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reynoldsno1
6th May 2009, 20:40
Apparently "ZULU" is now listed in the UN Charter of Words and Meanings that may have a racial prejudice innuendo attached ... :rolleyes:

...so it seems as though the ICAO (UN) phonetic alphabet may have to change - what's your choice for Z then??

Zebra (is the ZEBRA or ZEEBRA?) was the previous designation, but is that too, well, black & white?:ugh:

handysnaks
6th May 2009, 20:46
Apparently "ZULU" is now listed in the UN Charter of Words and Meanings that may have a racial prejudice innuendo attached ...

Please give evidence of the existence of said 'charter of words and meanings' I suspect you are making it up as you go along.....:rolleyes:

10DowningSt
6th May 2009, 21:57
If you're going to use Zebra, go the whole way...

Able Baker Charlie Dog Easy Fox George How Item Jig King Love Mike Nan Oboe Peter Queen Roger Sugar Tare Uncle Victor William X-ray Yoke Zebra.

dead_pan
6th May 2009, 22:00
G Gnu
P Pneumatic
X Xylophone

I could go on but won't

Chesty Morgan
6th May 2009, 22:27
How about Zenzizenzizenzic?

Yep, it's real!

ChristiaanJ
6th May 2009, 22:33
What about Z for Zizzy?
But then some of our French colleagues might confuse it with W for Willie.

CJ

con-pilot
6th May 2009, 23:25
How about, ZUCK. :p


(Nobody will forget ZUCK.)

Um... lifting...
6th May 2009, 23:44
Zsa Zsa:ok:

http://www.soundoflife.net/wp-content/uploads/2007/11/zsa-zsa-gabor.jpg

“I want a man who’s kind and understanding. Is that too much to ask of a millionaire?”
“Macho does not prove mucho.”
“A man in love is incomplete until he has married. Then he’s finished.”
“I don’t remember anybody’s name. How do you think the “dahling” thing got started?”
“There is nothing wrong with a woman welcoming all men’s advances as long as they are in cash”
“I love the intellectual type, they know everything and suspect nothing.”
“One of my theories is that men love with their eyes; women love with their ears.”
“To a smart girl men are no problem - they’re the answer. ”
“How many husbands have I had? You mean apart from my own? ”
“To a smart girl men are no problem - they’re the answer.”
“I never hated a man enough to give him diamonds back. ”
“You never really know a man until you have divorced him. ”
“We were both in love with him. I fell out of love with him, but he didn’t. ”
“Getting divorced just because you don`t love a man is almost as silly as getting married just because you do.”
“I know nothing about sex because I was always married.”

seacue
6th May 2009, 23:47
ICAO* Alphabets

ICAO-1
Able, Babble, Cable, Dabble, Edible, Fable, Gable, Hobble, Idle, Jumble, Kettle, Ladle, Maple, Noble, Ogle, Pebble, Quibble, Rabble, Sable, Table, Usable, Vigil, Wiggle, Xingu, Yugo, Zadar.

ICAO-2
Aisle, Bile, Coil, Dial, Exile, File, Guile, Heil, Isle, Jewel, Kyle, Lisle, Mile, Nile, Oil, Pile, Quail, Rile, Silo, Tile, Udile, Vile, While, Xyle, Yule, Zylo.

* Intended to Confuse Aeronautical Operators

Mgggpilot
7th May 2009, 00:11
Easy! Z=ZERO. Even a chinese will be able to say it

n5296s
7th May 2009, 00:26
This one seems quite good (formatting somewhat mangled I'm afraid). Although personally I would have chosen M=Mayday and N=Negative, maybe for all these people who think that PanPan is useful we could have P=Panpan too.

--------------

You may not be aware that a team of international academic authorities has been commissioned by the European Community to create a new phonetic alphabet free of patriarchal references (such as Papa) or words that might otherwise be offensive to minorities (e.g., Zulu) or those of differing gender. (Romeo, for instance, connotes a sexually obsessed individual, possibly a harasser.)

Fortunately, we have been able to obtain an early sample of their work. Try any common communication, and you will realize that a mere $238 million has been well spent!

