PDA

View Full Version : One-in-a-Jillion Chance


seacue
16th Aug 2010, 05:24
Extracted from a Washington Post obit.

C. R. H (48) died July 27th.... Two days earlier Mr. H. was attending a community garden party in his honor in Rockville when he was apparently struck by lightning during a torrential storm.....

Mr. H. was one of four people in the region who died as a result of this severe storm.

[Edited to add:] I think the other fatalities were due to falling trees.

unstable load
16th Aug 2010, 05:49
My Mum always used to say, "never go out in the rain, you'll catch your death" :eek:

Rollingthunder
16th Aug 2010, 06:00
Chances of being hit by lighning in your lifetime are a whopping 1 in 5,000

Bruce Wayne
16th Aug 2010, 06:49
Lightning strikes 13-year-old boy at 13:13 on Friday the 13th

Read more: Lightning strikes boy, 13, at 13:13 on Friday the 13th | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1302883/Lightning-strikes-boy-13-13-13-Friday-13th.html#ixzz0wkVgxjni)

.... The boy was struck at Lowestoft Seafront Air Festival .. its JB AND its aviation related (well.. sort of !).

ZH875
16th Aug 2010, 08:21
Lightning strikes 13-year-old boy at 13:13 on Friday the 13th

Read more: Lightning strikes boy, 13, at 13:13 on Friday the 13th | Mail Online (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1302883/Lightning-strikes-boy-13-13-13-Friday-13th.html#ixzz0wkVgxjni)

.... The boy was struck at Lowestoft Seafront Air Festival .. its JB AND its aviation related (well.. sort of !).


The newspaper reports states
The boy was struck at Lowestoft Seafront Air Festival today, Firday 13th, and it was only while the ambulance team was treating him that they noticed the time - 1.13pm.
So he must have been struck before 13:13, so hardly a 13/13/13/13 coincidence :E

Blacksheep
16th Aug 2010, 09:08
The scene is an equatorial paradise. It is the monsoon season and dark clouds are massed overhead. We three - Rickwall Cillons Engineer, airline development engineer and FAA DER - are atop a cherry picker, testing the top antenna for certification of a new TCAS Supplementary Type Certificate on the B767. Raindrops begin to patter all around and the Rockweel Collans engineer erects an umbrella. :uhoh:

FAA DER (who is from Florida) and self exchange glances. Instant decision! - the TCAS Antenna installation is fine! Cherry picker descends to ground sharpish and three engineers scarper hastily indoors. There is a loud CRAAACK!!! and a sharp electrical smell in the air. Zoom in on remains of expensive electronic test equipment, smouldering quietly in the rain.


(One imagines a deep voice booming from the heavens "Damn! Missed again!")

Gainesy
16th Aug 2010, 09:34
In the bush at a SADF camp, about 14.00, hot and v.humid, no rain. Hairs stand up on head then a massive kerbangflash a second later. Everyone in tent deaf and seeing stars for a minute or so. Yarpy radio op beaming happily at gently smoking heap in corner. It'd hit the radio aerial on a c.60ft tower.
Rain started while we were still staggering about half deaf.

Cue mega-keen young SADF Lt: "C'mon, lets string another aerial".
Corporal radio op: "F off man eh"?


Mum was always absolutely terrified by lightning, her house was hit by ball lightning when she was a girl.

Storminnorm
16th Aug 2010, 10:46
My Gran used to turn all the mirrors round to face the wall
if there was thunder and lightning around.
She said the mirrors attracted the lightning.
Must be something in that. The house never got hit AFAIK.

Capetonian
16th Aug 2010, 10:52
My gran used to put cotton wool into the electricity outlet sockets during a storm in case the electricity leaked out!

Storminnorm
16th Aug 2010, 10:55
Cap'n Drapes would know all about that I think.
He was into things involving elektrikery.

radeng
16th Aug 2010, 11:00
WE had a neighbour who would wrap a dish cloth around each tap to keep the lightning away. I never could figure out what that did - perhaps it was a bit like the ravenous bug-blatter beast of Traal!

TerminalTrotter
16th Aug 2010, 11:10
Junior Radio Officer sitting in ships radio room, back to the bulkhead, as far as possible from antenna installation, which is crackling an interesting shade of blue. Enter Chief Radio Officer. "Is it earthed?" "No". "Shouldn't you earth it then?" "Yes." "Go on then." "No."

Oddly enough, non of the gear was damaged, and no action was taken for failure to obey an order.

TT

seacue
16th Aug 2010, 11:12
Some Googling has shown me that being killed by lightning is far more common than I expected.
NWS Lightning Safety Medical Information (http://www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov/medical.htm)
But it still seems that being struck by lightning at a party in one's honor is a rare event.

lomapaseo
16th Aug 2010, 11:40
My gran used to put cotton wool into the electricity outlet sockets during a storm in case the electricity leaked out!


I heard that steel wool cleaning pads like SOS etc. work better in outlets at stopping electrical surges during a storm

RJM
16th Aug 2010, 12:24
Avoid making the top of the foil hat pointed. It's asking for trouble.

Tankertrashnav
16th Aug 2010, 13:03
Did you realise that at 13.13 on the 13th, millions of 13 year olds all round the world weren't being struck by lightning?

How spooky is that?

B Fraser
16th Aug 2010, 13:49
While driving around the M25 a couple of years back, the clouds turned a curious shade of bottle green. A few moments later, there was an almighty bang and the courtesy light fell out of the roof and dangled on its' wire. I checked the steering then the brakes and all seemed well however I pulled over. My mate and I got out and there was no sign of impact damage other than a small paint blemish on the roof. We set off again and wondered if we had indeed been struck by lightning.

