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Slasher
28th Aug 2011, 13:10
I saw T-Bone in the paper today bitching about how the AU
should not recognise the new government in Libya if it ever
eventuates. What's his story? Thought he'd disappeared off
the political map.

Solid Rust Twotter
29th Aug 2011, 09:07
http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/461462-adieu-gaddafi-6.html

Solid Rust Twotter
1st Sep 2011, 20:32
Free farms and equipment = no support. And Malema wants to grab the lot.

Words fail me.

Black farmers in South Africa selling farms back to whites, in failure of land reform | StarTribune.com (http://www.startribune.com/world/128790343.html)

Black farmers in South Africa selling farms back to whites, in failure of land reform

JOHANNESBURG - South Africa's minister of land reform says black farmers have resold nearly 30 percent of the white farmland bought for them by the government — often back to the previous white owners.

Minister Gugile Nkwinti announced the startling indicator of failure at Wednesday's launch of a long-delayed government policy paper to revitalize plans to more equitably distribute agricultural land, redressing historical wrongs. Seventeen years after white minority rule ended, the vast majority of agricultural land remains in the hands of some 40,000 white commercial farmers.

Nkwinti said the government had bought 7 percent of the country's commercial farmland since 1994. He said black farmers had resold about 2 percent.

Many black farmers have failed for lack of support.

AP

Capetonian
2nd Sep 2011, 07:29
Black farmers have failed to understand that farming is labour intensive and requires forward planning and crop rotation and that the produce needs marketing and careful handling. They seemed to think that the stuff harvested itself, took itself to market, and the money came rolling in making you rich.

They have not learnt that having a few scrawny goats and chickens scavenging on an arid piece of land is not commercial farming. Until they grasp this, they will continue to fail, and of course the wit mense (*) will be blamed!


(*) White people

dfdasein
2nd Sep 2011, 10:41
Which is to say, better a wit mens than a foolish mens.

unstable load
4th Sep 2011, 10:33
Which is to say, better a wit mens than a foolish mens.

Depends on your point of view....
Black dude is given a formerly productive farm and a load of equipment to start being a vertebra in the backbone of Africa's new dawn (yawn) and suddenly realises this is too much like hard work, so he sells the farm to the white guy that used to own it........

black guy just got a load of moolah off the taxpayer, free gratis and for nothing... Fool??:=

dfdasein
4th Sep 2011, 14:50
Better a witty fool than a foolish wit?

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Sep 2011, 08:36
More from Hayibo...

Londoners slam poor quality of Luthuli House riots

LONDON. Londoners have scoffed at yesterday’s riots in Johannesburg, calling them “namby-pamby”. 15 year-old looter Dawn Sinclair-Thug said from her cell in Wandsworth Prison last night that from what they had seen from BBC footage, South African youth were “fackin’ soft, yeah”.

London’s youth expressed their disappointment yesterday with the quality of rioting performed by their South African counterparts outside Luthuli House in Johannesburg.

“I thought you Africans were supposed to be all wild and dangerous and everyfing,” said Sinclair-Thug. “But my nan gets up to crazier every Sunday at the nursing home.”

The Brixton Community Youth Association announced yesterday that they were running a collection drive to send every underprivileged South African youth a BlackBerry and a brick to raise the general standard of rioting. The Londoners said they were also willing to dispatch a team of feral teens to give emergency training on basic looting skills.

“From what I saw on the telly, they was just standing around burning flags and T-shirts, almost like they had some kind of political point to make,” Sinclair-Thug complained. “You don’t burn T-shirts, man, you fackin’ steal them.”

Sinclair-Thug suggested that their training would cover a number of components.

“First off, cover your fackin’ faces,” she said. “Secondly, pick your targets better. It seemed like yesterday they was hangin’ outside some building that had no Nikes inside it whatsoever, which is a total time-waster.”

She continued: “Thirdly, don’t waste violence on journalists. Save it for innocent local shop-keepers. They’re the ones gagging for a boot in the head.”

Meanwhile, in Johannesburg ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema announced early this morning that he was accepting tender applications to be the official supplier of rocks to disaffected SA youth, noting that there was a critical rock shortage in Johannesburg’s CBD.

Malema had earlier been called upon to settle confusion arising from his message to the youth to lead a “peaceful but militant” revolution.

“It is quite simple,” Malema snapped at journalists. “Peaceful but militant is like when you feel sad and happy at the same time. Like when Msholozi smiles at you and it reminds you of how things used to be but then you remember you just sprinkled ground-up glass into the filling of his lunch ciabatta.”

He suggested that peaceful but militant behaviour could be manifested in a number of different ways. “Give a journalist a hug, but in the process pick their pockets. Or offer to paint your MP’s house, and when you’ve finished burn it down. Just simple stuff like that,” he said.

Fashion analysts suggested that Julius consider tweaking his look for today’s session of his hearing.

“Yesterday he did black beret and Biko T-shirt,” said designer Kuku Froufrou.

“Today we suggest he ratchets up the revolutionary chic by arriving smeared with blood with the head of an MK vet under his arm.”

Solid Rust Twotter
5th Sep 2011, 09:38
Whistle blowers now face jail terms and corruption can be safely hidden by the pilferati. Another step out over the abyss for a country run on the appearance of democracy but more and more fine print prove it to be nothing more than a protected kleptocracy where the ruling elite can plunder at will.


TAB = That's Africa, Baby!


Info Bill: ANC gets its way

September 3 2011 at 11:24am
By ANDISIWE MAKINANA
Independent Newspapers

After more than a year of wrangling, compromises and reversals, and in the face of sustained civil society opposition, the controversial Protection of State Information Bill is close to becoming law.

On Friday ANC MP Elleck Nchabeleng punched the air with delight as Cecil Burgess, chairman of Parliament’s specially convened committee on the bill, announced it would be sent for printing.

Minutes earlier, committee members had approved the bill clause by clause, giving the nod to provisions that will see mandatory jail terms for the possession or disclosure of classified information.

According to the bill, anyone who comes across such documents should notify, and surrender them to, the police or a security agency – or they will be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine or imprisonment of up to five years.

This sentence increases to 15 years in the case of disclosing classified information relating to the intelligence services, and 25 years when the information is handed to a foreign state.

Until the last minute, opposition parties tried to persuade the majority ANC MPs to reconsider the three contentious clauses dealing with the “unlawful” possession or disclosure of classified information.

The DA, ACDP and Inkatha Freedom Party all proposed that the ruling party add a clause to protect those who reveal classified information in the interests of the public.

But the ANC responded that the time for discussion had passed, and the clauses were put to the vote.

The eight ANC MPs, excluding Burgess, out-voted the opposition

The committee will meet on Monday (Today) to deal with the financial implications of the bill in light of the proposal for a classification review panel, which will review and oversee status reviews, classifications and declassifications, and will require funding.

The bill will then go to Parliament for a debate and approval before it can be signed into law by the president. - Saturday Star

Capetonian
5th Sep 2011, 09:40
It seems the ANC has learned a lot about repression, racism, and domination from the Nationalists who ran the country (better and with more freedom) prior to 1994.

Mac the Knife
5th Sep 2011, 14:57
"......the Nationalists who ran the country (better and with more freedom) prior to 1994."

Hullo? I'm by no means a lover of the manifestly incompetent ANC but you really ought to stop smoking that stuff!

Obviously too long since you experienced the joys of the Nat police inspecting your bedsheets for pubes that are a bit too curly.

Better and with more freedom my ass...

Mac

cavortingcheetah
5th Sep 2011, 17:18
Let's see if I can edit this into some slightly less literal semblance?

That was called sex across the Rainbow Nation bar. The penalty for which in these free and enlightened days if indulged without care and attention to detail, could possibly be AIDS. In the days of power of the Nationalist Party had AIDS even been invented, discovered of dreamed up, depending upon your persuasion? South Africa now is believed by some to be the country in the world with the highest per capita incidence of AIDS. That's a medical side of affairs which is just one aspect of the quality of governance afforded to its people by the ANC?

birrddog
5th Sep 2011, 17:40
Sorry cc, but that is uncalled for, inappropriate and inaccurate.

Capetonian
5th Sep 2011, 17:47
Obviously too long since you experienced the joys of the Nat police inspecting your bedsheets for pubes that are a bit too curly.

I never gave them grounds for suspicion and thus never had reason for concern. You are picking here on one minor part of the Nats policy which was often not enforced, specially towards the end, unless they wanted to nail someone for something else or humiliate them publicly (or should that be pubicly?) The only time they came knocking on my door in the small hours was with a pile of unpaid parking fines.

The country was demonstrably better run under the Nats than it is now, less corrupt, and whilst I grant that the majority of the population had no democratic rights, now they have it, look what they've done with it. You want me to believe it's better now? Even many of the 'previously disadvantaged' don't think so. Why do you think the ANC is keeping them uneducated?

Cacophonix
5th Sep 2011, 19:13
You are picking here on one minor part of the Nats policy which was often not enforced, specially towards the end, unless they wanted to nail someone for something else or humiliate them publicly (or should that be pubicly?) The only time they came knocking on my door in the small hours was with a pile of unpaid parking fines.

You should have seen what they did to Steve Biko! You really do try the patience of patient men sometimes Capetonian. Clearly you didn't really get involved in or understand anything here.

You wouldn't understand freedom if it bit you on the bum I suspect. One wonders where you live these days? Not a good word for any country. You don't even seem to like South Africans... :(

Caco

Mac the Knife
5th Sep 2011, 19:25
Just for a kickoff, the number of banned books under the Nats was as long as my arm - and more.

I'm not aware that the ANC has banned ANY books.

Yet.....

Mac

PS: That reminds me of the old joke about how to test the reflexes of the SAP.
You get in a tickey-box (phone box) with a coloured (mixed race) girl and while you're screwing her phone the police and see who comes first....

:ok:

Capetonian
5th Sep 2011, 19:26
Steve Biko was a political activist who was brave enough to raise his head above the parapet and he paid the price. A brave but foolish man who made a martyr of himself. He was brutally treated and probably murdered by the police and there is no excuse for that. Such events did not happen every day which is why they are still remembered.

You don't even seem to like South Africans...

Huh? Because I've criticised the current rulers for being corrupt and repressive?

I don't think that banning books, and yes I remember the 'Government Gazette', is as harmful as keeping an entire nation ignorant and in poverty, and failing miserably to deliver on the promises they made prior to 1994. Most of the books and magazines they banned were so-called pornography rather than political, and whilst this may seem an outdated view, that was the decision of the Much Deformed (and Much Maligned) Church authorities. Plenty of regimes were, and still are, worse than SA under the Nats, but we don't hear too much about them.

Cacophonix
5th Sep 2011, 19:33
Such events did not happen every day which is why they are still remembered.

Maybe not in Bishop's Court or Rondebosch or whatever but the violent toll, inclusive of those who were effected by the ravages of sheer poverty, was huge. The ANC are, as Mac implies, still working up to what was wrought here under the NATs.

Anyway, if you miss the NATS so much there might be that spot on the Orange River, but then again, you don't appear to like Afrikaaners either!

Caco

Capetonian
5th Sep 2011, 19:46
then again, you don't appear to like Afrikaaners either!

Now where does that come from?

Capetonian
5th Sep 2011, 22:10
I may appear defensive of the old regime, but I am sick and tired of hearing people trying to defend the new one and pretend it is so much better and everyone is happy and rich and content now that the new democracy has come to South Africa. It particularly annoys me when I hear this PC rubbish from white South Africans who left the country before 1994 because they didn't want to live under the black government which they knew was coming, and now from the security of Buckinghamshire or Vancouver or Frenchs Forest they won't tolerate any criticism of the government that they ran away from.

There is so much potential for good and so much hope in the new South Africa but the bunch of goons who are in power now are wrecking it for everybody. It's rotten from the top downwards.

The old regime was evil and murdered or imprisoned people who didn't toe its line. The new one is corrupt and incompetent and made promises upon which it had neither the intention nor the means of delivering. The new regime allows people to die through lack of health care, employment, education, policing, and infrastructure. It still panders to an elite, as did the old one. Its policies of BEE are as racist as the sheltered employment policies of the Nats. Why are so many people blind to this, or just unwilling to admit it?

Mike X
5th Sep 2011, 22:32
The new one is corrupt and incompetent and made promises upon which it had neither the intention nor the means of delivering.

The means was never an issue. Blatant South African politicians' monkey ways refers to lack of intention. The colonialists were around for quite a while and what did Africa learn ? Zilch.

The word 'bling' comes to mind. Is it the crow that collects shiny things ? Talk about a bird brain.

Unfortunately, the new SA is more polarized than ever, as you know.

Cacophonix
6th Sep 2011, 04:27
There is so much potential for good and so much hope in the new South Africa but the bunch of goons who are in power now are wrecking it for everybody. It's rotten from the top downwards.

The old regime was evil and murdered or imprisoned people who didn't toe its line. The new one is corrupt and incompetent and made promises upon which it had neither the intention nor the means of delivering. The new regime allows people to die through lack of health care, employment, education, policing, and infrastructure. It still panders to an elite, as did the old one. Its policies of BEE are as racist as the sheltered employment policies of the Nats. Why are so many people blind to this, or just unwilling to admit it?

Can't argue with a word of that!

Caco

unstable load
8th Sep 2011, 19:32
Well said, Capetonian.
The current lot are no better or no worse than the previous lot. Repression is repression, no matter how you cloak it. All that's changed is the victims.

Mike X
8th Sep 2011, 19:38
Repression is repression, no matter how you cloak it. All that's changed is the victims.

Yup. Those who payed their taxes pre 1994.

Capetonian
13th Sep 2011, 07:19
Expressed simply, this means that the ANC supports racist songs and policy aganist whites. Nothing new in that, it's just verification of what we all knew, and it's now out in the open. Maybe that's better than the pretence that preceded this.

ANC 'appalled' by Malema hate speech ruling
JOHANNESBURG,- Sep 12 2011 15:50

The ANC says it is "appalled" by the hate speech judgment against youth league leader Julius Malema, saying the ruling failed to take into account "the history of South Africa".


“People have experienced far worse in the past,” ANC spokesperson Keith Khoza told the Mail & Guardian. “The issue is not about Malema. These songs were sung before he came along.”

Malema was found guilty of hate speech in the South Gauteng High Court, sitting as the Equality Court, by Judge Collin Lamont on Monday morning.

Lamont ruled that the words Dubula I'bhunu -- or "shoot the boer" -- might have been part of a legitimate struggle song in the past, but in the way Malema sang the chant, and the way they had been portrayed through the media, they had been transformed into hate speech.

The ruling party disagreed, Khoza said.

“The ANC is not happy. We will study full judgment to understand the implications and decide on the next step to take, having looked at the options”, he said.

The ANC later confirmed that it would appeal the decision.

The group argued that "Malema singing Dubulu i'Bhunu suggested white Afrikaners should be shunned or at worst killed," said Lamont in his ruling.

He said the reference to "boer" could be loosely translated as "referring to the Afrikaaner community".

Lamont said certain words in the song "dehumanised the Afrikaner community, referring to them as dogs".

"Dehumanising the enemy was one of the seven steps to genocide," he pointed out.

"Hate speech is a direct invasion of dignity," Lamont ruled, effectively balancing the right to dignity with the right to freedom of speech.

"There is inevitably tension between freedom of speech and hate speech," Lamont admitted.

But Lamont made it clear that there he saw no evidence that the song had led to specific farm murders and violence against Afrikaners in the months when it was sung by the youth league leader.

The judge ruled that Malema understood the double meaning of "Dubula i'bhunu", which had changed from a struggle song against apartheid to one that also promoted violence against the Afrikaans community.

Malema and the ANC had argued in court this year that the song was a struggle song that referred to apartheid and did not exhort its listeners to kill farmers or Afrikaans people.

Lamont disagreed, saying the struggle song had been innocuous before it made headlines in the media but "would never be innocuous again".

Once the media translated the words as "shoot the boer", the audience understood them as promoting violence against the white Afrikaans community, he added.

He said Malema was well aware of how the song was understood when he sang the song at youth league rallies, and knew how it would be reported on in the media.

"It is reasonable that words mean different things to people" said Lamont.

Lamont translated Malema's words in court as: "Shoot, shoot, shoot, shoot the boer; shoot them with a gun."

Lamont spent over an hour reading his judgment, starting with how "boers" came to live in South Africa and used apartheid to consolidate their power as a minority group.

He said that the evidence before him showed South Africa was a deeply divided society and would "remain so for some time".

But he said the Constitution and ubuntu-based law could be used to make judgments to reconcile society.

Solid Rust Twotter
16th Sep 2011, 12:02
Another view of the 600 lb gorilla in the room no one wants to talk about....

Is South Africa in (http://www.moneyweb.co.za/mw/view/mw/en/page295025?oid=551959&sn=2009+Detail&pid=287226)

South Africa is in a state of “functional decay,” according to Dr Jan du Plessis, author of the Pretoria-based Intersearch, a publication “aimed at the top echelon of a company or organisations.” Below are some extracts from the July-August issue of the journal. The extracts have been edited by me to give readers an indication of the nature of Intersearch, offer them thoughts to digest, and invite their responses. I have taken possibly unpardonable liberties in summing up chapters and omitting others. Also, where statistics are quoted, I have omitted some of the references provided by Dr du Plessis. My apologies to him if my extracts do not convey the depth and meaning of his lengthier publication (it is accessible at [email protected]).

(1) The struggle ideology of 1994 that was supposed to set the scene for years – if not decades – to come, has failed to produce a coherent and functional mindset. The future is now collapsing on the past.

The miracle of the new democracy has continued and is still visible in the formal trappings of political power: the constitution, regular elections, the structure of parliament and all the various government departments. Alongside this formal process, an alternative process has evolved with its own internal dynamics: a steady functional decay of governing capabilities.

The real dynamics of the functional decay of government has been largely ignored by the media and others. It was not “news”. The constitution makes ample provision for the various formal institutions that embody political power. However, no provision has been made for a political system in a mode of functional decay: lack of good governance!

“Transformation” has led to a collapse of expertise and skills in the public service. What has happened very often borders on the unbelievable. Presented here is not a comprehensive list of what has gone wrong, says Dr Du Plessis, but rather an indication of the penetration of governing decay in the whole of society at large.

(2) For 2009-10, the number of security guards increased from 194,525 to 387,273 - 3 security guards for every police officer. Government even employs security companies for the protection of government itself. When the private sector and civil society engage security companies for street level protection, government has abandoned the single most important core function of a state as outlined in the constitution: protection of its citizens.

(3) The final account for the arms purchase will be R47.2bn. The initial cost in 1998 was R30bn. Some 20% of the accompanying logistical support for the three submarines is still missing. One of the subs has been in the dry dock since 2006 and may be there until 2013. The last support for the Agusta helicopters is still outstanding, as well as 11 Gripen fighters. The military has troops, but cannot deploy them.

HIV/Aids has devastated the army and information about infection levels is a no-go area. In 2005 a cursory reference said 48%. The UN has determined that the level of infection in the armies of Southern Africa is basically four times the average of the national level. If this is true of South Africa, the country no longer possesses the capability of a fighting force – it has degenerated into a welfare society.

The single most important question has not yet been answered in parliament: where is and what is the nature of the enemy? Has the time not come to return all these smart weapons to the original suppliers and tell them: thanks, but sorry, we cannot afford them?

(4) From 1997 to 2006, 11 400 GPs were trained. Doctors leave the public sector for the private sector, or leave the country.

(5) Government considers that R75bn over the next five years will be needed to turn around the countrywide deterioration in roads. Five to ten times more engineers, particularly in provincial governments, are needed. More than 30% of roads are in a “bad” or “very bad” condition.

(6) A major Transnet challenges is its ageing fleet of trains and locomotives. The average age of the locomotives is 35 years. This implies that no decision making or money allocation to rectify the situation has been made over the past 20 years.

(7) Government would like to make passenger trains the centre of the public transport system, but needs R400bn to replace the aging network. At least R93bn is needed to replace 33% of the fleet immediately, because it is old and unsafe.

(8) The auditor-general reports that up to June 2009 municipalities spent R5.6bn on irregular, unapproved and wasteful expenditures. For the period up to June 2010, this increased to R9.26bn.

(9) The estimated backlog in terms of network maintenance of electricity generation and transmission is close to R32bn, and climbing by R2.5bn per year.

(10) Officially, the country’s water purification works show that some 56% of the 821 plants are either in a critical situation or do not function properly. This implies that millions of litres of sewage waste – not treated or purified – are dumped in rivers and streams. In 2011, 284 water purification works were rated as high-risk.

(11) In Feb 2011, 6m learners were engaged in an annual national assessment. Gr. 3 and Gr. 6 learners respectively obtained an average of 35% and 28% for literacy skills and 28% and 30% for numeracy. The state of education is now approaching a catastrophic level. The black youth, in particular, have been let down by government.

Conclusion: To understand the essence of governing decay, says Dr Du Plessis, it is necessary to penetrate into the very heart of the ideological and political thinking of the ANC government. It conducted an anti-apartheid struggle. In terms of any criticism, this is basically a no-go area for it is politically incorrect, yet, of cardinal importance for an understanding of the future!

The appearance of dysfunctional governing systems in society can be linked directly to the decisions and policies adopted by the ANC government after 1994 in an attempt to destroy the “last vestiges of apartheid”. The core of the new thinking was contracted in the “comprehensive transformation of society”. The inherent racism of apartheid was to be replaced by a “non-racial democracy.”

Some 10% whites now have the moral obligation and constitutional responsibility to support and carry 90% of the historically disadvantaged. This obligation has eventually acquired, in policy terms, the qualification of a transfer of assets. At present the technical and popular concept for this transfer is nationalisation – particularly of mines and farms.

In ideological terms the transformation of society opened up the possibility for functional decay – system destruction and eventually the phenomenon of a failed state. Functional decay of governing services in society is no longer the exception – it has become a way of living!

Mac the Knife
16th Sep 2011, 12:37
How about something positive instead of all this negativity?

http://www.iol.co.za/polopoly_fs/madonsela-july-6-1.1094066%21/image/3946982784.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_300/3946982784.jpg

We have a Public Protector (Thuli Madonsela) who is smart, has big brass balls and who won't take no shit from no-one - just now Minister of Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs Sicelo Shiceka is being told in no uncertain terms that his ducking and diving won't wash anymore.

Thuli for President! :ok:

Mac

Cacophonix
16th Sep 2011, 14:33
Amen to that Mac

And as a salute to you knives, sitting here in CT watching rugby with an ex colleague who is recovering well from a non key hole appendectomy most excellently wrought by a couple of SA knife men.

It ain't all bad here.:ok:

Caco

Solid Rust Twotter
16th Sep 2011, 19:57
With you on that, Mr Mac. Problem is the usual suspects are already ganging up to stick those knives in her back in order to keep their sticky little paws in the cash drawer.....:hmm:

Mac the Knife
18th Sep 2011, 06:39
"In the wake of Zuma’s appointment of Chief Justice Mogoeng to the position last month, ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe told The Sowetan that the "independence of the judiciary and separation of powers must never be translated into hostility".

"You can’t have a judiciary that seeks to arrest the functioning of the government," he said."

You most certainly can and indeed you most certainly should when the functioning of the government seeks to subvert the Constitution!

Without such a judiciary Watergate would never have happened and Nixon would have been around for a few more years.

The ANC evidently even after 100 years has completely failed to understand just what this democracy that they struggled for is all about - a sobering thought! The concept of government of the people, by the people and for the people becomes lost when the ANC confuses itself with the people.

But just as the judiciary is "supposed" to only render verdicts favourable to the ANC, the Constitution is seen as being "a moveable feast" that can be applied one way when it suits them and another when it doesn't (and amendments rammed through to change it to suit their plan du jour).