A
Affirmative N
New
B
Bearing O
One
C
Czar P
Ptomaine
D
Disregard Q
Question
E
Emergency R
Repeat
F
Fire S
Say-again
G
Gnu T
Tsunami
H
Hijack
U
Unsafe
I
Iago V
Violation
J
Jalepeno W
Weather
K
Knew X
Xerox
L
Llanelli Y
Ypres
M
Mnemonic Z
Zero

G-CPTN
7th May 2009, 00:34
A is for horses,
B for mutton
C for yourself
D for mation
E for peron
F for vescence
G for police
H for beauty
I for luton
J for oranges
K for teria
L for leather
M for sis
N for eggs
O for the wings of a dove
P for relief
Q for a bus
R for mo
S for me to know and you to find out
T for gums
U for nasia
V for Espania
W for goodness sake
X for breakfast
Y for goodness sake
Z for breezes

AC3854
7th May 2009, 00:52
I think there may be something to this - sadly.

On a recent episode of The Bill (that's recent as in recent Downunder) DC Jo Masters (the large chested lesbian, if I can use that expression) was calling in a VRN and I was sure she said ZEBRA instead of ZULU. At the time I put it down to a daft scriptwriter ... but now I'm not so sure. Could have been hearing things, I suppose ...

If they were to remake the film Zulu, what would it be called? Large black men with spears?

con-pilot
7th May 2009, 01:36
If they were to remake the film Zulu, what would it be called? Large black men with spears?

Racist. :*

It must, must I say, be called; "Large indigenous to the African Continent non-specific gender persons without firearms."

Really. :=




;)

kenhughes
7th May 2009, 02:27
10DowningStreet:

Love Mike Peter Queen Roger Sugar

That may upset the "gay" element? (Yes, I know it's used in the US - but they don't care about upsetting the gays). :)

Mgggpilot:

Z=ZERO. Even a chinese will be able to say it

Er, no. They'd say Zelo. The Japs would be OK with it though.

How about Z = Zorba. That wouldn't upset any one. Except, perhaps, Prince Philip. :E

Howard Hughes
7th May 2009, 05:22
In that case, surely X must be for Xenophobe...:E

notmyC150v2
7th May 2009, 05:43
Aye
Bee
Cee
Dee
Eee
Eff
Gee
Aitch
Eye
Jay
Kay
El
Em
En
Oh
Pee
Que
Arrgh
Es
Tee
You
Vee
UU
Ex
Why
Zee

Problem solved.

under_exposed
7th May 2009, 07:47
Advocaat
Bitter
Creme de menthe
Diamond White
Everards
Fullers
Guinness
Hops
India pale ale
Jagermeister
Keg
Lager
Malibu
Newcastle Brown Ale
Optic
Pernod
Queens Head
Red wine
Sherry
Tanglefoot
Under the influence
Vodka
Whisky
X-sober
Yard of ale
Zombie

Roger Sofarover
7th May 2009, 07:50
Con

Apparently it is now racist and offensive to call an Eskimo an Eskimo. The can only be referred to as Inuits.

bnt
7th May 2009, 08:07
I'm not buying the OP's claim at all. Calling someone "Zulu" is about as racist as calling someone "Bavarian" i.e. not very. It's a name that Zulus use to describe themselves; their language is Zulu, and their historic tribal area is Kwa-Zulu.

"Eskimo" is a different case, since (with some exceptions in e.g. Alaska) the word wasn't and isn't used by the Inuit peoples to describe themselves. I thought what most people think, that it means "eaters of raw meat", but now I read more, I'm not so sure. Still, the point is that most "Eskimo" themselves don't use it or like it, so it's out now, at least in Canada.

Gainesy
7th May 2009, 08:25
First time I went to Canada I couldn't figure why there were so many Japanese taxi drivers.:O

Lon More
7th May 2009, 08:41
Return to the old one; as a Republican I'd love to hear "the Queen Fox Easy"

ExSp33db1rd
7th May 2009, 08:54
wot's wrong with Zed ?

Captain Stable
7th May 2009, 09:08
Ack, Beer, Charlie, Don, Edward, Freddy, George, Harry, Ink, Johnnie, King, London, Monkey, Nuts, Orange, Pip, Queen, Robert, Sugar, Toc, Uncle, Vic, William, X-ray, Yorker, Zebra

Standard Noise
7th May 2009, 09:19
A is for apple, b is for balloon, c is for candle.......

So easy even kids can learn it!


'Ezy14appleballoon turn left heading.....'

Captain Stable
7th May 2009, 09:26
Or we could bring all aviation to a total halt:-

A Arse
B Bollocks
C ?

etc...

