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etrang
8th Aug 2010, 02:27
Sauna championship?

The annual World Sauna Championships in Finland have ended in tragedy with the death of one of the finalists, the organisers said.

Russian finalist Vladimir Ladyzhensky and Finnish rival Timo Kaukonen were both taken to hospital after collapsing and Mr Ladyzhensky later died.

The event, which has been running since 1999, requires participants to withstand 110C for as long as possible.

BBC News - Finalist dies at World Sauna event in Finland (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-10904691)

Cacophonix
8th Aug 2010, 02:28
Were they not men?

V2-OMG!
8th Aug 2010, 02:32
Why go to Finland to get boiled?

One can usually get themselves into enough hot water on PPruNe.

Gentleman Jim
8th Aug 2010, 02:37
The event, which has been running since 1999, requires participants to withstand 110C for as long as possible.

Well I doubt it will be running from 2011 onwards. What a ridiculous thing to do. The article says people were being treated for burns, well, yes, if it were 110C they will need treating for burns. The mind just boggles. Join us next year for the 'who can stand it the longest in an industrial sized liquidizer', a certificate of health signed by a Doctor is required before entry.

etrang
8th Aug 2010, 02:48
Were they not men?

No, they were lobsters.

rh200
8th Aug 2010, 02:50
WTF:ugh::ugh:

I think this is a classic example of evolution, and the smartest will survive. Just remove the inside door handle, and all the dumb people will die.

Sorry maybe an over reaction on my part but again :ugh::ugh::ugh:

BlueDiamond
8th Aug 2010, 03:30
Actually I agree, rh200 ... since we no longer have to survive the dangers of fighting sabre-toothed tigers, injuries or illness without treatment or incredibly harsh living conditions as we did in our hunter/gatherer days, nature has had to find new ways of weeding out the fit from the unfit. Smarter people would be unlikely to take part in such an incredibly stupid contest while the idiots who do stand a good chance of being removed from the gene pool.

Worrals in the wilds
8th Aug 2010, 03:47
The ultimate result of shielding men from the effects of folly, is to fill the world with fools.
Herbet Spencer, Vol. 3, Ch. IX, State-Tamperings with Money and Banks.

IJM
8th Aug 2010, 03:47
Can't the Finnish just stick to the Air Guitar Championships or the Mobile Phone Throwing Campionships? A lot safer.

crippen
8th Aug 2010, 04:03
Not true. He steamed to death actually.:rolleyes:

rh200
8th Aug 2010, 04:06
What about the wife carrying championships, now theres a good wholesome sport for the whole family!

Loose rivets
8th Aug 2010, 04:23
Used to run upstairs with her in me arms, :E now she helps me carry stuff in from the car.:(


Can't understand this water temperature thing. Darn pool is 93f at the moment, you'd think it would be really unpleasant at that temp, but it's okay. Not refreshing, but okay.

Ewww...DON'T READ THIS IF YOU'RE SQUEAMISH. Bloke in Essex fell into a vat of zinc. (hot dip galvanization is done at 600c I think.)

It is said that he swam for a few seconds before...stopping.

Pugilistic Animus
8th Aug 2010, 04:43
Muppets :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

jcbmack
8th Aug 2010, 04:46
Muppets :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:


Temperature at work again.

Tarq57
8th Aug 2010, 04:49
It's got to be a media typo or error.
110C just would not be bearable, for any length of time.

I bet it was 110F.

sitigeltfel
8th Aug 2010, 05:22
Darwin-1 Scandinavia-Nil

Slasher
8th Aug 2010, 05:33
I bet it was 110F.

Your grandma could handle 110F. It was 110C allright. But
spending outdoors on a sunny humid day in Dubai or
Sharjah this month will boil you alive too!

sitigeltfel
8th Aug 2010, 05:40
Mr Arvela said police had launched an investigation and he insisted that “all the rules were followed” and that all contestants had undergone medical checks before the competition. Physical condition, probably. Mental health, obviously not. The very fact that they volunteered for this would have ruled them out.

The Guinness Book of Records stopped accepting feats such as this a long time ago.