The ANC really has no policy as such apart from to remain in power forever and allow its cadres to continue feeding at the trough of cronyism and corruption forever.

The ANCYL with the ignorant, profoundly racist and corrupt Julius Malema at its head has at least exposed one thing - that after 17 years of democracy there are a lot of very disappointed people in this country who feel, quite rightly, that the ANC has let them down. That their "ideas", if implemented, would only lead to a collapse of the economy, is a matter of profound indifference to Malema - an initially populist leader whose only real interest is personal power and privilege.

But, just as with Thuli Madonsela, there are glimmers of light - the former ANC stalwart and former intelligence minister Ronnie Kasrils participated in a march to Parliament on Saturday opposing the new Protection of Information Bill.

"Kasrils said his love for his country “transcends the love of my party”. On media freedom, he suggested government was pushing through the information bill to spare itself embarrassment.

“This all-embracing secrecy bill... we smell and suspect is not about the real secrets that must be defended, but it's to prevent those silly leaders who have egg on their face, who have been exposed by the media for doing foolish and embarrassing things.”

Among such things, he said, were “misusing and abusing” tenders and contracts, as well as taxpayers' money."

A pity that we don't have more whose love of their country transcends their party alliances and desire for power and self-enrichment.

I wonder where we are going. There are plenty of potential black politicians with both intelligence and integrity but they are smart enough to keep out of the ANC, where their sensibility would quickly have them labelled as "coconuts" ("black on the outside, white on the inside" - a popular label for any black person who has doubts about the wisdom of "Africanist" non-policies).

The ANC (effectively a centrist party whose main concern is not to rock the boat in order to allow its cadres to continue to enrich themselves at the people's expense) may depend for too long on its belief that as the principal "struggle" party it has a mandate to rule the country forever and its "built-in" majority of simple people who will continue to vote ANC no matter what happens.

Will, for the first time in Africa without a brutal war or complete collapse, sobriety and good sense cautiously emerge?

Let us all hope so and do our bit to make this happen.

Mac

Solid Rust Twotter
18th Sep 2011, 09:46
Somehow, I don't think holding your breath in anticipation would be a good idea, Mr Mac.:(

On a lighter note, Hayibo again...

Malema to recruit Ally McBeal after latest legal setback

JOHANNESBURG. ANC Youth League leader and balladeer Julius Malema has reportedly asked skeletal lawyer Ally McBeal to join his legal team as he continues to fight legal battles on multiple fronts. Malema reportedly sought the counsel of McBeal after hearing of her work with other black singers like Al Green and Barry White.

On Monday Malema took a break from his ANC disciplinary hearing to be found guilty of hate speech, moving McBeal to comment that at last there was enough material available for her to complete a new season of the show.

McBeal, who has kept herself busy since the show stopped airing in 2002 by not eating, said she was delighted to be working again. She said she expected to be in Johannesburg by Tuesday, adding that she would travel to South Africa by fax.

Commenting on the decision to appoint McBeal to his legal team Malema said he was very excited to be working with such a prominent attorney. He said his first choice for new legal counsel had been LA Law’s Blair Underwood, but that he had been both unavailable and insufficiently fictional to warrant a role in the greatest African drama since Jock of the Bushveld.

“But McBeal is an excellent second choice,” added Malema’s spokesperson Izzie Pukupuku. “She’s a young loner on a crusade to champion the cause of the innocent, the helpless and the powerless in a world of criminals who operate above the law.”

Asked if she wasn’t confusing McBeal with Knight Rider, Pukupuku admitted it was possible, saying 1980’s TV and talking cars were the domain of the ANC’s old guard who, she added, seemed determined to buy as many luxury vehicles as it took till they found one that actually spoke.

McBeal is expected to be present when the Malema’s disciplinary trial resumes on Tuesday, but Pukupuku would not say exactly what role she would be playing.

She said that between setting up trust funds, fighting the ANC, battling it out in court with AfriForum and fending off investigations from SARS and the Hawks, Malema had enough work going to employ an eloquence of lawyers.

But she said McBeal wouldn’t be just another lawyer riding on Malema’s cash-for-favours funded gravy train, adding that she had attracted their attention for a number of reasons.

“Firstly her work as a class warrior is legendary. She took other famous black singers like Al Green and Barry White from working class bedroom stereos and placed them firmly in the TV lounge of middle-class suburbia.

“Secondly everybody knows that Ally McBeal always wins her cases –it’s just how Hollywood writes its scripts.”

She said that thirdly - and most importantly - just like Malema, McBeal was single. “And a pretend girlfriend is exactly what he needs right now to help blow off a little steam,” said Pukupuku.

“He is so busy pretending to care about the poor that sometimes he forgets to take the Julius-time that he deserves. Setting him up with a pretend girlfriend is the least we can do,” she said.

Capetonian
25th Sep 2011, 21:02
Is there really any hope when this goes on?

JOHANNESBURG — South Africa's top policeman is expected to be suspended in the coming days over allegedly fraudulent police leases, the Sunday Times reported.

The national police commissioner was accused by the country's anti-graft body of turning a blind eye to lease agreements reached with businessman Roux Shabangu for police office space at three times the market rate.

Zuma's spokesman was quoted by the newspaper as admitting that a suspension had "the potential for causing some uncertainty in the police force."

South Africa's crime intelligence chief Richard Mdluli appeared in court on Thursday over fraud allegations, adding to a murder charge which led to his suspension in March.

Cele was appointed police chief in 2009 to replace Jackie Selebi, who had also been suspended on corruption charges and was last year sentenced to 15 years in jail.

Mike X
25th Sep 2011, 23:31
Why is everyone so worried ?

Africa is the last untapped continent. The Chinese have realised this. Economic colonization, if you will.

After Africa, what then ?

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Oct 2011, 11:56
Big wheel keep on turnin'.......

Cape Town - Public Protector Thuli Madonsela has found Co-operative Governance Minister Sicelo Shiceka guilty of maladministration and repeated abuse of public funds.

She asked President Jacob Zuma to take "serious action" against him.

Madonsela said Shiceka deliberately misled the president about a trip to Switzerland in 2008 because it had no verifiable work content but saw him twice visit his then girlfriend in jail.

"His actions were accordingly unlawful and constituted maladministration, dishonesty in respect of public money and improper conduct."

Five-month probe

Madonsela's report on a five-month probe into the complaint against Shiceka was made public on Friday after she handed it to Parliament's joint committee on ethics and members' interests.

She said Shiceka lied to her by denying that he visited the Anstalten Hindelbank prison in Berne, and this constituted another breach of the Executive Ethics Code.

The trip cost the taxpayer R546 864, an amount she termed "exorbitant".

She said the minister claimed that his trip was related to the FIFA World Cup and that he had met officials in Switzerland but said he could no longer remember who they were.

Madonsela concluded that two stays by Shiceka at Cape Town's One and Only Hotel in 2009 to the tune of R294 316 was a violation of the ethics code and the Constitution, as was his stay at the Lesotho Sun while he was on sick leave this year.

She rejected his explanation that he could not stay at his residence in Cape Town on the one occasion because it was infested with mosquitoes and on the second because it was due for upgrading.

"We questioned why the mosquitoes were not doomed away."

Victimisation

Madonsela said Shiceka's demand that the department pay for his hotel stay in Lesotho while he was on sick leave and not entitled to such a privilege also "constituted fraudulent misrepresentation".

She asked that the director general in the presidency advise her within 60 days of action taken against Shiceka.

Madonsela also recommended that the director general of the department of co-operative governance take steps to recover the cost of the trip to Switzerland, the stay at the One and Only and travel expenses incurred by the wife of a man Shiceka described as his father figure.

She called on the department to ensure that officials who co-operated with the investigation were not victimised, given that "some expressed concern that they were going to suffer an occupational detriment".

Madonsela indicated that she took these fears seriously because it became apparent that after her provisional report was given to Shiceka, witnesses had been approached.

"This should not have happened," she said.

- SAPA

Capetonian
14th Oct 2011, 12:23
The Nats did it too, but they did it better!.

The marvellous ANC, that paradigm of democracy and freedom, monitors communications .... surely not!

Secret state: How the government spies on you


The turmoil in the leadership of the State Security Agency has again cast a baleful light on the role and reach of the secret apparatus available to the government.

The reasons alleged for the departure of National Intelligence Agency director Gibson Njenje underline persistent concerns about the abuse of covert power: Njenje refused to stop spying on some of the president's friends -- the controversial Guptas -- and refused to start spying on some of his political enemies.

The role of surveillance in our politics recently is undeniable. Jacob Zuma would probably not be president if someone in crime intelligence had not leaked recordings of former Scorpions boss Leonard McCarthy to Zuma's lawyer.

This week, as part of an occasional series on the Secret State, we explain the architecture of South Africa's spy agencies and take a closer look at the use and abuse of state surveillance.

State intelligence agencies can -- and do -- access citizens' private communications illegally. The Mail & Guardian has been told by well-placed sources that it is a common occurrence, especially in police crime intelligence (see "A police case in point" below).

The M&G's informants included two former police crime intelligence agents and a former military intelligence operative.

A fourth source, who works for a state department, described how he used a contact at police crime intelligence to obtain detailed information of an individual's movements in and out of the country over seven months.

The source alleged that that it took crime intelligence less than 36 hours to source the information -- without a judge's permission.

Yet another source, a former police detective, claimed to have acquired cellphone billing and ownership records through crime intelligence on numerous occasions without a judge's knowledge or approval, mainly to speed up investigations.

A sixth source asserted that she had obtained text messages and cellphone billing records that she needed for personal reasons through a contact at crime intelligence -- again illegally.

No one is exempt from the South African government's all-seeing eye. It has the capacity to see your text messages, hear your cellphone conversations, pinpoint your location through your cellphone, access your personal cellular and land-line telephone records and read your emails.

Parliament's joint standing committee on intelligence revealed in its 2009/2010 report that, over a four-year period until the end of March last year, one of the state's eavesdropping centre had legally carried out three million interceptions -- phone calls, text messages or emails.

Two specific laws provide for legal interceptions for reasons of security and crime prevention.

Rica
The Regulation of Interception of Communications and Provision of Communication-related Information Act 70 of 2002 (Rica), which came into effect in 2005, makes it illegal for any authority to intercept communication without the permission of a judge designated to rule specifically on all interception applications in South Africa.

The normal legal route for authorities to access private communication can be tedious and time consuming: a law enforcement agency such as the police has to accumulate enough evidence to convince the designated judge that tapping or bugging is necessary to address crime, protect public health and safety, or ensure national security.

When the judge is satisfied that an interception is justified, he or she issues what is legally known as an "interception direction".

With this direction in hand, law enforcement goes to the cellphone, telephone or internet service provider, which must comply with the judge's orders and is legally bound not to inform a customer of the impending eavesdropping.

Criminal Procedures Act
Another way of accessing information related to communication is provided for in section 205 of the Criminal Procedures Act 51 of 1977, which allows a law enforcement agency to apply to a high court judge, a regional court magistrate or a magistrate to grant access to cellphone records, telephone records or information about billing and ownership of a cellphone.

It also provides for a person's whereabouts to be tracked through his or her cellphone. This information has to be provided by a telecommunications service provider, which cannot legally release such privileged customer information without being ordered to do so under section 205.

According to the latest report of the Rica judge, retired Judge Joshua Khumalo, there were 419 interception applications between April 2009 and March, of which 34 were refused. The majority, 325, came from the police, with the rest coming from the National Intelligence Agency.

Khumalo commented that, given the vast extent of electronic communication taking place, the number was not excessive. However, the relatively modest number of directions may mask a much larger eavesdropping footprint.

Complaints are also rare. Any member of the public can complain to the inspector general of intelligence if they suspect that the state is illegally intercepting their information.

According to the office of the inspector general of intelligence, only two complaints about surveillance were received during 2010 and four so far this year. Neither of the individuals who complained in 2010 were actually under surveillance, the inspector general claimed.

Included in this year's batch, the M&G understands, was a complaint by Sunday Times journalists Stephen Hofstatter and Mzilikazi wa Afrika. The inspector general found that Hofstatter was not bugged, but Wa Afrika was indeed -- "pursuant to a judge's direction".

From the legal to the illegal
Despite strict legislative provisions, those working in state intelligence agencies can access private communication at any time through bypassing the legal system. And you are unlikely to know about it, unless someone in an agency informs you.

This is possible, sources say, because of the huge number of interceptions that take place, the advanced technology involved and the lack of oversight in intelligence agencies.

Where it all happens
The office for interception centres in Sandton houses the technology and expertise that enable the state to scrutinise ordinary citizen's private lives. In particular, cellphone and telephone conversations, text messages and data -- emails and internet website addresses -- are intercepted using these facilities, all supposedly within the bounds of Rica.

Established in terms of Rica, the office serves all the state's intelligence agencies and the National Prosecuting Authority. State intelligence agencies include the former National Intelligence Agency, now the domestic branch of the State Security Agency, and the former South Africa Secret Service, now the foreign branch, and the police and military crime intelligence divisions.

One source, who asked to remain anonymous, said that the sheer number of interceptions made it difficult for the designated judge to closely scrutinise them.

"Hundreds of cellphones are being monitored. How will the judge know if any of them are monitored illegally, unless an investigation is done into every single monitored phone?"

The source said that, although a careful record was kept of all cellphones monitored by intelligence agencies via the office, it was difficult for an inspecting authority to detect illegal interceptions.

He said because of the advanced technology, one was unlikely to hear a click, hum or echo on a cellphone if someone was eavesdropping.

"You're not going to know if they're listening to you. Many people say there's a click or an echo, but today's technology doesn't allow for that type of detection," said the source.

In fact, the cellphone operators are obliged to make provision for a live feed via the office, making cellphone interception easy.

Even if you have it on good authority that a state intelligence agency is illegally intercepting your communications, it would be very hard to prove.

"They know how to cover their tracks," explained another source. "There’s no way of proving that the interception was illegal."

Finessing the legal route
One way for law enforcement officers to listen in on the sly and make it appear legal is to falsify affidavits and evidence placed before the Rica judge. But this still leaves a paper trail that can be investigated and does not eliminate the long wait for a legal interception direction.

Sources said the quick and dirty method of intercepting illegally was to sneak a peak while no one was looking. Certain state surveillance projects run for years and involve intercepting the communication of a number of individuals.

So, if an agent wants to take a closer look at an individual but lacks the evidence required for a direction, the target is subsumed under an existing long-term surveillance project.

Under the pretence of suspecting the individual of being associated with the villains already under surveillance through the project, his or her communications are intercepted.

There is no specific direction, no case number and no paper trail marking the interception -- and no judge has knowledge of the individual's case.

Meanwhile, the investigating officer claims to be gathering evidence and assembling a case to present to the judge to legalise the interception.

Later it emerges that the targeted individual was not involved in the suspected malfeasance. The surveillance is dropped and he or she is forgotten -- except that an embittered, soon-to-be ex-spouse knows what is in the individual's bank account and what he or she has said on the phone to a divorce lawyer.

The intelligence sources said that one reason for illegal interception was to speed up investigations -- the legal route takes time and wanting to bug a suspect based on a hunch would not convince the judge to issue a direction.

There is also a flow of information between state intelligence agencies and private investigators. If a private eye knows someone inside state intelligence, he or she can gain access to communications and phone records through that contact. And the deal can work both ways.

Outsourcing
Another way in which the state can intercept communication illegally is by outsourcing to a private entity informally so that deniability is maintained. A private investigator obtains the information and passes it back to the state agency involved.

Private investigators can obtain such information by paying contacts at banks and telecommunications service providers. They can also intercept communication by bugging rooms -- without obtaining entry warrants.

A bug is a hidden device that transmits conversations and other sounds. It can be a transmitter, sending signals to a recipient nearby, or can be based on cellphone technology. A bug can be located in a room in Cape Town while the eavesdropper dials in from London and listens to conversations in real time.

No permission required
The National Communications Centre houses interception facilities that provide for the bulk monitoring of telecommunications, including conversations, emails, text messages and data, by state agencies.

In bulk interception all signals, regardless of who sends them, are intercepted, and thousands of signals can be intercepted simultaneously. These are then analysed to find intelligence relevant to security issues by using methods such as voice and word recognition technology.

However, intelligence sources said the centre's facilities were open to abuse and could be used to target individual numbers.

In 2005 an investigation of the then-National Intelligence Agency's use of the centre found that bulk interception facilities had been used illegally to intercept conversations of private citizens in South Africa.

Because the centre targets "foreign signals intelligence", this is interpreted as falling outside Rica and no judge's direction is required. But the centre's remit includes any foreign communication that "emanates from outside the borders of the republic, or passes through or ends in the republic".

This leaves an obvious loophole for the interception of the communication of South African citizens. At the moment there is no legislation governing the centre. This means that you can be bugged completely outside of the law, and without a judge’s direction, if your communications involve a party in another country.

This week the South African Police Service vehemently denied involvement in illegal interceptions.

"The allegations made to the media are denied with the contempt it deserves. Interception is regulated by the Rica Act. The process is such that no illegal interception can occur due to the various 'fail safes' built in and is subject to full compliance audits and inspections by the office of the inspector general of intelligence.

"Any person with information or a perception that his or her communications are subject to 'illegal interception' by the SAPS is encouraged to lay a complaint with the office of the inspector general of intelligence, who is the competent authority to investigate such matters."

The inspector general's office said: "All complaints alleging illegal interceptions were fully investigated. In none of the complaints received did we find any unlawful interceptions."

The State Security Agency had not commented at the time of going to print.
A police case in point
Deon Loots is an former police officer. Dressed in shorts, running shoes and a T-shirt, he is the guy next door. It is a look he has spent years perfecting as a former undercover officer for the police's crime intelligence division, which he left in 2001.

Loots agreed to meet with the M&G to discuss his experience of illegal interception. He claims to have experienced both sides of this double-edged sword -- intercepting others' communications and having his own privacy violated through the abuse of state facilities.

After leaving the police, he said, he maintained close ties with former colleagues at crime intelligence headquarters in Prieska Street, Erasmuskloof, in Pretoria.

The links were useful for his work as a private investigator. Loots claimed that he could approach a contact at this office at any time and request information about, or the communication of, whoever he was investigating. Such information was usually obtained illegally through state facilities, he said.

But things went sour. Loots claimed that, after a personal dispute, his contact had used the crime intelligence division's facilities to intercept his cellphone communication and access his bank accounts to sabotage his business and financial endeavours.

He said he knew this because his former contact knew intimate details of his financial and legal affairs that he had not shared with her and which she could only have learned through state facilities.

But there is another reason why Loots was certain that his communication was being intercepted. As a former member of the intelligence community, he said, he was well aware that illegal interception was an everyday occurrence.

Loots said that he had complained to the police and its crime intelligence division without any result. He had also filed a complaint with the inspector general of intelligence, Faith Radebe, from whom he was awaiting a response.

At the time of going to print, Radebe's office had not confirmed receiving Loots's complaint.

Solid Rust Twotter
20th Oct 2011, 10:50
More waste of scarce resources...

R400m to upgrade official residences: News24: South Africa: Politics (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Politics/R400m-to-upgrade-official-residences-20111020)

R400m to upgrade official residences
2011-10-20 08:48

Lizel Steenkamp, Die Burger

Cape Town - Renovations to the presidential homes and offices, as well as to the Bryntirion estate in Pretoria where ministers live, will cost more than R400m.

A brand-new dressing room and sauna are part of the interior renovations to Mahlamba Ndlopfu, the president's official residence in Pretoria, of which the total estimated cost is about R169m.

These details are contained in a written reply by Public Works Minister Gwen Mahlangu-Nkabinde to parliamentary questions asked by Athol Trollip, the DA’s parliamentary leader.

Trollip has highlighted the huge expenses at a time when millions of people are unemployed and there is poor service delivery countrywide.

“The state can build 7 000 houses with these millions,” said Trollip.

Frugality

He says President Jacob Zuma has a poor understanding of the hardships suffered by citizens and little respect for frugality.

“He will live in these houses and has to be accountable for the huge expenses.”

Details of the renovations are:
- Genadendal, Zuma’s official Cape Town residence: R13.5m has already been spent over the past three financial years
- Tuynhuys, Zuma’s offices at Parliament: R24.4m has been spent over the past three financial years and another R780 000 has been spent on office furniture
- Bryntirion estate in Pretoria: The estimated expense is R193m, of which R55m is for a new road to the estate, R42m for a new fence
- Mahlamba Ndlopfu, Zuma’s official residence in Pretoria: an estimated R169m. Maintenance has to be done to the security system, which includes improving escape routes and the installation of an electronic surveillance system

Apart from renovations to wooden frames, balconies, steps, fireplaces and chandeliers at this residence, a new dressing room, sauna and steam room are also being built.

New baths and toilets are being supplied and the house will be fitted with extensive energy saving devices, among them solar water heaters.

Not ordered by president

In response to Trollip’s question on whether the listed expenses were justified, Mahlangu-Nkabinde said the “market determined construction costs” and that the contracts were awarded after a tender procedure.

Presidency spokesperson Zanele Mngadi said none of the work had been ordered by Zuma.

"No, the president never gets involved in renovations," The Star quoted her as saying.

"The department of public works is responsible for managing government property, and procurement is done in terms of its procurement policy."
- Die Burger

While infrastructure fails and service delivery goes down the toilet....

Cop hurt in violent George riots: News24: South Africa: News (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Cop-hurt-in-violent-George-riots-20111012)

Cop hurt in violent George riots
2011-10-12 15:25


Johannesburg - Violence erupted in Thembalethu township, outside George, on Wednesday when residents clashed with police in service delivery protests, Western Cape police said.

"The situation is very tense. The people are throwing petrol bombs at the police," said Captain Bernadine Steyn.

A policeman was hit by an object thrown by the protesters.

"One of our members has been rushed to hospital after being hit above his eye," she said.

Three police vehicles were damaged and the Thembalethu police station was pelted with stones.

"We are making arrests. I am not sure now how many people we have taken in but we are arresting the violent protesters," said Steyn.

Police fired rubber bullets and water cannons were used to disperse the crowd.

Residents protesting over poor service delivery had set up burning tyre barricades in the streets. The community was reportedly enraged by water and sanitation problems in the township.

Police said about 4 000 people had gathered and more were joining the protest.
- SAPA

Talk of police shooting marchers moving toward council offices in George. The ironic thing is these are the same people who rioted before the elections, yet still voted these turkeys back into power and are now rioting again. With that kind of mindset there is no hope for SA.

Mike X
20th Oct 2011, 15:09
Seventeen years of democracy, huh ? How long did it take other African countries to regress to nothingness after the 'bad' colonialists pulled out ?

Now these countries receive aid, including from South Africa.

Knock the pale skinned, but where would the aid come from, then ?

Capetonian
20th Oct 2011, 15:18
The ironic thing is these are the same people who rioted before the elections, yet still voted these turkeys back into power and are now rioting again. With that kind of mindset there is no hope for SA.

Sad and ironic, isn't it. And yet people still say : "Oh how wonderful that South Africa is now free and democratic." It's not, and even if it were, at what price? When you point this out you're accused of racism, sour grapes, bitterness, and so on.

Solid Rust Twotter
20th Oct 2011, 15:32
Without moving away from the tribal/racial mindset, the ballot box will never mean anything in SA. When people start voting to improve things rather than to keep corrupt ideologues in power because they're part of the same demographic, we'll see progress. Until that happens SA will only sink further into the mire. The question is - Have we reached the point of no return yet? Can things still be fixed?

Mike X
20th Oct 2011, 17:15
The question is - Have we reached the point of no return yet? Can things still be fixed?

SRT, This is THE question. So far the answer is NO. Evolution appears to be on the backfoot. Then again, it isn't too different in other 'civilized' countries.

