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Cacophonix
23rd Aug 2010, 18:28
Years ago I was told by my sports master at school that sport was more than just about health and fitness, it was about life and was character building. I tended to believe him but as I get older my cup of cynicism is running over.

What does this tell any young man or woman about anything? Drugs in cycling and athletics, bad acting in football and now fake blood in rugby! Whatever next, violence in tiddlywinks?

BBC News - Doctor cut lip of Harlequins winger Tom Williams (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-11055639)


A doctor has admitted cutting the lip of Harlequins rugby player Tom Williams to enable the winger to pretend to be injured during a Heineken Cup match.

A General Medical Council (GMC) panel has been told how Williams became "extremely panicked" after he bit into a fake blood capsule and was challenged about the authenticity of his "injury".

He then asked Dr Wendy Chapman to cut him and she agreed, the panel was told.
It is to be prayed that the mind be sound in a sound body.

Ask for a brave soul that lacks the fear of death,which places the length of life last among nature’s blessings,which is able to bear whatever kind of sufferings,does not know anger, lusts for nothing and believesthe hardships and savage labors of Hercules better thanthe satisfactions, feasts, and feather bed of an Eastern king. I will reveal what you are able to give yourself;

For certain, the one footpath of a tranquil life lies through virtue.

Juvenal would roll in his grave.

ORAC
23rd Aug 2010, 18:45
Multi committunt eadem diverso crimina fato; Ille crucem scleris pretium tulit, hic diadema.
Juvenal

(many commit the same crimes with a different destiny; one bears a cross as the price of his villainy, another wears a crown)

lomapaseo
23rd Aug 2010, 19:02
Years ago I was told by my sports master at school that sport was more than just about health and fitness, it was about life and was character building. I tended to believe him but as I get older my cup of cynicism is running over.

What does this tell any young man or woman about anything? Drugs in cycling and athletics, bad acting in football and now fake blood in rugby! Whatever next, violence in tiddlywinks?


You have every right to be cynical about Santa Claus, the tooth fairy and of course sports. As long as money is involved, the character that it builds is fame and greed.

Bet heavily on this and enjoy it for what it is.

Thinking about it our most loved sports heros were probably relatively low paid, while our most well known sports heros were jealously known for their money.

secretly I always wanted to be a rich sports star like ( insert name here) rather than the best.

Gentleman Jim
23rd Aug 2010, 19:10
Why on earth did he have to ask a Doctor?? Why not go in to the toilets and smash his lip on the tap. Would it hurt? To a rugby player?

Parapunter
23rd Aug 2010, 19:12
Can't help but feel you've veered a couple of degrees west of the point there Jim;)

RJM
23rd Aug 2010, 19:19
secretly I always wanted to be a rich sports star like ( insert name here) rather than the best.

It's only relatively recently (with the rise of sports broadcasting on television with its massive paid advertising) that any sports star who wasn't independently wealthy had any hope of being rich. There just wasn't any money in sport and often the best that could be hoped for was support in kind from a sponsor with a connection to the sport - free Slazenger racquets for tennis players; a works supported car for a rally driver etc.

Plenty of sports heroes of 50 years ago died broke - not because they'd lost money but because they'd never had any means of making much.

So 'rich' should mean 'best' but it doesn't because 'celebrity' plays a part. A plain introvert on the women's tennis circuit may learn less than a lesser player in a shorter skirt.

I'd like to be rich and famous and brilliant at sport but not have to put up with the likes of V Beckham.

tony draper
23rd Aug 2010, 19:34
Good grief! we hear of footy players acting,flinging themselves to the Earth and wriggling about in the manner of Sir Larry's Richard the third as he gasped his last on Bosworth field, but then we can expect little better from those oinks, but from Rugger players?,by the lord harry, as acting goes, blood capules and self inflicted wounds is bordering on the Method School.
:rolleyes:

OFSO
23rd Aug 2010, 20:20
Sic transit gloria mundae

(If you get sick in transit, don't worry, you'll be seeing Gloria on Monday)

Just to liven up the Latin !

sea oxen
23rd Aug 2010, 20:35
I very much doubt that she'll be struck off for this, she'll just have a bloodied nose.

