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Grabbers
20th Apr 2009, 12:39
As you may be able to guess from the title I am suffering from the above complaint. Now normally, I am quite keen to live and let live but since two of the little gits fell down and smashed some very old glass in a window, I don't want them doing it again. Also, the amount of sticks and crap, literally, I come downstairs to find is becoming a bind. How can a chap permanently get rid of them?

Yours in hope of a lack of chess based replies :O

mustpost
20th Apr 2009, 12:46
Big fire - roast rook, friend of mine just did it:E
Also smashed up a bit of his living room...

Gainesy
20th Apr 2009, 12:48
Get chimney swept, ask sweep where you can get a grill fitted to keep em out. He might even source & fit it, many do.

Grabbers
20th Apr 2009, 12:51
Thanks. Toyed with the idea of the fire. Will do it with the kids - should keep 'em entertained. Also, yelling up the chimney "I did this F**KING yesterday" doesn't help.

Avitor
20th Apr 2009, 12:53
Get a cowl.

OFSO
20th Apr 2009, 13:08
Avitor said: Get a cowl.

Actually I had an OWL, several in fact. They hiss all night. It was illegal to stop up their access holes (protected species) so one dark night.......

Never let morality stop you doing what is right.

CLdave
20th Apr 2009, 13:16
I had the same problem once many moons ago, and I solved it by positioning a radio in the chimney flue and leaving it on for a couple of days. Not sure if the choice of music played any part, but I am sure there are plenty of radio stations that qualify as bird-scarers !

Dave.

tony draper
20th Apr 2009, 14:05
Surely some chicken wire would do the trick,flat piece across the top of the chimney pot secured with large cable wraps(the kind old bill uses for handcuffs,to prevent the critters tumbling down the hole then a bit shaped into a cone sticking up from said pot deter any nest building activity, again secured to the chimney pot with wraps it aint rocket science.:rolleyes:
.

frostbite
20th Apr 2009, 14:45
Just maybe...... if you leave a joss stick burning in the grate the smell will put them off.

On the other hand, they might like it.

Grabbers
20th Apr 2009, 15:13
With the exception of Tony Draper thank you to all of your helpful suggestions.

Tony,

Typical Geordie response. Foof.

N707ZS
20th Apr 2009, 15:40
You could always recycle them. The green alternative.
Rook Pie | A perfect Scottish recipe for rook pie (http://www.scottish-recipes.com/rook-pie.html)

Tolsti
20th Apr 2009, 15:51
Network Rail use plastic owls (bigguns) on their trackside electricity substations to stop birds landing on their insulators etc. Pop one on your roof and I reckon you'll be OK.

Der absolute Hammer
20th Apr 2009, 15:58
Ya really need all them guns..hmm?

airship
20th Apr 2009, 16:57
With the exception of Tony Draper thank you to all of your helpful suggestions. I beg to differ, what Tony D suggested was: Surely some chicken wire would do the trick,flat piece across the top of the chimney pot secured with large cable wraps(the kind old bill uses for handcuffs,to prevent the critters tumbling down the hole then a bit shaped into a cone sticking up from said pot deter any nest building activity, again secured to the chimney pot with wraps it aint rocket science. A quite balanced and even constructive reply, there being no proof that these were even European (or worse, rooks of French origin)... :ok:

I must admit I do prefer the gentle cooing of ordinary pigeons, compared to other birds though. However, I would still find it quite acceptable should 'the originator of the thread' one evening on returning home suddenly find himself confronted with deadly razor-thin spikes that reached upto and into his shoulders as he 'inserted his Yale key' upon returning home.

If you don't know what the **** I'm on about, then do some research, punk...?!

