropics.

Lonewolf_50
30th Aug 2010, 14:22
Breakfast comes in four forms, with a few variations upon the theme.

Form 1: The Pilot's Breakfast (aka the Fighter Pilot's Breakfast)

1 cup black coffee
1 candy bar (choose Milky Way, Mars Bar, Snickers, Three Musketeers, Hershy with almonds, Baby Ruth, Cadbury's bar of proper composition, Toblerone, etc)
1 or 2 cigarettes, unfiltered

Consumed in the briefing.

Form 2: breakfast when you have time for it

Cup hot coffee or tea
Two slices toast, dry (or soaked in butter, ye continental canines!)

1 glass champagne or vodka
1 glass orange juice
2 aspirin (for the hangover, of course!)

A 2 or 3 egg omlette filled with

Sauteed Mushrooms
Grilled Onions
Diced avocado
Tomato, fresh chopped or stewed, your choice
Feta Cheese, or Jarlsberg, shredded
Bacon or ham, but fried first!Served with a freshly made salsa, Pico de Gallo, or sauce suitable to region on the side to add as topping.

Sides: hash brown taters, grits, or home fried taters

Form 3: a South Texas Breakfast (the pastor almost got me! :ok: )

1 large tortilla (flour or corn) filled with:
Huevos con chorizo con frijoles con salsa caliente
and
1 large tortilla (Flour or corn) filled with
eggs, last night's brisket, bacon, barbq sauce

Coffee
Tequila

Form 4: the college student's breakfast

2 slices cold pizza, from last night, a bit taken from slice #2 (but not sure whose teeth, could be the dog's)
1 can flat, warm beer 2/3 thirds full from last night
handful Fritos

Granted, some of you have offered suitable substitutes, but I think I've got breakfasts figured out. :cool:

There is also the Doghouse Breakfast, aka "The Missus is angry at me for my coming home drunk late last night Breakfast"

1 Bowl Pedigree Dog Food
1 can flat Budweiser (poured on above)
1 hammer lock on the neck of Fido, to keep him from eating it before I do, sans utensils

But that's not a preferred breakfast! :eek:

Um... lifting...
30th Aug 2010, 15:10
But I expect that you are going to tell me that "egg whites" is a universally recognised delicacy, and I am to blame for not knowing that.

No, no... you are only to blame for being a snarky old sourpuss who really shouldn't travel anywhere at all.

Some people like to eat omelets made solely of egg whites. Ergo, it costs the restaurant more in time and labour (and eggs) to provide this, hence the charge. A whole egg omelet costs less. Counterintuitive, I suppose.

One suspects a breakfast buffet in an Asian or Pacific Island hotel would lead your head to explode.

wings folded
30th Aug 2010, 17:45
No, no... you are only to blame for being a snarky old sourpuss who really shouldn't travel anywhere at all.

Some people like to eat omelets made solely of egg whites. Ergo, it costs the restaurant more in time and labour (and eggs) to provide this, hence the charge. A whole egg omelet costs less. Counterintuitive, I suppose.

Well, I will take your advice, and not venture beyong the end of my road. That way I will not encounter bizarre pehenomena such as omelettes made only of egg white. (How do you make scrambled eggs only with whites? No, do not bother. Above all, I am not likely to encounter you.

Read my post again.
I said that I was intrigued. I did not say that I was critical.
"you are only to blame for being a snarky old sourpuss "
What a fine debating skill you display. I wish I was half as good.

con-pilot
30th Aug 2010, 21:11
(How do you make scrambled eggs only with whites?

The same exact way you would if using whole eggs. Many health conscious people eat only egg whites, some by choice and some by doctor's order to limit cholesterol intake.

It's not rocket science.

Tankertrashnav
30th Aug 2010, 22:11
Mrs TTN likes scrambled white of egg. I get her yolks added to mine to make an even richer taste and colour. Yum :ok:

Btw - my cholesterol is fine!