"How do we know that we're not dead ?" asked my mate. "For all we know, we could be up in heaven".

I turned on the radio and Steve Wright was doing his radio show.

I replied "If we've gone anywhere then we've gone down and not up, they wouldn't play this bollox in heaven".

Tankertrashnav
16th Aug 2010, 14:04
Whereas if your set had retuned to Radio 3 and you were listening to one of Beethoven's late quartets you would have had cause to check your shoulders for embryonic wings :)

MagnusP
16th Aug 2010, 14:05
Driving across the Forth Bridge a few years ago when the bridge was struck. All the electronics on my car (a Mondeo so, yes, it was quite a few years ago) reset themselves and the headlights switched off. It got interesting for a few seconds . . .

unstable load
16th Aug 2010, 16:23
Gainsey,

Woke up after a very stormy night in the Kruger Park and started to bail out the tent and save the rat-packs.
7am loomed and the Lance-Jack tries to raise the base with no luck, new battery fitted to the radio, still zilch, so it gets pulled out the tent to dry off in case it got wet which is when we discover the reason behind that one BIG bang last night.
Top section of the Jasco antenna missing a third and the last 2/3 shredded.

Adrenaline IS brown.:eek:

11Fan
16th Aug 2010, 17:05
If you are caught on a golf course during a storm and are afraid of lightning, hold up a 1-iron. Not even God can hit a 1-iron.

Lee Trevino (http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/l/leetrevino125119.html)

con-pilot
16th Aug 2010, 19:02
Well, in my life I've had at least three lightening strikes.

















Just happened to be in an aircraft all three times. :p


Two of the times there was little to no dammage, the other time was a lot different. A real 'there I was story' that was. :ooh:

Tankertrashnav
17th Aug 2010, 16:57
(a Mondeo so, yes, it was quite a few years ago)


Blimey that's quite a new car to me! Doesn't seem that long since my old Sierra had to go (RIP :().

rgbrock1
17th Aug 2010, 17:10
The Mrs. and I were on vacation in upstate New York two years ago (Lake George to be precise) and were staying in a small cabin. Said small cabin also included a roofed porch area. (Excellent for sitting outside sipping the suds and watching the wild life go by!)

We were sitting on the porch one early afternoon when some ominous-looking, and very dark, clouds started appearing out of nowhere. Uh-oh, I thought, them thar clouds are thunder-boomers.

Before the thought even made it's way to my lips so as to voice my uneasiness to the Mrs. there was this god-almighty clap of thunder that sounded like it would split the very cabin apart. Followed shortly by the hair on the back of my neck and arms starting to stand at attention. This was followed shortly by a bolt out of the heavens who struck a pine tree about 75' in front of us, splitting a hunk of the tree off like so much kindling.

I can still "picture" the stars in front of my eyes to this day. As well as the screaming and general ninny-like behavior of the Mrs. as she scurried rapidly into the cabin.

Me: "C'mon sweetheart, stay out here. This is neat. It's like a fireworks display".

the Mrs. "F**k the fireworks display. I'm staying inside"

Go figure.

grizzled
17th Aug 2010, 17:43
'Twas late on an August afternoon in the early 70s and the young Grizz was working as an ATCO at a regional airport in Western Canada. As is typical of that area in late summer there were a lot of CBs milling about. With my Government Issue ATC binoculars I was watching a shiny new PWA 737 as they were approaching the NDB inbound (approx 4 miles away).

Just as the skipper keyed his mic and started to transmit his px report the aircraft took a lightning bolt smack on the radome. I was in the unique position of seeing the lightning hit the aircraft at exactly the same time as I heard this:
"Tower, PWA412 is by the F**K!!!!"

Noah Zark.
17th Aug 2010, 20:25
My Gran used to turn all the mirrors round to face the wall
if there was thunder and lightning around.
She said the mirrors attracted the lightning.
Must be something in that. The house never got hit AFAIK.

When I was a yoof, my old Mum also used to either cover up or put away any cutlery that was laying around, for the same reason.
Later on in adulthood it occured to meself that what the oldies had taken to be lightning being attracted was probably just the reflection in mirrors etc.of a lightning flash outside.
I can still recall how most people were terrified of lightning in a way that they thought of it as having a mind of its own and came looking for victims.
Of course it does , but now we understand it more, as a weather phenomena, and with a bit of luck, usually (!) we are safe from it, and enjoy the spectacle.
Just as an aside, a couple of weeks ago I was fortunate enough to be enjoying a cruise on the Med., and as I went on me late-night promenade around the deck before turning in, well after midnight, saw a huge thunderstorm over on the horizon.
I stayed and watched it for twenty minutes or so, it was beautiful. No sound, we were so far away from it, but the flashes and colours, and the clouds being illuminated were, to use a well-hackneyed phrase, awesome!

Loose rivets
17th Aug 2010, 21:02
Well the photies that I posted last night were the evidence of what one strike can do. The Sheriff's daughter probably took some moments to regain proper vision, but the largely stone and concrete house was more or less gone before the fire ensued.

I was talking about it to a Mercedes dealership guy a few minutes ago, and he talked of a dealership that got hit. Most of the cars were roasted, and the windows were etched with eerie patterns on the inside.

I got a belt off a ski-boat lift. Stung it did, but that was nowt compared to the bloke in England that was struck 11 times. What was worse, when he was interred, his gravestone was hit. What had he done?

My son's neighbor had a nice truck. Fully loaded as they say. One belt on the aerial, and so much of the electrics was fried, that it was a write-off.