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bnt
22nd Apr 2009, 07:28
N747PA was the second 747 ever made, the first to be delivered and flown commercially. After it was decommissioned, it was turned in to a restaurant in Suwon, South Korea. It has since been abandoned, so you now have the shell of a historic aircraft just sitting there on the street, slowly falling apart. There are some excellent photos of the current situation at the following site: Dark Roasted Blend: Abandoned Boeing 747 Restaurant (and Other Plane Conversions) (http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2009/04/abandoned-boeing-747-restaurant.html)

http://lh3.ggpht.com/_hVOW2U7K4-M/Se5a6_jh5pI/AAAAAAAA_d8/OezkvV9y1Qw/s800/yruktjfyhjndgbf.jpg

http://lh4.ggpht.com/_hVOW2U7K4-M/Se5au2pan7I/AAAAAAAA_Yo/f1XJE949hQU/s800/91.jpg

What a way to go ...

SpringHeeledJack
22nd Apr 2009, 08:37
I remember seeing this at Heathrow when I was a wee laddie, glimmering in white with the blue decals, the epitomy of international travel at the time. It is indeed a tragedy (from a romantic sense) that it sits rusting away in a bastardised state. It's 'soul', if aircraft have such a thing, has long since left the dessicated hulk in the photos.

I was seriously considering opening such a restaurant a few years back, but sobered up smartly when i researched just how quickly the novelty value disappears and the customers go elsewhere. Perhaps at an airport there might be a viable business opportunity to be had ?

As an aside wasn't this one of those early frames that Boeing bought back so they could strip it bare and see where there was corrosion etc and they found that most of the internal erosion was caused by the acidic march of leaking urine from the toilets ? :yuk:


Regards


SHJ

Blacksheep
22nd Apr 2009, 09:14
I've often wondered why would anyone want to go and dine in an old aeroplane fuselage?

The Fiji state aircraft was abandoned at Subang in KL. After several years the old B707 was moved down the road to Petaling Jaya and turned into a restaurant. Nobody came to eat, the restaurant went bust and the aircraft rotted away. That seems to always be the way with these schemes. The same seems to apply to old ships turned into nightclubs.

Rollingthunder
22nd Apr 2009, 09:17
Hope the QEII does better.

OFSO
22nd Apr 2009, 10:57
I've often wondered why would anyone want to go and dine in an old aeroplane fuselage?

About 30 years ago an old DC-3 was used in Darmstadt (D) as a restaurant. It was on a parking lot near the main railway station. I heard some time later that the guys who errected it had no knowledge of undergear downlocks and in something of a storm one night one side retracted and dropped the aircraft on the second-hand BMW's that were for sale and parked there.

I ate there a few times - the word used to go around "we're just popping up to Darmstadt International Airport for lunch" and off we'd go - but as several JB's commented, the novelty soon wore off. Mind you, the toilets were free to use......

Storminnorm
22nd Apr 2009, 11:07
Poor old 747. Just a very close formation of several million
potential beer-cans now, by the looks of it!!!

G-CPTN
22nd Apr 2009, 12:12
Interesting to see the 'corrosion' where the ribs are.
You can also see where the blue section has been repainted.
Is this just flaking of the paint (due to thermal flexing of the stucture?) or is it actually a chemical reaction (and if so, what causes it?)?

eliptic
22nd Apr 2009, 12:26
Jumbohostel (http://www.jumbohostel.com/DynPage.aspx)

http://www.jumbohostel.com/graphics/17966.jpg

Buster Hyman
22nd Apr 2009, 12:38
No, its actually Air Force One just after maintenance.

Mr Grimsdale
22nd Apr 2009, 12:56
No, its actually Air Force One just after maintenance.

After maintenance? Somebody better tell them they forgot to gaffer tape the engines back on!

pigboat
22nd Apr 2009, 13:21
You'd need a conveyor belt to get that sucker airborne.

airship
22nd Apr 2009, 13:29
Did the earliest jumbos have iron or steel frames in their fuselage? Because those streaks of corrosion are really reddish, not something you'd expect if they were aluminium surely...?! :confused:

bnt
22nd Apr 2009, 14:49
The plane was cut in to slices before shipping to Korea, so I suspect that its structural integrity was destroyed in the process, and they had to add a steel frame to hold it together at its new home. The rust is coming from the joins where it was sliced and reassembled, or from other parts where rusty water might pool, such as the windows.

lomapaseo
22nd Apr 2009, 15:50
That looks like the condition of some of the planes that United got stuck with when they took over the Pan Am transpacific routes

gingernut
22nd Apr 2009, 19:46
I once thought of opening a disco for dwarfs in G-AWPU.