Capetonian
22nd Oct 2011, 11:15
The Genocide In Democratic South Africa


They are conservative, Christian Caucasians, a fact that might help explain why the fashionable left in the West doesn’t much care that they’re being exterminated.

The Boers—or farmers—of South Africa have tilled the land for generations, on small holdings or on large commercial farms. But orgiastic killing sprees by The People, in combination with a Stalinesque land grab by their representatives, is threatening this minority’s survival.

Not to mention making life an inferno for farmers across the county.

Journalists for "Carte Blanche," the South African equivalent of "20/20," conducted a six-month investigation into what has become known as farm murders, or "plaasmoorde" in Afrikaans. The short documentary opens with a funeral, Elsie Swart’s. Elsie was one of three farmers killed in the span of only seven days. She died after being “severely tortured, burned with an electric iron, beaten, and strangled to death.”

The victims of this ongoing onslaught, we are told, are invariably elderly, law-abiding, god-fearing whites, murdered in cold blood, in ways that beggar belief. For the edification of racism spotters in the West, "Carte Blanche" ought to have pointed out that their assailants are always black.

Typically, the heathens will attack on Sundays. On returning from church, the farmer is ambushed. Those too feeble to attend Sunday service are frequently tortured and killed when the rest are worshiping. In one crime scene, Bibles belonging to the slain had been splayed across their mangled bodies. In another, an “old man’s hand rests on the arm of his wife of many years.” She raped; he, in all likelihood, made to watch. Finally, with their throats slit, they died side by side.

Beatrice Freitas has survived two farm attacks. Her equanimity belies the brutality she has endured. She and her husband immigrated to South Africa from Madeira 40 years ago. They built a thriving nursery near the Mozambiquean border. It supplied the entire region with beautiful plants. Some people build; others destroy. Beatrice tells her story as she drifts through the stately cycads surrounding the deserted homestead. There’s an ephemeral quality about her.

When the four men attacked her, Beatrice says her mind “disappeared.” She and her permanently disabled husband, José, were tied up while the home was ransacked. When the brutes were through, they wanted to know where she kept the iron. They then took her to the laundry room, where two of them raped her, coated her in oil, and applied the iron. They alternated iron with boot. When they were through, 25 percent of Beatrice’s body was covered in third-degree burns. They suffocated her with a towel, and left her for dead, but she survived. She says the Lord saved her.

No one was ever arrested—not then, and not after the couple was attacked three years later. This time Jose died “in a hail of bullets.” Arrests and convictions are rare. "Carte Blanche" tells of Dan Lansberg, shot dead in broad daylight. Members of his courageous farming community caught the culprits, but they “escaped” from the local police cells. As I’ve explained before, the newly configured South African police is a corrupt, illiterate, and ill-trained force, “riven by feuds, fetishes, and factional loyalties.” The South African justice system has collapsed, confirms Professor Neels Moolman, a criminologist. In democratic South Africa, a person has over a 90 percent chance of getting away with murder. Or as Moolman puts it, pursuing “a criminal career without fearing the consequences.”

Sky News sent its correspondent to the northern province of South Africa, where the viewers are introduced to Herman Dejager. (CNN’s Anderson Vanderbilt Cooper and his pal Angelina Jolie were nowhere in sight.) Before retiring every night, Herman prepares to fight to the death to protect what’s his. He checks his bulletproof vest, loads the shotgun, and drapes ammunition rounds on the nightstand.

Herman’s father died in his arms, shot in the face by intruders. Kaalie Botha’s parents were not so lucky: “You can’t kill an animal like they killed my mom and father. You can’t believe it.” Kaalie’s 71-year-old father’s Achilles tendons had been severed so he couldn’t flee. He was then hacked in the back until he died, his body dumped in the bush. His wife, Joey, had her head bashed in by a brick wielded with such force, the skull “cracked like an egg.”

Dr. Gregory H. Stanton heads Genocide Watch. He says the slaughter of 2000 Boers is genocide. (One wonders why "Carte Blanche" drastically underreported the number of murdered Boers, pegging it at 1400 all told, when back in January of 2006, Genocide Watch reported a total of 1820 murders.) The rates at which the farmers are being eliminated, the torture and dehumanization involved—all point to systematic extermination.

“Genocide is always organized, usually by the state,” Stanton has written on Genocide Watch’s website. Indeed, according to Sky News, the farmers believe “these attacks are an orchestrated, government sanctioned attempt to purge South Africa of white land owners, as has already happened in Zimbabwe.” Consequently, Zimbabwe, once the breadbasket of Africa, is now its dust bowl. Robert Mugabe, Zimbabwe’s Marxist President, is greatly admired by Jacob Zuma, South Africa’s strongman, and head of the African National Congress.

That certainly would explain why the ANC plans to dismantle the Commando System, a private Afrikaner militia that has existed since the 1770s, and is the only defense at the farmers’ disposal. More damning—and contrary to the pro-forma denials issued by the ANC’s oleaginous officials—The Daily Mail reported, in February 2006, that the government is dead-set-on forcibly seizing the land of thousands of farmers. By the year 2014, a third of the Boers’ property will have been given to blacks.

In democratic South Africa, dispossession is nine-tenths of the law.


You can read more about this journalist/writer who left South Africa after it became a 'democracy' here : Into the Cannibal's Pot | ILANA MERCER (http://ilanamercer.com/newsite/into-the-cannibals-pot.php)

vulcanised
22nd Oct 2011, 11:50
It's getting more and more difficult to spot the difference between SA and Zim.

unstable load
24th Oct 2011, 06:43
Indeed, vulcanised, it is.
I wonder how those who so vehemently supported the transition to ANC rule are feeling knowing that this is squarely in their laps.
Don't get me wrong, I agree that Apartheid was reprehensible, but by and large ALL South Africans were safer and better cared for than they are now.

Today we have clinics that are there to use up real estate and nothing else, an education system that has teachers with Primary school level knowlege trying to teach high school (after the ANC closed the "white run" Teacher's Colleges), lots of people calling themselves Plumber/Mechanic/Electrician that have never served a day as an Apprentice and that I would not let even close to my battered old wheelbarrow.
Come to SA and try to find a local Black that will unburden himself to you and you will be amazed at what the last 15 years have done to improve their existence......:=

But, we have got a "representative government" now, so all is OK.:ugh:

Bitter, me??:mad:

Capetonian
24th Oct 2011, 08:29
I agree that Apartheid was reprehensible, but by and large ALL South Africans were safer and better cared for than they are now.

When I say this to the lefties overseas I am told I'm 'racist'. Oddly enough, anyone who actually knows anything about Southern Africa agrees! Tne greatest experts are always thosewith the least expeirence and knowledge on the matter.

Solid Rust Twotter
24th Oct 2011, 09:30
Well, except for the new ruling elite raking in the shekels at the expense of their compatriots, but that's a small price to pay for their continued wealth and comfort.


Isn't it...?:confused:

unstable load
25th Oct 2011, 06:30
Capetonian,
Of course you are racist, old son...

The fact that the current lot turned out to be lying theives after they told everybody that wanted to listen that they were the salvation of South Africa and that the Rockspiders were murderers is also your fault because Apartheid made them thus.....

The mere fact that you hold a contrary opinion makes you racist.

Malema says so. It must be true......:ugh::ugh: and the lefties agree, so there!:{

Capetonian
25th Oct 2011, 07:06
The fact that the current lot turned out to be lying theives after they told everybody that wanted to listen that they were the salvation of (insert country name here)

Suitably edited, the above comment could apply to any politicians of any shade, anywhere, at any time in history! And it ain't gonna change!

rh200
25th Oct 2011, 07:20
Well you guys will all be saved soon, you'll get the SKA and it will be like a new dawn. Or that's what the lefty's over here tell me, it'll transform your education systems and inspire the young people to achieve.;)

Solid Rust Twotter
25th Oct 2011, 09:12
The SKA is going to SA? Didn't know that. It would be good on the job creation front, but I fear the upkeep may be crippling, particularly if there's anything left outdoors that can be carted off and sold. Hope it doesn't require too much power either. The system is failing and infrastructure is crumbling.

Have those running the SKA thought this one through...?

rh200
25th Oct 2011, 09:15
The SKA is going to SA? Didn't know that

I don't actually know that, but its a good rumor:p. I'm just presuming the huggie fluffys in Europe will want it that way for those reasons.

Mind you if Malema goes into full pelt then that might even be enough to put the huggie fluffys off.

Officially the decision is in Feb 2012 I think, though rumor has it we'll get an idea before that.

rh200
25th Oct 2011, 09:18
Hope it doesn't require too much power either.

About 900000 MWhr/year from what I hear, or 40 MW if you prefer.

Cacophonix
25th Oct 2011, 10:31
Mind you if Malema goes into full pelt then that might even be enough to put the huggie fluffys off.

If M gets his way then be prepared to hug South Africans (fluffy or otherwise) as they will all be packing for Perth.

Caco

rh200
25th Oct 2011, 12:13
If M gets his way then be prepared to hug South Africans (fluffy or otherwise) as they will all be packing for Perth


Wouldn't mind to much, especially if there the hardworking farming type, might bring back some life to our country towns.

They probally wouldn't winge as much as the poms, and they should preferably bring there own women, actually more than one woman would be good:E

dfdasein
25th Oct 2011, 15:56
Malema complains over intimidation

2011/10/24 05:45:26 PM
Johannesburg - State institutions are being used to intimidate people wanting to join the ANCYL's economic freedom marches, league president Julius Malema said on Monday.
"Innocent people are being threatened. Since when do state institutions intimidate people who have different political views?" Malema asked at a media briefing in Johannesburg.
He said bus companies had had to pull out of the march because they were being told that their contracts would be terminated if they transported protesters.
Malema said the ANCYL had met with ANC leaders to discuss the march.
"Some people who think they are more ANC than the ANC leadership are saying we are marching to undermine the ANC," Malema said.
"The leadership doesn't see it like that and they say that nothing is wrong with the march as long as it is successful and peaceful."
Malema said that ANC leadership had accepted the ANCYL's explanations.
The league expected 5 000 people to participate in the march, he said.
There would also be 1 000 youth league marshals, 500 police and private security company members to ensure the march was peaceful.
"The ANC leadership told us to look out for agent provocateurs. We might be infiltrated by people with ill intentions."
Malema said the ANCYL had been told to pay the Johannesburg and Pretoria municipalities R1m each.
"We will not pay to march. We have provided all the applications. If there is an uprising, people don't apply for permission," he said.
"Our demands are clear. We have no aim of bringing down the government. [This] is a popular government... We are rising to raise our concerns with them."
The "economic freedom youth mass action" is scheduled to take place on Thursday and Friday.

Members will march from Beyers Naude Square, to Chamber of Mines in Johannesburg, the Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE) in Sandton and the Union Buildings in Pretoria.

Malema said members were supposed to march along the M1 highway but instead are marching through alternative routes to prevent traffic delays.

"The route doesn't matter, Pretoria does. Anything that will get us there is OK," he said.

Malema said the league were marching to demand the appropriation of land without compensation.

"This is our grandfather's land, taken by force. We want that land back," he said.

"We constitute 90% of the country and the ownership [of land] should reflect that."
Ignorant investors
Malema spent the weekend travelling to townships across the Gauteng to drum up support for the march.

He visited Thembelihle, Diepsloot, Ivory Park, the Methodist Church in Heildelburg and Bantu Bonke township in Vereeniging.

"In Alex, the people stay like pigs. In Diepsloot the people stay like pigs. We want that land. Cowards are scared to speak of this issue."

Malema said marching to the JSE would not affect foreign investment in the country.

"People worry about reputation. Ask what the march in Wall Street is doing to the reputation of people there?" he asked.

"This is an international problem. Only ignorant investors won't know that."

Malema said the league would not discuss the ANC's succession debate during the march, but were preparing a document that would define the "ideal" leader for the ANC.

"We will share this document with the structures. We need to find the right person to lead the ANC beyond its 100 years," he said.

ANCYL deputy president Ronald Lamola reportedly said in Kimberley, Northern Cape on Saturday that the league was going to replace President Jacob Zuma with Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe.

Lamola said on Monday that he was "grossly misquoted".

"What I said was that deputy presidents always take over from the presidents... one day with this history Kgalema will become president," he said.

It is inevitable, but we did not say when this will happen."

The Congress of SA Trade Unions said that it would support the march, but condemned Lomola's remarks.

SA Municipal Workers Union spokesperson Tahir Sema said the union would stand by the march.

"We will be waiting on the outcome of the bilateral meeting between... Cosatu and the ANCYL, which would determine whether we would be supporting the march on the streets or not," he said.

stuckgear
25th Oct 2011, 18:30
Don't need a flashlight and a map to see where is heading.

Perhaps for christmas Zuma will get a copy of "How to deal with political opponents" by R. Mugabe in his stocking !

TZ350
25th Oct 2011, 19:09
unstable load [quote] Don't get me wrong, I agree that Apartheid was reprehensible, but by and large ALL South Africans were safer and better cared for than they are now. [ quote ]

As someone who lived in NZ during the " boycott / sanction SA to end apartheid " era, and who has quite a few SA friends ( most of whom are fortunate enough to be living outside the country ) I wonder if the examples of ANC sanctioned genocide and descent into anarchy are being reported by the media there. The white proponents of the boycott will be ignoring it for sure.............:rolleyes:

But militant the indigenous scum there will be secretly wishing that in the future.............

Maybe, just maybe, Apartheid in SA was not implemented as " equitably " as it could have been, but the examples of Zimbabwe and the deteriorating situation in SA today are well on the way to proving it was the only way to maintain a
( relatively ) safe and civilized society.

Capetonian
25th Oct 2011, 19:19
There's a lot of discussion on this topic going on here :

http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/466645-activists-3.html#post6770180

TZ350: :ok::D

Mike X
25th Oct 2011, 19:43
Malema is attending an art exhibition.

He's intensely staring at something hanging on a wall and asks a nearby lady : "was this sh1t painted by whites?"

"No", she answers, "it's a mirror."

Capetonian
26th Oct 2011, 08:20
There are Different Morals

OLD VERSION:
The ant works hard in the withering heat all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter.

The grasshopper thinks the ant is a fool and laughs and dances and plays the summer away.Come winter, the ant is warm and well fed.
The grasshopper has no food or shelter, so he dies out in the cold.

MORAL OF THE OLD STORY:
Be responsible for yourself!


MODERN VERSION:
The ant works hard in the withering heat and the rain all summer long, building his house and laying up supplies for the winter.

The grasshopper thinks the ant is a fool and laughs and dances and plays the summer away.

Come winter, the shivering grasshopper calls a press conference and demands to know why the ant should be allowed to be warm and well fed while he is cold and starving.

CCN, TV1,2 & 3, M-Net and Carte Blanche
show up to provide pictures of the shivering grasshopper next to a video of the ant in his comfortable home with
a table filled with food.
The country is stunned by the sharp contrast.

How can this be, that in a country of such wealth, this poor grasshopper is allowed to suffer so?

Kermit the Frog appears on Rian with the grasshopper and everybody cries when they sing, 'It's Not Easy Being Black..'

The ANCYL stages a demonstration in front of the ant's house where the news stations film the group singing, We shall overcome.

Then Rev. Desmond Tutu has the group kneel down to pray for the grasshopper's sake.

President Zooooma condemns the ant and blames President de Klerk, President PW Botha, HF Verwoerd and Apartheid for the grasshopper's plight.
Julius Malema exclaim in an interview with TV News that the ant has become rich off the back of the grasshopper, and both call for an immediate tax hike on the ant to make him pay his fair share.

Finally, the Government drafts the Economic Equity & Anti-Grasshopper Act
retroactive to the beginning of the summer.

The ant is fined for failing to hire a proportionate number of black bugs (BBE) and, having nothing left to pay his retroactive taxes, his home is confiscated under the Government Land Repo Act and given to the grasshopper.

The story ends as we see the grasshopper and his free-loading friends finishing up the last bits of the ant's food while the government house he is in, which, as you recall, just happens to be the ant’s old house, crumbles around them because the grasshopper doesn't maintain it.

The ant has disappeared to Australia, never to be seen again.

The grasshopper is found dead in a Drugs related incident, and the house, now abandoned, is taken over by a gang of Nigerian spiders who terrorize and ramshackle, the once prosperous and peaceful, neighborhood.
The entire Nation collapses bringing the rest of Africa with it.

skwinty
26th Oct 2011, 08:43
This is like the story of the Ants and the Grass Hoppers.
All it took was 4 years….

These are pictures of sugar/citrus/banana farm right next to Ngwenya
Lodge in Komatipoort, South Africa.

It was sold to (taken by) the SA Government 4 years ago, in their land
reform and re-allocation program whereby the riches is taken from the
white imperialists and distributed among the less advantaged, oppressed
"indigenous" community i.e. black empowerment.

This is what it looked like last week when the previous white owners thought
they were going to look at the development of their old homestead and farm.
They matched each scene (Aug 2011) with a 'before' photo (Jan 2007) and
the last photograph was taken from a helicopter where the remains (shell) of
the house is visible.

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic09.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic08.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic07.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic06.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic05.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic04.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic03.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic02.jpg
http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/Jan2007-Aug2011pic01.jpg

http://i997.photobucket.com/albums/af92/skwinty/DSC_0237.jpg

Capetonian
26th Oct 2011, 08:59
Thanks for posting that Skwinty, I was looking for it.

It sums up the way Africa is going, reverting to its orginal state. Of course it's all the fault of the imperialist racist colonial swine etc etc! When these people grow up and accept some responsibility for their actions - or rather, lack of action - instead of playing the blame game and pulling out the race card at every opportunity, we might see some improvement.

Meantime http://flyingpigtruck.com/images/FlyingPig_350.jpg

Capetonian
28th Oct 2011, 19:49
I've brought this across from the 'activists' thread as it is perhaps more appropriate here :


I first went to Robben Eiland in 1975, when it was still a prison. The warders used to organise dances and we went across on a very puke inducing ferry, if I remember correctly from Quay Four, where there is now a lovely restaurant. It wasn't a pleasant occasion, but it gave me a different perspective on the place that I overlooked from my kitchen window, without giving it a thought in those days, as we learned that 'it's jus' a blerry prison where they locked up a few kaffirs'. There was of course no internet, the media in SA were very controlled, and most of us believed what we were fed, mainly because it suited us, living in that paradise, to do so.

As times moved on and resistance to the Nationalist regime in SA gathered momentum, and I was one of the privileged people who had access to the international press (thanks to my ex- who worked at the airport and used to get me the UK newspapers off the weekly direct LON-CPT flight on Sunday morning.) Sunday mornings used to consist of a bit of HR (that's not hand relief by the way) and then reading the papers while she was burning the toast and trying to cook breakfast.

I started to get a different view of things but, perhaps to my shame, never really questioned any of it. As I said in another posting, Nelson Mandela has been held up as a saint, a criminal, and a terrorist, and perhaps he was all three at different times in his life.

Roll on the years, change of government, not for the better for most people but that's another story, and perhaps 6 years ago I went to Robben Eiland, now no longer a prison, on the tourist ferry from the Nelson Mandela Gateway at the Clock Tower in the Harbour, with my family. Before boarding the ferry you are locked into a darkened room to watch a video about the prisoners and what happened in those days. A deeply moving and humbling experience. Of course it's just another view of history from the opposite perspective to what we learned. I, having grown up in SA, was far more moved by it than the overseas visitors.

We were then taken round, as you were, by an ex-political prisoner, and the absence of bitterness and rancour as he addressed us was noticeable.

All South Africans, of all races and poltical persuasions, should have the opportunity to visit Robben Eiland and to learn what went on there. I am not convinced that the change of government in SA has benefited the majority as it was meant to, nor am I an apologist for apartheid - it went on around me and I admit that I benefited from it, but I did not know enough about what it implied to either support or oppose it, and that of course was exactly what the government wanted. It was like the weather, it just happened and was beyond our control, a fact that we accepted.

Indeed, many of us white folk should hang our heads in shame, but so should many of the black leaders of South Africa, in fact of many countries in Africa, now.

This is from the Robben Eiland website :

The entire six square kilometer island is now a UN World Heritage Site. A forlorn yet tranquil atmosphere permeates the place. One can almost hear audible sighs of relief from the island, once a haven for seals and ocean birds before sailing ships rounded the Cape. Sailors relentlessly plundered it for fresh seal meat and penguin eggs. Eventually it became a dumping ground for exiles and criminals. In the 17th century the Dutch were the first to banish their political troublemakers and Muslim leaders from the East Indies. Today there’s a beautiful shrine, called a kramat, built in honor of Tuan Guru. After his release this Muslim holy man went on to found Islam among Cape Town’s slaves.
Xhosa chiefs who rebelled against British rule were shipped to the island from the Eastern Cape. From the mid 1800’s criminals, prostitutes, outcasts, lepers and the mentally ill joined them. All were subjected too much cruelty and abuse.

And I end with a quote from Nelson Mandela :

“Today when I look at Robben Island, I see it as a celebration of the struggle and a symbol of the finest qualities of the human spirit, rather than as a monument to the brutal tyranny and oppression of apartheid. It is true that Robben Island was once a place of darkness, but out of that darkness has come a wonderful brightness, a light so powerful that it could not be hidden behind prison walls…
It's a great shame that the current leaders of SA do not live up to the promises and the expectation of Nelson Mandela.

Mike X
28th Oct 2011, 21:19
It's a great shame that the current leaders of SA do not live up to the promises and the expectation of Nelson Mandela.

Hell Capey, I've often thought about that.

I've often wondered what goes through his mind when he looks around him.

AAhh, Africa.

Time for a new version by Darwin, methinks.

unstable load
29th Oct 2011, 06:47
I've often wondered what goes through his mind when he looks around him.
I suspect he knew that those who came after him would be as they are.

He is/was obliged to stand on the moral high ground as the focal point of the struggle, which he has done admirably. His successors though, are under no such restrictions and it is showing all over the place with a gradual (occasionally) and often accellerated decay of what the country once was in terms of infrastructure alone, without getting into the emotions of the question.

Mike X
29th Oct 2011, 17:08
I suspect he knew that those who came after him would be as they are.

He is/was obliged to stand on the moral high ground as the focal point of the struggle, which he has done admirably. His successors though, are under no such restrictions and it is showing all over the place with a gradual (occasionally) and often accellerated decay of what the country once was in terms of infrastructure alone, without getting into the emotions of the question.

Very well and succintly put. I guess that's politics.

I gave up on the new South Africa about two years ago (yes, I have a very high tolerance threshold). I ,now, honestly believe that should this beautiful country fall below a certain level of economic ruin, there will be civil war.

I just hope my elder family members (liberal) do not have to experience it.

Capetonian
29th Oct 2011, 17:37
Is there a brighter future for white Africans?

By Fergal Keane, Former Africa correspondent


Zambia's recently appointed vice president is a white man, an unprecedented sign that Africa could finally be escaping the racial conflicts of its immediate past.

In isolated farmhouses, on big plantations, in small towns, sleeping in fan-cooled rooms or in the swelter of thatched huts, the planters and their workers did not hear the end creeping stealthily towards them through the elephant grass and coffee bushes.

There had, it is true, been trouble that might have forewarned them, but that was two months before in January, when workers rose on the cotton plantations.

The air force and vigilante squads had put an end to that problem.

Yes, in the early hours of 15 March 1961, the oldest white regime in Africa slept at ease.

So when the first screaming faces appeared in the open windows or standing at the end of beds, there was incredulity, and horror.

Across a 400-mile (640km) front, peasants armed mainly with axes, machetes and hoes descended on the dwellings of their colonial masters.

The attackers clubbed and hacked the Portuguese and their black and mixed-race servants. There were beheadings and mutilations, countless rapes.

In the town of Luvo, a sawmill owner and his family were reported to have been cut to pieces in their own machinery.

