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gingernut
11th Aug 2010, 23:32
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v617/gingernut123/DSC_0003-1.jpg

Well these are two of my favourites, often carried around "the allotment", off for me'hol's soon, and was thinking of taking my trusty Spear and Jackson.

I once heard a phrase, (which I roughly agreed with), that "every good man carries a knife."

Having said all that, was watching a cop's vs robbers show last night, and was a little alarmed that someone pulled up with a similar knife ended up in jail for 6 weeks.

And had a bad experience with a client who had a very close young relative, knived to death, with something like mine in the picture.

I'm not sure how "the law" clarifies things, and would be grateful for any opinion.:)

radeng
11th Aug 2010, 23:48
I've often wondered about this.

Mrs radeng drives off to be part of the team running a Girl Guide camp. So in the piled high car are about 6 or 10 sharp knives for the girls to use when cooking over the wood fires, two or three axes for chopping the wood and so on. What's the position if for some reason she gets stopped by one of the more officious boys in blue?

Presumably, following on from a case the other year where a chef was prosecuted for carrying knives (legitimate tools of trade) and the case discharged, there's a legitimate reason for having them. but consider the problems for the camp if the knives are confiscated and they don't have the tools to cook with.....On the other hand, the papers would really make them look silly, of course.

Of course, the other possibility is trouble from the PC brigade who don't approve of letting girls between 10 and 14 handle knives etc. Kid you not, she's had Guides of 12 years old who have never been allowed to strike a match or light a gas ring!

parabellum
12th Aug 2010, 00:31
Not certain about this but it used to be governed by blade length. Penknives were usually OK so around 2.5 inches I would think?

In my youth we all carried pruning knives when out in the garden or walking in the woods, standard rural practice, in those days we whittled a lot!:)

SoulManBand
12th Aug 2010, 00:43
One of these should be OK, unless you try to board a plane.

http://www.victorinox.com/medias/sys_master/celum_assets/8798759976990_4_6026_T_Bild2_1570_eps.jpg?null

Cacophonix
12th Aug 2010, 00:47
Last time I saw this question, I was covered in blood!

Flying Lawyer
12th Aug 2010, 00:54
UK:

It is an offence to have with you in a public place, without lawful authority or good reason, any article which has a blade or is sharply pointed. Exception: A folding pocket-knife provided the cutting edge of the blade does not exceed 3 inches.
[Section 139, Criminal Justice Act 1988, as amended]

“public place”
Includes any place to which at the material time the public have or are permitted access, whether on payment or otherwise.
Note: Includes in a vehicle in a public place.

“folding pocket-knife”
Excluding a lock-knife, even if it folds when unlocked.

“lawful authority or good reason”
Includes for use at work, for religious reasons, as part of a national costume.
Note: It is for the person who has the article with him in a public place to prove (on a balance of probabilities) that he had good reason or lawful authority for doing so.

Maximum Penalties:
Magistrates Court: 6 months imprisonment, or a fine, or both.
Crown Court: 4 years imprisonment, or a fine, or both.


.

Cacophonix
12th Aug 2010, 00:59
Lawyer

When you have seen the reality?

Davaar
12th Aug 2010, 01:02
Do you carry a knife?

Not any more. I follow the PPRuNe Law Reports (Crim, Vol 1, UK).

Namib, just accept it.

pigboat
12th Aug 2010, 02:09
When I flew in the bush, I wore a double-edged belt knife. Great for opening engine oil cans, beer cans, skinning moose, etc. Had to keep the gun in the survival kit though. :p

RatherBeFlying
12th Aug 2010, 02:49
I walk around with a SWAK and a Hinderer Rescue Knife. The latter I consider an essential escape tool when in any vehicle or aircraft as it comes with a window punch How to escape a sinking car - The Globe and Mail (http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/national/how-to-escape-a-sinking-car/article1666027/).

Both tools are used almost daily in workshop situations.