Rollingthunder
30th Aug 2010, 22:45
Hmmm, watching recipe on food channel, fresh spinach pasta with nice rendered bacon, a bunch of egg yokes, parsley, spinach briefly sauteed and parmasan cheese. I could eat that for brekkies. takes five minutes.

(Egg yokes have recenty been shown to be not as bad for cholesterol as the scare mongers once said) (with a bit of moderation of course)

ref: pasta carbonara

Flying Lawyer
30th Aug 2010, 23:34
wings folded

W:"How are you doin?"
M:"How am I doing what?"
If someone you meet in England greets you with 'How do you do?', do you respond ‘How do I do what?'
..... dishes which I have never encountered in their alleged country of origin, such as Belgian waffles, French toasts, English muffins, Danish globs of hydreganated (sic) palm oil and over refined sugars, known as "pastries" Never encountered in their alleged country of origin? :confused:
Have you never encountered Belgian street-vendors selling gaufres de Bruxelles? Or gaufres de Liege?
'French toast' is called ‘pain perdu’ in France.
'Danish pastries' are called ‘wienerbrod’ in Denmark.
'English muffins' are called 'muffins' in England, and have been since the early 19th century. American muffins are different.

bagel (what the fcuk is that I ask myself).
Have bagels really not reached the rural idyll of Norfolk yet? :eek:

I don't know why you ended up with pancakes but, if your exchange with the waiter was as you relate, and given that it was New York, I have a hunch. ;)

.

Old 'Un
30th Aug 2010, 23:43
Strewth! Five pages and no-one has mentioned lamb's fry or bubble 'n squeak yet.

If you really want to go a little "off piste" (so to speak), try "mountain oysters" as part of your breakfast platter. Not for the squeamish.


And don't get me started on the cholesterol debate.

Le Vieux

Um... lifting...
31st Aug 2010, 03:24
I said that I was intrigued. I did not say that I was critical.

You're right. That was only inferred (by everyone on the thread) due to your truly civil attitude toward your server earlier on.

Above all, I am not likely to encounter you.


Food servers everywhere will sleep sounder tonight.

singaporegirl
31st Aug 2010, 09:24
Are wings folded and V2-OMG!!!!!! (http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/367308-has-chef-ramsay-turned-you-into-restaurant-rambo.html) related?

Tankertrashnav
31st Aug 2010, 10:04
'Danish pastries' are called ‘wienerbrod’ in Denmark.



Interesting. In that case I wonder what they call them in Austria?

Flying Lawyer
31st Aug 2010, 18:07
In that case I wonder what they call them in Austria?

Kopenhagener Gebäck
Danish bakers modified an Austrian pastry made by immigrant bakers from Vienna in the mid 19th century.
(Google)

__________

Going back to the OP's topic, good though a traditional English breakfast is, my first breakfast on every trip to America is Eggs Benedict. (With hash browns if I can manage to add a side order without my other half noticing.)
Delicious. :)


.

con-pilot
31st Aug 2010, 19:34
Eggs Benedict

I love Eggs Benedict and make it at home on special occasions.

And yes, I make my Hollandaise Sauce from scratch and use fresh asparagus, steamed, not dumped in boiling water. Another key requirement is to know how to properly poach the eggs.

Firestorm
31st Aug 2010, 20:23
A Texan offered me grits once. And I accepted once. Won't do that again :=

Cardinal Puff
31st Aug 2010, 20:39
We calls it sadza in this neck of the woods, Firey. Can't beat it for putting meat on yer bones.:ok:

Of course, the two foot of boerewors and two pounds of steak served with it don't hurt either....:E

Um... lifting...
1st Sep 2010, 02:43
Another key requirement is to know how to properly poach the eggs.Correct.
First, you must clandestinely purloin them from under the chicken in the dark of night...