SO

Sir George Cayley
23rd Aug 2010, 20:39
I've witnessed violence in an international Tiddly Wink match... it was quite entertaining actually.:)

But wrong, so wrong.

As for the Doc at the rugby, she didn't have a thing for the player by any chance?

Sir George Cayley

G-CPTN
23rd Aug 2010, 20:44
Do you mean a soft spot?

ExSp33db1rd
23rd Aug 2010, 20:56
I'd like to be rich and famous and brilliant at sport but not have to put up with the likes of V Beckham.


Or even D.Beckham.

I can put up with not being famous or brilliant (at anything ) but the lack of riches and having to put up with the likes of Beckham ( pl. ) is a source of discontent.

Parapunter
23rd Aug 2010, 21:02
Nah, out of the two, definitely V Beckham. One of our lorry drivers was her uncle.


He was a miserable, umsmiling tosspot too.

Keef
23rd Aug 2010, 21:20
I'll stick with the Latin (I thoroughly enjoyed that) and leave out the Beckhams, if I may.

Si vobis placet!

Blacksheep
24th Aug 2010, 07:22
...it was about life and was character building. Uckers. Forget about Rugby, Cricket and Jolly Hockey Sticks. Uckers is what its all about. Waterloo may have been won on the playing fields of Eton but The Nile and Trafgalgar were won on the uckers boards of Guzz.

The noblest sport of all remains unsullied by play acting or drug taking to this day. Although there are some (foreigners and landsmen mostly) who insist on "consulting the rules" when the game is not going well for them.

TwinAisle
24th Aug 2010, 08:32
Sic transit gloria mundae

Mundi, dear boy.... genitive singular, and "mundus" is a masculine noun of the second declension...

The good doctor might reflect on "accipere quam facere praestat injuriam"....

TA

BlueDiamond
24th Aug 2010, 10:10
He then asked Dr Wendy Chapman to cut him and she agreed, ...
First, do no harm ...

OFSO
24th Aug 2010, 10:32
Thanks Twin...spelling never was my great asset. Ah well, si dies hodiernus esset piscis, reiceram !

TwinAisle
24th Aug 2010, 10:53
Reiceram has got me stumped... is that an imperative?

TA

Blacksheep
24th Aug 2010, 12:36
The exclamation mark would seem to make it so. Though Virgil knew it not.

Davaar
24th Aug 2010, 16:17
you'll be seeing Gloria on Monday

You are closer than you may realise, OFSO.

Miss Goldie Hawn had a starring role as Gloria Mundi some years ago in a thriller. "Foul Play" was the title, I think. Hollywood is choc-a-bloc with that classical wit.

11Fan
24th Aug 2010, 16:55
By your command.....

Foul Play (1978) (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0077578/)

The name of Goldie Hawn (http://www.pprune.org/name/nm0000443/)'s character, Gloria Mundy, is taken from the Latin phrase "Sic transit gloria mundi", which translates as "So passes the glory of the world". The phrase was used until 1963 in the papal coronation ceremony; given that the film features an attempt to assassinate the pope, it is likely that there will soon be another papal coronation.

Best Line of the movie:

Tony Carlson (http://www.pprune.org/name/nm0000331/): I play Detective. You play Lady In Distress.
Gloria Mundy (http://www.pprune.org/name/nm0000443/): Hey, wait a minute. It's *my* ass they're after.
Tony Carlson (http://www.pprune.org/name/nm0000331/): I'm sorry. You're right. That was a stupid, glib, chauvinist remark and I apologize. It *is* your ass they're after, and it's my job to see to it that... I get there first.