Tarq57
8th Aug 2010, 05:45
So how warm is it in those places? And what humidity?
Most I've been in (outside) was 45C. Lasted several minutes.

driftdown
8th Aug 2010, 06:16
I am just going out into about 38 Deg and that temperature is slowly rising as I type this. Don't expect to be inside again for a couple of hours and so carrying a couple of litres of iced water :eek:

Still another couple of days and the water option will not be allowed so time to hibernate... I wish :{

The Met chaps seem to have stopped advising the apparent temperature. That was always interesting, look at the actual and then calculate what it felt like to the body a bit disconcerting to see it at 49 Deg, but after a while it is possible to get used to the heat.:\

sitigeltfel
8th Aug 2010, 06:21
Set to hit 33C here today, more than enough. Just about to jump onto the mower for a bit of lawning before things get too hot.

aviate1138
8th Aug 2010, 06:31
The guy in the zinc, zank.

Sorry........

Efe Cem Elci
8th Aug 2010, 06:31
This sounds like a shoo-in for a Darwin Award. Amazing what people will do, and this doesn't even have an adrenaline rush involved. :confused:

RegDep
8th Aug 2010, 07:32
They both boiled and steamed themselves. By the time the towel was thrown in, they had seizures because of brain damage for high core temperature, and bad burns because of the steam.

Crazy, yes. Craziest show-off in the world, no.

tony draper
8th Aug 2010, 07:44
Tiz said that freezing to death is a easy way to go,once the shivering stops which it apparently does after a while, deep hypothermia sets and one feels no discomfort and strangely euphoric then one slips gently into the hereafter with a smile on one's face, Hmmm,one wonders who sent this report back.
:uhoh:

superspotter
8th Aug 2010, 08:10
Tiz said that freezing to death is a easy way to go,once the shivering stops which it apparently does after a while, deep hypothermia sets and one feels no discomfort and strangely euphoric then one slips gently into the hereafter with a smile on one's face, Hmmm,one wonders who sent this report bac
Maybe the ex Cheshire police constable, who helped himself on his way with a bottle of vodka too...

sitigeltfel
8th Aug 2010, 08:25
.....or Ötzi

BAMRA wake up
8th Aug 2010, 08:40
Tiz said that freezing to death is a easy way to go,once the shivering stops which it apparently does after a while, deep hypothermia sets and one feels no discomfort and strangely euphoric then one slips gently into the hereafter with a smile on one's face, Hmmm,one wonders who sent this report back

Think it's down to the Nazis, one of their many gruesome experiments on humans during WW2, meticulous with the data they were, the results had benefits for their airmen and sailors.

RegDep
8th Aug 2010, 08:57
once the shivering stops which it apparently does after a while, deep hypothermia sets and one feels no discomfort and strangely euphoric
I think this is from those who got rescued (some of them around)
with a smile on one's face
and this from the rescuers who came too late (them too).

probes
8th Aug 2010, 09:08
It's got to be a media typo or error.
110C just would not be bearable, for any length of time.

Dare I say 100C is the regular and normal temp for the sauna for me, for example? A little above is very bearable, 110 not for long, but still not killing as a rule.
Maybe outside heat-wave was a factor, too, as the brain was 'hotter' than usual before the sauna already.
Anyway, Darwin award - maybe, but for crazy competitiveness, not sauna heat, I'd say.

Tarq57
8th Aug 2010, 09:13
And I might be wrong, but anything above about 39C, at 100% humidity, will cause the body to overheat. That temperature is uncomfortable but not deadly, unless dehydration occurs.
Temperatures above 100C are survivable only if the bodys cooling system (evaporative) is able to control the core temperature.

Would it feel much different, walking into 100C/100%, than it would to, say, dip your hand in boiling water? Same temperature.

probes
8th Aug 2010, 09:18
Tarq57, same temp, different 'material'. Sauna-heat is a (traditional) cure for many diseases.

Tarq57
8th Aug 2010, 09:21
Yeah, I've been in a few, mostly without temp gauges, and holidayed in warm spots, high humidity, too.
Is over 100 (or even as high as 100) within the realms of normal for a sauna?

probes
8th Aug 2010, 09:28
Absolutely. 80-100 is very normal. I personally prefer about 1,5 hours with 80 (meaning: to the heat, being there for some time (until you feel it's enough), out again, a shower or a swim, a beer, to the heat etc) and about half an hour with 100. Works wonders. You have to drink a lot (not necessarily beer, could be water, too :) and relax. Our sauna is wood-heated, electricity-heated saunas are a little different (not so good).