V2-OMG!
22nd Apr 2009, 19:48
No, its actually Air Force One just after maintenance.
After maintenance? Somebody better tell them they forgot to gaffer tape the engines back on!

Maybe it takes after the executive-in-chief; flies with the aid of four teleprompters.

I remember seeing this at Heathrow when I was a wee laddie, glimmering in white with the blue decals, the epitomy of international travel at the time. It is indeed a tragedy (from a romantic sense) that it sits rusting away in a bastardised state. It's 'soul', if aircraft have such a thing, has long since left the dessicated hulk in the photos.

I was seriously considering opening such a restaurant a few years back, but sobered up smartly when i researched just how quickly the novelty value disappears and the customers go elsewhere. Perhaps at an airport there might be a viable business opportunity to be had ?

SpringHeeledJack, I love what you wrote about an aircraft's "soul."

Unfortunately, one of Trans-Canada's original Connies almost lost its soul when it was turned into a cocktail lounge at Pearson International.
It is in the process of being added to the collection at the Museum of Flight in Seattle.

Quite the story.
CF-TGE The Real Story (http://www.rbogash.com/connie_story.html)

SpringHeeledJack
22nd Apr 2009, 21:19
It just seems as if certain machinery, such as Steam locomotives, planes, various vehicles and ships, especially the more 'analogue' that they are, seem to have a character or energy about them that gives those close to them the feeling of it being somehow alive.

I saw this aircraft dwarf the other planes on the ground as it taxied past in Jan 1970 in the first week of service (?) and it's size was so impressive at the time. Travel by air had a glamour back then and perhaps they could never have imagined this cutting edge mode of travel ending up as it has in the photos of the original poster :(


Regards


SHJ

notmyC150v2
22nd Apr 2009, 22:09
Wonder how long the novelty on this will last???
http://i164.photobucket.com/albums/u6/notmyc150v2/727HotelRoom.jpg

V2-OMG!
23rd Apr 2009, 01:24
....until the next big quake?

henry crun
23rd Apr 2009, 04:52
This one has been used as a cafe for a good many years.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v712/crun9/Mangaweka.jpg

Buster Hyman
23rd Apr 2009, 08:05
Wonder how long the novelty on this will last???

Until it's due for a C check?

Oh, now I get it...biscuit bomber...gotcha!:ok:

bcgallacher
23rd Apr 2009, 08:19
I spent a very nice year with this aircraft in Argentina with a new company - went bust - AEROPOSTA .Must have been about 1994 and it was in good shape. I believe this was the aircraft that flew through the approach lights in Oakland? It had been through the CRAF programme and had a lot of money spent on it.

mafibacon
23rd Apr 2009, 11:05
Bllacksheep -
Are you sure it was a fiji 707?
I was in Brunei at the time with RBA (1974) and seem to recall the aircraft grounded was a Sabah 707 that was to have a sauna fitted. The idea was rejected by the UK CAA (who were on contract to the Malaysian Govt) and they refused to certify it due to probable corrosion problems,so they let rot by the owner (Sabah PM?).
I think he had another 707 which was a pretty much standard version.
If my memory serves me right it was one of the few, if not the only, 707 to have both front and rear airstairs.
However it was a long time ago and "old age and infirmity don't come alone"
Cheers
MB

Rollingthunder
23rd Apr 2009, 11:23
http://s290.photobucket.com/albums/ll260/StudeSteve/Classic%20Aircraft/Propliners%20and%20Skytrucks/K9058530E_1000039.jpg

airship
23rd Apr 2009, 13:51
The plane was cut in to slices before shipping to Korea, so I suspect that its structural integrity was destroyed in the process, and they had to add a steel frame to hold it together at its new home. The rust is coming from the joins where it was sliced and reassembled, or from other parts where rusty water might pool, such as the windows. So let me get this straight. Just in case we lose both Boeing and Airbus in the 2009-11 great depression, will that mean that post-2012 entrepreneurs won't be able to simply refit the latest RR or GE (if they also still exist at that time) engines and put N747PA (amongst others) back into service...?! :{

And what about all the Concordes in today's musuems. Someone promise me that they'll all fly again one day...?! :{

Rollingthunder
23rd Apr 2009, 14:00
all the Concordes in today's musuems. Someone promise me that they'll all fly again one day

Sorry, not until I present the Hyper-Drive and anti-grav mechanism (s).

I'm working on it.