The really big knives are in the kitchen.

If HM Plod doesn't like it, he will find something to charge you with:}

SASless
12th Aug 2010, 04:17
Do I carry a knife?

NO....they are not worth a darn in a gun fight!

(That and I no longer frequent bars, taverns, dives, joints, that would necessitate such acoutrements for an evening out.....also have given up seeing married women as well! I do frequent a couple of places that issue you a knife upon arrival if you are underdressed.)

Loose rivets
12th Aug 2010, 06:04
I'm mindful of that high ranking army officer that was with the governmint. He was stopped at Liverpool St Station? I think, the Leatherman type knife caused him to be hauled off to the nick. As he said, It was probably only because of my rank/standing/whatever, that I wasn't put in handcuffs. Just how barmy does it have to get before the country implodes into its own selfrighteousness?

Such a contrast.

When I wuz a nipper, I acquired leather belt. It had come from a demobbed soldier. I also acquired a knife. It had come from my grandfather butcher upon his death. I was so small that when I put this black-steel blade under the belt, the tip scratched along the ground.

A dear neighbor, a devout Catholic that seemed to take care of half the neighborhood, reacted fit to bust the stings on her pinny. She told my mother that it was dangerous.

My mother told me on another occasion, to tell my granny that the cut on my thumb, was caused by a Lido mangle. She didn't want to be criticized for letting me have a penknife with a blade as long as my hand. Pretty much everyone had one of those knives. They were seven and sixpence.

I had a sheath knife when I was a very young teenager. I killed a cat with it in our local high street. It was an unhappy cat, having just been run over. My friends turned away in horror, but I knew what I had to do. The driver thanked me for "Doing what you did."

I also, with the same or similar knife, rescued a chicken from a barb on a fence. Nice bit of surgery on his leg freed him - till Christmas anyway. Odly, despite it being a different knife, we were making our way across the fields on our way back from the Braintree Lido when that happened.

See what I'm getting at? One self inflicted injury, one cat saved from mortal agony, and one chicken given prolonged life. All by carrying a knife. Never considered sticking it into anyone.

Comes hard, that even when wearing my stripy uniform, I'm not trusted with a knife. I bet a lot of these people that make these rules were not allowed one when they were nippers. That's the truth of the matter.

Blacksheep
12th Aug 2010, 08:07
When I was a Boy Scout it was de rigeur to have a six inch (minimum) sheath knife in a leather pouch on your belt. It had to be a proper "Bowie" pattern, too. Then there was the knobbly sailors knife dangling from the ring part of the scouts belt. The black one with a fat blade and a spike for splicing ropes and gouging stones out of horses hooves. One could then easily "help" little old ladies across the road at knife point. Some of them just wouldn't go otherwise. :suspect:

In these politically correct days they're not even allowed a Leatherman. :rolleyes:

Checkboard
12th Aug 2010, 08:17
Includes for use at work, for religious reasons, as part of a national costume.

Does that means gangs in Glasgow get away with murder? ;)

http://www.sfu.ca/sfunews/files/spring2009/dressedtokilt01-09.jpg

Comes hard, that even when wearing my stripy uniform, I'm not trusted with a knife.

I'm not surprised! :eek:

http://cdn.plussizecostumesupercenter.com/csc_inc/images/items/343x432/1192PFW.jpg

:)

Ancient Mariner
12th Aug 2010, 08:42
When I, at the age of 15, was a cadet on the good ship Gann I learned that "a sailor kept his nails clean and his knife sharp".
My paternal grandfather was a hunter who spent the winters at Svalbard "harvesting" polar bears, fox and anything else that moved. He taught me to sharpen a knife.
I must have around 50-60 knives and I never travel anywhere without a Swiss Army knife in my kit. It came in handy on a long train journey through China when the noise from the loudspeaker was about to drive me crazy and cigarette filters in my ears made no difference. I'd just read a book by Paul Theroux called Riding the Red Rooster in which he suggested carrying a Swiss Army knife just for such occasions. I used it to remove the loudspeaker cover, disconnected the wires, replace the cover and the train personnel were none the wiser. Ah, peace and quiet.
Per