Um... lifting...
1st Sep 2010, 06:41
OK, so now when a visitor to a commonwealth country doesn't know that:

Old means "dark" (in reference to beer)

or

Pudding may (or may not) mean a dessert dish and indeed may mean a savoury accompaniment to roast beef

or

Biscuit means "cookie"

or

Short black is what the rest of the world calls an espresso

...and they have an infantile meltdown and throw their toys out of the pram in consequence, you're going to consider that acceptable behavior and be sympathetic? Just good to be clear, because I'm certain there'd be no inconsistency in behavior or standards.
Funny, it always seemed easiest to me to be clear on what I wanted served and read the menu, anywhere in the world, be firm, yet polite, and if for whatever reason I didn't get what I wanted, try to sort it out, and if not, chalk it up as a learning experience. Hasn't failed yet... on 7 continents. But what would I know?

Oh, and you can discontinue the use of the word 'seppo' anytime you like. FL, by the way, is not from N. America.

Tankertrashnav
1st Sep 2010, 09:41
Bit of cross thread drift here but one of the joys of JB is learning new words. I've recently picked up "snarky" from this and the language thread but now "seppo" which I would never have worked out in a hundred years.

Brilliant :ok:

Lonewolf_50
1st Sep 2010, 15:03
Wings Folded
How do you make scrambled eggs only with whites?
It is quite simple: one separates the yolk from the white (which you also do when making things like mayonaise or angel food cake), a trick I learned from my mother at about age nine. {On weekends, and some mornings of the week, she'd assign the task of cooking breakfast to one of us youngsters (four kids in the family) as we got older}. Part of the trick is to crack the egg, and then separate the two halves of the shell while holding the egg fatter side down, letting the albumen fall into your mixing bowl. If needed, transfer the yolk back and forth a few times between halves of shell to let the rest of the albumen fall into the bowl, leaving you with just the yolk on the bottom of the shell half.

Then proceed with making the omelette, or whatever.

What one does with the yolk is open to your imagination: I usually feed it to the dog, as I'd once heard it makes the coat a bit shinier ... but that may not be true.

Regarding your mythical waiter, I find your tale to ring untrue. I've eaten breakfast in many states of our fair land, to include Maine, Connecticut, Massachusettes, Rhode Island, New York, Indiana, Illinois, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Deleware, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas, Missouri, California, Utah, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Arizona, Wyoming.

I without exception am (or have been) offered coffee right off the bat, or asked if I wish to have some. Typically, coffee arrives before order is confirmed, should I wish to ponder the menu. I sometimes ask for tea, but usually accept coffee as it is my preferred breakfast beverage (after a Bloody Mary).

Likewise, I noted in your narrative a claim that he'd no orange juice on offer, but had other exotic juices. I find that unlikely, as orange juice is standard breakfast kit on this side of the pond. Have yet to see it NOT on offer after about four decades of eating breakfast in places other than my own house.

Being condemned to a stack of pancakes rather than the egg you ordered is likely to have happened, I've seen mistakes made in restaurants in many of our states, EXCEPT for your narrated time spent bickering about the egg and the sausage. He's more likely to have remembered you and your order, not been likely to have mistaken you for much of anyone else ... and there's your foreign (to him) accent. ;) When telling tall tales, plausibility is still a required element of the narrative.

As to explaining variations in fried eggs ... the variations are an artifact of the size of our great country, and people developing different ways of preparing fried eggs.

Sunny side up: put egg in pan, fry, do not turn over (IIRC, Germans do Spiegeleier this way, been a few years since I had them there ...)

Over easy: put egg in pan, fry, then turn over to cook slightly the "top" of the egg. Produces a runny yolk with a thin covering, and often a little bit of runny white.

Over medium: as above, but cooked a bit longer to ensure no runny white, but a nice liquid yolk.

Over hard: break the yolk when flipping over, so it's not runny at all. (I never understood why, but there you go, tastes differ).

The differences in bacon across the pond and here are intriguing (I think you all call our bacon streaky bacon??). I found that I prefer the British and Irish approach to bacon, having sampled both, but I am happy to have either that or American strip style. Canadian bacon I save for Eggs Benedict. (yum!)