I had travelled widely in Angola towards the end of its civil war but knew nothing of this story until I picked up an old colonial-era book in the guesthouse where I was staying, about three hours north of the Zambian capital Lusaka.

The book was a long, lurid warning about the perils of white men losing their grip in Africa.

Not in his wildest imaginings, could the writer have foreseen the present - an Africa in which, this week, the old white liberal party of South Africa would elect a black parliamentary leader in a country ruled by a black government.

Or the appointment of a white farmer as vice president of overwhelmingly black Zambia.

In Zambia, the arrival of Dr Guy Scott in the vice president's chair suggests to nervous whites elsewhere - further south in Zimbabwe and South Africa - the possibility of a political future that they can be part of.

It would be very foolish to draw from these two developments any evidence of a new, post-racial trend in the politics of Africa but I think there is a potentially useful lesson in the story of Dr Scott.

When I met him in his office in Lusaka, his first comment was to instruct one of his assistants to get rid of two ivory tusks sitting at the top of the room.

"I campaigned against ivory trading. I don't want to see it in here," he said.

The accent is unmistakably that of a white, southern African farmer though not nearly as clipped as those further south.

Dr Scott's father emigrated from Glasgow to what was then Northern Rhodesia in 1927, and worked as a doctor on the railways.

Unusually among his peers, he spent much of his life advocating better conditions for Africans.

When his son Guy went into politics, it was to campaign against the corrupt and inefficient regime of Kenneth Kaunda, post-colonial Zambia's founding father.

"We are now very post-colonial," Guy Scott said to me, when I told him how strange it was to see a white man sitting in the vice president's chair.

What put him there was the overwhelming support of thousands of black Africans for whom he transcended any question of race.
'Passion for the land'

I thought of other white Africans - Joe Slovo, Ruth First and Helen Suzman in apartheid South Africa - who, in their very different ways, chose to step outside the privilege of skin.
Map showing Angola, South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe

The days of race massacre and terrible wars of counter-insurgency vanished forever on that day when I watched Nelson Mandela sworn in as president of a new South Africa at the Union Buildings in Pretoria.

But for Africa's whites, the long journey towards acceptance, to feeling that they have a future as of right on the continent is only really beginning.

Guy Scott's example suggests that the way forward is through a political involvement that recognises a constituency beyond white interests.

In Zimbabwe, that led some white farmers to be targeted by the state, but it won them unprecedented respect among black fellow citizens who were similarly persecuted.

More than 50 years after the Sharpeville massacre when police killed 69 demonstrators in the South African township, 50 years after the terrible massacres which launched Angola's war for independence, and 50 years after the horrific killing which accompanied Algeria's break with France and the mass exodus of white settlers there, the whites who have remained in Africa are a comparatively small group.
Stuart Kearns Farmer Stuart Kearns resettled from Zimbabwe to Zambia

And I have met many who feel there is no future for them on the continent.

But there are others who offer another view.

In Zambia, I met Stuart Kearns, a farmer who had been driven off his land in Zimbabwe.

His father had been killed during the bush war in what was then Rhodesia. Now here he was working new fields in another African country.

Why did he keep going? I asked. "It's the passion," he said, "the passion for the land."

That is something any African, black or white, can understand.

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Oct 2011, 09:31
Malema off to Mauritius after march: News24: South Africa: Politics (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Politics/Malema-off-to-Mauritius-after-march-20111029)

2011-10-29 23:02
Johannesburg - ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema jetted out to Mauritius two hours after leading the economic freedom march, the Sunday Times reported.

Malema was whisked away in a blue light convoy to catch a business class flight to party it up at his friend's wedding in Mauritius.

The wedding was that of his friend, Limpopo property developer David Mabilu.

Once Malema was seated on board the Air Mauritius aircraft, the pilot announced: "Please welcome Mr Julius Malema, the president of the ANC Youth League on board."

Mabilu, 42, married his fiancée, Phala Mokgophi, 38, at a glamorous ceremony on Saturday, in front of 300 guests.

The couple had splashed R10m on the three-day ceremony including flights and accommodation for their guests.

SAPA

Malema out of step with his own march
31-Oct-2011 | Justice Malala
Mahatma Gandhi, the Indian resistance movement leader, was not what one would call a Bollinger Bolshevik.

I am sure I do not need to explain what Bollinger is to leaders of the ANC Youth League and its president Julius Malema, but for readers of this column I shall explain what it is. Bolly, as the English like to call it, is a brand of champagne produced for nearly 200 years by the Bollinger family of France.

A Bollinger Bolshevik is a hypocrite, a person who claims to work for the people and to represent them, while at the same time feeling no qualms about rushing off to enjoy the trappings of wealth away from the sweaty masses.

When Gandhi and his supporters decided on a campaign of civil disobedience against British colonial rule, they decided to target the British salt monopoly and its taxation of this commodity. Many leaders of the Indian National Congress thought the campaign would not resonate with the masses.

But salt was a potent weapon. Everyone used it. Everyone needed it, for salt is lost heavily in the heat and sweat of India. Plus, the British would feel the might of the protest: takings from salt tax made up 8.2% of the British Raj's revenues.

Gandhi dressed simply, in the traditional Indian dhoti and shawl, just as many ordinary, working members of his community did. Not for him the flashy watch, the display of wealth, the assertion that he was setting an example for Indians to be wealthy.

And so on March 12 1930, Gandhi and 78 supporters set off on what was to be known as the salt march. They were to march 390km in 24 days.

This is what the Wikipedia website records of the march: "According to The Statesman, the official government newspaper which usually played down the size of crowds at Gandhi's functions, 100000 people crowded the road that separated Sabarmati from Ahmedabad.

"Every day, more and more people joined the march, till the procession of marchers became at least two miles long. At Surat they were greeted by 30000 people. When they reached the railhead at Dandi, more than 50000 were gathered."

The salt march led to mass civil disobedience in India, with hundreds of thousands arrested. As a beginning to a campaign, it was perfect in many ways: the message resonated with the masses, and those who articulated the campaign and its vision were truly rooted among the people.

For the majority of South Africans unemployment is a real and palpable phenomenon. In most families, a brother or a sister is jobless, a cousin has stopped looking and a once-promising young relative has turned to crime.

Joblessness is our salt. It touches all of us. Unfortunately we do not have a Gandhi. We have Malema. That's the problem.

Malema and the "leaders" he sits with in the ANC Youth League have no idea of the power of perception. They have no appreciation of the fact that ordinary people are not stupid, and will not be fooled or used for long.

Malema's swift departure for Mauritius after the league's "economic freedom" march last week illustrates the point perfectly. Lately Malema had put aside his Breitling watch, his fancy threads and Italian shoes. He donned a beret and styled himself as some sort of Che Guevara. Five thousand young people turned up to join his march from Johannesburg to the Union Buildings.

Then, as soon as Malema had used the march to make it clear to Zuma that he has some support, he had no qualms about commandeering the metro police - paid for by taxpayers - to rush him to OR Tambo airport so that he could attend a fancy party in Mauritius.

What Malema managed last week was to hijack a legitimate cause (unemployment) for his own selfish end (installing his own candidate in the party presidency). He has no real interest in the poor and unemployed. He has no real interest in inequality.

What Malema wants is power, and he will use many desperate people to get to it.

By Thursday evening, as he walked most of the way with his supporters, Malema had gained a lot of sympathy for his cause. But he does not have the sense to protect those gains. By Friday afternoon, as he rushed to OR Tambo escorted by metro police vehicles, all flashing lights and sirens blaring, he was already giving his supporters and those impressed by the march the middle finger.

It is easy to imagine him whistling: "The working class can kiss my arse / I've got the foreman's job at last."

And swigging a bit of Bolly.

Unfortunately for him, the poor can read, and they can see. And they will not be fooled for long.

We can only hope...

Capetonian
31st Oct 2011, 09:44
Unfortunately the poorest and the most desperate are the least educated and can't read, and if they could, they would understand very little. The ANC has a deliberate policy of keeping the masses uneducated, despite its avowed and undelivered intentions of educating people. Once again, nothing has changed for those people at the lower levels since the Nats were in power.

I rather suspect that Malema's champagne socialist, or Bollinger Bolshevik, lifestyle will not be seen as we see it, but rather as a symbol of the success that others can achieve if they follow and support him.

He is probably less dangerous than Mugabe because he is as uneducated and stupid as Mugabe is educated and intelligent, but he is nevertheless a great danger and a great worry.

I used to work with a champagne socialist. The woman was married to someone who was a director of a large Spanish banking institution (which folded due to massive fraud and inefficiency), drove a BMW 745, lived in a very upmarket private estate (La Moraleja) near Madrid, and used her husband's company chauffeur to go shopping and to and from work. We suspected he was providing other services too but that was never proved and is beside the point other than to illustrate the lack of morals of such people.

They proved their commitment to 'socialism' by going on holiday to Cuba, travelling first class on Iberia, and staying in 5 star hotels.

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Oct 2011, 09:51
Using that yardstick, the ANC must be a bunch of socialist icons then...

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Oct 2011, 14:31
Yet another step out over the abyss...

ANCYL members storm private land - Pietermaritzburg
Oct 31 2011 09:10

Durban - A group of people has invaded private land in Hilton outside Pietermaritzburg, claiming it belongs to ANC Youth League leader Julius Malema, according to a report on Monday.

Land owner Rusty Roodt told The Witness newspaper he would approach the high court in Pietermaritzburg on Monday to obtain a court order to stop people from invading his land.

He said the police had done nothing to stop the land invasion at Winterskloof in Hilton.

One of the land invaders reportedly said: "We are continuing what we started when we marched on Thursday and Friday to reclaim what is ours," in reference to an economic freedom march from Johannesburg to Pretoria led by Malema.

Mike X
31st Oct 2011, 21:55
One of the land invaders reportedly said: "We are continuing what we started when we marched on Thursday and Friday to reclaim what is ours," in reference to an economic freedom march from Johannesburg to Pretoria led by Malema.

I'll stay calm..

16 (I'm being nice) years and you still can't wipe your arse properly.

I am a white South African male who will stand next to anyone who believes in this country.

Enough with ignorance.

I hope Zuma gets his comeuppance, then Mbeki. Fekwits. Yeah, I',m seriously pissed off.

I live here.

Solid Rust Twotter
4th Nov 2011, 16:28
In your wildest acid fueled fantasies you couldn't make this stuff up...

Cape Town 'killing cable thieves' | ITWeb (http://www.itweb.co.za/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48976:cape-town-killing-cable-thieves)
The Congress of SA Trade Unions (Cosatu) will be laying charges against the Democratic Alliance (DA) for “trying to kill copper thieves”. The federation says it will report deputy Cape Town mayor Alderman Ian Neilson's plans to electrocute copper cable thieves to the Public Service Commission and the Human Rights Commission.
“Cosatu will also lay charges at the police station about the DA's intention to do grievous bodily harm, through the policy of the City of Cape Town.”
Nielsen, during a radio interview, confirmed that the city leaves on electricity for streetlights during the day, in some areas, to deter thieves from stealing the copper.
“This clearly is with the intent to electrocute the thieves. There has, however, been no notice sent out telling people that the electricity will be live with current. During the day, people generally expect the electricity to be off, and so people, including kids, try to steel copper to get money,” says Cosatu.
It explains that this is not an attempt to justify theft, but to caution against the intention to try and kill copper thieves by leaving the current on.
Several years ago, the border fence was electrified and people trying to cross the fence to get into SA were killed, according to the federation. Getting into the country may have been illegal, but it was found to be a crime when the lives of people were endangered, where they could be injured or killed.
“For Nielsen to say this on public radio is an outrage and the city administration must be held to account for this.”

Last resort

Neilson says the city rejects Cosatu's comments “with contempt”.
“The characterisation of copper thieves as a bunch of innocent children shows how far Cosatu is removed from reality. The thieves are criminals who deserve to be dealt with harshly.

“They are criminals, not only because they cost the citizens of Cape Town millions, but also because they endanger the lives of pedestrians and vehicle occupants when street lights are off for extended periods along dark roads and dangerous intersections. These are the real innocents whose lives are placed in danger by copper thieves.”
He adds that the matter of cable theft is taken very seriously.
“Leaving street lights on during the day is not standard practise. It is a last resort measure to deter thieves, and is only employed in areas where the city has experienced high incidents of cable theft.”
The deputy mayor explains that in suburbs relatively unaffected by cable theft, the city is able to use day-night switches activated by photo sensors to automatically switch off in daylight.
However, in hot spots, disruptions are invariably caused by cable theft and the city leaves the lights on in these areas on an ad hoc basis.
“All electricity installations should be treated with caution and treated as live. There have been no deaths as a result of street lights being left on.”
Copper theft and vandalism have cost Cape Town in excess of R10 million over the last six months.
“The financial losses suffered by the city due to cable theft means that the city has to spend large amounts of money on repairs. This is money that could have been better spent on upgrading the present electrical infrastructure or to expedite the provision of an electricity supply to newly established areas.”

Theft is murder

In August, energy minister Dipuo Peters said cable theft should be made a serious crime, since it's currently regarded as a petty offence.
The department said copper theft cost the country approximately R100 million last year, excluding the indirect costs incurred due to the disruption the theft caused to the economy.
“A person who steals the copper is a murderer, a thief and a saboteur,” said Peters. She explained that without power cables, basic services, including emergency medical operations, are threatened.

Anonymous action

Minister of community safety Dan Plato this week commended the actions of a business owner, which resulted in the arrest of four alleged copper thieves.
The owner's steps also resulted in the confiscation of 50 tons of copper, valued at about R2.4 million, in Brackenfell.
“I wish to commend the vigilance of the scrap yard owner and his staff, whose tip-off to the authorities aided police to bust the perpetrators.”
The scrap yard owner, who wishes to remain anonymous, was approached by the suspects who wanted to sell two containers of granulated copper. The businessman suspected foul play and contacted the police.
“The assistance of community members to bring criminals to book is key to increasing safety, and I urge the public to follow this example and report suspicious activities and crime to the police,” said Peters.

Solid Rust Twotter
10th Nov 2011, 05:26
Wonder if Malema gets it, although now that SA is a net importer of food rather than an exporter, it probably doesn't matter.

http://www.avcom.co.za/phpBB3/download/file.php?id=131571

Food security? We used to have that....

Capetonian
10th Nov 2011, 07:27
Am hearing he might be suspended.

Hopefully by his fat neck.

Solid Rust Twotter
10th Nov 2011, 07:44
Too little, too late.

Read "whitewash" (although he'd whine bitterly about that tag).

CathayBrat
10th Nov 2011, 10:54
Capetonian

Am hearing he might be suspended.

Julius Malema suspended for five years from ANC - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/southafrica/8880854/Julius-Malema-suspended-for-five-years-from-ANC.html)

We shall see. I never know if i should laugh or cry at what that country has become. I would think Madiba is probably crying.

stuckgear
10th Nov 2011, 12:19
:ugh::ugh::ugh:

And so Malema will strike a challenging party probably resulting in a rise in violence.

Malema is not just going to wander off into the wilderness and quietly expire.

Capetonian
10th Nov 2011, 12:29
Malema is not just going to wander off into the wilderness and quietly expire.

I fear you are correct, but his political credibility has been blown. By the time his suspension is over he will be too old to rejoin the ANCYL and hopefully he will be person non-grata within the ANC due to the shame he has brought upon them.

Somehow, although he's going to make a lot of noise, I don't think we're going to see a lot more of him on the political scene. The main concern I would now have is that he will appeal, for which he has 14 days, and win that appeal. He is only entiteld to one appeal and the decision of that is irrevocable.

In the meantime, he has angered a lot of people and there are quite few who would like to see him inside one of these
http://www.thepost.co.za/polopoly_fs/necklacing-tyre-july-27-1.1106873!/image/818145695.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_300/818145695.jpg or with a high speed lead injection.

stuckgear
10th Nov 2011, 12:49
I fear you are correct, but his political credibility has been blown.


You mean to say he actually had some ? :hmm:

I'd had him pegged as an opportunist rabble rouser. and there lies the danger, the rhetoric speaks to the rabble, hollow words maybe, but opportunism and telling the crowds want they want to hear does unfortunately carry some weight. true it may be down to a lack of education and literacy, but those tactics worked for Blair too.

it may result the ANC support split with hardliners following Malema and the corrupted shower believers following zuma.

of course malema might happen to expire in the time honoured tradition of the 'car accident' ! :suspect:

stuckgear
10th Nov 2011, 12:50
In the meantime, he has angered a lot of people and there are quite few who would like to see him inside one of these
http://www.thepost.co.za/polopoly_fs/necklacing-tyre-july-27-1.1106873!/image/818145695.jpg_gen/derivatives/box_300/818145695.jpg or with a high speed lead injection.


i'm surey winnie can always lay her hands on a box of matches. :hmm:

Capetonian
10th Nov 2011, 12:59
STAMP NOTICE RECALL CANCELLED

SUBJECT–Julius Malema STAMP

The Reported Problem: Stamp Was Not Sticking To Envelopes.

Course of Action: The Premiers Office Allocated
R1.5 Million To Test Stamp

FINDINGS
1. The stamp is in perfect order.
2. There is nothing wrong with the adhesive
3.People are spitting on the wrong side.

http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/malema.jpg

Solid Rust Twotter
10th Nov 2011, 13:12
I fear our Jules will be shuffled into another job where he can make waves and continue to spew his hatred of those with who he disagrees.

It's perhaps a telling peek into the agenda and psyche of the ANC that the charges of hate speech against him were not among those attracting censure, but rather quietly shuffled off out of sight despite a ruling by the judiciary that he refrain from hate speech and incitement to violence against whites.

Capetonian
11th Nov 2011, 08:09
Ag shame! It couldn't happen to a nicer person.

I hope the brake pipes on his car are well protected (not!)

'Vulnerable' Juju's finances probed

Rumours of Julius Malema's imminent arrest appear to have been greatly exaggerated, but investigations into his financial affairs by the Hawks, the public protector and the South African Revenue Service (Sars) are understood to be progressing and pose a threat to the ANC Youth League president, rendered vulnerable by his suspension from the party.

Malema in exile: I'll soldier on, vows defiant Julius - Newspaper - Mail & Guardian Online (http://mg.co.za/article/2011-11-11-defiant-julius-ill-soldier-on)
'Vulnerable' Juju's finances probed - Newspaper - Mail & Guardian Online (http://mg.co.za/article/2011-11-11-vulnerable-jujus-finances-probed)

Solid Rust Twotter
11th Nov 2011, 09:22
...rendered vulnerable by his suspension from the party...

So much for equality and other noble ideals that were touted as reasons for "the struggle". It appears the ruling elite are considered bulletproof as long as they toe the party line.

Capetonian
12th Nov 2011, 13:00
http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/Malema-1.gif

Solid Rust Twotter
12th Nov 2011, 13:35
Don't think so. He's appealing the verdict and will no doubt crawl out from under his rock to cause trouble elsewhere before too long. He's a useful foil to divert attention from the goings on of the regime.

unstable load
12th Nov 2011, 16:20
He's a useful foil to divert attention from the goings on of the regime.

Got it in one, Mr. Twottie!
Sadly, so many people miss or ignore this little factoid.
The man is a puppet.

james ozzie
12th Nov 2011, 21:41
I fear that Mr Julius now has the excuse and motivation to start his own party of extremist whack-jobs. To say that he lacks political credibility is untrue - he enjoys huge groundswell support among the poor and illiterate and his new party will draw a sizeable percent of votes. The result is he will get a number of seats in an election, as they are dispensed on the number of votes polled. And then he can put in his pals, as the candidates are not voted in by constituencies.

And when he gets enough seats, he will find himself the kingmaker with the numbers to block motions in the parliament. I am no fan of this guy but I think the ANC have just catapulted him to political power. He would have been less of a threat kept in the ANC.

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Nov 2011, 09:47
This young man hasn't quite got a handle on things, but it's a good start.:ok:


The Tokoloshe| News24 (http://www.news24.com/MyNews24/The-Tokoloshe-20111113)

The Tokoloshe
13 November 2011, 15:43

400 years ago Africa might as well been another planet in our solar system.

We were living in peace in our thatch huts. The 10 piece of cattle were grazing under the African sky. The head of the family sat in the shade of a tree drinking beer, the wives were working the land and the kids were making clay oxen to play with.

Every man’s dream, even to this day, no matter where on this planet you might come from. It sounds like the African version of the Playboy mansion. You sit in the shade and your multiple wives work for you.

Then the Europeans arrived and laughed at our people who had no education and thought our way of life was savagery. We had to fight them with spears to survive and ultimately lost the battle. They took our land and made us their slaves. They sold us to America and we became a trading commodity.

That is, what it is. We can’t change the past. So now 400 years later, what now?

We had to learn through bloodshed that we were not a planet of another solar system. We are part of this world and in this world there are certain rules that can’t be broken if you want to have food. Whether we like these rules or not, they are a reality. We can fight them like Mugabe does but it would only result in hunger.

Too many Africans are yearning for life as we knew it back then…but they just love the white man’s BMW and Lear Jet. The donkey cart is way too primitive for their liking and the cow hides that once covered our loins are not as “cool” as a Hugo Boss suit. We are a race that conveniently wants to fall back on our traditions when it suits us.

Not everybody has the ability to be as black and white as I am, and I mean that in more than one sense. I accept and acknowledge that. But I had to ask myself where do I fit in? Do I want to go back to my ancestral land in Dundee and demand this land be given back to me so I can acquire a few wives and create my own Playboy Mansion or do I like it here in Sandton with a Blackberry?

You would be horrified if you read all the messages I get on Facebook of people swearing at me, calling me a traitor, a disgrace to all black people in South Africa and that whites are paying me to blog my views.

What they don’t know is that I have been very blessed to come from a long line of fighters that have fought from the days of the spear right up to the AK47. They fought for my freedom and as sure as this sun is going to come up tomorrow, I am not going to mess up all they have fought for.

I have to address this cultural jail that stands between my people and true freedom.

Let us look at the Tokoloshe first.

You slept with your bed raised up on a few bricks so that when the Tokoloshe comes at night, he could move freely around your room without knocking his head against any object. For those that know this superstition will know it is a small mystical hairy thing that looks like a psychotic angry little bear and catches you at night. But if he knocks his head against your bed, you are going to get this menace all over you and he has a temper like no other on earth. Stop laughing, I’m dead serious!

I haven’t seen him yet. I badly wanted to see him when I was small because while others feared him, I thought he sounded cool and wanted to befriend him. My grandmother would look at me in absolute horror when I wanted to see the Tokoloshe. She would tell my mother “Eish this child scares me”.

When my Grandfather returned from exile, he brought me a Teddy Bear from London. I looked at the Teddy and instantly knew this was the Tokoloshe I always wanted to meet. So my bear got named Tokoloshe. I got smacked a few times because I would jump on my Grandmother when she takes her afternoon nap and scare her with Tokoloshe.

But the modern new reborn Tokoloshes sit in Parliament.

Parliament…hmmmm… let us discuss running this country, being an example to the citizens and our traditions.

In a new African landscape how practical is it having multiple wives? Nice idea, being a man. Come on you guys reading this, admit it!

But 20 children? Not so good because if I see what my university education and all the sundry trimmings are costing my father I would hate to think he had to make 20 of us. He would need to join the bank robbers to keep us at university.

My mother didn’t come cheap either, so he would have had to start stealing cattle from the white farmers if he wanted more wives. She cost him 40 head of cattle back in the 80’s. But wow, was she worth every cow! You should see her today in her Chanel dress …but 5 of them?

That is the humorous side of our tradition, but the more serious side is the following reality. There are only two of us and not twenty. So from my first breath my father has been there every step of my way thus far. We are his life and the reason he works this hard. He has spent every moment available guiding me into manhood (without sending me to a bush so some traditional butcher can slaughter my stuff beyond repair) How, as a father will you possibly find the time to devout this kind of attention to 20 kids? I don’t even want to think what life would have been like without my father. Unthinkable.