PS. Sorry about being so offensive, but my shop-owner neighbour on the ground floor has recently threatened to take me to court over my feeding the pigeons / other birds (with or without mangled feet). He wants a war, and maybe you want one too. But don't push it or I'll give you a war you won't believe. Let it go...?! You started it, you came looking for me. Now, I'm gonna be looking for you. I mean, just who the **** do you think you are? Complaining about rooks making their nests where they do? You're fortunate enough to own a house with a chimney and you're complaining about some birds? Were you simply born without any empathy at all for (what you obviously consider lesser) creatures? Well, join the club, I ain't got no empathy for you neither, you sicko (http://www.michaelmoore.com/sicko/health-care-proposal/) (the NHS will cover all necessary treatment won't they)...?! ;):confused:

Grabbers
20th Apr 2009, 17:05
And it was going so well too. :(

mustpost
20th Apr 2009, 17:12
well done And it was going so well too:D

Lon More
20th Apr 2009, 17:36
The sun must have been over Airship's yardarm early this morning:hmm:

airship
20th Apr 2009, 17:40
And it was going so well too. Just what was 'going so well (for you) too...?: :rolleyes:

You started a thread where you describe your annoyance of a couple of rooks. Did you use this opportunity to express any joy that wild creatures share your domain? No. Your complaint, if formally made to a local municipal council might one day result in rooks, pigeons and any / all other 'wildlife' (including errant or stray cats) also being considered as mere pests, the equivalent of plague-carrying rats, and henceforth subject to special local laws enacted by intellectually-delinquent mayors.

As someone else previously suggested, why not simply light a fire in the chimney, burn-off the offenders (or at least their offspring) to a crisp and 'have done with', instead of subjecting other PPRuNers with a soft-spot for animals such as myself to yet another superfluous debate about rights and wrongs? What's your problem mate?

Checkboard
20th Apr 2009, 17:40
Under UK law:

Can birds' nests be removed

As a rule, no. Most birds are fully protected and you must allow the young to leave the nest before taking any action to block the entrance holes.

Some birds' nests can be removed, but only if they are causing a threat to health and safety. The nests of feral pigeons can be legally removed anywhere in the UK, and house sparrows and starlings in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. If possible, please allow them to remain until the breeding cycle is complete.

The RSPB: Advice: Can birds' nests be removed? (http://www.rspb.org.uk/advice/law/whatsintheroof/removal.asp)

tony draper
20th Apr 2009, 18:10
Hmmm,one thunk one's suggestion was quite a reasonable simple engineering solution to a rook problem,yer chicken wire is a very versatile cove,one used to have a device called a rook gun,over and under, .410 barrel over a .22 rimfire.alas one has it no more, but then those were much more violent times.
:)

Grabbers
20th Apr 2009, 18:41
Airship

You've hit the nail on the head. I do quite fancy a war. Grabbersland against the Rook invasion and the axis of insanity (ring any bells?). As it happens I do consider myself superior to rooks. Would you like to know why? It is because they are rooks. How many rooks reside in a cottage with two chimneys, real beds, electricity and all the trappings of superior beings? None, and do you know why? It is because they are rooks. How many of them are tapping away on an internet forum saying 'what do we do about the nasty human playing Radio 1 underneath our house?' None, I'll wager. And why is that? It is because they are rooks. I could call it the War Against Rooks. WAR - quite a snappy acronym eh?

Anyway, I'm off to incinerate all the little baby rooks as they sleep. And don't get me started on the fieldmouse in my pantry. That little f***ers head is coming clean off when I catch it. :ok:

Moira
20th Apr 2009, 19:00
One does wonder though which would be the superior flyer, the rook or the warlord? :E

Rightbase
20th Apr 2009, 20:01
unless you are very sure the chimney is clear. My son tried that in our lounge - one nil to the rooks.

The most satisfying solution was a set of drain rods up the chimney (no fire needed in spring and summer). Such was the success of this technique that on hearing a croak down the chimney the whole family would stop me using the rods until they were all half way up the garden to witness the impressive effect on the startled bird. The delight of the family, and the refusal of any of them to trade places with me, meant I never saw it for myself. But I heard it - and it was good.

Rooks are intelligent birds with highly developed communication skills. The enraged calls to the rest of the squadron, the subsequent display of aerial aggression by a dozen or so of their number, and the hasty retreat of the family back indoors were the icing on the cake for me.