My personal complaint with strip bacon is the great variation on "doneness" of the strip. Some places leave the fat a bit clear, to me undercooked, others take the time to make it all crispy and just right, and others cook the crap out of it. So it goes, take what you like, leave the rest, or order some ham or sausage.

Sausages can be in links, or patties, which is why he asked.

Regarding his "interrogation," people prefer to have options on this side of the pond. ;)

For HarleyD:
the USA does not 'get' breakfast
This statment is classified as "wrong" in English. See menu posted by FL. (I also think you were teasing a bit ... )

My condolences on the sausage and gravy and biscuits thing -- it can be frightening when first confronted with it. I wasn't raised in that region, so when I first encountered that fine dish, it was with some apprehension. It's not to everyone's taste, particularly as the gravy varies greatly in flavor and consistency. (Tip: use lots of pepper), and the sausage is in pattie form, or ground, rather than link.

Beyond that, regarding breakfast and many other things:

gustibus non disputandum est

Funny old thing. When I was traveling in the Lake district about twenty years ago, I didn't piss and moan in re their breakfast not being like I had back home. I simply dove in to a full English breakfast and enjoyed it, though y'all can keep the blood pudding, thanks. Maybe it belongs with the sausage, biscuits, and gravy in the category of "foreigners beware" cuisine. :cool:

As the French might say: vive le difference!

Flying Lawyer
1st Sep 2010, 17:43
HarleyD Sorry if I got the reference to FL as being from North America, as I assumed that he was from USA. I believe that North America also includes a small country called Canada. I apologize unreservedly.

Wrong again. I'm from a small country called Britain.
Many Brits regard experiencing different cultures as one of the attractions of travelling and don't expect (or want) our hosts to adapt to what is familiar to us. (Not all of us try to find fish & chips and an 'English pub' when abroad. ;))

No need to apologise for thinking I was an American. There are a few nationalities with which I'd prefer not to be confused but American certainly isn't one of them - far from it.

FL

Mac the Knife
1st Sep 2010, 18:11
Hard to believe that no-one has mentioned deviled kidneys yet.

Guinness advisable.

Ah......

Mac

wings folded
1st Sep 2010, 19:02
How do you make scrambled eggs only with whites?
It is quite simple: one separates the yolk from the white (which you also do when making things like mayonaise or angel food cake), a trick I learned from my mother at about age nine. {On weekends, and some mornings of the week, she'd assign the task of cooking breakfast to one of us youngsters (four kids in the family) as we got older}. Part of the trick is to crack the egg, and then separate the two halves of the shell while holding the egg fatter side down, letting the albumen fall into your mixing bowl. If needed, transfer the yolk back and forth a few times between halves of shell to let the rest of the albumen fall into the bowl, leaving you with just the yolk on the bottom of the shell half.

Then proceed with making the omelette, or whatever.


The technique of separating a yolk from the white is one with which I am extremely familiar, since I employ it each time I make an authentic mayonnaise. Except, of course, in this context I am looking to keep the yoke and discard the white.


Regarding your mythical waiter, I find your tale to ring untrue.
There was nothing mythical about my server (see! I learn American as I go!)


I without exception am (or have been) offered coffee right off the bat, or asked if I wish to have some. Typically, coffee arrives before order is confirmed, should I wish to ponder the menu. I sometimes ask for tea, but usually accept coffee as it is my preferred breakfast beverage (after a Bloody Mary).


Bloody mary apart, I am accustomed to being asked about my drink (or beverage) preference pretty early on in the intercourse we call ordering breakfast.

Likewise, I noted in your narrative a claim that he'd no orange juice on offer, but had other exotic juices. I find that unlikely, as orange juice is standard breakfast kit on this side of the pond. Have yet to see it NOT on offer after about four decades of eating breakfast in places other than my own house.

Believe what you like. I think that you were probably not present at the time. I am still at a loss to know why "orange juice" caused such difficulty

Being condemned to a stack of pancakes rather than the egg you ordered is likely to have happened, I've seen mistakes made in restaurants in many of our states, EXCEPT for your narrated time spent bickering about the egg and the sausage. He's more likely to have remembered you and your order, not been likely to have mistaken you for much of anyone else ... and there's your foreign (to him) accent. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/wink2.gif
Quite.