But what would I have been, if my father happily cavorted around claiming it is his culture and tradition?

I probably would have been marching with Malema on the road to nowhere and my father would have been dead by now. I would be visiting a graveyard and trying to find life’s answers from a stone. Back in the 80’s when he married my mother us blacks haven’t heard of HIV/Aids and those enlightened ones that did know about it, thought it was a homosexual disease.

So unbeknown to us we were killing ourselves. Merrily living out the principles of our tradition, not knowing we are committing suicide and resulting in 2 Million orphans just in South Africa alone, let alone the rest of Africa.

Wouldn’t this be a far more worthy cause to march about than march to get stuff you deliriously think should be given to you for free?

Imagine what must be going through the mind of a 4 year old kid, who is left all alone tonight, with nobody to take care of him or her? None of these orphaned kids asked to be here, so imagine how a child has to try and make sense of all of this?

So why do I still have my parents? Because my father knew he can’t run around making babies that he can’t provide for. He had to think soberly about life with a new millennium looming. He had us because he wanted us. We were to become his legacy. We weren’t conceived in a moment of uncontrolled lust or in the name of an outdated tradition.

We won’t discuss the merits of the social grant for mothers with kids and absent fathers but alarmingly condoms are still very unpopular accessories amongst the population of Africa. Until recently we had that scary old Bat as a minister of health. Tokolosh personified. Beetroot juice and cabbage leaves will cure the disease, while the Chief would shower after a bit of inyama.

What did my father do 7 years ago when I reached puberty? He sat me down and told me the facts and how it all happens. Every time I leave the house he jokingly says he will draw blood when I return and have me tested. He jokes, but it has sunk in so deep now, I think about the consequences every time I see a gorgeous girl.

What do my people do? Until recently it was better swept under the table than discuss the matter. It became unlawful to state a person has died of AIDS on his death certificate. How big is this denial?

Please don’t make a comment after you have read this and tell me this disease was invented by the Apartheid rulers to wipe us out. I’m not even going to discuss that old stale story! And speaking about Apartheid, get over it. It has no relevance in 2011. Dead, gone, born 31-05-1961 and was executed on 27-04-1994. Our ultimate justification for everything that we do wrong can’t come back so we can stone it.

The most bizarre superstition was invented to “cure” the disease. Rape a girl and it goes away. By girl, I mean little ones that had to helpless have their lives taken from them without their consent. Grown men believing in rubbish like this. How in the name of God can you possibly justify this, no matter what your traditions or beliefs are?

We have now for far too long shrugged our shoulders and hid behind our traditions on the one hand and on the other we want to sit at the UN and pretend we have the wisdom to help decide the fate of other countries. In this world we need to merge with, you have:

1. One wife. You sleep around, you die.

2. You have more kids than you can provide for, they starve and when they grow up they will steal to survive because you didn’t have enough money to send them to a decent school. The government schools are a complete waste of time because the teachers are never in class.

3. You can’t sell or trade with your daughters. They are not consumer goods.

4. You study or qualify as an artisan so you can earn your own keep and build your own house. There isn’t enough money going around building 40 Million free houses. You can wait until the sun burns itself out, it is not going to happen. So live with it.

5. Forget the white man’s wealth. It has long gone been transferred to Sydney. There isn’t any left here. Create your own. Forget about redistribution. Use your logic. The wealth of 5 Million whites was never going to send 45 Million blacks into a blissful retirement. The white wealth Malema cries about daily, was only in the hands of a few whites.

So until we move ourselves forward and merge ourselves with the world, we will remain primitive. 17 Years after independence you don’t dance from Beyers Naude to the stock exchange and have foreign journalists film your insanity in the name of freedom. We were freed 17 years ago, embrace it and use your freedom to trade with the world, not crash your own stock market.

We can march up to the Union Buildings until the cows come home. We are not going to move ourselves forward until we free ourselves from ourselves!

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Nov 2011, 10:59
Hayibo again...

Malema’s political career on the line as BBC demand return of their Teletubby
PRETORIA. Children’s hero and family entertainer Julius Malema looks set to have his political career terminated before the end of the week after the BBC announced they had commissioned a new season of Teletubbies for 2012. “We won’t be doing it without Tinky Winky,” said a spokesperson for the broadcaster, Clumsy Segway.
While it had been rumoured for some time that Malema and Tinky Winky were one and the same person, it was only officially confirmed a week ago when Malema stepped out at his friend’s wedding in Mauritius wearing his original purple suit.
Segway, who admitted that Tinky Winky had been missing for some time, said he was delighted that one of the shows principal characters had been located again ahead of the new season.
“With hindsight we should have looked for him in the Youth League a long time ago,” said Segway who admitted that the television show and the ANCYL had much in common.
“Both are aimed at children between the ages of one and four,” he said, “But both enjoy substantial cult followings with older generations – mainly university and college students and other people with nothing to do.”
Segway went on to suggest that much of the successful Teletubby formula had been adopted by the ANCYL as it plotted its way to the summit of the South African political landscape.
“The mixture of repetitive, non-verbal dialogue, simple songs, bright colours and the occasional forays into physical comedy has seen it tap into the very heart of its demographic,” he said.
Asked if the 2012 Teletubbies would dress in the same colouful suits they wore at the turn of the century, Segway said that while he was not a costume expert, that a fatty in a purple outfit had as much class as a Peter Andre, Katie Price wedding.
“Which probably means it will be business as usual then for the Tubbies,” he said.
Segway added that he was not surprised that Tinky Winky had failed to avoid controversy during his time in charge of the ANCYL. As a Teletubby he was seldom out of the spotlight and in 1999 he dominated the headlines for the first time when American cleric Jerry Falwell claimed he was a homosexual role model for children.
Asked to comment on Falwell’s claims a spokesperson for Malema, Dipsy Makgalemele denied them. “He has never been a homosexual nor a role model,” he said. “And he never will be.”
When asked how Tinky Winky had gone unnoticed for so long at the head of a such a prominent political organization Makgalemele pointed to the sun as it began to set on the horizon and muttered, “Time for Telly bye bye,” before he rushed off to an unknown destination, where according to reports, the people dressed much better.

Capetonian
15th Nov 2011, 06:16
http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/image010.jpghttp://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/image012.jpg

Solid Rust Twotter
22nd Nov 2011, 05:38
Another nail in the coffin. This will serve to punish anyone daring to bring to light state and ANC corruption from the past and in the future. This bill is for the exclusive benefit of the corrupt regime running SA and will make state fraud and cronyism even more prevalent than it is now.

Info Bill: ANC gets its way

September 3 2011 at 11:24am
By ANDISIWE MAKINANA
Independent Newspapers

After more than a year of wrangling, compromises and reversals, and in the face of sustained civil society opposition, the controversial Protection of State Information Bill is close to becoming law.

On Friday ANC MP Elleck Nchabeleng punched the air with delight as Cecil Burgess, chairman of Parliament’s specially convened committee on the bill, announced it would be sent for printing.

Minutes earlier, committee members had approved the bill clause by clause, giving the nod to provisions that will see mandatory jail terms for the possession or disclosure of classified information.

According to the bill, anyone who comes across such documents should notify, and surrender them to, the police or a security agency – or they will be guilty of an offence and liable to a fine or imprisonment of up to five years.

This sentence increases to 15 years in the case of disclosing classified information relating to the intelligence services, and 25 years when the information is handed to a foreign state.

Until the last minute, opposition parties tried to persuade the majority ANC MPs to reconsider the three contentious clauses dealing with the “unlawful” possession or disclosure of classified information.

The DA, ACDP and Inkatha Freedom Party all proposed that the ruling party add a clause to protect those who reveal classified information in the interests of the public.

But the ANC responded that the time for discussion had passed, and the clauses were put to the vote.

The eight ANC MPs, excluding Burgess, out-voted the opposition

The committee will meet on Monday (Today) to deal with the financial implications of the bill in light of the proposal for a classification review panel, which will review and oversee status reviews, classifications and declassifications, and will require funding.

The bill will then go to Parliament for a debate and approval before it can be signed into law by the president. - Saturday Star

Still no sign or word from those who made all that noise to get these larcenous thugs into power back then...

Capetonian
22nd Nov 2011, 05:48
Still no sign or word from those who made all that noise to get these larcenous thugs into power back then...
No, and there won't be, because they fall into one of two camps. Either they are like the Euro defenders who can't see anything wrong, or they won't admit that they were wrong and they crawl away back under their stones.

Meanwhile as the ANC restricts press freedom to what may prove to be a greater extent than the Nats ever did, today is known in SA, somewhat ironically, as 'Black Tuesday'.

http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/Capture-1.jpg

Al Fakhem
22nd Nov 2011, 09:36
Interestingly, it's only the "white" slave trade that is mentioned by African politicians. How about the Arab slave trade?

Arab slave trade - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arab_slave_trade)

lonkmu
22nd Nov 2011, 09:38
Julius Malema stated yesterday :

"I want the people of South Africa to treat me the same way they treated
Nelson Mandela".

Evita Bezuidenhout immediately responded :

"What a great idea. Let's start with the 27 years in jail . . . . . "

cavortingcheetah
22nd Nov 2011, 14:15
The common biographical sketch of the British Shadow Secretary of State for Wales goes thus:

(When Hain was 10, he was awoken in the early hours by police officers searching his bedroom for 'incriminating documents.)

May South Africans expect to be favoured with a statement from Peter Hain's office even acknowledging the passage of the Secrecy Act, the successor to that under which he claims persecution?

Solid Rust Twotter
22nd Nov 2011, 17:48
Quite so, Mr C. It appears the old apartheid era act was not restrictive enough for our glorious new rulers, so they drafted one that really does the job.

Any word from those who agitated to place this shower in power?





Anything...?

bnt
22nd Nov 2011, 19:39
Any word from those who agitated to place this shower in power?
Well, Tutu thinks it's "insulting (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-15822105)". Plus:
The office of Nelson Mandela, South Africa's first post-apartheid president and also a Nobel peace laureate, also has expressed reservations about the bill.

The Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory said the bill failed to strike a balance between free speech and protecting legitimate state secrets.
Sies tog ..?

unstable load
23rd Nov 2011, 06:05
It must be really disheartening for Mandela to see himself reduced from Icon to has-been in the eyes of his beloved ANC.
His own family is even squabbling over his corpse while it still has breath in it......

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Nov 2011, 06:06
http://www.zapiro.com/Cartoons/m_111122tt.jpg
http://www.zapiro.com/Cartoons/m_111123tt.jpg

Capetonian
23rd Nov 2011, 11:42
Under the Nats, in the good old days, the press was censored. The joke that did the rounds was :

"This is a democracy. You can say anything you like, and we can do anything we like to you for saying it."

There seems to be far greater repression now than there was under the Nats.

Meantime, the sense of humour will always live on

http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/Malema-2.jpg
(Malema builds R16 million palace)

cavortingcheetah
23rd Nov 2011, 11:54
If you feel politely pressured you could write to Peter Hain as I did:

Dear Mr Hain,

I write from Johannesburg where those who supported your efforts to embargo, embarrass and excommunicate the apartheid South African regime now find themselves traduced by the very political party that you worked so hard to install. I refer to the ANC and the passage of the Secrecy Act so recently condemned by Desmond Tutu, André Brink and the office of Nelson Mandela.
It would be most gratifyingly appropriate to hear that you have raised this matter in the British House of Commons. It is surely only fair that South Africans of all races and colors should expect nothing less than a vociferous protest both from your government and you in particular.

Yours sincerely,

cavortingcheetah
(real name supplied of course)

[email protected]

Capetonian
23rd Nov 2011, 12:50
Peter Hain MP
39 Windsor Road
Neath
SA11 1NB

Tel: 01639 630152
Fax: 01639 641196

Sir (I can't bring myself to use the word 'dear' to such people)

During the many years that you campaigned for democracy and freedom from oppression for the people of Rhodesia and South Africa, did it ever cross your mind that the result would be the substitution of relatively benign dictatorships for far more malignant and dangerous forms of oppression and bad governance?

Are you satisfied, now that conditions for the huge majority of people in those countries and the neighbouring territories are now worse than before the much vaunted 'democracy' for which you campaigned so vociferously?

Have you spoken out against the poisonous regimes of Robert Mugabe and Jacob Zuma? Do you intend to do so or are you using your position as MP for Neath and Shadow Secretary of State for Wales to abrogate your responsibilty for the harm that you and like minded politicans have wrought upon Southern Africa?

I would appreciate answers, and not just empty platitudes, in response to these questions.

stuckgear
23rd Nov 2011, 13:51
Hain is one of those pompous self inflated [email protected] that likes to pontificate from the sidelines.

he'll have no qualms and in the liberal left wing fluffy mind, they are right will always be right, no matter what the resultant carnage is.

Bear in mind:

- He resigned from ministerial office over the failure to declare donations to his campaign in 2008.

- He was an enthusiastic supporter of the ill-fated AV system campaign in May 2011.

However, sometimes the pompous bubble these fcukwits live in needs bursting from time to time.

good job.

you should circulate the letter to members of the Zim and SA diaspora dotted around teh globe and freinds, relatives and like minded thinkers remining in country. At the very least it will swamp him mailbox with the results of failed rhetoric.

cavortingcheetah
23rd Nov 2011, 15:31
In fact I was rather fond of the old regime and I have always found the object of my quoted e mail to be utterly loathsome.

paully
23rd Nov 2011, 16:54
This just a prelude to Zuma declaring himself President for life ala `Mad Bob`. The watch the :mad: hit the fan ...and it will..:rolleyes:

Capetonian
23rd Nov 2011, 17:16
In fact I was rather fond of the old regime and I have always found the object of my quoted e mail to be utterly loathsome.

I read your words and thought I'd written that! My sentiments exactly. Despite it being 'politically incorrect' to say so, I was also rather fond of the old regime, not so much when it was in power but in hindsight when one compares it with the current shower (pun intended!) of corrupt incompetent despots (or should that be tosspots!).

Going a step further, many black people I know in SA and ZW feel totally disillusioned and deceived by the 'democratic' governments and whilst they might not exactly welcome back the old regimes, they certainly recognise the merits they had, perhaps a properly functioning infrastructure and checks and balances that worked being amongst them.

If Permatan Pete and Bliar entered a context for the most loathsome I would not know which to vote for. Bliar's even more loathsome wife might tip the vote towards him!

Solid Rust Twotter
24th Nov 2011, 05:14
Game over...

http://www.avcom.co.za/phpBB3/download/file.php?id=132779

unstable load
24th Nov 2011, 05:22
Twottie,
Seeing Zapiro at work often has me wondering whether this whole censorship thing isn't aimed exclusively at him....:D:D

Sad days indeed, with worse to come as the stranglehold starts to be felt.

Capetonian
24th Nov 2011, 14:38
http://i1226.photobucket.com/albums/ee406/Helios340/Malema21nov.jpg

rmcb
25th Nov 2011, 10:44
Nando's: Last dictator standing - YouTube

unstable load
25th Nov 2011, 16:31
Aaah, Nando's!
They had some great and often short lived ads.
Not scared to extract the wee from just about anyone.
Good food, too.

cavortingcheetah
25th Nov 2011, 17:42
The Original Home of Nando's (http://www.nandos.co.za/)

Solid Rust Twotter
26th Nov 2011, 03:01
Yet another party stalwart caught with his greasy little fingers in the cookie jar...

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v667/4HolerPoler/Zapiro.gif

Posted at 12:12 UTC. Dangblasted time stamp fairy.

Solid Rust Twotter
26th Nov 2011, 07:30
Afraid to say Nando's no longer make good food. Their sauces have become watered down and tasteless and the chook is much the same. Prefer to make my own when it comes to peri-peri huku.

Great ads though.:ok:

Capetonian
26th Nov 2011, 07:36
Can concur with that. The last few times I've been to Nando's it's been disappointing, even more so in the UK where you have to put up with poor or irritatingly obsequious service from people who speak incomprehensible English (despite being English - the foreign staff often speak better!). And you have to stand in queue to order your food.

TZ350
26th Nov 2011, 10:54
Quote:
Still no sign or word from those who made all that noise to get these larcenous thugs into power back then...

Capetonian [Quote ]
No, and there won't be, because they fall into one of two camps. Either they are like the Euro defenders who can't see anything wrong, or they won't admit that they were wrong and they crawl away back under their stones.

Meanwhile as the ANC restricts press freedom to what may prove to be a greater extent than the Nats ever did, today is known in SA, somewhat ironically, as 'Black Tuesday'. [Quote]


I wonder if those f:mad:g scum who supported sanctions against the pre Mandela regime and exercised great delight in causing maximum aggravation to any white SA passport holder applying for visas in the mid 90's, will reverse their policies in the forseeable future and grant immediate asylum status to all white SA citizens when the place turns into Zimbabwe Mk 2......................

unstable load
27th Nov 2011, 18:28
TZ350,
Dream on, old son!
They have absolved themselves of any sense of responsibiliy by declaring it "job done" the day Mandela got into power.
After that, it's simply "Tuffski-shitzki" and no fault of theirs. As long as the big bad A-word was gone it was a win for them. Consequences, schmonsequences.

PS, SRT, that statement should have carried the caveat of "take aways only" ......

Solid Rust Twotter
27th Nov 2011, 19:16
I wonder if those fg scum who supported sanctions against the pre Mandela regime and exercised great delight in causing maximum aggravation to any white SA passport holder applying for visas in the mid 90's, will reverse their policies in the forseeable future and grant immediate asylum status to all white SA citizens when the place turns into Zimbabwe Mk 2......................

Big fat hairy chance...

Mike X
27th Nov 2011, 19:57
Big fat hairy chance...

'bout sums it up. :yuk:

Solid Rust Twotter
29th Nov 2011, 08:58
Having the dirt on Zuma is such a great get-out-of-jail-free card....

The Schabir Shaik guide to healthy living - News - Mail & Guardian Online (http://mg.co.za/article/2011-11-29-the-schabir-shaik-guide-to-healthy-living)

The Schabir Shaik guide to healthy living
CHRIS ROPER AND LISA VAN WYK JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA - Nov 29 2011 07:13


Today marks 1 001 days since convicted fraudster and Zen Master Schabir Shaik was released on medical parole due to terminal illness. His continuing enjoyment of life against the odds and his never-say-die attitude are a shining example to sick people the world over -- especially sick people stuck in nasty jails.

Now, for as little as R50 000 deposited in a Swiss bank account, you too can be part of the Shaik 'n Bake Health Club. For a full programme and diet plan, please mail [email protected] In the meantime, here's a small taster of what you can expect.

The key to the Shaik 'n Bake Lifestyle Plan, as revealed by the master himself, is simple. Shaik pays careful attention to his nutrition, and maintains a healthy balance of relaxation and exercise, while making time for the spiritual aspects of his life -- a simple lifestyle that's doing him the world of good.

Follow Master Shaik's example with these top health tips.

Nutrition
If life hands you a bowl of prison gruel, make samoosas. It's a well-known fact that a healthy diet is an essential part of overall wellbeing, and this becomes even more important when one's health is below par. For Master Shaik, there is no better place to make sure your body is getting exactly what it needs than at some of the finest restaurants in KwaZulu-Natal. It makes perfect sense -- slogging over a hot stove can be tedious, especially when you're sick.

Just ensure you make wise food choices -- something Master Shaik is very good at. The pasta dish named after him at Spiga d'Oro, one of his favourite restaurants, contains garlic (good for the immune system, and a homage to great Health Ministers of the Past), olives, tomatoes and basil. Delicious and nutritious. And Ile Maurice, where he celebrated his wife's birthday, is renowned for its seafood -- a great source of protein. And don't forget the Tibetan goji berries. According to the Sayings of Shaik, the rules by which you will live your life, you should be "f***ing gorging goji berries" until one is "sh**ing the things out". Inspiring words from one of nature's survivors.

Exercise
Physical exercise is key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle in the face of a terminal illness. Being chased around a jail cell by a man called, to choose a random name, Mac, does NOT qualify as exercise, unless he catches you. Physical activity gets your heart and blood pumping and gives you a nice healthy glow. Master Shaik certainly takes his own advice to heart. A round of golf provides gentle exercise along with a chance to get some sunshine and fresh air. If you're feeling up to anything more vigorous, practise martial arts. But Shaik, bless his cotton Crocs, recommends you sign up for a class rather than trying out your moves on random members of the public. That's Level Three stuff (another R50 000 in the Swiss bank account, please), and only safe for adepts. And anyway, the stress of having charges laid against you won't be good for your blood pressure, even if they are dropped.

Which leads us to ...

Relaxation
Take relaxation seriously. When you're unwell, you deserve a little time out. Three nights at an exclusive luxury lodge might just do the trick. To make sure that no one disturbs your R&R, hire a R47 500-a-night private villa -- if you can afford it, of course. And if you can't, no matter. All good things come to those who wait, especially if while you're waiting you're compiling your memoirs, tentatively entitled: Scuttlebutt: The Untold Story of the Arms Deal. Trust us, someone else will eventually decide to do their bit for your spiritual and physical wellbeing and help out.


Spirituality
No matter what your religious beliefs, many believe the trick to healing lies in finding time to explore the spiritual aspects of your life. Just not jail time, obviously. So it's a lucky thing that Master Shaik's parole officers allow him the time to attend mosque each week. Inner peace and quiet reflection cannot be underestimated. Just be careful that you don't undo the good this does by getting into violent altercations outside your chosen place of worship. Sure, there may be no charges brought against you, but a two-day stay in the Big House while authorities assess what actually happened is really the last thing a terminally ill person needs.

If you act now and purchase the Shaik 'n Bake Lifestyle Plan, you'll get a limited edition commemorative The Sayings of Master Shaik booklet, hand-lettered on exquisite prison-issue toilet paper using a Bic pen smuggled into jail in the rectum of a government-approved minister. This includes philosophical conundrums such as: "If a terminally ill man doesn't die in a forest of lies, and there's nobody there to hear him, does he in fact not die?" But wait! There's more! You'll also get Shaik 'n Friends, a CD of Master Shaik singing with some of our most lovable and charismatic politicians. The disc features favourites such as Me and Jacob Zee, with its touching verse: "Terminal's just another word for nothing left to tell/ nothing, I mean nothing honey if I get free/ yeah feeling good is easy Lord if I don't sing the blues/ so get me the hell out of here/ you know feeling terminal was good enough for me/ good enough for me and my Jacob Zee."

It's 1 001 days and counting! Be part of the miracle, sign up now!

Capetonian
8th Dec 2011, 07:08
How sad is this??
There are many microcosms of decay that one can use as examples of the decay of the macrocosm of South Africa. In many respects the booming of South Africa's mining industry and its current decay under the ANC's BEE system is a microcosm of the booming of the Republic of South Africa under Apartheid and its decay under the ANC regime.

During the first half of the 20th century, gold was discovered on several farms south of the Free State town of Odendaalsrus. After the Second World War, Sir Ernest Oppenheimer and his Anglo American Corporation, the
progenitor of Anglo Gold bought up all the prospecting rights in the area and decided to mine the richest gold find in the history of South Africa.

Prices of property in Odendaalsrus skyrocketed so Sir Ernest Oppenheimer decided that he would build his own town for his miners instead of paying the exorbitant prices in Odendaalsrus.

He drove 20km south and climbed a hill called "Koppie-alleen" (Hill alone) and looked down on the plains where his mines would be and decided to build a town from scratch called "Welkom", named after the farm where the gold was first discovered.

The people of Odendaalsrus were upset and took him to court objecting to the new town. Ernest Oppenheimer's lawyer was Abram (Bram) Fischer, an Afrikaner Communist and Anti Apartheid activist that would later defend Nelson Mandela at the Rivonia trial.