The chimney sweep removed a large canvas waste-bucket full of twigs and branches when he cleaned it. A couple of months later they were back and I had the devil of a job getting the rods back up through the compacted debris. Whatever else they might be, rooks are damned hard workers when nest building.

reynoldsno1
20th Apr 2009, 22:03
Ya really need all them guns..hmm?

Rooks are one of the most gun shy birds around - used to walk slowly up to rookeries, and they didn't move, slowly raise the barrel - and the buggers would scarper after about 6" of movement

henry crun
20th Apr 2009, 22:47
Mr Draper has given the simplest solution to the problem.

I had similar problems with starlings and a short length of chicken wire mesh now prevents their nest building.

Windy Militant
21st Apr 2009, 08:11
Back towards the end of the seventies when posh Scandinavian wood burners were en vogue my brother installed one as part of a restoration project for a client. The stove it was claimed would work on any chimney guaranteed or your money back.
After watching the salesman and his mate fumigate the house for several hours the client received a considerable discount on the stove, and the suggestion that a H pot might improve matters. Upon removing the original pot it was apparent there was a blockage. Three wheelbarrows full later, the wood burner was working a treat. Anyway it was decided to fit the H pot anyway to discourage further nesting.
After a week or so it became apparent that the little beggars were at it again. As the roof of this building allowed us to overlook the chimney pot in question we were able to watch as the birds dragged sticks about two foot long and a quarter inch round straight into the H pot with what appeared to be very little effort.
Next stage of the campaign was to fit wire balloons onto the pot. There we go Mr ****** that should stop them says brother, and as he says it rook flies up to balloon bends wires apart and his mate dives through the gap and disappears into the chimney with another stick.
I believe Mr Drapers alternative option was eventually used to solve the problem.
Mind you the rooks only caused a bit of smoke damage which was nowhere near the trouble we had with the squirrel widdle in the ceiling of the master bedroom! :}

tony draper
21st Apr 2009, 08:50
Once had reason to go into a loft of a large 18th century buildingthat had been unentered for a hundred years or so,switched on me torch and there right in the middle was a pile of twigs branches and all sorts of other dunnage about ten foot high by fifteen foot across,someone with knowledge of these matters said it was a Owls nest and had probably been in use for a couple of centuries,don't know what happened to it,the building was being turned into a Granny Farm so one suspects it went the journey,which seems a shame.
:uhoh:

passy777
21st Apr 2009, 09:07
I had the same problem once many moons ago, and I solved it by positioning a radio in the chimney flue and leaving it on for a couple of days. Not sure if the choice of music played any part, but I am sure there are plenty of radio stations that qualify as bird-scarers !



So what music was played??

Songs from Sheryl Crowe?
Rook Around The Clock?

Seriously though, it needs sorting.

My former next door neighbour (nearly 90 years old) sadly was killed due to a build up of nesting materials in his chimney which allowed Carbon Monoxide to enter into the house. His dog also died. Fortunately for his wife, she was away visiting relatives.
Prevention is the best option and a cowl is probably the most effective and cheapest method.

DP

N707ZS
21st Apr 2009, 09:12
Chimney fire could also be a big risk. Rook and co would have the last laugh.

Scumbag O'Riley
21st Apr 2009, 13:58
The most satisfying solution was a set of drain rods up the chimney (no fire needed in spring and summer). Such was the success of this technique that on hearing a croak down the chimney the whole family would stop me using the rods until they were all half way up the garden to witness the impressive effect on the startled bird.I'd have had the fecking smallest child up there cleaning it out and earning his keep. That were what we used to do when we owned half the world, if he gets stuck then you get the rods out.

tony draper
21st Apr 2009, 14:05
One always thought sending young children up a chimney was disgraceful, a much better engineering solution would have been to send them down the chimney where they would have benefited from the pull of gravity
:)

OFSO
21st Apr 2009, 15:09
Brilliant, Tony, and you could always say "before plunging into the chimney, take a good look around, and if you see any rooks up there, kick 'em in the oxters..."

foresight
21st Apr 2009, 15:43
Ornery chicken wire is rapidly eaten away by the noxious products of combustion, if the fireplace is in regular use (I know this 'cos I tried it). Eventual solution was a substantial grill made by a local blacksmith.