BAMRA wake up
8th Aug 2010, 09:33
Is over 100 (or even as high as 100) within the realms of normal for a sauna?

Tarq57, it's not normal, but entirely possible. Imagine an insulated almost airtight wooden box, you share the space with a cast iron stove burning dry wood. The stove has a tray of stones on top, occasionally a naked, buxom Finn slops water over the stones and a wave of steam circulates over and down. Your every sweat pore opens and trickles of brown sweat converge and gravitate towards your nether regions.

50 to 70C would count as normal. 100C+ ranks along with Finnish drinking, boating, driving exploits.

Tarq57
8th Aug 2010, 09:34
Awesome. (Love the benefits of a very warm climate or sauna myself, too. Pity NZ is a bit cool at the mo.)

I retract my comment about the typo.
Sometimes, on the odd occasion, maybe I'm just too ready to doubt the media. Who'd have thought?

RegDep
8th Aug 2010, 09:35
For those of you (underprivileged) who have not had pleasures of sauna: 100 -110°C is the air temperature, which is bearable and even feels good (although I like 90°C because of my heart condition) when dry (low relative humidity) . When one wants to feel some more heat, one throws small amounts of water on the hot stones of the heating "system".

In the case at hand, there was an automate that threw 0.5 liters every 30 seconds (pretty much pretty frequently, in anyones taste). The championships had been won earlier in some 3 to 4 minutes (remember, not the time but the added humidity counts).

Now, there sit the three consecutive years champion (a Finn) and the last year's number three (a Russian). The videos show the referee rushing in after over SIX minutes and SHOWING RED CARD to the competitors! And, the competitors refuse to come out. I mean, who wants a draw on a competition between a Finn and a Russian. No one.

After been dragged out, both collapse and the 60 years old Russian dies. The Finn is brought to hospital.

You gotta understand this, folks! No Finn can be beaten by Russians in sauna. The former president used to take his Russian counterparts to sauna every time they came to pay a visit in Finland. Now you know something about history, boys and girls. It's all about survival of the fittest.

probes
8th Aug 2010, 09:47
50 to 70C would count as normal.

Well, it depends. People from sauna-tradition would say that's a little chilly. :) Sauna starts from 80. For us, I mean.

HKPAX
8th Aug 2010, 09:57
Coefficient of thermal conductivity. Very dry air temperature (conductive, not radiated) can be hugely higher than 110C I've heard. Tub of water at 40C would do for you in a short while.

Anyway, re the above postings, is there a hidden massage somewhere?

RegDep
8th Aug 2010, 10:05
Nothing hidden in mine, message or massage.

crippen
8th Aug 2010, 10:08
No Comment! . .
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see location.:)

sitigeltfel
8th Aug 2010, 10:21
Think it's down to the Nazis, one of their many gruesome experiments on humans during WW2, meticulous with the data they were, the results had benefits for their airmen and sailors.

I read a book years ago about the history of the ME163 Komet. Pilots who returned half frozen to death were put into a bed with a couple of jolly Frauleins to get the circulation going again.

Maybe something along these lines....

Google Image Result for http://mischalke04.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/frauleins-in-uniform.jpg (http://www.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=http://mischalke04.files.wordpress.com/2008/03/frauleins-in-uniform.jpg&imgrefurl=http://mischalke04.wordpress.com/category/private-pressings/&h=741&w=900&sz=186&tbnid=j-nv21vUCc8zKM:&tbnh=120&tbnw=146&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dfrauleins&hl=en&usg=__XrOr-PVo1emY0tapAhrbOnFQYSM=&sa=X&ei=aIReTOugOciOjAeKvrXxAw&ved=0CCUQ9QEwAw)

chuks
8th Aug 2010, 10:36
My first sauna in Finland was with a very macho Finn. There we sat, the temperature showing about 105° with him telling me, "Any time you have had enough, just feel free to step out..."

I was just sat there, thinking, "After a while, one of us must throw the towel in or else we are going to die in here!"

I left and he came out about 30 seconds later. Later his sauna burned down, the jerk. (They use a special oven that first sends the heat from a wood fire over some stones. Then you close off the fire to use the hot stones to heat the sauna. You must not use the sort of stones that explode when doused in cold water but not everyone knows this...)