MagnusP
12th Aug 2010, 10:34
Always. Swiss army keyring knife. I've posted it home from EDI more times than I care to remember.
Weekends. 3" pocket knife (for illicit cuttings from other peoples' plants) :E
Kilted. Sgian dubh with 4" blade.

tezzer
12th Aug 2010, 10:38
There would have been a quicker way !

Wildpilot
12th Aug 2010, 10:41
Yes a three inch folding buck knife, I'm a float pilot and always messing about with ropes etc. Don't know what the law in Aus is, I'm sure its illegal as they love a rule or two here!:ok:

Gainesy
12th Aug 2010, 10:48
Always carried a penknife since I was about ten, Grandad gave me my first one and taught me how to use it.

Sometimes carry a bigger one, but only when rough shooting or to keep one's place at the bar when going for a pee.

Namib, look afore ye leap mate. FL knows a fair few knife and gun users and even helps them with moving house.:)

MagnusP
12th Aug 2010, 11:07
I got my first knife when I was about 8, as a prize for coming second in a race at a Sunday School picnic.

I suspect times have changed.

Storminnorm
12th Aug 2010, 12:14
What was the first prize Magnus? A gun???

Parapunter
12th Aug 2010, 12:21
I do believe there is research that suggests that by joining the socio economic group that carry knives for 'protection' one becomes far more likely to be injured or killed by them. In other words, thick male youths.

Keef
12th Aug 2010, 12:30
I carry a Leatherman pretty much all the time. It comes in very useful for minor fettling in the aeroplane, and extremely useful for odd jobs around the house. I'd be lost without it. I even use it to trim candles in the church.

M was worried that I'd be arrested for having an offensive weapon and asked the local policemen (she was well known to them in her volunteer role). They gave her the "blade is shorter than the limit, and he has good reasons for carrying it - should be no problem" answer.

MagnusP
12th Aug 2010, 12:44
Storminnorm: I honestly can't remember. I was probably too busy learning to play the Scottish version of mumblety-peg, called knifey.

Blacksheep
12th Aug 2010, 12:57
As Crocodile Dundee put it

"Ya call that a knife? THIS is a knife!

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/08/14/article-1045029-0056152F00000258-387_468x286.jpg

Lon More
12th Aug 2010, 12:58
In the past I always carried a lock knife when on the bike. It was perfectly acceptable to Plod back in the 60s/70s. Prior to that, as a Boy Scout, i wore my dad's old bayonet, you never knew when someone might need it up them; and in the kilt I'd feel naked without a sgian dubh. most useful for dispatching of the occasional German found within the Royal and Ancient Kingdom of Fife.

Blacksheep
12th Aug 2010, 13:36
Aye, but what about they Redcoats, Lon? :suspect:

Tankertrashnav
12th Aug 2010, 14:00
Up to recent years I used to sell bayonets on occasion in my militaria shop. Always required ID if there was any doubt that the buyer was under 18, but they would certainly all have been classified as offensive weapons if carried in public. Tried to solve the problem by wrapping them well in layers of newspaper which I taped round, but I was never convinced of the legality of my customers taking them home, so in the end I just stopped dealing in them.

birrddog
12th Aug 2010, 14:21
As a sprog I always had one around, ranging from folding knives, locking knives, switch blades, butterfly knives, even the odd machete if the situation called for it :)

These days one is nervous traveling with a leatherman - lest the stazi get their knickers in a twist. Much to my annoyance on the occassions that I need it.

I leave one leatherman in my flying (GA) bag, one in my gun bag, and one in my fly fishing bag.

When hunting or eating biltong, I carry a proper hunting knife with a bone handle - though the blades are 3" or less.