When telling tall tales, plausibility is still a required element of the narrative.

Why not just call me a liar



As to explaining variations in fried eggs ... the variations are an artifact of the size of our great country, and people developing different ways of preparing fried eggs.

Sunny side up: put egg in pan, fry, do not turn over (IIRC, Germans do Spiegeleier this way, been a few years since I had them there ...)

Over easy: put egg in pan, fry, then turn over to cook slightly the "top" of the egg. Produces a runny yolk with a thin covering, and often a little bit of runny white.

Over medium: as above, but cooked a bit longer to ensure no runny white, but a nice liquid yolk.

Over hard: break the yolk when flipping over, so it's not runny at all. (I never understood why, but there you go, tastes differ).


Nuances totally unkown over here. But why in a high ranking hotel can the server not explain the difference? I do speak English after all. What hope would have a Japanese?




Sausages can be in links, or patties, which is why he asked.

Sausage in my culture comes in what you call "link". "Patties" are not sausage


But do not get unduly upset.

Americans attach a huge amount of imortance to their right of choice.

It is part of the culture, and not to be derided.

But if you order an English breakfast, when you are only half awake, you know pretty well what you will get, and althought the quality can be variable, there are few hidden surprises. Choice is highly limited. But when I have just emerged from my bed, I do not want to be confronted with too many choices.

The bacon will be the bacon. The sausage will be the sausage. The eggs will be fried normally. (Usually)

Just a matter of culture, I suppose.

Lonewolf_50
1st Sep 2010, 22:22
Why not just call me a liar
Heavens no!

Many tales grow a bit in telling (including a few of my own). As time passes some relish oftens gets added to any narrative. From the tale as told, the waiter came off as a composite, a bundle of bad waiters all wrapped in one. Then again, truth is oft stranger than fiction. :ok:

I am still at a loss to know why "orange juice" caused such difficulty
I share your surprise, given its ubiquity here in the States. Anita Bryant's commercials were most effective. (1960's) It is certainly possible that either your hotel was too fancy (is that possible? ), or someone dropped the ball on the logistics of breakfast liquids in the kitchen and pantry department.

Given that you were there and I was not, a deliberately nasty person in employ as waiter is certainly within three sigmas ... and as noted by other respondents, it was New York after all. :p

My apologies if my rambling reply came off as "you're lying." That wasn't the spirit intended. I think "mythical" for waiter was ill chosen.

Matari
2nd Sep 2010, 03:20
pssst....wings folded...over here, a little closer.

Thanks. I'm talking quietly because I don't want anyone else to hear. What I'm about to say is totally against the latest editorial policy, and if you're seen talking to me you'll get banned from the next Gatwick bash or whatever they call those mutual back scratching get-togethers.

But listen, it is really ok to like American stuff, and still be an empire-loving servant of the crown. I mean, think about it...even some English folk like Elvis, or Johnny Cash, or Irving Berlin, or old western movies. And there's a connection between those things and, well, breakfast.

Heck, it's easy to make fun of American breakfasts, but those lumpy biscuits and gravy come from old chuck wagon breakfasts. And grits? Well Elvis and Johnny Cash were brought up on the stuff. And bagels and lox? Oy vey, finish it and stop complaining already, we've got a Broadway musical to see.

But I guess that leap of cultural understanding takes a bit of effort. Sometimes it's just easier to feign ignorance and confusion. Instead of marshaling that famous British patience and humo(u)r, I guess some just like to get all uppity and indignant. Oh well, we better end this conversation now. I hear the editorial board approaching....

MagnusP
2nd Sep 2010, 09:25
Quite enjoyed American brekkies when I travelled there on a regular basis. Crab Benedict and Irish coffee at the Buena Vista in SF. Bliss. Also the great omelettes you got at the Hale Pohaku facility on Mauna Kea.

