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Ken Wells
1st May 2009, 16:09
British bank holidays are Public Holidays and have been recognized since 1871.The name Bank Holiday comes from the time when banks were shut and so no trading could take place. Now they shut for good!

The 1871 Act designated four holidays in England, Wales and Ireland (then wholly part of the UK), and five in Scotland.

There are currently a total of 8 permanent bank and public holidays in England, Wales and 9 in Scotland and 10 in Northern Ireland. These include Christmas Day and Good Friday, which in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are common law' holidays (they are not specified by law as bank holidays but have become customary holidays because of common observance).

France has 15, Germany 19 ( although 6 are regional ) Holland 12, even Lithuania has 15.

Zimbabwe has 13 surpisingly enough though no, (I've just ripped my country off again and bought another Merc for my 10th wife day)
But dear old England makes do with just 8.

No day to celebrate St George, Arimistace Day. VE day etc.

Maybe Gordon should institute "U TURN day" but that would be one a week at the current rate.:=

Crepello
1st May 2009, 16:44
But dear old England makes do with just 8.


This gives dear old England a small competitive advantage over some other nations. Not much, admittedly, but one of the few things that 'Red' Brown hasn't tinkered with in his tireless efforts to dismantle the nation...

ATNotts
1st May 2009, 17:54
It's true that most European countries have more public holidays that the UK, but at least in the UK we know that each year we will get all of them. No so in most other European countries.

Rather than declaring the holiday on the nearest convenient Monday, most holidays in Germany and France actually mean something - and take place on a particular date. if that date happens to be a weekend day, hard cheese.

It is therefore perfectly conceivable that if 25/26 December fall on a Saturday Sunday, then as 1st January is also a Saturday, the poor begger may get no public holidays at Christmas!!

It is however a shame that the UK cannot at least attempt to take the same days as the rest of Europe when it's perfectly possible to do so. This weekend, for example, today is the Mayday holiday in almost every European country, but the UK has moved to Monday! With a little forethought the UK could have had it's long weekend Friday to Sunday, instead of Saturday to Monday, and saved one days disruption to internation commerce and transport.

James 1077
1st May 2009, 18:53
It is however a shame that the UK cannot at least attempt to take the same days as the rest of Europe when it's perfectly possible to do so. This weekend, for example, today is the Mayday holiday in almost every European country, but the UK has moved to Monday! With a little forethought the UK could have had it's long weekend Friday to Sunday, instead of Saturday to Monday, and saved one days disruption to internation commerce and transport.

Surely it should be Europe seeing that the UK takes its on the Monday and so also following suit? :}

tony draper
1st May 2009, 19:07
Tad supprised those arseols in Brussels haven't obliged us to do so or that our sheeplike government hasn't volunteered it.
:)

Ken Wells
1st May 2009, 19:56
Tad supprised those arseols in Brussels haven't obliged us to do so or that our sheeplike government hasn't volunteered it.


I object;

Sheep are far more intelligent than this UK ( or should that be Scottish) Government!!!:ok:

http://i595.photobucket.com/albums/tt35/cptkenwells/0423lazy-sheep.jpg

StaceyF
1st May 2009, 20:10
British bank holidays are Public Holidays and have been recognized since 1871.The name Bank Holiday comes from the time when banks were shut and so no trading could take place. Now they shut for good!

The 1871 Act designated four holidays in England, Wales and Ireland (then wholly part of the UK), and five in Scotland.

There are currently a total of 8 permanent bank and public holidays in England, Wales and 9 in Scotland and 10 in Northern Ireland. These include Christmas Day and Good Friday, which in England, Wales and Northern Ireland are common law' holidays (they are not specified by law as bank holidays but have become customary holidays because of common observance).

France has 15, Germany 19 ( although 6 are regional ) Holland 12, even Lithuania has 15.

Zimbabwe has 13 surpisingly enough though no, (I've just ripped my country off again and bought another Merc for my 10th wife day)
But dear old England makes do with just 8.

No day to celebrate St George, Arimistace Day. VE day etc.

Maybe Gordon should institute "U TURN day" but that would be one a week at the current rate.:=

Brits take enough time off via "sickness" to nullify any claim for extra days off.

Just view the EU stats.

Ken Wells
1st May 2009, 20:46
Woa did someone miss the point!

BOFH
2nd May 2009, 00:27
ATNotts

Rather than declaring the holiday on the nearest convenient Monday, most holidays in Germany and France actually mean something - and take place on a particular date. if that date happens to be a weekend day, hard cheese.

Quite. There are few things that suck harder than the 24th of December falling on a Thursday ( a half-day), then everything being closed until Monday the 28th. How charmingly mediaeval. It's akin to being stoned for whistling on a Wednesday.