Checkboard
12th Aug 2010, 14:54
You could buy a leatherman knifeless fuse (http://www.leatherman.com/products/product.asp?id=14&f=6&c=1).

Specs

Tools:

* Needlenose Pliers
* Regular Pliers
* Wire Cutters
* Hard-wire Cutters
* Wire Stripper
* Small Screwdriver
* Large Screwdriver
* Phillips Screwdriver
* Scissors
* Wood/Metal File
* Bottle Opener
* Can Opener
* 8 in | 19 cm Ruler



.... i.e. No knife blade. :cool:

Storminnorm
12th Aug 2010, 15:12
One could be done for carrying scissors.
Unless one was a Hairdresser.

Lon More
12th Aug 2010, 15:48
but what about they Redcoats, Lon?

easy pickings with a .303 from the top of the Jenny Gray bing.:E

youngskywalker
12th Aug 2010, 16:35
It wont be long before you are not allowed to sharpen a stick in the UK!

Gainesy
12th Aug 2010, 17:01
True that, Radz had to go to Norway to try it...:)

OFSO
12th Aug 2010, 18:54
Yup, there's a cheapo version of a Leatherman in my shoulder bag. Why shouldn't there be ?

The second weekend in September is the Festival de Troubadours in our local town. As ever I'll be wearing armour and carrying an unsheathed sword (in a medieval version of a quick-draw holster) from Friday September 10th to Sunday September 12th. Also a rather large and sharp knife (in belt pouch) to cut up food - medieval hosts only provide a woodern fork and spoon; in them far-off days most people carried a knife for personal use.

And yes, all of that including driving to and from the town. If the Mossos or Guardia stop me I'll explain where I'm going or where I've been and they'll say, very good, carry on.http://i656.photobucket.com/albums/uu287/ROBIN_100/Me.jpg

Firestorm
12th Aug 2010, 18:56
Gainsey: brilliant :ok:

Slasher
12th Aug 2010, 19:30
I carry a RPG.

Say hello to my li'l friend!.....

g2wD5TaMf2k

Cardinal Puff
12th Aug 2010, 20:38
I usually carry three, all lock blade folders. One utility knife for day to day stuff, a slimline hideaway behind my belt and a biltong knife. Best biltong knife I've ever owned is a Spyderco Meercat. Problem is that Spyderco, for reasons known only to themselves, have stopped making them. Everyone who has ever seen or used my Meercat wants one. Definitely a market for them out here.

Standard pen knives can be a little dangerous as they're usually not too stable and can twist or fold while in use. Lock blades are far better in that respect. I used to carry a Swiss army knife but it now resides in my safe after a British friend sliced off his thumb while trying to cut biltong when it turned and folded in his hand.

Knives should be kept sharp as possible. They're more dangerous when dull causing the user to saw away at something rather than cutting it. A dull knife is merely a sophisticated and somewhat shiny stick.

NRU74
12th Aug 2010, 20:43
The maximum penalty in England and Wales for carrying a 'Bladed Weapon is now 4 years.

...and the Divisional Court, in Brooker v DPP 2005, found that a Butter Knife fell into the category of being a 'Bladed Weapon'

ThreadBaron
12th Aug 2010, 22:21
Yeah! Well? Spreading margarine is unlawful, innit?

Flying Lawyer
12th Aug 2010, 23:57
NRU74

You are confusing two different offences.
The decision in Brooker v DPP [2005] related to bladed articles (see my previous post) not to what you describe as a "Bladed Weapon".

Carrying an offensive weapon in a public place without lawful authority or reasonable excuse: Maximum penalty (Crown Court) 4 years, or a fine, or both.
In UK law, there are three categories of 'offensive weapons':
those made for causing injury to the person;
those adapted for such a purpose;
those not made nor adapted for such a purpose, but carried with the intention of causing injury to the person.