Parapunter
2nd Sep 2010, 09:47
But I guess that leap of cultural understanding takes a bit of effort. Sometimes it's just easier to feign ignorance and confusion. Instead of marshaling that famous British patience and humo(u)r, I guess some just like to get all uppity and indignant. Oh well, we better end this conversation now. I hear the editorial board approaching....

And we have a winner in the self defeating, contradiction of the week category.:D

Lonewolf_50
2nd Sep 2010, 12:54
Quite enjoyed American brekkies when I travelled there on a regular basis. Crab Benedict and Irish coffee at the Buena Vista in SF. Bliss. Also the great omelettes you got at the Hale Pohaku facility on Mauna Kea.

The crab sounds a bit high end for breakfast (given my experiences of SF), but if it starts the day well, it looks to be a fast well broken! :ok:

@ parapunter: Matari's post looked to be another way of saying

When in Rome ... ;)

Parapunter
2nd Sep 2010, 12:56
I can read.

Wings folded may get something from bashing the Americans, but Matari is patently the other side of that coin and two wrongs don't make a right.

Lonewolf_50
2nd Sep 2010, 13:03
Geese and ganders ... hmmm, never had goose for breakfast, but once did have some turkey. Bacon is better.

Now that I think of it, I suspect there will be a cross pond agreement on the vile heresy called "turkey bacon" that has been foisted upon the unwary public by marketing poultryoons! :mad:

Matari
2nd Sep 2010, 14:12
Parapunter:

Matari is patently the other side of that coin and two wrongs don't make a right.

Actually, if I'm traveling abroad and stumped by a local menu, I generally reckon it's more my fault than the fault of the menu writer or waiter/waitress.

In France, a nice pain au buerre does me fine for breakfast, and I don't moan about it. In Brazil, I'm happy with a few slices of mango and melon. And so on.

And whilst in Britain, nothing is better than a full English / Scottish breakfast with all the trimmings. Great stuff!

My only advice to Wings was to relax, try something different, engage in some friendly banter with the locals (even if they are the dreaded Americans) and life will generally be much more fun.

wings folded
2nd Sep 2010, 16:17
Wings folded may get something from bashing the Americans,


For Parapunter and any others who share his view, here is another breakfast ordering scenario, this time in London in one of those hotels whose prestige implies impeccable service.

(The kind of place where if you phone room service for a midnight snack of mermaid's tit on toast, they respond with "We would normally recommend a Pouilly Fume with that, but if you prefer a Chablis or something else, please indicate your preference)

I am not a particpant, you understand, merely an observer. As you are all no doubt busy people, I will spare you all of the exchanges, except for the one concerning the American Guest (hereinafter AG) and the waiter (hereinafter W) and the subject of juice.

Here goes:

AG: accustomed to an astonishing array of choices, but knowing what he wants, orders "Cranberry Juice"
W: (snottily) we do not have that.
AG: OK, mango.
W: don't have that
AG: Allright, passion fruit
W: no.
AG: (getting a little bit irritated) Ok, just a glass of iced water.
W: There is no ice until the bar opens at 11 o'clock, so that will be a glass of water, then.
Glass of water is delivered to the table about 10 minutes after the departure of AG. Departure without breakfast. Didn't blame him.


Different hotel, same city.

Greeted at the door to be seated. Room number is demanded.
"Cooked breakfast buffet or continental?"
"Well, I do not know yet, I will take a look at the buffet and then decide"
"No, I need to know now"
"Why"
"To charge it to your room"
Did a 180 and went into an absolutely basic but charming and friendly cafe across the street where I was served an English breakfast of generous and delicious portions, no surprises, no interrgatories, just scrumptious.