(and no, don't offer me suggestions - I can work them out myself thanks to conversations overheard around squaddies... :} )

Mgggpilot
7th May 2009, 09:30
Different opinion from me. If I were Zulu, I would be proud of hearing every guy in the world of aviation mention my tribe. It is such a good feeling you know, isnt t¿!
A=angola B=burkinafaso C=Congo
D=Denmark E=England etc

radeng
7th May 2009, 09:31
The 1936 'Handbook for Wireless Operators' has the official table 'for international working' as:

Amsterdam, Baltimore, Casablanca, Danemark,, Edison, Florida, Gallipolo, Havana, India, Jerusalem, Kilogramme, Liverpool, Madagascar, New York, Oslo, Paris, Quebec, Roma, Santiago, Tripoli, Upsala, Valencia, Washington, Xanthippe, Zurich.

As the words are longer tha the ICAO ones, they've got syllabic redundancy which helps in poor siganl to noise conditions. It also probably needs a reasonable knowledge of geography as well as ancient Greek history (for Xanthippe).

The advantage of the ICAO alphabet is that people know it: under poor conditions, it has significant disadvantages

I quite like Xanthippe though!

Farmer 1
7th May 2009, 09:45
A for Horses
B for Mutton
C for Miles (or Seaforth Highlanders - thanks Geoff Firth)
D for Kate (or D fer Ential)
E for Brick
F for Lump (or F fer Vescence)
G for Police (or G for Get It)
H for Consent (or H for Bless You)
I for Novello (or I for the Engine)
J for Nice Time (or J for Oranges)
K for Restaurant
L for Leather
M for Cream (or M for Sis)
N for Lope
O for the Wings of a Dove (O for the Rainbow)
P for Relief
Q for the Loos
R for Mo
S for you, you can take a hike (or S for Rantzen)
T for Gums (or T for Two)
U for Me (or U for Mism - thanks Andrew W Llewellyn)
V for Espana
W for a Quid (or W for the Winnings)
X for Breakfast
Y for Mistress
Zee for Moiles (or Z for Wind)

GOLF_BRAVO_ZULU
7th May 2009, 09:50
bnt

http://www.battleships-cruisers.co.uk/images/hmseskimo3.jpg


Oops.

henry crun
7th May 2009, 09:52
Back in the dark ages when the previous phonetic alphabet changed to the current one, the squadron I was on had a C/O who was a lay preacher.
Our aircraft had two VHF boxes and each frequency was referred to by the letter assigned to it, and at this station our approach frequency was on N for Nan, as it was then.

In the days leading up to the changeover everyone was swotting up on the new alphabet.

Came the day and our C/O was leading the first pair to get airborne.
He called the tower and said, “Tower, Red are airborne changing to N……………N………………………………......................................N Nonconformist”.

After that we devised an alphabet for him, A for Aisle, B for Bishop, C for Curate D for Deacon etc etc.

Evanelpus
7th May 2009, 10:42
Able, Baker, Charlie Dog
I'm as hard as a chocolate frog!

Must away, time for my medicine and sisters doing the rounds.

deltayankee
7th May 2009, 10:52
Err, does that mean its offensive to say India too?

Sounds like a windup to me.

Isn't there also one for nervous flyers? (Accident, Broken, Crash, Disaster, Emergency, Fire...)

unstable load
7th May 2009, 10:52
So, what will become of the time zone formerly known as ZULU, then???

Oddly eneogh, ZULU is also the word for the heavens - ie, the Zulu nation are the people of heaven......

seacue
7th May 2009, 10:54
I was working in a US Air Force lab when the Alpha Bravo ... Hotel ... alphabet became widespread. One of the younger engineers was a recent MIT graduate - his father was French and mother was American. He ridiculed the choice of "hotel" for H by pronouncing it the French way: 'O-tel

ZEEBEE
7th May 2009, 11:01
wot's wrong with Zed ?


Nothing...I'm fine thanks :}

ChristiaanJ
7th May 2009, 12:45
wot's wrong with Zed ?
It's only one syllable. All the ICAO ones have at least two.

CJ

larssnowpharter
7th May 2009, 14:01
Not in aviation circles but the Italians regularly use:

Ancona
Bari
Cremona
etc

ChristiaanJ
7th May 2009, 14:24
lars,
I think just about every country has its own 'local' spelling alphabet.
The French use names, for instance (again not in aviation).