If the prosecution rely upon the third category, they must prove the defendant carried the item with the intention of causing injury.
eg There is nothing inherently unlawful in carrying a baseball bat in a public place, but there are circumstances in which the prosecution would have little or no difficulty proving that it was being carried with the intention of causing injury.

______________________

The UK law may well cause inconvenience to some people who wish to carry a knife for an entirely innocent purpose (Parliament has made an exception for small folding pen-knives) but the fact is that the carrying of knives in the UK is a serious problem - particularly amongst youngsters.
I don't have the national figures to hand but, in London alone, 10 teenagers were fatally stabbed last year. By the 2nd July this year, 9 London teenagers had been fatally stabbed.
Every year, many hundreds of people of all ages are seriously injured and/or scarred for life.

Knives carried about the streets, even if not intended to be used to cause injury, represent a threat to public safety. Even if carried for an innocent reason, or for bravado or in the belief that it could be used for self-defence if necessary (two very common reasons amongst youngsters), all too often it takes only a moment of irritation, drunkenness, anger, perceived insult or something trivial like a 'look', for the knife to be produced. Then, murder, manslaughter, grievous bodily harm and wounding often follow.




.

SASless
13th Aug 2010, 01:08
Knives carried about the streets, even if not intended to be used to cause injury, represent a threat to public safety. Even if carried for an innocent reason, or for bravado or in the belief that it could be used for self-defence if necessary (two very common reasons amongst youngsters), all too often it takes only a moment of irritation, drunkenness, anger, perceived insult or something trivial like a 'look', for the knife to be produced. Then, murder, manslaughter, grievous bodily harm and wounding often follow.


FL....in all fairness, could we not for once in a discussion about cutting, shooting, pummelling, throttling, etc.....focus upon the individual, the human hand that controls the trigger, knife, club, mace, or whip?

We all drive automobiles....and road rage is a problem yet we do not argue we should do away with cars.

My point is we should focus on the operator and not the tool when we seek to protect the public by banning something.....let's ban the actor and thus ban the action simultaneously.

Where do we draw the line?

Do we do away with all kitchen knives because of the risk of domestic violence?

Do we empty all tool sheds because hammers and chisels or hoes and shovels might be used in an assault?

I see Cell Phones and Women drivers in BMW's or SUV's to be a very dangerous combination....do we ban the women of this world from driving and using cell phones?

NRU74
13th Aug 2010, 07:07
Flying Lawyer
Sorry, I meant Bladed Article, of course, not Weapon, but S42 of the Violent Crime Reduction Act did increase the penalty to 4 years.

MagnusP
13th Aug 2010, 09:07
margarine is unlawful

There seems to be an unneccesary "unl" in there . . .

MagnusP
13th Aug 2010, 09:42
do we ban the women of this world from driving

Please sir, please sir, I know this one! :E

JEM60
13th Aug 2010, 09:47
Never carried one myself, but I was once in a taxi with a friend and our respective wives, 05.00 in Athens after a heavy night in a club. Taxi Driver would not find the hotel, and was obviously taking us for a ride, who knows to where. He said our hotel didn't exist. My friend produced a knife [to my huge surprise!!, pointed it at the driver, and said ''Hotel...... NOW''. He got there within five minutes. My friend then said he always carried it abroad. It was a good ''persuader'' in his opinion. My friend is now a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society.........

Bruce Wayne
13th Aug 2010, 10:35
focus upon the individual, the human hand that controls the trigger, knife, club, mace, or whip?

We all drive automobiles....and road rage is a problem yet we do not argue we should do away with cars.

My point is we should focus on the operator and not the tool when we seek to protect the public by banning something.....let's ban the actor and thus ban the action simultaneously.

Where do we draw the line?

indeed. where is the line to be drawn?


do you ban people ?

do you ban people that could potentially commit a violent crime?

how is that defined ?

Who determines that ?

so you now you are getting into the realms of pre-emptive legislation.