The Chermans have this Aufguss thing they do, throwing water on the stones and then sending steam in all directions with a sweaty towel while sat there with totally serious expressions, as though this is not collective insanity. You do notice how well the steam carries the heat to your hide, relative to dry, hot air.

If you want heat from nature, try working in the Sahara in the summer. 50° in the shade, if you can find any! The throttles on a Twotter are painfully hot to the touch, about like wrapping your hand around a hot coffee mug.

You can drink about 4 litres of water per day without needing to pee at all and survival time is easy to figure by using a formula of 1 litre/day/person assuming no activity. We carried about 30 survival litres for about 15 people on the airplane, just the bare minimum, plus a cool chest crammed with drinking water iced down. Never mind food, it is water you need in that situation.

RegDep
8th Aug 2010, 10:40
It is a jolly good idea for anyone live to go to bed with a hypothermic patient Warm the casualty gradually using body heat, hot water bottles, heating pads.
Hypothermia - First Aid Topics (http://www.firstaidtopics.com/hypothermia/)

Storminnorm
8th Aug 2010, 10:48
This has reminded me of the story about a chap that drowned
after falling into a vat of beer.
At the inquest it was stated that he got out twice, to go for a P*ss.

Slasher
8th Aug 2010, 11:04
Would it feel much different, walking into 100C/100%, than it would to, say, dip your hand in boiling water? Same temperature

Nah not the same. Water vapor content at 100% RH constitutes only 3% of the atmosphere by volume.

BlueWolf
8th Aug 2010, 11:11
3°C and raining here. Hoping for much anticipated snow overnight.

One feels compelled to remark that in one's considered opnion, those who voluntarily expose themselves to high heat and humidity (above 30°C and/or 50%) are barking, and deserve what comes to them.

:confused:

Slasher
8th Aug 2010, 11:19
those who voluntarily expose themselves to high heat and humidity (above 30°C and/or 50%) are barking, and deserve what comes to them.

Yep those whove barked in Dubai, Sharjah, Manama, Kuwait etc got what came to them.

In my case it was a keg, good mates and a horney young buxom arab chick! :E

GrumpyOldFart
8th Aug 2010, 11:27
Bloke in Essex fell into a vat of zinc.


Wasn't Rusty Steele, was it?

probes
8th Aug 2010, 13:15
Anyway, re the above postings, is there a hidden massage somewhere?

Nothing in mine either, except maybe a slight smile, as we know of course, what people not accustomed to sauna think when they hear about/see/experience it for the first time.
But of course there are activities in the world we wouldn't dare do.

critter592
8th Aug 2010, 14:05
Sounds like chuks' friend overdid it a little. :O

Bloke in Essex fell into a vat of zinc...
...It is said that he swam for a few seconds before... stopping.

At least he left this life with an untarnished reputation.

Sorry... :}

sled dog
8th Aug 2010, 15:59
I can second what Chuks said, if you need natural heat try the Sahara. Once went from Sebha to Ghat, then over the Algerian border ( dont`t ask) into a small strip. OAT on arrival was 55c....Had to sit around drinking water until the "cooler" evening air allowed us to leave. :cool:

SoulManBand
8th Aug 2010, 16:08
The event, which has been running since 1999, requires participants to withstand 110C for as long as possible.

I am not surprised that they got ill, sitting in a sauna for 11 years.

notmyC150v2
8th Aug 2010, 22:22
Don't the Fins enjoy running from the sauna out to the snow for a roll around in the freezing cold before retiring to the sauna again.

Bloody strange bunch if you ask me. Dunno what the russkies ever saw in the place...

Gas Bags
9th Aug 2010, 04:22
Now this is a competition!!!

http://i1012.photobucket.com/albums/af246/GasBags/BBQ.jpg?t=1281327056

chuks
9th Aug 2010, 05:19
Rolling in the snow is not so bad. Jumping into very cold water is out; it seems that you really can suffer cardiac arrest (a heart attack) that way so that slowly walking into the water is the way to go.

Find a pretty girl and stand back to back with her while someone empties a bucket of cold water over you both. Or an ugly one if you keep your back turned, that should work about as well...

It can be quite pleasant to be stood there steaming in the cold breeze off a Finnish lake or stream. Don't knock until you have tried it.