At pretty precisely one third of the cost of the breakfast which I had not even ordered in the hotel, and which required a bit of negotiation to have the item removed from the bill upon checking out

goudie
2nd Sep 2010, 16:32
All this American/English chat about trying to order a meal in each other's respective countries is reminiscent of the American in 'Fawlty Towers', trying (and failing) to order a Waldof salad:{

Storminnorm
2nd Sep 2010, 16:41
Can't beat tea and toast for brekky I think.
With a nice bit of marmalade to spread on the toast.

goudie
2nd Sep 2010, 16:47
After a bowl of cornflakes (Kelloggs) Norm
Standard fare in my garret

Storminnorm
2nd Sep 2010, 16:52
Don't bother too much with cereals myself.
Just tea and toast really, with a couple of poached
eggs now and then.

Krystal n chips
2nd Sep 2010, 17:51
But the big question here.. wings folded.... is..would your responses have been the same if the breakfast (s) in question had been the best of the lot......erm, FREE...?....just asking....:E

Given the sort of culinary outlets one visits ( see earlier post.... excludes Aberdeen ) one is unlikely to encounter such a quandary... or rather dilemma, you understand...

Um... lifting...
2nd Sep 2010, 18:26
them behave absolutely disgracefully in foreign (to them) countries, with plenty of redistribution of childhood entertainment devices. Never claimed they didn't, and it's shameful when they do, but you seem intent on giving a pass to those who aren't American who conduct themselves in precisely the same way. I've been delighted to approach Ugly Americans abroad and correct their behavior in terms they understand in an accent they are sure to understand... to wit... "You're a guest here, stop acting like a jackass, because you're pissing me off..." Works every time.
Seppo is in fact a rhyming slang contraction of Septic Tank (yank) and is not intended as a reference to the contents of either the tank itself, or the inhabitants of the USA. most 'residents of the United States of America' I have knownThanks for the gracious tutorial, but I've known about rhyming slang for decades, its derivations, and generally its intent... pull the other one. I don't think you can equate 'Brit', which is a contraction for 'Briton' with 'seppo', though it will doubtless be entertaining to watch you try.

I am still at a loss to know why "orange juice" caused such difficulty In the land that invented Florida, California, as well as FCOJ and introduced it to the Allies, I would be too. The story is so implausible as to border on the unbelievable. Orange juice as a commodity wouldn't even exist if it weren't for America. It is a rare place that serves breakfast where it can't be found. You must have astonishingly dreadful luck.
"Patties" are not sausageIt's a matter of geometry, not of culture. A fat sausage, cut across its longitudinal axis, becomes a patty. It hasn't suddenly changed its state of being. It's still a sausage. Patties tend to be more highly spiced and flavorful. I realize this plethora of choice causes great difficulty, but try to bear up.
Believe it or not, it's possible to walk into any place in the US of A that serves breakfast with your eyes closed, mutter "Cu'coffee, bla... twoeggscram... wheattoast...buur..." and get what you want. Though generally, they won't know what the 'Full English' is. Kind of to be expected... it's not England, and it doesn't want to be.

Tankertrashnav
2nd Sep 2010, 19:36
Now that I think of it, I suspect there will be a cross pond agreement on the vile heresy called "turkey bacon" ...


In vew of the unfortunate transatlantic sniping going on, congratulations on finding something we can all agree about, Lonewolf :ok:

con-pilot
2nd Sep 2010, 19:45
My first, and last, experience with 'turkey bacon' was in Dubai. I never realized just how much I liked pork until I was forced to go without it for a long period of time.

I can only assume that some people like 'turkey bacon', however I am not included in that group. It is now in the same category as are Brussels Sprouts.

MagnusP
3rd Sep 2010, 09:02
Orange juice as a commodity wouldn't even exist if it weren't for America.

Actually, Brazil produces a lot more. However, OJ from Florida is my preference.

Tankertrashnav
3rd Sep 2010, 09:16
I suspect the Brazilians object to the word 'America' being used as a synonym for the USA as much as the Scots object to 'England' being used as a synonym for Great Britain. Ergo Brazilian oranges are American.

In any case oranges are native to many parts of the world outside of the American continent, and I cant believe that nobody in any of these other areas ever squeezed the juice from an orange to make a refreshing drink.