“No, no!” said the Queen. “Sentence first—verdict afterward.”
“Stuff and nonsense!” said Alice loudly. “The idea of having the sentence first!”
“Hold your tongue!” said the Queen, turning purple.
“I won’t!” said Alice.
“Off with her head!” the Queen shouted at the top of her voice.


Alice in Wonderland - Lewis Carroll

alisoncc
13th Aug 2010, 15:06
Excuse me people but are you all aware that those sharp pointy things on your rifles are illegal in a public place, and that particularly applies to the guy at the front with the 2 ft knife.

http://alisoncc.com/nwimages/FoWParade3_1.jpg

birrddog
13th Aug 2010, 15:22
alisoncc, that reminds me of the silly laws over here... Bayonettes affixed to your rifle verboten, because clearly a knife at the end of a rifle is more deadly than just a rifle on its own....:ugh:

Gainesy
13th Aug 2010, 17:34
That appears to be Weston-super-Mare, safer to go armed there, the local wimmin are both demanding and fed on chips from age 3.:uhoh:

birrddog
13th Aug 2010, 19:53
Soon keys to be outlawed in Great Britain (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-10969469).....

Man guilty of stabbing Dirty Sanchez star in Norwich

A Norfolk man has been found guilty of stabbing a star of the MTV show Dirty Sanchez.
Mark Edward Smith, of Charles Close, Toftwood, near Dereham, had denied wounding Matthew Pritchard, 37, with intent to inflict grievous bodily harm.
But Smith, 43, was found guilty at Norwich Crown Court and remanded in custody to be sentenced on 27 August.
Smith lashed out with some car keys after Mr Pritchard, from Cardiff, pushed him out of a shop in Norwich.

To be fair, if I thought a guy was going to give me a Dirty Sanchez, I'd take a stab at him too!

vulcanised
15th Aug 2010, 15:41
'The accused was found to be in posession of a mercury thermometer, M'Lud'.

Fatboy Ginge
15th Aug 2010, 21:08
I certainly do. It comes in most useful for my job as a multi-drop LGV driver. All our pallets are shrink wrapped and on my trusty multi-tool is a knife that I keep razor sharp.

One flick of the wrist and the shrink wrap is split without damaging the goods.

A plastic plod did start to object one morning when I pulled it out of the case on my belt but a proper copper told him not to be "A ******* useless jobsworth ******, **** off and book some cars for parking semi-legally."

As jobsworth walked away the PC asked for a closer look and wanted to know where he could get one.

Thick Blue Line
15th Aug 2010, 23:58
I couldn't agree more with FL's post, and I think the ligislation is spot on. If bobbys were lurking around farm land and outdoor pursuit places locking up folk for innociently carrying blades then I would say there was a problem. But they don't, the legislation is used for the right people in the right places.


focus upon the individual, the human hand that controls the trigger, knife, club, mace, or whip?

We all drive automobiles....and road rage is a problem yet we do not argue we should do away with cars.

My point is we should focus on the operator and not the tool when we seek to protect the public by banning something.....let's ban the actor and thus ban the action simultaneously.

Where do we draw the line?


....in all fairness, could we not for once in a discussion about cutting, shooting, pummelling, throttling, etc.....focus upon the individual, the human hand that controls the trigger, knife, club, mace, or whip?

We all drive automobiles....and road rage is a problem yet we do not argue we should do away with cars.

My point is we should focus on the operator and not the tool when we seek to protect the public by banning something.....let's ban the actor and thus ban the action simultaneously.

Where do we draw the line?

Do we do away with all kitchen knives because of the risk of domestic violence?

Do we empty all tool sheds because hammers and chisels or hoes and shovels might be used in an assault?

I see Cell Phones and Women drivers in BMW's or SUV's to be a very dangerous combination....do we ban the women of this world from driving and using cell phones?


