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View Full Version : MPs refuse to clock-on...


airship
27th Apr 2009, 15:22
Apparently they don't like the idea of having to clock-on (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/8020332.stm) in order to claim a simplified 'daily-allowance' for attending the House in lieu of the current exorbitant and corruption-prone MPs' expenses allowances...?! :rolleyes:

(Having already subjected ordinary citizens to such devices for decades)

Oh Yea, oh yea, oh yea, long may we continue to have "a set of rules for the great-unwashed", another for the select few...?! Long live the Queen! Long live democracy! :}

frostbite
27th Apr 2009, 15:28
Probably has too many associations with actually doing a job for them.

Captain Stable
27th Apr 2009, 15:29
I'm getting to the stage where I just want to tell them "You'll fcuking well do as you're told - you're our servants - we are not yours!" and to back up that order with a few brigades of revolutionary guards...

airship
27th Apr 2009, 15:45
"Fix bayonets" anyone? I wonder if we could get Queenie II on our side, and / or the Grenadier guards...?! :uhoh:

OFSO
27th Apr 2009, 15:48
I loved the clip shown on Friday night and Saturday night of HIGNFY when an MP, justifying the allowance for his second home 30 some miles from the House of Commons, said "but you don't understand, we must live nearby - when a conmmittee meeting starts, we have to be there right on time..." and he was interrupted by the interviewer saying "oh, it's just like a proper job, then...."

Storminnorm
27th Apr 2009, 16:03
I have long held the view that our esteemed Public Servants should
only be paid the National Average wage plus a token percentage in
order to offset MINOR expenses.(Say between 5% to 10% of Salary)
Any travel should be offset from the public purse to whatever sum
is required as shown by the production of a receipt for the ticket.
Any requirement to stay in the Capital should be similarly repaid
on production of a similar receipt from wherever they stay, but must
be of a reasonable ammount. Eg, NOT living it up in the Ritz!
The problem is that the B*st*rds have had it so good for so long
that it will need a minor revolution in order to change anything.
So they'll just carry on grabbing. It's Human Nature.

hellsbrink
27th Apr 2009, 16:50
I loved the clip shown on Friday night and Saturday night of HIGNFY when an MP, justifying the allowance for his second home 30 some miles from the House of Commons, said "but you don't understand, we must live nearby - when a conmmittee meeting starts, we have to be there right on time..." and he was interrupted by the interviewer saying "oh, it's just like a proper job, then...."

Yup, now who was that herbert who got Dimbleby'd on Question Time... Ahh, Eric Pickles.

At least it's better than the Labour bod who claimed he lived with his parents when his real house was only a couple of miles away....

capewrath
27th Apr 2009, 16:58
Next time anyone goes for a job interview try saying you are happy with the salary offered, but you'll want extra money for turning up.

Answer: Is that right - there's the door. 2nd word is OFF!

Paradise Lost
27th Apr 2009, 19:15
The main problem is that we are hopelessly over represented in the H of C, by hordes of Scots and far too many constituencies in the rest of the country. If we cut the numbers of the freeloading, immoral, dishonest, lazy sods by half, there'd still be far too many of them.
Some of them must have started out with some moral integrity, but like rotten apples, they all seem to become infected with the same complete disregard for their "clients", and delusions about being unaccountable, and even above the law.
There is a good reason to pay them a decent salary; to lessen the temptation of bribery. Unfortunately the current incumbents appear to have a very low threshold!
Like errant infants, they will have to have the EXACT rules laid out for what expenses (fully receipted), they may claim.
Employing one's extended family, in any paid capacity should be expressly forbidden, for obvious reasons.
Since the idle MP's only sit for about 140 days a year, those who can't commute could easily live in the Ritz, for less than they are fiddling now on fraudulent second home allowances!

Gertrude the Wombat
27th Apr 2009, 20:04
My MP, after doing a full day's work in London:

(1) Gets the train home. On the train he will be working, unless he's talking to constituents. (He travels second class.)

(2) Gets the bus to whichever meeting he as to attend that evening. On the bus he's probably talking to constituents.

(3) Attends whichever meeting has come to the top of his list that evening (a typical MP will be invited to several things every evening).

(4) Gets the bus home, which again counts as working as he's talking to constituents.

(5) Does more paperwork before going to bed.

(And of course he claims 0p second home allowance, living only 60 miles from London.)

You want a time clock on the bus, then, and in every school hall, so that he can clock in and out, not to mention when he works on the piles of paperwork I've seen on his dining table?