Storminnorm
23rd Apr 2009, 14:14
My mate developed an anti-gravity drive unit that really worked.
All they found was a large hole in the garage roof.
Told him to chain it down!! Some people NEVER listen!!!! :sad:

Standby Scum
12th Dec 2010, 14:19
Historic 747 reaches a grim destination - latimes.com (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fgw-korea-plane-20101213,0,7814977.story)

stuckgear
12th Dec 2010, 14:36
So let me get this straight. Just in case we lose both Boeing and Airbus in the 2009-11 great depression, will that mean that post-2012 entrepreneurs won't be able to simply refit the latest RR or GE (if they also still exist at that time) engines and put N747PA (amongst others) back into service...?! http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/boohoo.gif


'maybe' in some jurisdictions it'll just need a sign off for a CofA to be issued :hmm:

And what about all the Concordes in today's musuems. Someone promise me that they'll all fly again one day...?! http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/boohoo.gif

negative. The type certificate was canceled, so the aircraft will never be able to fly except in an 'experimental' capacity. once the TC is terminated it will require compete re-certification, and under the costs associated with that its not economically viable.

Though of course with prior TC holder, aerospatiale now EADS being a principle player in the EU and under EASA, stranger things have happened, however, the liability issue of skipping the certification process would be, well....

lomapaseo
12th Dec 2010, 15:53
Enough of the sentimentality. If you're not going to keep it looking like an aeroplane then turn it into beer cans. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gif Enough of the sentimentality. If you're not going to keep it looking like an aeroplane then turn it into beer cans. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gif 12th Dec 2010 10:36Enough of the sentimentality. If you're not going to keep it looking like an aeroplane then turn it into beer cans. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gif 12th Dec 2010 10:36Enough of the sentimentality. If you're not going to keep it looking like an aeroplane then turn it into beer cans. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gif
http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/statusicon/user_online.gif http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/buttons/report.gif (http://www.pprune.org/report.php?p=6117772) Enough of the sentimentality. If you're not going to keep it looking like an aeroplane then turn it into beer cans. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/cwm13.gif
http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/statusicon/user_online.gif http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/buttons/report.gif (http://www.pprune.org/report.php?p=6117772)

I'll drink to that:ok:

acbus1
12th Dec 2010, 17:07
Haven't read all previous posts - has anyone thought of sticking it on eBay?

'Just a few scuffs, works perfectly, delivery mileage only, buyer collects, starting bid 99p, no returns, good luck.'

smo-kin-hole
12th Dec 2010, 22:55
Check out the "Solo" restaurant at Colorado Springs, CO with a KC-97 half into the restaurant. The cockpit is largely intact. Some of the booths have mannequins in full Military flight gear and they have a WW1 flight sim with two joystick chairs and a big screen.

I had the exuberant experience of shooting down my FO twice. Made my whole day.:cool:

Flap 5
13th Dec 2010, 07:04
Hope the QEII does better.

Yes the Queen Elizabeth ended up as a casino in Hong Kong and caught fire there and was burnt out.

At least the Queen Mary has been well looked after at Long Beach, California.

alisoncc
13th Dec 2010, 09:55
Pan Am brought their very first 747 to Heathrow in July'ish 1969 (I think), and self and colleagues from RCA Aviation at Sunbury on Thames were shown around it, along with others of course. Was dead impressive then. Lots of RCA kit, including the then new AVQ30 Weather Radar. Seems like a long time ago. Wonder if it was the same one portrayed earlier.

Blacksheep
13th Dec 2010, 12:59
Are you sure it was a fiji 707?
I was in Brunei at the time with RBA (1974) and seem to recall the aircraft grounded was a Sabah 707 that was to have a sauna fitted. I was at MAS at Subang in 1980 and the B707 that became a restaurant as parked outside the airside staff canteen. It was in Fiji State livery at that time, allegedly under lien for unpaid debt. Some local entrepreneurs bought it and moved it to PJ as a restaurant but it eventually rotted just like the 747 in the topic title.

RAFEmployee
13th Dec 2010, 17:47
http://eyerex.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/nokia-n73-croydon-airport-plane.jpg

bnt
13th Dec 2010, 20:52
Haven't read all previous posts - has anyone thought of sticking it on eBay?
Put what on eBay? It's just been shredded. It was definitely structurally unsound - you can see the steel that was used to keep it together in the pics on the LA Times site linked above.

It wasn't the first time this particular plane got a little scuffed. It took out the approach lights on takeoff from SFO in 1971 - story here (http://www.airlinercafe.com/page.php?id=77). :ooh:

Groundloop
14th Dec 2010, 09:32
Yes the Queen Elizabeth ended up as a casino in Hong Kong and caught fire there and was burnt out.

The Queen Elizabeth was not a casino - it was being fitted out as a floating university - it even carried the name Seawise University when it burnt out.

winglit
14th Dec 2010, 11:49
What's on the menu in this restaurant?

Jumbo sausage and chips?
A plane omelette?
Wings and ribs?
Gyros?
Lobster thermocouple?

If it's in Korea, maybe Chow mainwheel?