Lettre Code Lettre Code
A Anatole N Nicolas
B Berthe O Oscar
C Célestin P Pierre
D Désiré Q Quentin
E Eugène R Raoul
É Émile S Suzanne
F François T Thérèse
G Gaston U Ursule
H Henri V Victor
I Irma W William
J Joseph X Xavier
K Kléber Y Yvonne
L Louis Z Zoé
M Marcel

Sorry for the tatty table, after copy-and-paste...

CJ

warloc67
7th May 2009, 14:33
"Zed's dead, baby, Zed's dead" - Pulp fiction, Bruce Willis's character.:hmm:

Farmer 1
7th May 2009, 14:51
Quote:
wot's wrong with Zed ?

It's only one syllable. All the ICAO ones have at least two.

CJ

Except for Golf.

And Mike.

ChristiaanJ
7th May 2009, 17:56
Touché, farmer1

Sailor Vee
7th May 2009, 18:25
(Romeo, for instance, connotes a sexually obsessed individual, possibly a harasser.)But, in the same alphabet, he has his Juliet. :ok:


Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog
I'm as hard as a chocolate frog!
The follow up ....... Alfa, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, I'm as hard as a concrete shelter. :O

Keef
7th May 2009, 21:15
I remember yonks ago learning
Anton
Ärger
Bertha
Cäsar
CHarlotte
Dora
Emil
Friedrich
Gustav
Heinrich
Ida
Julius
Kaufmann
Ludwig
Martha
Nordpol
Otto
Ökonom
Paula
Quelle
Richard
Siegfried
SCHule
Theodor
Ulrich
Übel
Viktor
Wilhelm
Xanthippe
Ypsilon
Zacharias

I used it about twice for dictating telegrams, then they changed to the NATO one.

frostbite
7th May 2009, 21:47
Why did they have alternatives for some of the letters?

(Never imagined I'd be grateful to NATO!)

ExSp33db1rd
8th May 2009, 05:00
So, what will become of the time zone formerly known as ZULU, then???



Already gone, mate. The French have snaffled it - UTC - Universal Temps Co-ordinaire - or something.

In days gone by the French and English scientists battled over the position of the Prime Meridian, either through the Greenwich Observatory in London, or Paris. The English won, but the French never accepted it, and Parisian Standard Time was always 6 seconds ahead of GMT. Until the coming of the Space Age and the launching of satellites, when they had to come into line - but they got the name !! The bar stewards won after all !!!

( yes, I'm an Anglophile not a Francophile - so sue me )

ExSp33db1rd
9th May 2009, 01:26
Singapore Telecoms operators used to use countries - Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Ecuador, France, Germany,Holland etc. Can't remember what they used for X ? Yugolsavia, Zimbabwe

911slf
7th Aug 2009, 17:58
O for a woman (or is that homophobic? Better than homophonic anyway):)

Rossian
7th Aug 2009, 18:25
They use Italian town and city names eg Ancona Bologna Como.....
The Ancient Mariner

Fantome
7th Aug 2009, 19:01
At the change over from Able, Baker, Charlie, Dog . .. . . in 1955, to the one in use today, this exchange happened . . .. ..

Echo Whisky Alpha, turning final.

Echo Whisky Alpha, continue approach. Two dogs crossing the runway.

Echo Whisky Alpha, don't you mean two deltas?

(That EWA driver was the late Chris Braund, renowned for his stammer, whereby a hundred hilarious tales were told around the traps. He also owned the Mustang, VH-FCB. He sold it to Jack McDonald who sold it to the Philippines, then to Hong Kong and now in England. Photos of her were recently posted on proone. Chris paid three hundred quid for her at the grave yard at Tocumwal round about 1955. Cash money. Hopped in and flew her away.)

Dushan
7th Aug 2009, 20:58
Singapore Telecoms operators used to use countries - Australia, Brazil, Canada, Denmark, Ecuador, France, Germany,Holland etc. Can't remember what they used for X ? Yugolsavia, Zimbabwe


Well now they can change to Ex-Yugoslavia and Yemen...

ShyTorque
7th Aug 2009, 21:31
A few years ago I taught my daughter (then aged about 7) the phonetic alphabet over lunch at the local flying club after she asked about aircraft registrations.

She picked it up very quickly but on a later visit she had forgotten some of it. She refused to let me help her out.

She scratched her head for a while then got very annoyed when I giggled after her attempt at "K" and laughed out loud after the letter "O".

Kangaroo then Ostrich.