G-CPTN
27th Apr 2009, 20:55
In 1988 (after being out of work for ten months) I was offered a job. It was a good job (export sales manager). At first it was agreed that I could work from home in Somerset, but 'fellow directors' (of the MD who had offered me the job) felt that I should be within the London Airport triangle (Heathrow, Gatwick - yes, I know that that is only two).

I house-hunted, but the prices were such that anything equivalent (or even acceptable for a family of four) would have meant a tripling of my mortgage. The MD really really bent over backwards (his words "What can I do to get you to come and work for me?") but such were the rules for mortgages that he would have had to pay me three-times the salary offered (which was generous anyway).

We parted as good friends and I bumped into him at various trade exhibitions (which is where I had met him) and we remained on good terms with each other.

1DC
27th Apr 2009, 21:53
One of our local mp's says she ain't voting on the robber gordons new deal cos her wages are her business and private.Apart from campaigning locally to keep post offices open and then voting to close them in the House of commons, i'm not sure what else she has done in her time as a polly apart from putting a lot of weight on.. She is labour and a jock and i am prepared to put folding money on her being free to move back up north at the next election,assuming she gets reselected..

unstable load
28th Apr 2009, 06:39
Simple solution..

Issue them all high security ID cards (if they don't already have them) and make the lazy buggers swipe them at the door to get in for those important committee meetings they need to attend, then pay them per hour attended wherever they are supposed to be.

flyingfemme
28th Apr 2009, 07:59
The House of Commons is a high security area and I can't believe that MPs comings and goings are not carefully noted (and timed) already. How else do they know who is there that shouldn't be?

capewrath
28th Apr 2009, 09:35
Unstable load wrote:-
Simple solution..

Issue them all high security ID cards (if they don't already have them) and make the lazy buggers swipe them at the door to get in for those important committee meetings they need to attend, then pay them per hour attended wherever they are supposed to be.

Better than that - tag them.

hellsbrink
28th Apr 2009, 11:03
I say make them clock on, but not for any "extra" money. Make their salary depenedant on how often they are there doing their job. Don't turn up to things or turn up often enough, you don't get paid.

And NO extra expenses of any kind

Sprogget
28th Apr 2009, 11:09
Were I an MP and particularly a Labour MP, faced with imminent redundancy, I think I might be very tempted to get my snout as far in to the trough as I could manage before the inevitable comes round.

Then again, I'm not an MP. I'm just a small business owner battling to stay in the game, since my co. falls under the radar for any kind of support scheme this lot have announced.

MagnusP
28th Apr 2009, 11:23
I note the UK has managed to retain an opt-out to the European Working Time directive. Slave labour, anyone?

According to the UK Employment Minister:

The current economic climate makes it more important than ever that people continue to have the right to put more money in their pocket

Amply demonstrated by the greedy barstewards in Westminster, no?

Avitor
28th Apr 2009, 11:29
They thieve because they can.

hellsbrink
28th Apr 2009, 11:31
I note the UK has managed to retain an opt-out to the European Working Time directive. Slave labour, anyone?

The EWTD is confusing me. If the UK needs an opt-out so people can work overtime, then why doesn't Belgium need an opt out as you can work overtime here as well despite the EWTD?

Methinks it's another piece of misdirection here

MagnusP
28th Apr 2009, 12:39
At the moment, an individual can sign an opt-out thereby allowing working for more than 48 hours per week. The proposal was to phase that choice out over 3 years to make the 48 hours an enforceable maximum. That's what the UK has dodged. I don't know how far down the line Belgium has gone.

Home - Statute Law Database (http://www.statutelaw.gov.uk) has all the bits & pieces.

Mac the Knife
28th Apr 2009, 13:08
I could not dig: I dared not rob:
Therefore I lied to please the mob.
Now all my lies are proved untrue
And I must face the men I slew.
What tale shall serve me here among
Mine angry and defrauded young?

Rudyard Kipling, "A dead statesman", from Epitaphs of the War

GroundedSLF
28th Apr 2009, 14:49
They should just adopt the expenses policy of my company - wouldnt be able to fiddle anything - unless you submit a VAT reciept for fuel dated before the journey was undertaken - you dont get money back!

Hotels - limit of 120 within M25, 90 outside.

Food - Up to 5 breakfast, 15 dinner (only with reciept) - Cant claim for lunch, as you would usually buy that anyway.

Second home allowance - forget it, you knew where the job was based when you took it, pay your own way to get there.