Fischer was a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University and travelled to the Soviet Union in 1932. He was also later awarded the Lenin Peace Prize (1966) the Soviet equivalent of the Nobel Peace Prize. The prize was normally
awarded to prominent Communists who were not Soviet citizens.

Fischer, incidentally, was married to Molly Krige, the niece of liberal Boer General Jan Smuts. She was also a staunch Communist.

Nevertheless, in 1947 the Provincial council issued Oppenheimer with the birth certificate of the town of Welkom.

In his mind Oppenheimer envisioned a beautiful garden city with broad streets. He commissioned the design of Welkom to leading town planner William Backhouse and landscape gardener Joane Prim. For Backhouse the design of a town from scratch was a dream come true. Space was not a problem on the Free State plains, so he designed the streets broad with no traffic lights, only roundabouts, to keep the traffic flowing and no high-rise buildings. In the centre of Town he wanted a Roman Forum with a square where town folk could gather. It was surrounded by a horseshoe shaped road of 75metres wide, known affectionately by the town people as the
"Hoefie" short for the Afrikaans word "hoefyster" meaning horseshoe. Sports clubs, golf clubs, olympic swimming pools, cinemas, theatres, hospitals, parks, schools, a technical college and an airport were built, all
with the riches of the gold below the soil.
The town attracted people from all over South Africa. Money was flowing, salaries were high. By the 1970's Anglo Gold was operating six massive mines with 22 deep level shafts in which 122,000 people worked. The mines of Welkom were producing 35% of South Africa's gold, which in turn was producing 75% of the world's
gold.
Everyone was driving a new car at least every year. They would say that when the ashtray was full, it was time to buy a new car. The "hoefie" gave rise to the hot-rod culture of Welkom where young men would drive around at night showing off their new Ford Cortinas with eagles painted on the bonnets and flames on the sides, fur on the dashboard and plastic oranges on the radio antennae. This culture also gave rise to the building of a Grand Prix racing track at Welkom. Times were good for blue collar whites.

Even in the nearby black township of Thabong and the coloured township of Bronville, the living standards were very high.

But then the ANC took over in 1994, mostly with the help of the Oppenheimers and J.P. Morgan who founded Anglo American Corporation in 1917. Hardly have the ANC communists taken over or they wanted not only a cut of the pie from the mining industry, but the whole thing.
Black Economic Empowerment was introduced and mines had to give away half of their assets to black ANC members. For Anglo American Corporation the writing was on the wall and before they could lose everything, they merged with Minorco in 1999 and moved their assets to London. In the last 10-15 years more than 100,000 jobs have been lost in Welkom. The skip wheels of the mines are not turning anymore and the noise of the mines
as well as the hot-rods have fallen silent. The ziggurat-like walls of the slime dams next to the R73 road are the last remnants of a once thriving mining industry.
Today, the mines are in the hands of BEE companies and being plundered for scrap metal. The municipality of Matjabeng is run by the ANC. In June 2011 it came into prominence as one of the worst examples of ANC corruption and misrule. How a small town blew R2bn on dodgy deals <http://www.timeslive.co.za/local/article1113227.ece/How-a-small-town-blew-R2bn-on-dodgy-deals>

Most of the whites have left Welkom. Blacks make up 90% of the population and whites 8%. To say that the town is a shadow of its former self is an overstatement. The decay is obvious everywhere and it is fast becoming a ghost town. 1500 staff houses at the mines are standing empty. Even churches have closed their doors.
The remaining whites in the area, mostly farmers are struggling under stock theft and brutal farm attacks, tortures and murders <http://www.iol.co.za/news/south-africa/farmer-wife-worker-injured-in-farm-attack-1.474519>.

Elsewhere it is not going any better. The Aurora mine at Grootvlei, which is owned by the Zuma and Mandela families and at one stage employed 5000 workers now have less than 200. Aurora is now a ghost town <http://www.sowetanlive.co.za/news/2011/01/31/aurora-mine-now-just-a-ghost-town>

On the 8th of May 2011 in a Carte Blanche TV show, it was revealed that Cosatu calls the owners of Aurora (Zuma and Mandela) "Super exploiters". If there is an abyss of desperation these men at the hostels are in it. At
Grootvlei, near Springs, the water and electricity have been cut, the toilets are a shock. On good days they have hot food.

Two hours drive to the west is the Orkney mine in Klerksdorp. There is an inescapable feeling of sadness here. Cooking pots are empty here too. Ntsani Mohapi has been on the mine since the mid '70s, he should be in line for a pension but that is all gone now. There are people who are crying, there are people who are dying because we deal with people who are lying."
As things stand hundreds of miners are still in limbo; millions are outstanding in salaries. Wives have left husbands, children have dropped out of school, people have been blacklisted. They can't even claim UIF.

The allegations against Aurora's directors are damning: since they took over the Pamodzi mines in 2009, which were fully operational at the time, they have been accused of not paying salaries, making endless broken promises, misappropriating UIF and pension fund money and stripping assets of mines they haven't paid for. Source Carte Blanche <http://www.solidaritylegalservices.co.za/aurora-iii/>

Even the BBC has extensively reported on how the Zuma and Mandela families exploit their workers http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-13275704> and treat them worse than dogs. While the Zuma and Mandela family members grow rich and fat, they do not pay their starving workers, which effectively makes them slave owners.
Is this the "Freedom" Mandela and Zuma spoke about and fought for?
They were not Freedom Fighters. They were not fighting for the Freedom of the people, rather for the enslavement of the people under a communist yoke. The Grootvlei mine now stands in ruins <http://www.iol.co.za/business/companies/grootvlei-mine-now-stands-in-ruins-1.1075667>

What could not be stolen and sold for scrap is cut up and sold to Chinese state-owned mining company Shandong Gold. The white foreman at Aurora can only watch as the looting of the mine continues <http://www.iol.co.za/business/companies/foreman-watches-as-aurora-mine-was-looted-1.1075668>
This is the same ANC who wants to nationalize the mines <http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Politics/ANC-must-nationalise-mines-Malema-20091023>, the banks and the farms. Can you even imagine the utter enslavement of blacks, the dilapidation and ruin of South Africa that will follow?
As the rivers of gold and other critical minerals that once flowed from South Africa dry up one after the other due to BEE and nationalisation, the world and especially the Oppenheimers will long back to the good old
days when the whites were in charge of South Africa and they were making their fortunes. The day will still come that they will realize that they might have betted on the wrong horse.
As the blacks are being more and more impoverished by their ANC masters and South Africa driven into a starving Zimbabwe-like state, the day will still come that Blacks will miss and long back for Apartheid.
Nevertheless, those who have let the genie out of the bottle will have to put him back again.

Main Source: *Beyond the Miracle: Inside the New South Africa*. Alister Sparks. 2003. Page 239-246

And somebody's appropriate response :


I guess this is simply what everyone in SA knows and is experiencing right now! It’s not only the mines but virtually every aspect of business in SA. They are destroying every piece of infrastructure they possibly can and still harp on the fact that Apartheid caused it all!!! Regrettably there are huge numbers of PC and liberal left wingers overseas that will agree with them.

My worst nightmare is not what they do to themselves, I could care less how many of them starve to death or die of AIDS, it is what they are doing to the wildlife and the natural heritage of the country that causes me the most pain, and of course all those folks who cannot get out either for economic or passport/birth right reasons.

Unfortunately those in SA who want to leave don’t have a bolt-hole like those in Rhodesia had so they are unfortunately bound to end up as refugees or very dead when they are murdered by the starving hordes – just like Ruanda and the Congo and of course Zimbabwe. So many of the youngsters who can, and are being encouraged to by their parents, have already left causing a ‘brain drain of epic proportions. This making the problem even worse plus of course the corruption and ‘sell out’ to the Chinese who have yet another agenda! Their fate is pre-determined once they default on repayment of whatever the Chinese demand whenever they demand it! Those in Government are riding the gravy train just now but they are too stupid to understand what awaits them in the future…..

I have no answer and maybe I am too pessimistic but I do have the fear….!!

stuckgear
8th Dec 2011, 09:41
Cape,

the only thing i can say to that is great post.

:D:D:D

Mike X
8th Dec 2011, 11:11
^^^^^^^^ :D:D:D

TZ350
8th Dec 2011, 15:22
Great post.............:D:D:D:D

Utterly depressing though and truly frightening to think the rest of the world is standing by silently watching, tacitly espousing the benefits of " black empowerment "...:yuk::yuk::yuk:

Mike X
8th Dec 2011, 15:36
Black empowerment, government intelligence ad libitum...

This country in which I was born and live in is f****d. It is a slow ride down due to our first world infrastructure.

It is being dismantled piece by piece, as one would strip a car.

Once there's no more car ?

unstable load
8th Dec 2011, 16:58
Once there's no more car ?
Then they will sit on their bums with the begging bowl out and bemoan the legacy of Apartheid and what it did to them.
The West will hold concerts in their honour and donate tons of aid that will fritter away and be squandered by the democratically elected multi-term self styled Dictator and his cronies.



Much like it is now, actually...It's just the aid from the taxpayer that's being squandered right now...

Capetonian
8th Dec 2011, 17:00
As I've said before, the Peter Hains of this world have much to answer for. They should hang their heads in shame but they have no shame, no conscience, no honour, and no scruples.

Mike X
8th Dec 2011, 18:11
Then they will sit on their bums with the begging bowl out and bemoan the legacy of Apartheid and what it did to them.
The West will hold concerts in their honour and donate tons of aid that will fritter away and be squandered by the democratically elected multi-term self styled Dictator and his cronies.

Much like it is now, actually...It's just the aid from the taxpayer that's being squandered right now...

Well said.

Question is : are there enough "serfs " who will vote against the regime ? (and yes, I use the word regime, just as it was used when this beautiful country was prosperous).

unstable load
9th Dec 2011, 05:21
Mike X,
In my opinion, NO.
There is an ever increasing number of switched on, vocal folks that are speaking out against the current situation, but numerically they are totally ineffective against the great mass of numbers that fall under the aegis of the Tribal system and that will follow the instructions of the Union chiefs, who are de-facto members of Government via the Devil's alliance of ANC and COSATU.

TZ350
9th Dec 2011, 17:08
I believe that the only way out will be for a cabal to genetically engineer a rapid acting, airborne distributed, terminal virus.I'm sure some Americans would finance the development, particularly when a new administration would give the Chinese the boot , re minerals, rare earths, etc.

Plus it could be used, in a modified form, in the many other areas of the world that have an ever increasing " pest " problem. Much cheaper and safer than insurrections or boots on the ground..............:E

birrddog
9th Dec 2011, 18:20
TZ350, really? That comment is inappropriate and offensive on so many levels

Solid Rust Twotter
9th Dec 2011, 18:49
Precisely. We need good people to help build the country and get rid of the corrupt racist ANC regime. We don't need to act like the ANC and their mates, ZANU-PF.

RadioVop Zimbabwe - ANC Pledges Continued Support To Zanu-PF (http://www.radiovop.com/index.php/national-news/7707-anc-pledges-continued-support-to-zanu-pf.html)

ANC Pledges Continued Support To Zanu-PF
08/12/2011 18:50:00

ANC Pledges Continued Support To Zanu-PF

Bulawayo, December 08, 2011- South Africa's ruling African National Congress (ANC) has pledged to continue supporting Zanu-PF saying , it is also important that the former liberation war movement win elections scheduled for next year.

In a statement likely to worry the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) formations since South Africa is the mediator in the Zimbabwe political crisis, Gwede Mantashe, the ANC’s secretary general, said Zanu-PF should regain lost ground, adding that the relationship between the two parties should also be cemented.

Mantashe said this in his address at the ongoing Zanu-PF’s conference at the Zimbabwe International Trade Fair (ZITF).

The conference kicked off today and ends on Saturday.

“The president of South Africa and the ANC directed us to come here and affirm her commitment to be a good and trustworthy member to Zimbabwe and Zanu-PF in particular all the time, particularly that Zanu-PF is a sister liberation movement. That makes our relationship special.

“We should continue engaging to take our relationship to a higher level. It is important that Zanu-PF continue regaining lost grounds and represent the interests and the aspirations of the vast majority of the people of Zimbabwe,” Mantashe said in his solidarity message.

“This message of solidarity is an acknowledgement of the fact that we belong together. Our relationship has been historically sealed by blood since we fought the same white colonialists,” he added.

South Africa’s ANC is among other southern African liberation war movements that include FRELIMO (Mozambique), Patriotic Front (Zambia), Botswana Democratic Party, NPLA (Angola), SWAPO of Namibia and the December 12 movement of United States that pledged support and continued friendship to Zanu-PF in their solidarity speeches.

But it is the open support for Zanu-PF by the ANC of South Africa that is likely to worry the MDC’s over the latter’s neutrality when it comes to solving the Zimbabwe political crisis since that country’s President, Jacob Zuma is the mediator.

About 4000 delegates are attending attend Zanu-PF's conference, which is being be held under the theme "Defend National Sovereignty, Consolidate indigenisation and Economic Empowerment.''

The party's 10 provinces have endorsed President Robert Mugabe's candidature for next year's general elections at the conference.

General elections were supposed to be held this year, but were postponed after Copac failed to complete the crafting of the new constitution.

Parties in the inclusive Government agreed that new elections should be held after the new constitution was in place.

stuckgear
9th Dec 2011, 19:51
Gwede Mantashe, the ANC’s secretary general, said Zanu-PF should regain lost ground, adding that the relationship between the two parties should also be cemented.


So Mantahe is advocating more beatings, intimidation, electoral violence, 'political re-education' and vote rigging then.

Mike X
9th Dec 2011, 20:26
Bulawayo, December 08, 2011- South Africa's ruling African National Congress (ANC) has pledged to continue supporting Zanu-PF saying , it is also important that the former liberation war movement win elections scheduled for next year.

What's with these retar*s ?

Africa is free (unless you factor in the Chinese). The 'struggle' is long over. But the garage sale that benefits a few at the top is on the hop.

Sorry, I've tried, but it is a f**k up.

Capetonian
9th Dec 2011, 22:27
Africa is free? From what?

Mike X
9th Dec 2011, 22:53
Come on Capey.

Africa has been free (of colanisation) for decades. Free will. Ha ha.

BTW, you still living in Tamboerskloof ? Was good quite a few years back.

Grew up there and Vredehoek.

Capetonian
9th Dec 2011, 22:59
Mike X

Answering you by PM. Short answer, no! I also grew up in Tamboerskloof, Vredehoek (just in front of Tampax Towers), Hout Bay (now called that for two reasons!) Durbanville, and Tableview.

Capetonian
10th Dec 2011, 10:09
SW Radio Africa Zimbabwe’s Independent Voice | SW Radio Africa (http://www.swradioafrica.com/roy-bennett-speech-to-human-rights-congress/)

This link is to : A SPEECH BY ROY BENNETT, TREASURER GENERAL OF THE MOVEMENT FOR DEMOCRATIC CHANGE, TO THE LONDON INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS CONGRESS, 23 NOVEMBER 2011

There are frightening parallels between what ZANU-PF have done in ZW and what the ANC are trying to do in ZA. As is so often the case, a tyrant is being ignored.

A long speech but well worth reading.

Solid Rust Twotter
11th Dec 2011, 15:51
Just in case there's any doubt at all remaining as to the kind of people running South Africa and where we're headed...

ANC offers election help to Zanu-PF
2011-12-11 17:10


Johannesburg - South Africa's ruling African National Congress has offered to help President Robert Mugabe's ruling Zanu-PF win the next elections in neighbouring Zimbabwe, press reports said on Sunday.

"We are willing to assist in coming up with election messages and strategies that would deliver victory," ANC secretary-general Gwede Mantashe told Zanu-PF's annual congress Saturday in Zimbabwe's second city Bulawayo, The Sunday Times reported.

"It is important for Zanu-PFto regain lost ground and continue to represent the aspirations of the people of Zimbabwe," he was quoted as saying.

Observers voiced surprise at the offer, since Mantashe has frequently criticised the autocratic rule of President Robert Mugabe, 87, who has led Zimbabwe since independence in 1980.

They expect it to wrong-foot South African President Jacob Zuma - who is both ANC president and the regional Southern African Development Community's mediator for Zimbabwe, where Zanu-PF is in a conflictual unity government with the opposition Movement for Democratic Change led by Morgan Tsvangirai.

"These are government-to-government relations, and Zuma is working under the auspices of SADC, [while the] ANC is a different animal altogether," Mantashe said, according to the online newspaper The Zimbabwean.

"[The] ANC must interact with some of the sister parties in the region."

He added: "The ANC wishes to affirm her commitment to being a good and trustworthy neighbour to a fellow liberation movement."

"We will send campaign strategy teams to work with you; this will be the best way to celebrate the centenary of the ANC in January 2012," he said.

At Saturday's rally, Mugabe called on his supporters to unite behind him to win elections which he would like to see held next year.

- AFP

unstable load
11th Dec 2011, 17:12
Getting some practical experience in vote rigging before the next elections......:D

Solid Rust Twotter
11th Dec 2011, 17:20
I guess they're already up to speed on vote buying and intimidation.

stuckgear
11th Dec 2011, 17:27
South Africa's ruling African National Congress has offered to help President Robert Mugabe's ruling Zanu-PF win the next elections in neighbouring Zimbabwe, press reports said on Sunday.


hmmm so where does that sit in terms of legality; one state interfering in the political elections of other state?

Hain et al. must be so proud of their work towards democracy.

Capetonian
11th Dec 2011, 17:28
Aren't we a bunch of cynics!

stuckgear
11th Dec 2011, 17:39
it's an art form cape.

:E

Mike X
11th Dec 2011, 17:58
For some reason, I read artscape. :uhoh:

Solid Rust Twotter
11th Dec 2011, 18:15
Aren't we a bunch of cynics!


Watching the inexorable decline of a once viable country due to the venal malfeasance of it's rulers, blindly reelected by those they're screwing the most, tends to suck the optimism out of one...

unstable load
12th Dec 2011, 05:19
Indeed, SRT....
As for the legality of the assisted ballot stuffing, I'm sure the ANC has given that all due consideration like they always do in matters legal......:ugh:

Capetonian
12th Dec 2011, 06:33
After the thugs took over Rhodesia, Wrex Tarr, a well-known comedian, explained the voting process as follows :

"There are two wooden boxes, a small one and a big one. You put your vote for us in the small wooden box. If you don't, we will put you into the big wooden box."

Elections in Africa have bene defined as : "One man, one vote, one candidate, one election, once."


_Hny8V13iuU

More here :

Wrex Tarr The Best Of (http://www.thenewrbc.com/pages/music/tarr.html)

maxrated
12th Dec 2011, 20:11
These were too good not to have pilfrered off the other African forum.


Articles in African papers
1. The Cape Times ( Cape Town )

"I have promised to keep his identity confidential,' said Jack Maxim, a
spokeswoman for the Sandton Sun Hotel, Johannesburg , "but I can confirm
that he is no longer in our employment.
We asked him to clean the lifts and he spent four days on the job. When I
asked him why, he replied: 'Well, there are forty of them, two on each
floor, and sometimes some of them aren't there'. Eventually, we realised
that he thought each floor had a different lift, and he'd cleaned the same
two twelve times. "We had to let him go. It seemed best all round. I
understand he is now working for Escom."

2. The Star ( Johannesburg ):

"The situation is absolutely under control," Transport Minister Ephraem
Magagula told the Swaziland Parliament in Mbabane . "Our nation's merchant
navy is perfectly safe. We just don't know where it is, that's all."
Replying to an MP's question, Minister Magagula admitted that the landlocked
country had completely lost track of its only ship, the Swazimar: "We
believe it is in a sea somewhere. At one time, we sent a team of men to
look for it, but there was a problem with drink and they failed to find it,
and so, technically, yes, we've lost it a bit. But I categorically reject
all suggestions of incompetence on the part of this government. The
Swazimar is a big ship painted in the sort of nice bright colours you can
see at night. Mark my words, it will turn up. The right honourable
gentleman opposite is a very naughty man, and he will laugh on the other
side of his face when my ship comes in."

3. The Standard ( Kenya ):

"What is all the fuss about?" Weseka Sambu asked a hastily convened news
conference at Jomo Kenyatta International Airport . "A technical hitch like
this could have happened anywhere in the world. You people are not
patriots. You just want to cause trouble." Sambu, a spokesman for Kenya
Airways, was speaking after the cancellation of a through flight from
Kisumu, via Jomo Kenyatta, to Berlin . "The forty-two passengers had
boarded the plane ready for take-off, when the pilot noticed one of the
tyres was flat. Kenya Airways did not possess a spare tyre, and
unfortunately the airport nitrogen canister was empty. A passenger
suggested taking the tyre to a petrol station for inflation, but unluckily
the jack had gone missing so we couldn't get the wheel off. Our engineers
tried heroically to re-inflate the tyre with a bicycle pump, but had no
luck, and the pilot even blew into the valve with his mouth, but he passed
out. "When I announced that the flight had to be abandoned, one of the
passengers, Mr Mutu, suddenly struck me about the face with a life-jacket
whistle and said we were a national disgrace. I told him he was being
ridiculous, and that there was to be another flight in a fortnight. And, in
the meantime, he would be able to enjoy the scenery around Kisumu, albeit at
his own expense."

4. From a Zimbabwean newspaper:

While transporting mental patients from Harare to Bulawayo , the bus Driver
stopped at a roadside shebeen (beerhall) for a few beers. When he got back
to his vehicle, he found it empty, with the 20 patients nowhere to be seen.
Realizing the trouble he was in if the truth were uncovered, he halted his
bus at the next bus stop and offered lifts to those in the queue. Letting
20 people board, he then shut the doors and drove straight to the Bulawayo
mental hospital, where he hastily handed over his 'charges', warning the
nurses that they were particularly excitable. Staff removed the furious
passengers; it was three days later that suspicions were roused by the
consistency of stories from the 20. As for the real patients: nothing more
has been heard of them and they have apparently blended comfortably back
into Zimbabwean society. .

stuckgear
12th Dec 2011, 20:29
As for the real patients: nothing more
has been heard of them and they have apparently blended comfortably back
into Zimbabwean society. .


Correction, they all managed gainful employment at the CAAZ.

Capetonian
13th Dec 2011, 22:07
A friend sent me this, I would guess it's from Hayibo

Doctors attending former ‘top cop’ Jackie Selebi say they are just hours away from confirming that he is suffering from the same slow-acting fatal disease that struck down Schabir Shaik and left him unable to do anything but drive his BMW around Durban, smoke Cuban cigars and lie next to his pool. Moments after being sentenced to 15 years in prison, Selebi dabbed at his forehead with a hanky and told aides that he was feeling “as if he might have some sort of fatal collapse at any moment in the next 20 years”. He was immediately rushed to the Manto Tshabalala-Msimang Memorial Hospital in central Johannesburg where doctors diagnosed him with a variety of terrifying ailments. According to medical team leader, Dr. Spock Zulu, initial tests proved that Selebi had advanced rheumatoid larceny, congenital mendacious warts on his shriveled ethical cortex, spasmodic hypertension of the kleptomania glands, as well as Lying ******** Syndrome, or LDS.

“We see this a lot in government,” said Dr. Zulu. “When large amounts of money combine with tiny amounts of accountability, the victim can transform from a mediocre bureaucrat into a Lying ********.” But, he said, none of these symptoms would earn Selebi a medical parole. “You only get out of jail for two reasons,” he explained. “Either you’re flat lining, or President Zuma has got you on speed-dial.”

However, he said, it was still possible that Selebi could be diagnosed with Shaik Syndrome, as long as he switched allegiance from Thabo Mbeki to Zuma. “We still don’t fully understand the medical science behind Shaik Syndrome, but we are all too familiar with the horrifying symptoms: the slow bloating triggered by donuts and sorbet; the paralyzing ennui of discovering that the Tevo didn’t record the latest Idols auditions and then the final, desperately sad decline into old age and death in between ten and fifty years.”

