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Matari
29th Apr 2009, 16:44
Here is a link to a flash animation of the International Space Station (ISS) coming together.

Amazing to think that for all its flaws and setbacks, it has been just over 10 years since the first modules were joined. An amazing triumph of the human spirit.

Space Station Assembly (http://i.usatoday.net/tech/graphics/iss_timeline/flash.htm)

Jimmy Macintosh
29th Apr 2009, 16:48
That's actually pretty cool I didn't realise how much had been added to it since I last saw an image of it.

The only minor problem I have is the stupid scale at the end in the bottom right hand* corner. What's the point of comparing it to the size of a 767 if they are at different scales?

*correction, left hand side :\

dead_pan
29th Apr 2009, 17:31
Very impressive - but does anyone here know what its really for? (don't give me any of that guff about microgravity research helping develop new drugs etc).

The answer? It serves precisely the same function as ISTC (http://www.istc.ru) in Moscow (which is?...)

OFSO
29th Apr 2009, 17:32
I notice they don't mention that from next year, the Space Shuttle reaches the end of its life, and the only way from 2010 on for Americans, Europeans, Japanese - yes, and Russians - to get to the ISS (space station) and back will be sitting on the front end of a Russian launch vehicle.

Optimistically a new US transport system will be ready in 2015, more likely up to five years after that at Bush levels of funding.

overfly
29th Apr 2009, 18:03
no scale in the bottom R corner when I view it, and the pictorial comparison with 767 at lower left looks about right, am I missing something?

Matari
29th Apr 2009, 18:42
OFSO:


I notice they don't mention that from next year, the Space Shuttle reaches the end of its life, and the only way from 2010 on for Americans, Europeans, Japanese - yes, and Russians - to get to the ISS (space station) and back will be sitting on the front end of a Russian launch vehicle.

Yes, they did mention it. Follow the timeline on the right-hand side down to the bottom, where they mention supply vehicles.


Optimistically a new US transport system will be ready in 2015, more likely up to five years after that at Bush levels of funding.


Er, it is Obama's show now. If he wants to increase funding to expedite the new launch vehicle, he has a Democrat-controlled Congress to give him whatever he wants.


And he can also name a new NASA administrator, one of the many, still-unfilled positions within Obama's administration. The many critical "next step" decisions are being hampered by Obama's, well, indecision:Yet the apparent indecision from Obama, which if nothing else suggests to NASA employees that they rate lower on the President's priorities than choosing a dog (http://features.csmonitor.com/politics/2009/04/20/vigilant-press-spots-bo-the-first-dog-out-for-a-walk/), is now causing some significant programmatic problems.

SciGuy: The lack of a NASA administrator now causing real harm (http://blogs.chron.com/sciguy/archives/2009/04/post_77.html)

G-CPTN
29th Apr 2009, 19:55
So, as we can 'see' the ISS as it traverses (at certain times of 'day' - actually twilight) would we be able to see an airliner at the same altitude?
Using my 40x binos I have been able to distinguish 'shape' (rather than just a spot of light).

(I was disappointed when first using an astronomical telescope that no matter what magnification I tried, the stars still remained as mere spots.) :ugh:

Rollingthunder
29th Apr 2009, 20:00
I think the retirement date of the shuttle is set arbitrarily. They could keep it operational until a new vehicle is ready.

Thinks: Overhauling a Morris Minor or a Northstar.

BladePilot
29th Apr 2009, 20:13
Jeez that's gonna make one big splash when it comes down:eek:

now where did I put that old SpaceLab crash helmet?

Jimmy Macintosh
29th Apr 2009, 22:58
Overfly,

The dimension on the 767 states 180', the ISS states 194' and is clearly smaller. Not a particularly good visual representation.

You are correct though it is on the bottom left hand side.

tony draper
29th Apr 2009, 23:13
I was under the impression that the Shuttle itself was originally only meant to be a stopgap vehicle until the real re usable craft cam along.
I posted a article here a while back that more or less said that nobody is sure what to do with the ISS now and that America was trying to disengage itself from the whole project and there was even talk of sending it to the Moon.
:uhoh:

GroundedSLF
30th Apr 2009, 08:09
It still looks a bit like a lego toy put together by a 3 year old.

frostbite
30th Apr 2009, 12:17
It would make a good pris, er, detention facility for those on a life sentence.

tony draper
30th Apr 2009, 12:21
yer,with a outside exercise yard. :rolleyes:

er340790
30th Apr 2009, 13:42
Well done the Russkies!

Just keep your filthy :mad: hands off our Arctic!

Mr Grimsdale
30th Apr 2009, 15:09
...any Danes or Norwegians care to comment on the above?

Rollingthunder
30th Apr 2009, 15:18
Right, that's it, we're taking over Greenland.



and the Alaska panhandle

blue up
30th Apr 2009, 19:45
10 years old, eh? At least it is now safe from Gary Glitter!

notmyC150v2
30th Apr 2009, 23:18
I heard that Michael Jackson is going into space. Now I know why :}:}:}

11Fan
1st May 2009, 03:29
Is there somewhere that is taking donations to fund his trip.