There is a thing they do with birch boughs dipped in water. Some Finnish friends told me about some visiting Russkies who thought this meant you should flagellate yourself when really you just use them to swish cool water onto yourself. The silly Ivans were out there raising red welts to the amusement of the Finns.

etrang
9th Aug 2010, 05:25
Don't the Fins enjoy running from the sauna out to the snow for a roll around in the freezing cold before retiring to the sauna again.

Yes, and i believe the Russians like to beat each other with Birch tree branches.

probes
9th Aug 2010, 06:17
i believe the Russians like to beat each other with Birch tree branches.

Oh, guys, it's really hilarious! Not only the Russians - all the sauna-people. And beating eachother (or yourself) with birch (or oak, or juniper :cool:, or even nettle-bunches, but they have to be 'softened' in almost-boiling water first) could be the hidden 'massage' in the messages, as it really works like massage and the doctors say is best to relieve mental stress or sore muscles. You have to know when and how to make these whisks (before mid-June mostly, whne the leaves are young and soft and full of good stuff, juices and all), of course.
And it was the main sort of medicine our forefathers had - remember, the climate is mostly damp and cold in the sauna-countries - and, for example, our granny was way over 80 when she loved to be birch-whisked in sauna, tired everyone out and when done with the whisking, some more water on the hot stoves and out the person whisking her had to get and then she was there telling it's heaven on Earth.

Ancient Mariner
9th Aug 2010, 07:13
We have an electric sauna at our cabin, use it all year round. 70-80 deg C, humidity to taste. Our grandchildren love it during winter, gives them an opportunity to jump naked in the snow. Just make sure the snow is the fluffy version, ice hurts. We have a small creek that cross our land which will do as well, but the cooling is instant and......breath taking. :eek:
Per

Blacksheep
9th Aug 2010, 07:23
best to relieve mental stress or sore musclesjump naked in the snowSelf flagellation?
Foolish people, all of them.

Glenlivet, Talisker or The Balvenie are the relaxation choice of gentle folk. :ok:

Hydromet
9th Aug 2010, 07:24
How did these blokes get through to the final when they ccouldn't even make it through the heat?:confused:

radeng
9th Aug 2010, 07:29
I seem to remember reading that the Romans used to roll in nettle beds as cure for rheumatism. Sounds as if the cure is worse than the disease.

Apparently gone are the days of the mixed sauna in Finland where perfect strangers would meet. Unlike my second trip to the country....but that's another story.

Blacksheep
9th Aug 2010, 07:34
that's another story.Don't be shy...
Do tell.

radeng
9th Aug 2010, 07:53
OK Blacksheep.

there was this company, now a well known name internationally, but then a small Finnish company with a different name. They had (God knows why) a factory way beyond the Arctic Circle, with about one flight a day, so you had to stay overnight: they had their own hotel as there wasn't any other. You arrived about 4pm, and by the time you'd checked in, you were expected to join them all in the communal saunas. Men and women, all naked. And too bloody hot for me! You came out and had a beer, and then went back in....

RegDep
9th Aug 2010, 08:31
radeng,

You are made of right stuff! Keep up the steady progress. See my post somewhere above, ending... "Survival of the fittest".

Best
Reg

Blacksheep
9th Aug 2010, 10:30
Too hot eh? And then you went back in. :E

Hah! I thought so. :}

radeng
9th Aug 2010, 11:49
I don't like heat. I didn't like Phoenix at 116F, and certainly not Ridgecrest at 125. Ridgecrest is the town adjacent to the US Naval Weapons Test Centre at China Lake. You know it's Navy - 220 miles from the nearest ocean, 2300 or so feet asl and in the middle of a desert! But the humidity is low, and Tokyo at 90 degrees and 70% humidity is far worse.

OFSO
9th Aug 2010, 12:08
I checked the temperature on the gym sauna this morning - it was 85ºc or 180ºf. Very pleasant with three scoops of water on the stove.

Sadly (this being Spain and hence nominally RC) it's segregated and the fair sex are banished to their own wood cabin elsewhere in the building.

Chrisbhb
9th Aug 2010, 15:40
Flipin in eck. That is sad! Here's the bloke here. RIP.

Sauna world championship death (http://www.divapor.com/sauna-articles/sauna-world-championships.php)

bearfoil
9th Aug 2010, 17:38
Isn't Death by Sauna more along the lines of "Roasting" to Death?