Meanwhile, Selebi’s brother says he stands by his assertion that sentencing judge, Meyer Joffe, is an “apartheid judge”, presiding over an “apartheid court” and enforcing the “imperial West’s” Roman-Dutch legal system. “Apartheid apartheid apartheid,” squealed Suleiman Selebi when questioned by journalists. “Apartheid, plus apartheid and because apartheid, we apartheid apartheid with apartheid and whether or not apartheid apartheid, we apartheid apartheid apartheid.”

This morning a spokesman from the Ministry of Justice asked Suleiman to “silence the noises in his head for five minutes” and to “listen very carefully.”
“Dude, I’m only going to say this once,” said spokesman Articles Tsotsobe. “The judges are appointed by your government. Your Government……“And as for imperialist Western Roman-Dutch law, you might want to ask your bra why he committed his life to policing that legal system. Although it turns out he wasn’t so committed, was he?”

prospector
14th Dec 2011, 03:16
According to medical team leader, Dr. Spock Zulu, initial tests proved that Selebi had advanced rheumatoid larceny, congenital mendacious warts on his shriveled ethical cortex, spasmodic hypertension of the kleptomania glands, as well as Lying ******** Syndrome, or LDS.


That sounds serious, hope your border control is up to keeping it contained, especially as it would appear to be very contagious.

Hayibo certainly good for a chuckle!!

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Dec 2011, 06:14
Although I don't agree with the organisers, this being a showcase event all the stops were pulled out. The reality is the level of incompetence is even worse than can be imagined. Of course the warnings were voiced years ago but the general consensus among the liberal intelligentsia back then was that full speed ahead into the ice pack was a good thing. Lucky for them they don't have to live with the results....

COP 17: Envoys slam SA 'incompetence'
2011-12-13 22:43



Johannesburg - Envoys at the global climate conference ended on Sunday in Durban left late-night sessions shaking their heads about their South African hosts, saying in rather undiplomatic speech they had let the process go off the rails.

Pretoria, however, hailed its diplomacy as a rousing success, saying SA showed it could punch above its weight in the global arena.

Such is the disconnect between SA, which sees itself as an emerging power championing African causes, and other nations which question its ability to keep pace with global affairs.

The gap is expected to grow larger as Africa's biggest economy tries to exert more authority on the international stage by pressing for a permanent seat on the UN Security Council and having one of its former foreign ministers elected head of the AU.

SA has already found itself this year on the wrong side of the mainstream argument over Libya and Ivory Coast.

Crucial lessons

Western powers also raised their eyebrows when, to please China, Pretoria blocked a visit by the Dalai Lama to attend the 80th birthday of South African hero and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu.

South Africa's diplomacy in Durban, where two weeks of talks failed to finish on time and many delegates had to leave before proceedings concluded, did little to change minds.

Envoys said the Department of International Relations and Co-operation failed to learn crucial lessons from UN negotiations that have been going on for about 20 years on how to push delegates to wind up discussions and start drawing up deals that will be approved.

Many envoys said a deal was only done in Durban despite SA and not because of it.

"There was no leadership; no idea of how to run this thing. It was chaos," said a diplomat from a leading country who asked not to be named.

"South Africa went into this with the idea if we negotiate all through the night on the final day we would get a deal," another diplomat said.

"They should have learned from previous meetings to start high-level talks on the most contentious issues as soon as the ministers arrive so that we would not be here two days after this process was supposed to end," said the diplomat who asked not to be named.

Political stature

In what may be seen as a vote against the process, Canada on Monday became the first country to announce it would withdraw from the Kyoto protocol on climate change, dealing a symbolic blow to the already troubled global treaty.

While powers such as China and Japan called the move "regrettable", South African foreign ministry spokesperson Clayson Monyela said there was no reason for the hosts of the Durban talks to respond because it was a UN matter.

Nel Marais, managing director of risk consultancy Thabiti Africa, said a reason South Africa's diplomats have trouble keeping up with changing times is that the bureaucracy has been transplanted into government from the ruling ANC, where posts are often given to reward political stature rather than ability.

For many in the ANC, the liberation struggle to end apartheid leads to continued support for African leaders who helped, such as Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe, even though they now face global isolation for suspected human rights abuses. It also shapes the ANC worldview.

Foreign minister Maite Nkoana-Mashabane, who chaired the Durban talks, said she wanted to hold open discussions where she would keep a neutral position. Several diplomats said she put off too many pressing matters until the last minute and did not do enough to push for agreements.

Anger started to build on Thursday night when she hosted the first major meeting of ministers a day before the planned end of the talks and let discussions drift into a series of speeches from delegations instead of making it a bargaining session.

It boiled over when two late sessions followed on the next two nights. The culmination was a dispute over language on the legal mechanisms to enforce emissions cuts that threatened to scuttle the entire process on Sunday morning.

Stagecraft

Mashabane called for a huddle among the main players to iron out their differences on the plenary floor, in full view of media cameras and within earshot of microphones.

It was either a high stakes gamble or a bit of stagecraft, but either way, many did not approve of a diplomatic scrum where envoys had to force their way in to have a say in the outcome.

"Negotiations should be held around the table and not on the table," the Russian delegation told the plenary session.

"Elbowing doesn't comply with the dignity of diplomats and diplomacy."
- Reuters

stuckgear
14th Dec 2011, 13:29
Air Zimbabwe plane seized at London Gatwick | The South African (http://www.thesouthafrican.com/news/air-zimbabwe-plane-seized-at-london-gatwick.htm)


American General Supplies (AGS) has seized an Air Zimbabwe plane after it landed at London Gatwick en route from Harare. The Boeing 767-200 plane was impounded over a debt of $1.2 million. This incident came barely a week after a South African company impounded another Air Zimbabwe plane with a smaller outstanding debt of $500,000.

Air Zimbabwe chief executive officer Innocent Mavhunga told the Herald newspaper they were negotiating with AGS to release the plane.
“The debt has been outstanding for some time and the plane has been impounded after we failed to meet the deadline of November 30 for the debt settlement, the plane is supposed to depart London today (Tuesday) evening at around 8.30 and we are hopeful that if our negotiations succeed, we will have the plane back,” Mavhunga said.

The debt has mounted after $1.5 million was spent on spare parts and maintenance equipment at AGS. Zimbabwe’s transport ministry says it is “frantically looking for money” to recover a national airline jet impounded over debts in Britain.


No doubt the race card will played somewhere soon.

Capetonian
14th Dec 2011, 13:38
http://www.pprune.org/airlines-airports-routes/471595-zimbabwe-seeks-cash-seized-plane-lgw.html?highlight=air+zimbabwe

I'm also waiting for the race card to be played.

http://www.zapiro.com/Cartoons/m_091124tt.jpg

Capetonian
15th Dec 2011, 16:18
Shortly after class, an economics student approaches his economics
professor and says, "I don't understand the point of BEE.
"Can you explain it to me ?"
The professor replied, "I don't have any time to explain it at my
office, but if you come over to my house on Saturday and help me with my
weekend project, I'll be glad to explain it to you."

The student agreed.

At the agreed-upon time, the student showed up at the professor's house.
The professor stated that the weekend project involved his backyard
pool.

They both went out back to the pool, and the professor handed the
student a bucket.

Demonstrating with his own bucket, the professor said, "First, go over
to the deep end, and fill your bucket with as much water as you can."

The student did as he was instructed.

The professor then continued, "Follow me over to the shallow end, and
then dump all the water from your bucket into it."

The student was naturally confused, but did as he was told.

The professor then explained they were going to do this many more times,
and began walking back to the deep end of the pool.

The confused student asked, "Excuse me, but why are we doing this?"

The professor matter-of-factly stated that he was trying to make the
shallow end much deeper.

The student didn't think the economics professor was serious, but
figured that he would find out the real story soon enough.
However, after the 6th trip between the shallow end and the deep end,
the student began to become worried that his economics professor had
gone mad.

The student finally blurted out, "All we're doing is wasting valuable
time and effort on unproductive pursuits. Even worse, when this process
is all over, everything will be at the same level it was before, so all
you'll really have accomplished is the destruction of what could have
been truly productive action!"

The professor put down his bucket and replied with a smile,
"Congratulations. You now understand BEE."

unstable load
15th Dec 2011, 17:15
That would be really funny if it wasn't true....:{:{:mad:

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Dec 2011, 19:47
Just a little something from the future leaders of the slow motion train wreck that is SA to remind us what have to look forward to. Still nothing but deathly silence from those who agitated on behalf of this shower for this to happen....

AFRICAN NATIONAL CONGRESS YOUTH LEAGUE

Office of the Secretary General

STATEMENT ON THE PASSING AWAY OF THE DPRK CHAIRPERSON OF THE NATIONAL DFEFENCE COUNCIL AND LEADER OF THE KOREAN PEOPLE: COMRADE KIM JONG IL.

The ANC Youth League wishes to send its heartfelt condolences on the passing away of the Great leader Comrade Kim Jong Il. As we remember this revolutionary we call upon the Korean people to forge ahead with the struggle to reunify their country, to free it completely of a legacy of Colonialism left to its people by imperialists represented by the United States of America.

May the undying spirit of Comrade Kim Jong Il continue to inspire the Korean people to defend the Songhun, the idea that it is possible for the people of Korea, Asia and the world to live well alongside each other in an egalitarian society, free from poverty, joblessness, hatred of each other and the oppression of one country by another.

As we will be proceeding to lay to rest Comrade Kim Jong Il, we remain vigilant of the problems facing the Workers Party of Korea and the Kim Il Sung socialist youth, this include the threat of imperialist aggression in the Korean peninsula, and the continued misleading propaganda of the Bak puppet regime and Western imperialism, to suggest that the government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea is responsible for the destruction and disruption of the Korean Republic.

As revolutionaries we know that the government of Korea republic will destroy itself, and at that point the unity of the Korean people will prevail, under the capable leadership of the Workers Party of Korea and its Youth League the Kim ill sung Socialist youth, and the spirit that is carried in Mount Paektu will rejoice at this victorious moment. We say so because, we know that the creation of the Korean Republic or South Korea is not desired outcome of the people of Korea, but the creation of imperialism, hence its borders are still guarded by the US military. In his words the dearly departed comrade Kim Jong ill "Overall relations between the North and the South have developed in favour of national reconciliation unity and reunification".

In commemorating this Great Leader we sent warnings to traitors of the people, led by Lee Myung Bak, who deliberately sunk his Cheonoan war ship and blamed it on the government of the Democratic People's republic of Korea, to desist from an unsustainable offensive against the North of Korea and the Korean peninsula in general. His continued assault on the image of the DPRK in collaboration with the United States will not continue unabated. In this regard we support the just cause of the Korean people to defend themselves, using whatever means at their disposal, to continue struggling for a just and equal world order and to defeat Capitalism in all its facets.

On this same breath, we congratulate the many achievements, under the leadership of Comrade Kim Jong Il, including making sure that democratic centralism is alive and well in the revolution, as we in the ANC also use it to guide the discipline of our cadres. We recognise that under his stewardship the DPRK managed an economy that saved people from joblessness, homelessness, illiteracy or lack of education thereof, and the varying degrees of poverty.

In technology to save our climate you also excelled, as we saw the successful introduction of an air steriliser, to curb emission and related hazards from the climate, and this shows the effectiveness of the Korean nuclear technology, and this equally shames the Western and Imperialist Propaganda, that the DPRK nuclear programme is aimed at creating war in the world. "Korea is right, do not retreat". We urge our dear Comrade Kim Jong Un, who will be tasked to lead the Korean revolution moving forward, do so, with memory of history and with distinction.

We are certain that the working people of South Africa, who are struggling to defeat the legacies of Apartheid, who want free, compulsory and quality education, decent housing, shelter, health, clothing, Nationalisation of mines and other key sectors of our economy and all the other basic amenities of life, are with you in your struggle to first unify your country and inspire the freedoms of all in the world under a just and equitable world order. The people of South Africa will not forget the support you gave to us during our struggle against Apartheid.

We say to all the Korean people fighting for peace and justice, Victory is Certain. Amandla, Awethu!!

All Power to the People

Statement issued on behalf of the ANC YL: International Relations Desk by Abner Mosaase: Secretary for International Relations, December 22 2011 (via the Mail & Guardian - see report)

Doodlebug
23rd Dec 2011, 20:58
Twotter, that is really something to sit up and take note of. Mayhap I have not been following the slow grind into oblivion too closely of late, but until this moment I was under the impression that 'Juliaaas' was the only one really pushing for, quote: ''Nationalisation of mines and other key sectors of our economy'', unquote, in direct conflict with the official line of the ANC. If the latter is now openly spouting this, the writing really is on the wall and the final and last Zimbabwe is inevitable. Paradise lost, indeed.

Solid Rust Twotter
26th Dec 2011, 15:48
Should South Africans be optimistic? | News24 (http://www.news24.com/MyNews24/Should-South-Africans-be-optimistic-20111226)

Some of the points in the original article are a little optimistic, but the comments that follow are a lot more telling.

bnt
8th Jan 2012, 13:26
The ANC are celebrating their 100th Anniversary (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-16459513) today. I'd have thought this thread would be on fire ... :E

The BBC showed a little of Zuma's speech. For someone so opposed to "apartheid", you'd think he'd know how to pronounce it properly. Still, he's getting a few cheers, by reading out the numbers of cattle gifted by South Africa's neighbours for celebrations e.g. five from the King of Lesotho. I'm not making that bit up.

Solid Rust Twotter
8th Jan 2012, 16:01
It's getting to that stage in the Zim scenario where people are so bludgeoned into accepting the crime, violence and thieving the ruling elite have allowed the country to descend into, that any response seems futile. There is confusion because no one will do anything to stop them. Where are the screaming hordes who agitated for a better SA? CMD has been kissing their arses and world leaders are rolling over to have their tummies tickled.

The airspace around Bloemfontein has been sealed off to prevent the beloved glorious leadership being disturbed and to show their power to the hoi polloi who pay their over inflated salaries. Major and minor roads have also been sealed off to allow the party to take place. Of course all this is inconveniencing those who are on the hook to pay for it all, ie, the SA taxpayer.

Stunned into submission by what has become of SA is probably the best way to describe it all.

Solid Rust Twotter
9th Jan 2012, 08:59
Bloemfontein - It had started with chanting and dancing by tens of thousands of ANC members, but by the time President Jacob Zuma had ended his 90-minute speech as the party celebrated its 100th anniversary, thousands had already left the Free State Stadium in Bloemfontein. The speech was devoted mainly to the history of the ANC. Many say the party hasn't delivered on its promises since taking power in 1994. "We need to ensure that our programme of transforming our country is accelerated and taken to new heights," Zuma said, flanked by an aide holding an umbrella. He acknowledged the problems confronting the ANC, saying it needs to "defeat the demon of factionalism" and to take "urgent and practical steps to restore the core values, stamp out factionalism and promote political discipline". It is unclear if the ANC members who'd left the stadium during his address had gone because of the heat, because they had to leave due to lack of accommodation or whether they were sending Zuma a message....

....One woman left saying she was bored. Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe proposed a toast and told the half-empty stadium that if they did not have champagne, they could take photographs of their leaders drinking, or raise clenched fists. "The leaders will now enjoy the champagne, and of course they do so on your behalf through their lips," he said.



Unfortunately, the irony is lost on supporters of the regime.

unstable load
11th Jan 2012, 09:54
Meanwhile,
Leaders left high and dry at ANC bash

Jabulani Dlamini, Volksblad
Bloemfontein - Several African heads of state are apparently deeply upset after they were left without food and bedding at the accommodation provided to them for the ANC's centenary celebrations.

The heads of state allegedly had to buy their own bedding, food, pots, pans, glasses and bottled water because the ANC had ordered the owners of the houses it rented at Woodlands Hills Wildlife Estate to remove all their possessions. There was apparently only liquor provided.

The hotel group contracted to equip the houses, which had been rented for up to R50 000 per day, allegedly did not do its job properly.

Had to buy necessities

Security guards for President Yuweri Museveni from Uganda had to buy him some grilled chicken from Nando’s.

“Ugandan officials had to leave Woodlands to go and buy duvets, food and other necessities for the president as there was a bed without linen,” said Mampho Mmelaedi, who looked after the house Museveni was staying in.

At least 15 women who were hired as housekeepers, waitresses and cleaners in the estate, came forward to speak about their dissatisfaction over how foreign dignitaries were treated.

Presidents who were treated badly included Bingu wa Mutharika from Malawi, Obiang Mbasogo from Equatorial Guinea, Hifikepunye Pohamba (http://www.whoswhosa.co.za/hifikepunye-pohamba-5159) from Namibia and Paul Kagame from Rwanda.

Valentine Rantsoareng, joint owner of the Rantsoareng hotel group, confirmed they were contracted for the job by the department of international relations.

He strongly denied allegations about the accommodation, adding that some of the heads of state had deviated from the menu and “rather asked for chicken”.

He said the staff members were hired by Design HR.

“I think people who make these allegations are somewhat dissatisfied because they haven’t been paid yet, but I have only now received the receipt for it,” he said.

Embarrassed

The women had another version of events, however.

“Namibian officials went to buy food, pots, plates and glasses to cook for the president [Pohamba]. I could see he was angry and disappointed,” said Motladi Metsing.

Kenalemang Pula said the Nigerian delegation arrived on Sunday morning and had packed their bags by lunchtime.

President Thomas Boni of Benin apparently immediately “stormed out" of Woodlands Hills.

One of the women said: “They kept asking us if we worked for the ANC or for the South African government. Understandably, they kept shouting at us. We were embarrassed to be there.”

When reached for comment, Museveni’s press secretary Tamale Mirundi, who was not part of the delegation, was trying to confirm the claims. However, Mirundi emphasised that if the reports were true the Ugandans would not have complained, because they saw themselves as fellow Africans, not visitors needing special treatment.

No official complaints

Free State ANC spokesperson William Bulwane said the party had been alerted to the claims. "Although we have not yet received any official complaints from heads of state we are going to be following this up with the estate."

ANC spokesperson Jackson Mthembu (http://www.whoswhosa.co.za/jackson-mthembu-25814) said he was unaware of any complaints, but said there had been “very, very serious problems" with accreditation for international dignitaries, spiritual leaders and the media.

President Jacob Zuma (http://www.whoswhosa.co.za/jacob-zuma-927) would apologise in person to heads of state and the department of international relations and co-operation would apologise to other international dignitaries, he said.

"We are not aware of any instances where heads of state had to go out of their way to secure linen or pots for private use. This was an event arranged by government and government made sure that all was in order.

"However, there were some instances where private houses who opened their doors to guests of the ANC did not adhere to the contract signed with the ANC. In these instances we dealt with these matters."

Everything would have come past me so I would have known if any complaints have been made.”

International relations spokesperson Clayson Monyela was also in the dark.

- Additional reporting by The Witness.

- Volksblad (http://www.volksblad.com/)

Solid Rust Twotter
13th Jan 2012, 06:45
Cape Town - Amendments to the SA Weather Service bill that threaten independent forecasters with fines and imprisonment for issuing severe weather warnings are draconian, the Democratic Alliance said on Thursday.

"[They are] an attempt... to establish and protect an unfair monopoly on services offered by the Weather Service, some of which are commercial services," said DA environmental spokesperson Gareth Morgan.

"The bill, if passed in its current form, will have various undesirable consequences, and will make South Africans less safe," he said.

Against the law

The bill would make it illegal for someone to issue warnings about severe weather or air pollution without written permission from the national weather service.

It would also make it an offence to supply false or misleading information about the weather service, or intentionally or negligently commit an act which negatively affects the organisation.

An aim of the bill was to limit the damage caused by incorrect forecasts about dangerous weather.

First offenders could face up to five years in prison or a R5m fine while subsequent offenders faced a maximum of 10 years' imprisonment or a R10m fine.

The bill would limit the liability of the weather service in any damage, loss or injury caused by its actions under the act.

A new clause would also allow a court to compensate the weather service for any monetary advantage the accused would have gained from a relevant offence.

"Perhaps the Weather Service sees this as a potential new income stream for itself," Morgan said.

‘Clumsy bureaucracy’

He said it was concerning that the bill failed to define a "severe weather event".

It was more concerning that a citizen with vital information about a tornado, for example, would face "clumsy bureaucracy" when applying for written permission to broadcast a warning, he said.

"There is no reason to believe that the Weather Service, with its limited ability to measure and observe weather changes all around South Africa in real time, can respond quickly to all severe weather events, offering affected people sufficient warning."

Morgan called for the offences clause to be removed.

Interested parties could submit written comment on the bill before the end of Thursday.

Public hearings were scheduled for Tuesday and Wednesday.

From the comments...

Vaclav Hornik, who runs the WindGuru weather service website based in the Czech Republic, was shocked at the development.

“I do not know what the practices are in SA (but) my personal opinion is that this is unbelievable… it’s like it was here during the communist regime. Freedom of speech punished? It’s a nightmare.”

Is there anyone left in any doubt as to where SA is headed?

Capetonian
13th Jan 2012, 06:49
Worth listening to : John Maytham on Cape Talk 567 in the afternoons. He is most incisive and had pretty scathing comments on this the other day. It's an outstanding show.

He is rather politically correct though, I guess being in SA he has to be!

It is tragic that the 'freedom' that has been achieved in South Africa and Zim is actually a kleptocratic dictatorship.

Solid Rust Twotter
13th Jan 2012, 07:22
In Africa?

Dang! Who would have thought...?

Solid Rust Twotter
13th Jan 2012, 12:11
Link to article in the Telegraph...

South Africa weather forecasters threatened with jail if predictions wrong - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/topics/weather/9010030/South-Africa-weather-forecasters-threatened-with-jail-if-predictions-wrong.html)

unstable load
14th Jan 2012, 16:11
Apparently they are getting cold feet about the proposed weather bill.
Problem is, they dare not tell anyone....:rolleyes:

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Jan 2012, 18:28
While the nepotism and nest feathering at the expense of the country continues unabated....

14 January 2012 19:40
Business Times
Khulubuse bounces back
Two of the Aurora boss's companies - registered in the British Virgin Islands - are busy with a multibillion-rand oil exploration project in DRC, writes SUTHENTIRA GOVENDER

President Jacob Zuma's nephew Khulubuse always manages to bounce back.

After he was ordered by the Pretoria High Court on Wednesday to pay more than R10-million to Protea Coin Group, a creditor of his mining group Aurora Empowerment Systems, it emerged that two of his other companies, registered in the British Virgin Islands, have started a multi-billion-rand oil exploration project in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

British oil industry watchdog group Platform London could not state when the operations in the DRC had started.

Platform, which has repeatedly highlighted various irregularities in the awarding of exploration licences in the central African country, has been monitoring activities of oil companies around Lake Albert on the border of the DRC and Uganda, where more than two billion barrels of reserve have been discovered.

Platform this week said that while it had not focused its investigations on Zuma's companies, Caprikat and Foxwhelp, it was aware of some of their operations.

Platform's Mika Minio Paluello said: "The two companies, Caprikat and Foxwhelp, have begun exploration activities in eastern Congo."

The deal has aroused suspicions, mainly due to high-level political connections involved.

The deal, which also involves President Zuma's lawyer Michael Hulley, is believed to also indirectly involve several ANC politicians.

On Friday Hulley confirmed that Caprikat and Foxwhelp had started exploration operations in the DRC.

"Activities have been ongoing ... and in respect of this project we have partnered with the DRC government," he said.

"If you ask anyone there, they will tell you the area is known for its deposits of oil. But the fact of the matter is that there are certain pre-emptive steps that you need to take. We are busy with those pre-emptive steps."