It is however a shame that the UK cannot at least attempt to take the same days as the rest of Europe when it's perfectly possible to do so

What we do is none of their business. The first of May is a great day to celebrate socialism, and the millions of lives snuffed out in its pursuit. The best way to do this is to go to work and make some money.

BOFH

wiggy
2nd May 2009, 01:13
ATNotts is right, certainly the French have more public holidays than the UK but what the likes of the Daily Mail and other Europhobic press never point out is that in France (gasp!!) if said holiday falls on a weekend then toughs***.

My kids are well chuffed because they got yesterday off School ( Mayday) and they get next Friday off ( VE day - quite right too, interestingly a day the English don't bother celebrating :mad: let alone Trafalgar Day...but I digress... ).

They were however somewhat unchuffed when "Papa" pointed out to them that next year both these special days fall on a Saturday and that unlike the bone idle English they will have no long weekends off in May next year.....


Next in our series in Franglais:"faire le pont" :} :} "

419
2nd May 2009, 10:32
Whilst French workers may not get as many official days off as UK workers, I wonder what the figure would be once you've added the time off due to industrial action.

BOFH
2nd May 2009, 12:30
I think that Godwin's Law should be modified so that a reference to the Daily Mail is included. :)

As a student in NRW it was pointed out to me that we had the benefit of all the catholic and protestant holidays. I think that BW had the same deal. In later life, I found myself in the position of being unable to contact Munich because they were off on a jolly - and vice versa when Hessen had a day off.

What a hateful, bland and vanilla world it would be to all have the same holidays. Just look at the some of the endearing holidays the Japanese have:
Respect for the aged
Marine Day
Children's Day

Moreover, if the holidays are two days apart, they also take the one in the middle. How very civilised.

In my opinion, that VE day isn't celebrated in Britain is a very good thing. Firstly, it's hubris. Secondly, it appears that a number of people are oblivious to the fact that the war was continuing to be fought in earnest - and at an appalling expense of life - on the other side of the world. WWII did not end on May the eighth.

BOFH

wiggy
2nd May 2009, 14:51
BOFH

"In my opinion, that VE day isn't celebrated in Britain is a very good thing. Firstly, it's hubris. Secondly, it appears that a number of people are oblivious to the fact that the war was continuing to be fought in earnest - and at an appalling expense of life - on the other side of the world. WWII did not end on May the eighth."



Thanks for the history lesson.....

You're right, World War Two didn't end May 8th, I've always been taught it effectively ended mid August / early Sept depending on which of a whole host of definitions you use (effective end of Japanese hostilities or formal surrender of Japanese Forces). Nevertheless, wether you recognise it's value or not, hubris or not, the French continue to recognise VE Day, 8th May, with a National holiday.

ChristiaanJ
2nd May 2009, 15:25
.... the French continue to recognise VE Day, 8th May, with a National holiday.It's really a matter of choice, no?
The Dutch national holiday is May 5th, the day the Germans occupying the Netherlands surrendered.

CJ

ChristiaanJ
2nd May 2009, 15:58
Re holidays, the situation in France is even more shambolic than suggested....

As said, there are May 1st and May 8th, wich, being fixed dates, 'wander' through the week. Great when they fall on a Wednesday, so two days leave will give you a five-day long weekend.

But then there's also 'Ascension' which also wanders around, because it's the 40th day after Easter.
It's always a Thursday and nearly always in May (although it can be very early May or, very rarely, early June). Another occasion for a long weekend.

That by itself would be enough to cause problems with productivity, planning, staff availability, etc.

What makes May such a nightmare (and I speak from experience), is that leave is normally allotted annually, and you have to 'use up' your allocation by May 31st. What happens frequently is that many people have more days of leave than they can afford to go on holiday. Hence many people end up in May with several days still 'unused' leave. Rather than let them 'go to waste', they'll take those days off, even if only to re-paint the kitchen.

So, in a 'good' year, at any given time in May you may find yourself with half the personnel on leave.....

And of course this is all totally uncoordinated. So the chap you need to get some urgent data from turns out to have left on ten days leave... And your trusted subcontractor has suddenly decided to close down for the entire Ascension week

Ah, the merry month of May in France....

CJ

BOFH
3rd May 2009, 09:00
wiggy

Thanks for the history lesson.....

I'm sorry. I was not trying to upbraid you. The point that I wished to make was merely that May the eighth wasn't the end of WWII, and has ChristiaanJ helpfully pointed out, it wasn't so much a victory for the occupied territories as a liberation.

It is a little aggravating, though, that many nations in Europe consider that the conflict ceased when the Tausend-Jahre Reich ended, only 987 years short. I admit a certain amount of emotional attachment to this point, as my grandfather had to assist the Japanese Emperor's railway construction project for a further four months after the champagne started flowing over here. My other grandfather was being shot at. In a bloody jungle - with all sorts of creepy-crawlies.