However should you prefer the small boys solution, I suggest building a platform near the chimney where they could stand guard with catapults. They would actively enjoy this so would be less cruel than inserting them in the chimney.

airship
21st Apr 2009, 15:58
About this time last year, I remember hearing the calls of what I imagine was a distressed young sparrow, whose parents had probably made a nest in the outlet of the communal air extraction (VMC) system in my small apartment building. Whilst shaving in the morning over several days, I heard the bird's fluttering and cries, emanating from the grille in the bathroom, diminishing in volume until they finally ceased. I even removed the grille from the bathroom vent, in case the bird might eventually fall down into the bathroom. But it was much further up (sounded like in the area where the building's owner's apartment was situated). I like to think that somehow, the young sparrow eventually escaped. Otherwise, there must be at least one (if not more), decomposing birds up in there.

Should I have called out the fire-brigade?

Whatever, I love birds, just like my new (almost 10 months old now) kitten loves them. The pigeons and doves which I regularly throw rice grains out to are a great distraction for Quitaime. They (the descendents of once great dinosaurs) allow Quitaime to approach within 1m of where they're feeding on the roof, before scaring her off by their mass 'TOGAs' lasting 10 seconds. I've repeatedly told them "not to encourage Quitaime's worse instincts" by such misbehaviour and teasing. By way of reply, all I got was a lot of nodding heads and cooing from the assembled party. Fortunetly (for them) all their gentle cooing had the effect of the average UK party political broadcast, I soon fell asleep...?!

Surely it is us human-beings (all 7 billion of us and far-outnumbering rooks or any other 'vermin' by species) that should today be seeking to accomodate our wilder siblings...?! :sad:

Overdrive
21st Apr 2009, 16:45
Personally, I'm pretty soft with animals and nature, so I'd definitely try to determine that they'd finished breeding if possible. I wouldn't be so desperate for a fire as to choke 'em out. I would take steps to keep them out afterwards though.

My mate had the rook problem. He cleared them under their own steam in about two days by blasting a cannister air horn up the chimney every hour or so.

G-CPTN
21st Apr 2009, 16:54
The olden-day solution was to discharge a blunderbuss up the chimney. It usually cleared any accretion of soot too . . . :E

An alternative might be a rocket (firework type) - though if there is any nesting material it might catch fire. That might, or might not, be a good thing.

frostbite
21st Apr 2009, 16:59
Chicken wire is a bit thin and short lived, so worth getting a section of heavy Twilweld which is several times thicker and galvanised.

RatherBeFlying
21st Apr 2009, 18:08
http://www.westol.com/~towhee/images/snakwall.jpgElaphe obsoleta - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Rat_Snake)

ShyTorque
21st Apr 2009, 21:41
The chimney sweep removed a large canvas waste-bucket full of twigs and branches when he cleaned it. A couple of months later they were back and I had the devil of a job getting the rods back up through the compacted debris. Whatever else they might be, rooks are damned hard workers when nest building.

Not only hard workers, but where are the rooks getting the canvas waste buckets from? :suspect:

belfrybat
22nd Apr 2009, 04:17
Oh rooks. I read "Books in the chimney". Had me wondering.:)

notmyC150v2
22nd Apr 2009, 06:02
Grabbers might have rooks in his chimney but I think it is quite obvious that Airship has bats in his belfrey. :}:}

Wod
22nd Apr 2009, 07:30
Would someone wiser than I give a brief treatise on Rook guns and their differences from the generic shot gun please.

I know there is a difference, I suspect it is in gauge.

tony draper
22nd Apr 2009, 07:43
Rook guns as I knew them were a barrel chambered for .22 rimfire and a barrel chambered for .410 shotgun shells in a over and under configuration, they had one in the window of Bagnal and Kirkwood gunsmiths in Newcastle for years.
:)
PS, a Punt Gun would get the job done swifter than yer rooker.:rolleyes:
YouTube - Punt gun (shotgun) video - best angle (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n7FeeamC4qk&feature=fvst)

Wod
22nd Apr 2009, 07:55
Thank you Mr Draper