Where do we draw the line? Offer a suggestion? What are the alternatives then?

off centre
16th Aug 2010, 02:41
Where do we draw the line? Offer a suggestion? What are the alternatives then?

Err, prosecute, convict, and sentence to painfully long, physically unpleasant prison time those that use a knife for violence? Make individuals take responsibility for their own actions? Hold the few who misuse a knife to account instead of the general public who just want to get on with their life where a knife sometimes comes in handy?

RatherBeFlying
16th Aug 2010, 02:49
When newly acquired, I took my ice axe to local steep slopes for self-arrest practice -- no that's not turning in oneself to HM plod; it's stopping yourself after a fall in whichever posture: sideways, backwards, forwards.

As for feeling safe in dangerous neighborhoods, I did find it a valuable morale builder when negotiating passage with a young grizzly -- and the marks would have helped the authorities to identify the culprit bear had he decided to get close to me:}

There is a recent news item of somebody who dissuaded a polar bear from making a meal of him by punching the bear in the nose as he had been advised by Inuit hunters:ok:

SoulManBand
16th Aug 2010, 03:00
The Inuit hunters are going to be in trouble now, with the PETA people. Abusing the polar bears, imagine that?

Thick Blue Line
16th Aug 2010, 10:20
Err, prosecute, convict, and sentence to painfully long, physically unpleasant prison time those that use a knife for violence? Make individuals take responsibility for their own actions? Hold the few who misuse a knife to account instead of the general public who just want to get on with their life where a knife sometimes comes in handy?


Thats my point, isn't this what happens already? Where is the problem?

Cheerio
17th Aug 2010, 10:40
I have a couple of knives, I don't have them in public, but this one is in my waxed cotton coat pocket:

http://www.heinnie.com/uploads/images_products/974.jpg

and this one is in my sock drawer:

http://www.heinnie.com/uploads/images_products/971.jpg

However, in reality, all I seem to do playing with knives is accidentally brob my hand. However, I get much more enthusiastic about axes and hatchets....... Given that I only have wood-burning heating and cooking, and get logs by the artic lorry load, I'm pretty handy with an axe. They are much better value in terms of hickory and steel for your money than a knife. I can throw (http://www.gransfors.com/htm_eng/yxkastning/index.html) them pretty well too. I would pity any Fred Barras wannabe who came prowling :p

I like nice simple top quality Nordic axes like Gränsfors, typically £60 or so. But even a 15 quid Bahco from B&Q is a nicely balanced and well made tool. Some people like fishing, others shooting, but when it comes to fieldwork, I like chopping!

Gainesy
17th Aug 2010, 11:29
What does "brob" mean? Cut?

Cheerio
17th Aug 2010, 12:26
Brob: (Carp.) A peculiar brad-shaped spike, to be driven alongside the end of an abutting timber to prevent its slipping.Result =

http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:Z90cOvEu7pFlWM:

:ok:

SASless
17th Aug 2010, 14:29
Knives are so.....well....plebian.....one should strive to do things in style!

I prefer this item as it smacks of real Americanism rather than something more Italianesque.

Perhaps this is the original "American Chopper"!

http://images.knifecenter.com/knifecenter/tomahawk/images/vtnewwinsert.jpg

Gainesy
17th Aug 2010, 14:46
They use those as currency in Jockistan. You may get mirrors and beads in your change.:E


Ah, a new word for a prick. Thanks Cheerio.:)

niknak
17th Aug 2010, 23:52
I use this little chap with it's 5 inch blade to hack my way through the NN jungle.

http://i902.photobucket.com/albums/ac221/oscarsbeak/Top.jpg

Last week I stopped in a police road block (they were searching for a missing child), the back of the car was full of plants 'n stuff and said blade was in clear sight on the floor cos that's where it had dropped out of my pocket when driving.
Mr Plod, seeing all the vegitation in the car, took a very understanding view by seeing it, giving me a severe "you silly pillock" look and chose too move me on.