Compared to our cousins fighting tooth and nail in the islands, they had it easy. To their credit, the cousins prosecuted the war with immense vigour, and accomplished their aim with a bang (let's make that two bangs.)

BOFH

MadsDad
3rd May 2009, 09:10
Wiggy, re the English not celebrating Trafalgar Day, that depends where you are.

Couple of (ex Dark Blue) mates of mine usually get through a bottle of Pussers in the local hostelry on Trafalgar Day. An afternoon of pints with large chasers usually has a deleterious effect on their equilibrium (last time they appeared to be standing on a very small boat in a very severe storm by the end of the afternoon).

L'aviateur
3rd May 2009, 09:30
I'm in Germany at the moment and we had the Mayday holiday on Friday. So I thought great, I'll go wander into town and do some shopping, WRONG. Everything is closed, as it is every Sunday.
Having had the luxury of holidays in the UK not actually meaning a holiday for everyone in the UK, I was surprised I can't even goto a supermarket here.

Lon More
3rd May 2009, 09:44
Brits out of step with the rest of the world as usual.:rolleyes:

Disgusted of Basingstoke will be writing to the Daily Snail again to complain that his attempts to bring equality throughout Europe have been foiled again as his petition for all European taxis to carry a bale of straw for the horse has received "nul points"

BTW everybody else seems to hve agreed onMexiczn flu or novel Flu. Only in the UK does it seem to have remained Swine flu. Is this because the gutter press find it easier to make up stupid headlines?

sisemen
3rd May 2009, 14:17
In Oz we get 9 national public holidays:

New Year's Day
Australia Day
Good Friday
Easter Sunday
Easter Monday
ANZAC Day
Queen's Birthday
Boxing Day

Although with Easter Sunday and Monday included in the list I suppose that it should be 7 days off work.

Except that the Queen's Birthday is not celebrated in WA along with the rest of Australia on 8 June because we have our State's Foundation Day on 1 June so it is shifted to 28 September. And the ANZAC Day public holiday is shifted to the Monday if ANZAC Day falls on a weekend. The rest of Australia doesn't shift it. All the States have a Labour Day but it is celebrated on different days by different States. Tasmania has something called Eight Hours Day on 9 March but that's probably celebrating the hours of daylight or somesuch - oh, and King Island Day and Devonport Cup Day and Royal Hobart Regetta Day and Launceston Cup Day and, and, and.

I hope that makes things clear.

I might move to Tasmania. They also have a Recreation Day public holiday (but that is Northern Tasmania only!). It would also mean that I don't have to clean my teeth and I can date my sister. :ok:

Bern Oulli
3rd May 2009, 20:59
It is worthy of note that Guernsey has a public holiday on 9th May (Liberation Day).

Ken Wells
3rd May 2009, 21:02
It seems one of those sad historic facts that Britian seemed to abandon the CI after invaded by a handfull of Krauts

A View of the River
4th May 2009, 02:28
Here in Manitoba, Canada, no business with over 4 employees may open until after 1.00pm on November 11th.

We still get a day off for the Queens Birthday, that's Queen Victoria naturally. :D

ATNotts
4th May 2009, 12:11
Coming back on my earlier comment, it matters not whether the UK had taken the Mayday holiday (and that's what the media call it) on Friday 1st May, or Monday 4th May - just that from a business perspective, it would be better if we in Europe (which is the area in which the UK does most of it's trade) were all off together. Again, we can celebrate / commemorate whatever we want on 1st May - whether it's dancing round a pole in silly costumes with bells on, or smashing windows of banks and attacking the police in the name of socialism.

The next cock-up is the Whitsun bank holiday, which the UK doesn't take at Whitsun. Most of the rest of Europe does, but we take that last Monday in May.

If you look at a calendar of European holidays in May, which is the worst month, it's the case that British business loses 2 working days on which trade could be done, simply because we don't harmonise our holidays - that's 10% on the working month, and the CBI would be sreaming blue murder if the governemnt suggested giving us two more bank holidays!!

radeng
4th May 2009, 14:05
Ken Wells,

The CI were abandoned to the Nazis because, according to what I've read, it was considered that defending them would have endangered the civilian population to an enormous extent.

A Guernseyman I knew - he's dead now - got his first car by stealing it from the Germans. One unit moved out and when the next moved in, 'they admired my fine haystack'. Jack also stole about 1000 gallons of German petrol - again, with unit change overs and the end of the Occupation. (his place had several large underground water storage tanks) He also spent time in prison for having a radio: being the only plumber on the island, he 'collaborated', did a plumbing job and went back to jail with the parts for a crystal set hidden in his trousers. With the help of the Guernsey gaoler, he lifted flagstones, laid an aerial in the sewers and relayed the news from London via the gaoler.