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aeroslon
11th Nov 2009, 14:08
Hi guys.
What do you think about using Iphone in "Aviation" mode?
Is it the violation of the law? Using it as a calulator?( to calculate cross wind companent before take off?)
Best Regards

JB LFPN FLYER
11th Nov 2009, 17:54
Hi ,

I've been doing that recently . All I can tell is that if you do not turn off the wifi and the blue tooth , it may still make some interference .

had some AHRS problems on a Cirrus GTS G3 with Garmin Perspective G1000 , .
The Heading reference was going away for something like 5 seconds then back ... believe me , when in flight , it is a lot of time .

I did not try with everything the WIFI and Blue tooth off though .

Regards

JB;)

Denti
11th Nov 2009, 17:59
Flightmode usually switches off all sending and receiving function. And it is absolutely legal to use it that way inflight. When deadheading usually i use the ipod function to listen to music, on the flightdeck i use some aviation apps. And on the ground i switch it back to normal mode and check weather, mail and the internet if needed :)

Intruder
11th Nov 2009, 18:36
And it is absolutely legal to use it that way inflight.
Not quite...

While it may be "absolutely safe" in your, my, or anyone else's opinion to use in that mode inflight, it is still technically illegal to use it that way on an airliner below 10,000'. It is NOT your call as to what is legal -- the FAA has given approval authority ONLY to the air carriers, and AFAIK ALL US carriers tell you electronic equipment must be "OFF" below 10,000'.

vs69
11th Nov 2009, 19:22
OR you could just use a pocket calculator? Cheaper,quicker??

raffele
11th Nov 2009, 21:05
When using the iPhone in Airplane mode, the comms part of the device is deactivated. This includes the GSM (2G, 3G, HDSPA), GPS, Bluetooth and WiFi. The WiFi can be re-enabled to connect to the internet (if the aircraft has WiFi installed of course). More details on iPhone Airplane mode can be found on the Support pages: iPhone: About connection settings and airplane mode (http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1355)

Beyond that its use is governed by airline and aviation authority policy for Personal Electronic Devices (PEDs).

Dunbar
11th Nov 2009, 21:35
Why on earth would a professional pilot need a calculator to work out a cross wind component?

Having said that, iphones are great.

BOAC
11th Nov 2009, 23:14
Why on earth would a professional pilot need a calculator to work out a cross wind component? - exactly! Have they never heard of a wristwatch?:eek:

OK - I know - they've all got digital watches.......................:)

Gin Jockey
11th Nov 2009, 23:42
All this excitement over electronic devices kills me... I'm sure the wings aren't going to fall off just because someone is listening to their ipod.

aeroslon
12th Nov 2009, 00:05
Thanks for replying,:ok:
I asked this question, because one of my colleague failded his route check as captain, because while waiting for take off (number 15 or smth like this) he recieved the latest ATIS and decided to recheck crosswind component for take off.He used Iphone in Aviation mode as a calculater. After the flight, captain was told that he failed the check and violated the airlaw by using CELL PHONE during the flight. So he is now grounded for unnknown time. :sad::sad::sad::confused::confused::confused:
For supporting him I will show him this topic.
Best Regards

Denti
12th Nov 2009, 00:29
Not quite...

While it may be "absolutely safe" in your, my, or anyone else's opinion to use in that mode inflight, it is still technically illegal to use it that way on an airliner below 10,000'. It is NOT your call as to what is legal -- the FAA has given approval authority ONLY to the air carriers, and AFAIK ALL US carriers tell you electronic equipment must be "OFF" below 10,000'.

Might be true for US carriers and FAA rules, however those are only a pretty small part of the world.

Over here i can use any personal electronic device and certainly any musicplayer as a pax from gear up until around 5 minutes before landing (the cabin crew tells us when to switch it off again), on the flightdeck it is the captains call but usually it won't be used below 10.000, although we are still required to balance our 5lbs EFB (an ots tablet PC) on our knees down to 1000ft AGL if we do fly a non precision approach (and not using IAN), and that wont be switched off at all, just stowed.

I do agree however that working out a crosswind component is something everybody should be able to do without use of an electronic device, and for getting the latest ATIS there is allways ACARS. Main use during flight while on the flightdeck is checking of crew duty/rest times both against EU-OPS and company regulations and deciphering of SNOWTAMs which is possible without any electronic device, im just too lazy and our EFB application for it is badly designed.

On the ground it is absolutely harmless and we can and often do tell our passengers to use their mobile phones if we have a long wait for take-off, of course we do tell them to switch them off again in time for departure.

Nightrider
12th Nov 2009, 07:13
Denti, nothing personal, "over here"....where is this?
Over here it is not allowed to use any electronic device as long as the seat belt sign is on. Mobile phones must be in off, not in flight mode or any other mode, and this during the entire flight.
According to the OM-A the captain has to ensure that these rules are followed.

Of course....who cares....

Big Bad D
12th Nov 2009, 07:42
One of the main reasons why most regulatory authorities (except perhaps in Denti's 'over there') have imposed a blanket ban on use of all electronic devices during take-off and landing phases was to avoid excessive delays in getting the cabin secure with cabin crew having to individually assess every passenger and their PEDs, whether they transmitted and whether they were in flight mode. It's not necessarily that all are 'unsafe' but more a question of practicality.

Denti
12th Nov 2009, 07:57
Different OM-As it seems. Ours says the use of personal electronic devices is not allowed during take off and landing but is allowed in all other phases of the flight, transmission modes have to be deactivated throughout the flight. Mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptops etc. may be used except during take off and landing as long as all transmission modes are off. Which is exactly what the iPhone in flight mode does, all transmission modes off.

All according EU-OPS of course, however some companies do choose and set other limits, those are company limits then and not set by the relevant regulation, in fact some companies do have WLAN or mobile phone picocells on board and allow the activation of the relevant transmission mode to access those services.