:)

birrddog
7th Aug 2009, 21:59
Quote:
(Romeo, for instance, connotes a sexually obsessed individual, possibly a harasser.)
But, in the same alphabet, he has his Juliet. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/thumbs.gif
Once flew an aircraft with a reg ending in RRJ.... jokingly referred to as "Romeo Rogered Juliet".

Even Mrs B found that funny...

ChristiaanJ
7th Aug 2009, 22:02
ShyTorque,
Give her the classic A for "Able" for effort!

CJ

ZOOKER
7th Aug 2009, 22:39
To return to the original question though, the replacement for the letter 'Z' is obvious.......
- ZOOKER, of course! :}
But seriously, with one less syllable, (and therefore more thinking time), there is always that famous character from Rowan Atkinson's 'Headmaster' monologue.......
ZOBB. :ok:

ZOOKER
7th Aug 2009, 22:43
Keef,
Wasn't Helmut Zacharias the composer of the 1964 Olympic Games BBC theme music? :ok:

G-CPTN
7th Aug 2009, 22:57
So far, nobody has submitted proposals for Æ or Ø . . .

Fantome
8th Aug 2009, 00:50
A few years ago I taught my daughter (then aged about 7) the phonetic alphabetMy seven year old dort took a while to get over the alphabetical chant that included .. . . . E F G . . elementary . .. P . . . (because it always got a laugh.)

She was asked in English class to quote a line or two from Romeo and Juliet. Came out with -

'Oh Romeo, Romeo . . .. let down your hair.'

Orion Man
8th Aug 2009, 03:45
I remember the Spithead review a long time ago in the solent. HMS Zulu was a once proud frigate that ended up in India I believe. What a shame that the PC brigade are ruining this country even further.

Regards

Orion Man

smo-kin-hole
8th Aug 2009, 03:47
All
Breeding
Charletains
Deploy
Extended
Fantasies
Guilt
Happened
Instantly
Jade
Kites
Launching
Mightily
Northward
Overhead
Pausing
Quite
Resolutely
Showing
Tainted
Undergarments
Vigorously
While
X-wives
Yammer......
ZZZZZZZZZZZZZzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz:zzz:

G-ZUZZ
8th Aug 2009, 06:37
Artie
Bart
Clancy
DiscoStu
Edna
Flanders
Gumble
Homer
Itchy
Jebediah
Krusty
Lisa
Marge
Nelson
Otto
Patti
Quimby
Rainier
Skinner
Tatum
Uter
VanHouten
Wiggum
XfilesEpisode
Yesguy
Ziff

rodthesod
8th Aug 2009, 07:29
Zit?

Always thought it was as per GCPTN's list but:

D for dumb
E for brick
K for black b******
V for La France

Richard Taylor
8th Aug 2009, 07:58
The UN are a bunch of Charlies. Tell them to Fox Oscar.

hoss
8th Aug 2009, 13:08
zealot? ;)

SOPS
8th Aug 2009, 13:27
try this
Phonetic alphabets, wordlists, texts, word frequency (http://www.bckelk.ukfsn.org/menu.html)

Capetonian
8th Aug 2009, 13:28
Foxtrot (a dance, might not be correct for camel shaggers who don't indulge)
Uniform (could be as in fetish - oops)
Charlie (insulting as in 'a right Charlie')
Kilo (insulting to US Americans who use imperial measurements)

Papa (ageist and sexist)
Oscar (like Foxtrot Oscar)
Lima (prejudice to Peruvians, and that is an insulting word in some places)
India (insulting to Pakis)
Tango (see above as in Foxtrot)
India
Charlie
Alpha (someone help me here, please)
Lima

Charlie
Oscar
Romeo (a tale of sex and debauchery)
Romeo
Echo (prejudice to ducks because their quacks don't echo)
Charlie
Tango
November (some calendars don't use this calendar)
Echo
Sierra (Fine if you're Hispanic, otherwise not)
Sierra


Zuma is a Zulu and a Zulu is a Zot

Slasher
9th Aug 2009, 06:40
Able Baker Charlie Dog Easy Fox George How Item Jig King Love Mike Nan Oboe Peter Queen Roger Sugar Tare Uncle Victor William X-ray Yoke Zebra.


Thats easy to remember -

An Able Baker met Charlie the Dog who cought an Easy Fox for George. Now this Item did Jig with King Love and mister Mike Nan (who plays the Oboe), while Peter Queen replyed "Roger Sugar Tare" as Uncle Victor William took an X-ray of a Yoke fitted to a Zebra.