Two years ago Khulubuse Zuma dismissed inference that his uncle, President Zuma, was personally involved and told Reuters: "He [Hulley] is my legal adviser and he signed because I couldn't sign for both. It is a technical thing."

Reuters reported that, while Zuma had signed with the DRC authorities on behalf of Caprikat, Hulley had signed on behalf of Foxwhelp.

Zuma, through Foxwhelp and Caprikat - both registered in the British Virgin Islands - acquired the rights to two oil concessions in the rich oilfields of Lake Albert in 2010.

Zuma, who paid $6-million in signature bonuses for the two blocks and now stands to make a fortune, was awarded the oil blocks by a presidential decree published in the Congo Journal Officiel in June 2010.

These two blocks were unexpectedly taken away from Irish-based oil group Tullow - which had been awarded the rights in 2006 - and handed to Zuma's companies.

At the time, Tullow declared that it was absurd to give exploration licences in a sensitive environment to a company with no experience.

When Caprikat and Foxwhelp were awarded the permits, DRC President Joseph Kabila reportedly came under fire for undermining investor confidence by his actions.

Tullow took legal action and secured an interim injunction from a high court in the Caribbean to block the reassignment of the concessions.

But, in November 2010, the deal was given the thumbs up by the high court.

Tullow this week said it had withdrawn any further attempts to pursue legal action to block the deal.

Tullow Oil said: "It became clear that Tullow's rights were not likely to be upheld so long as the DRC government maintained its position that it had the right to ignore or revoke the earlier award to Tullow."

Zuma could not be reached for comment.

Tomorrow Zuma is expected to testify in a liquidation inquiry being held before the Master of the High Court in Pretoria to determine what happened to the beleaguered Aurora's mining assets and the money that was meant to be paid to workers.

He is chairman of Aurora, which owes about 700 destitute miners more than R4.5-million in wages at its mines in Grootvlei in Gauteng and Orkney in North West.

The miners have not been paid in two years.

Aurora, which acquired the mines from Pamodzi Gold in October 2009, has been accused by trade union Solidarity of causing the loss of more than 5300 jobs at the mines and of asset stripping.

This week, the Pretoria High Court ordered Zuma, who had a surety agreement for Aurora, to pay the money owed to the Protea Coin Group from his own pocket.

Protea Coin, which provided security services to Aurora at its Grootvlei mine, applied for a liquidation order against Aurora on May 26 2010.

The settlement was made an order of court on July 28 2010.

Protea Coin turned to the high court on Wednesday to force Zuma to pay. The court ruled in its favour.

Khulubuse bounces back - Business LIVE (http://www.businesslive.co.za/southafrica/sa_companies/2012/01/14/khulubuse-bounces-back)

vulcanised
14th Jan 2012, 19:47
Caprikat and Foxwhelp

Sound like two £100 companies out of E&M.

Capetonian
15th Jan 2012, 08:44
This is the reality of African democracy, that wonderful freedom that the anti-apartheid and anti 'racist regime' campaigners fought for. Peter Hain where are you? Come out of the woodwork.


Zim's 'face of violence' promoted
RAY NDLOVU Jan 06 2012 00:00

Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has promoted army officer Brigadier Douglas Nyikayaramba to the rank of major general, a move that has alarmed opposition parties and analysts. They believe it is the beginning of Zanu-PF moves to win the elections expected this year by all means possible, including violence.

Nyikayaramba, who headed the Three Infantry Brigade in Manicaland province, has been criticised by observers for often overstepping his role in the barracks and actively dabbling in the country's political scene.

He has been involved in the continuing constitution-making process, pledged support for Mugabe as "president for life" (irking frontrunners in Zanu-PF's succession race) and made many belligerent statements intimating that the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) would never rule in Zimbabwe.

But it was Nyikayaramba's statements made in an interview with the state-owned Herald newspaper in June that exposed the underhand involvement of Zimbabwe's military in politics.

Nyikayaramba described MDC leader Prime Minister Morgan Tsvan*girai as a "national security threat rather than a political one", and suggested the military should step in to deal with him.

The MDC has accused Nyikaya*ramba of being a "Zanu-PF figurehead" and not a professional soldier, and of being the face of Mugabe's continued stranglehold on power. The MDC has linked him to the successive rigging of elections -- in 2008, 2005 and the presidential election in 2002, when he was chief executive of the Election Supervisory Commission. Now fears are growing that Nyika*yaramba's promotion could signal a campaign to militarise the next elections, which Mugabe wants held before March.

MDC spokesperson Douglas Mwon*zora said this week: "In this new post Nyikayaramba is supposed to direct violent and uncouth behaviour in the armed forces. This is clearly an indecent promotion."

A move to Defence Force headqurters
As a result of the promotion, Nyikayaramba will now move from his base in Manicaland to the Zimbabwe Defence Force's (ZDF's) head*quarters in Harare, where he now becomes chief of staff: quartermaster.

It is thought his deployment at the army headquarters will give him greater leeway to deploy soldiers to campaign for Mugabe, using violence if necessary. Pedzisayi Ruhanya, a political analyst, said: "Nyikayaramba will run elections using the army and he is at the centre of the militarisation of the country's politics, electoral institutions and the violent and partisan behaviour of the military."



Since the emergence of grassroots opposition in 2000, Zimbabwe's military has taken on an increasingly partisan role in support of Mugabe, with top army commanders such as the late Vitalis Zvinavashe and Constantine Chiwenga refusing to recognise any other leader "without liberation credentials", a dig aimed at Tsvangirai.

Because of the army's provocative stance, since June 2008 Tsvangirai has been accusing it of being a "military junta" that has overrun the country's democratic systems.

Zimbabwe's military has often turned on civilians. Human-rights organisations have documented the military's brutality in Operation Mavhotera Papi? (Where did you vote?) in the June 2008 run-off elections and in Operation Hakudzokwi (No return) in October 2008 against diamond panners in the Marange diamond fields.

Speaking about his promotion, Nyikayaramba said it showed Mugabe's trust in his services. "This is a sign of … confidence in me and I hope I will not fail. We understand the challenges facing us all but with collective efforts we will find a winning formula. My elevation would not have been a success without the contribution of men and women I worked with at various stations."

Defence Minister Emmerson Mnangagwa hailed Nyikayaramba's promotion and said: "The promotion does not come simply. He deserves to be where he is because of hard work. There are many people in the ZDF with the same experience, qualifications and disposition but we take into consideration many aspects.

"This is because of the hard work he has exhibited while in previous ranks. He has now reached the apex of his career and this is now the time to work harder." Also promoted by Mugabe was Air Commodore Michael Moyo, who assumed the rank of air vice-marshal. Moyo will be chief of the National Defence College in Harare.

dfdasein
16th Jan 2012, 10:42
And now for something a little different.

The Tokoloshe

13 November 2011

400 years ago Africa might as well have been another planet in our solar system.
We were living in peace in our thatch huts. The 10 piece of cattle were grazing under the African sky. The head of the family sat in the shade of a tree drinking beer, the wives were working the land and the kids were making clay oxen to play with.
Every man’s dream, even to this day, no matter where on this planet you might come from. It sounds like the African version of the Playboy mansion. You sit in the shade and your multiple wives work for you.
Then the Europeans arrived and laughed at our people who had no education and thought our way of life was savagery. We had to fight them with spears to survive and ultimately lost the battle. They took our land and made us their slaves. They sold us to America and we became a trading commodity.
That is, what it is. We can’t change the past. So now 400 years later, what now?
We had to learn through bloodshed that we were not a planet of another solar system. We are part of this world and in this world there are certain rules that can’t be broken if you want to have food. Whether we like these rules or not, they are a reality. We can fight them like Mugabe does but it would only result in hunger.
Too many Africans are yearning for life as we knew it back then…but they just love the white man’s BMW and Lear Jet. The donkey cart is way too primitive for their liking and the cow hides that once covered our loins are not as “cool” as a Hugo Boss suit. We are a race that conveniently wants to fall back on our traditions when it suits us.
Not everybody has the ability to be as black and white as I am, and I mean that in more than one sense. I accept and acknowledge that. But I had to ask myself where do I fit in? Do I want to go back to my ancestral land in Dundee and demand this land be given back to me so I can acquire a few wives and create my own Playboy Mansion or do I like it here in Sandton with a Blackberry?
You would be horrified if you read all the messages I get on Facebook of people swearing at me, calling me a traitor, a disgrace to all black people in South Africa and that whites are paying me to blog my views.
What they don’t know is that I have been very blessed to come from a long line of fighters that have fought from the days of the spear right up to the AK47. They fought for my freedom and as sure as this sun is going to come up tomorrow, I am not going to mess up all they have fought for.
I have to address this cultural jail that stands between my people and true freedom.
Let us look at the Tokoloshe first.
You slept with your bed raised up on a few bricks so that when the Tokoloshe comes at night, he could move freely around your room without knocking his head against any object. For those that know this superstition will know it is a small mystical hairy thing that looks like a psychotic angry little bear and catches you at night. But if he knocks his head against your bed, you are going to get this menace all over you and he has a temper like no other on earth. Stop laughing, I’m dead serious!
I haven’t seen him yet. I badly wanted to see him when I was small because while others feared him, I thought he sounded cool and wanted to befriend him. My grandmother would look at me in absolute horror when I wanted to see the Tokoloshe. She would tell my mother “Eish, this child scares me!”
When my Grandfather returned from exile, he brought me a Teddy Bear from London. I looked at the Teddy and instantly knew this was the Tokoloshe I always wanted to meet. So my bear got named Tokoloshe. I got smacked a few times because I would jump on my Grandmother when she takes her afternoon nap and scare her with Tokoloshe.
But the modern new reborn Tokoloshes sit in Parliament.
Parliament…hmmmm… let us discuss running this country, being an example to the citizens and our traditions.
In a new African landscape how practical is it having multiple wives? Nice idea, being a man. Come on you guys reading this, admit it!
But 20 children? Not so good because if I see what my university education and all the sundry trimmings are costing my father I would hate to think he had to make 20 of us. He would need to join the bank robbers to keep us at university.
My mother didn’t come cheap either, so he would have had to start stealing cattle from the white farmers if he wanted more wives. She cost him 40 head of cattle back in the 80’s. But wow, was she worth every cow! You should see her today in her Chanel dress…but five of them?
That is the humorous side of our tradition, but the more serious side is the following reality. There are only two of us and not twenty. So from my first breath my father has been there every step of my way thus far. We are his life and the reason he works this hard. He has spent every moment available guiding me into manhood (without sending me to a bush so some traditional butcher can slaughter my stuff beyond repair) How, as a father will you possibly find the time to devote this kind of attention to 20 kids? I don’t even want to think what life would have been like without my father. Unthinkable.
But what would I have been, if my father happily cavorted around claiming it is his culture and tradition?
I probably would have been marching with Malema on the road to nowhere and my father would have been dead by now. I would be visiting a graveyard and trying to find life’s answers from a stone. Back in the ‘80s when he married my mother us blacks hadn’t heard of HIV/Aids and those enlightened ones that did know about it, thought it was a homosexual disease.
So unbeknown to us we were killing ourselves. Merrily living out the principles of our tradition, not knowing we are committing suicide and resulting in two million orphans just in South Africa alone, let alone the rest of Africa.
Wouldn’t this be a far more worthy cause to march about than march to get stuff you deliriously think should be given to you for free?
Imagine what must be going through the mind of a four-year-old kid, who is left all alone tonight, with nobody to take care of him or her? None of these orphaned kids asked to be here, so imagine how a child has to try and make sense of all of this?
So why do I still have my parents? Because my father knew he can’t run around making babies that he can’t provide for. He had to think soberly about life with a new millennium looming. He had us because he wanted us. We were to become his legacy. We weren’t conceived in a moment of uncontrolled lust or in the name of an outdated tradition.
We won’t discuss the merits of the social grant for mothers with kids and absent fathers but alarmingly condoms are still very unpopular accessories amongst the population of Africa. Until recently we had that scary old Bat as a minister of health. Tokoloshe personified. Beetroot juice and cabbage leaves will cure the disease, while the Chief would shower after a bit of inyama.
What did my father do seven years ago when I reached puberty? He sat me down and told me the facts and how it all happens. Every time I leave the house he jokingly says he will draw blood when I return and have me tested. He jokes, but it has sunk in so deep now, I think about the consequences every time I see a gorgeous girl.
What do my people do? Until recently it was better swept under the table than to discuss the matter. It became unlawful to state a person had died of AIDS on his death certificate. How big is this denial?
Please don’t make a comment after you have read this and tell me this disease was invented by the Apartheid rulers to wipe us out. I’m not even going to discuss that old stale story! And speaking about Apartheid, get over it. It has no relevance in 2011. Dead, gone, born 31-05-1961 and was executed on 27-04-1994. Our ultimate justification for everything that we do wrong can’t come back so we can stone it.
The most bizarre superstition was invented to “cure” the disease. Rape a girl and it goes away. By girl, I mean little ones that were helpless and had their lives taken from them without their consent. Grown men believing in rubbish like this. How in the name of God can you possibly justify this, no matter what your traditions or beliefs are?
We have now for far too long shrugged our shoulders and hid behind our traditions on the one hand and on the other we want to sit at the UN and pretend we have the wisdom to help decide the fate of other countries. In this world we need to merge with, you have:
1. One wife. You sleep around, you die.
2. You have more kids than you can provide for, they starve and when they grow up they will steal to survive because you didn’t have enough money to send them to a decent school. The government schools are a complete waste of time because the teachers are never in class.
3. You can’t sell or trade with your daughters. They are not consumer goods.
4. You study or qualify as an artisan so you can earn your own keep and build your own house. There isn’t enough money going around building 40 million free houses. You can wait until the sun burns itself out, it is not going to happen. So live with it.
5. Forget the white man’s wealth. It has long gone been transferred to Sydney. There isn’t any left here. Create your own. Forget about redistribution. Use your logic. The wealth of 5 million whites was never going to send 45 million blacks into a blissful retirement. The white wealth Malema cries about daily, was only in the hands of a few whites.
So until we move ourselves forward and merge ourselves with the world, we will remain primitive. Seventeen yearsafter independence you don’t dance from Beyers Naude to the stock exchange and have foreign journalists film your insanity in the name of freedom. We were freed 17 years ago, embrace it and use your freedom to trade with the world, not crash your own stock market.
We can march up to the Union Buildings until the cows come home. We are not going to move ourselves forward until we free ourselves from ourselves!

Vusi Mabaso

dfdasein
16th Jan 2012, 16:45
About line 19: "FacePPRuNe" was "Facebook" in the original. Who has the capacity to do this?

vulcanised
16th Jan 2012, 16:59
The system has the capacity to do it.

It's someone's idea of a joke.

dfdasein
16th Jan 2012, 17:09
Thanks vulcanised. Oh dear.....

Solid Rust Twotter
16th Jan 2012, 18:09
Already posted a couple of months ago, dfd.

http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/369028-south-african-politics-18.html

dfdasein
16th Jan 2012, 18:33
Oops! Thanks SRT.

"dfd"?

"Done f******g done"?

Solid Rust Twotter
16th Jan 2012, 18:39
Contraction of your nick.

dfdasein
16th Jan 2012, 21:54
Ye gods!

Humble apologies Solid Rust Twotter. It has taken me a couple of hours, and after stumbling across the "What will you say in a post?" thread (Private Flying) to understand your "contraction of your nick" remark. Senior hours....

Solid Rust Twotter
18th Jan 2012, 12:06
More money wasted while the country spirals around the drain. This is just another big ticket item that can be mercilessly milked for kickbacks and freebies. It's all a waste of time in any case - There's nothing afloat big enough to carry the egos of the pilferati....

Zuma now wants to buy a warship
Jacob Zuma wants an aircraft carrier, and it will be partly up to convicted fraudster Tony Yengeni to decide who will get the contract to supply a warship potentially costing even more than the four frigates bought as part of the controversial 1999 R60 billion arms deal.

17 January 2012 | PAUL KIRK


JOHANNESBURG - Jacob Zuma wants an aircraft carrier, and it will be partly up to convicted fraudster Tony Yengeni to decide who will get the contract to supply a warship potentially costing even more than the four frigates bought as part of the controversial 1999 R60 billion arms deal.

The Citizen can reveal that the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) has formally registered a project to acquire a warship capable of operating more than a dozen helicopters, and possibly also vertical take-off jets.

Codenamed: “Project Millennium” the acquisition is technically temporarily on ice, however navy insiders have said several ships are being closely looked at, including the French- built “Mistrale” warships as well as smaller vessels from Holland and Germany.

The ship would give the SANDF what is called a: “strategic lift” capability – meaning that soldiers and equipment could quickly be ferried to points off foreign countries and then lifted onto land by helicopter.

A spokesman for the South African Navy, Greyling van den Berg, said: “Project Millennium, the acquisition of a strategic lift capability for the SANDF, has been officially deferred until such time as the Defence Review, being conducted by the Minister of Defence, has been approved by Parliament and promulgated.

“Should the Defence Review stipulate that a strategic sea lift capability is a future requirement of the Department of Defence, the project could be reactivated. Time scales will depend on when this requirement is required by.”

Advocate Paul Hoffman SC, director of the Southern Africa Institute for Accountability said: “The usefulness of the project is … questionable.

If Yengeni remains on the review committee, it could cogently be argued that the success of the project will depend on the size of the bribes.”

Terry Crawford-Browne, chairman of Economists Allied for Arms Reduction said that he thought that proceeding with the acquisition would be “madness”.

Capetonian
18th Jan 2012, 12:11
To paraphrase the article :

Zuma wants his buddy to be the recipent of a massive bribe which they will then share whilst the majority of people in South Africa live in poverty and fear thanks to the unfulfilled promises, nepotism, and corruption of the government whom they elected in their ignorance.

dfdasein
18th Jan 2012, 14:11
How long before the nuclear option is revisited?

Solid Rust Twotter
18th Jan 2012, 14:48
Not enough scope for kickbacks unless they can sell it to one of the loons in the ME or to NK. Even the UN will eventually start taking a closer look at their dealings with the dodgier bits of the planet if they were to be dumb enough to go down that route.

On top of that, rounding up what's left of the expertise they've managed to chase out of the country would probably be beyond them. Some inept political crony would be placed in charge and things would go downhill from there. Think SA infrastructure.

Capetonian
19th Jan 2012, 05:55
I don't know who wrote this, it was forwaded by a friend with no source reference. Sadly there is a great deal of truth and awkward reality expressed in it.


WHY AFRICA HAS GONE TO HELL

White Zimbabweans [he means Rhodesians] used to tell a joke—what is the difference between a tourist and a racist? The answer—about a week.

Few seem to joke any more. Indeed, the last time anyone laughed out there was over the memorable head-line “BANANA CHARGED WITH SODOMY” (relating to the Reverend Canaan Banana and his alleged proclivities). Zimbabwe was just the latest African state to squander its potential, to swap civil society for civil strife and pile high its corpses. Then the wrecking virus moves on and a fresh spasm of violence erupts elsewhere. Congo , Ivory Coast , Sudan , Rwanda , Sierra Leone , even Kenya . Take your pick, for it is the essence of Africa , the recurring A-Z of horror. Therefore, as surely as Nelson Mandela took those steps from captivity to freedom, his own country will doubtless shuffle into chaos and ruin.

Mark my words. One day it will be the turn of South Africa to revert to type, its farms that lie wasted and its towns that are battle zones, its dreams and expectations that lie rotting on the veldt. That is the way of things. Africa rarely surprises, it continues to appall.

When interviewed on BBC Radio, the legendary South African jazz musician Hugh Masekela spoke of the 350-year struggle for freedom by blacks in South Africa. The man might play his trumpet like a dream, but he talks arrant nonsense. What he has bought into is a false narrative that rewrites history and plays upon post-colonial liberal angst. The construct is as follows: white, inglorious and bad; black, noble and good; empire, bad; independence, good; the west, bad; the African, good. Forgotten in all this is that while Europeans were settling and spreading from the Cape, the psychopathic Shaka Zulu was employing his Impi to crush everyone—including the Xhosa—in his path, and the Xhosa were themselves busy slaughtering Bushmen and Hottentots. Yet it is the whites who take the rap, for it was they who won the skirmishes along the Fish and Blood Rivers and who eventually gained the prize.

What suffers is the truth, and—of course— Africa. We are so cowed by the moist-eyed mantras of the left and the oath-laden platitudes of Bono and Geldoff, we are forced to accept collective responsibility for the bloody mess that is now Africa. It paralyses us while excusing the black continent and its rulers.

Whenever I hear people agitate for the freezing of Third World debt, I want to shout aloud for the freezing of those myriad overseas bank accounts held by black African leaders (President Mobutu of Zaire alone is believed to have squirreled away well over $10 billion). Whenever apartheid is held up as a blueprint for evil, I want to mention Bokassa snacking on human remains, Amin clogging a hydro-electric dam with floating corpses, the President of Equatorial Guinea crucifying victims along the roadway from his airport. Whenever slavery is dredged up, I want to remind everyone the Arabs were there before us, the native Ashanti and others were no slouches at the game, and it remains extant in places like the Ivory Coast. Whenever I hear the Aids pandemic somehow blamed on western indifference, I want to point to the African native practice of dry sex, the hobby-like prevalence of rape and the clumps of despotic black leaders who deny a link between the disease and HIV and who block the provision of anti-retrovirals. And whenever Africans bleat of imperialism and colonialism, I want to campaign for the demolition of every road, college, and hospital we ever built to let them start again. It is time they governed themselves. Yet few play the victim card quite so expertly as black Africans; few are quite so gullible as the white liberal-left.

“On the eve of this millennium, Nelson Mandela and friends lit candles mapping the shape of their continent and declared the Twenty-first Century would belong to Africa. It’s a pity that for every Mandela, there are over a hundred Robert Mugabes.”


So Britain had an empire and Britain did slavery. Boo hoo. Deal with it. Move on. Slavery ended here over two hundred years ago. More recently, there were tens of millions of innocents enslaved or killed in Europe by the twin industrialised evils of Nazism and Stalinism. My own first cousins—twin brothers aged sixteen—died down a Soviet salt mine. I need no lecture on shackles and neck-irons. Most of us are descendents of both oppressors and oppressed; most of us get over it. Mind you, I am tempted by thoughts of compensation from Scandinavia for the wickedness of its Viking raids and its slaving-hub on the Liffe. As for the 1066 invasion of England by William the Bastard…

The white man’s burden is guilt over Africa (the black man’s is sentimentality) , and we are blind for it. We have tipped hundreds of billions of aid-dollars into Africa without first ensuring proper governance. We encourage NGOs and food-parcels and have built a culture of dependency. We shy away from making criticism, tiptoe around the crassness of the African Union and flinch at every anti-western jibe. The result is a free-for-all for every syphilitic black despot and his coterie of family functionaries.

Africa casts a long and toxic shadow across our consciousness. It is patronised and allowed to underperform, so too its distant black diaspora. A black London pupil is excluded from his school, not because he is lazy, stupid or disruptive, but because that school is apparently racist; a black youth is pulled over by the police, not because black males commit over eighty percent of street crime, but because the authorities are somehow corrupted by prejudice. Thus the tale continues. Excuse is everywhere and a sense of responsibility nowhere. You will rarely find either a black national leader in Africa or a black community leader in the west prepared to put up his hands and say it is our problem, our fault. Those who look to Africa for their roots, role-models and inspiration are worshipping false gods. And like all false gods, the feet are of clay, the snouts long and designed for the trough, and the torture-cells generally well-equipped.

I once met the son of a Liberian government minister and asked if he had seen video-footage of his former president Samuel Doe being tortured to death. ‘Of course’, he replied with a smile. ‘Everyone has’. They cut off the ears of Doe and force-fed them to him. His successor, the warlord Charles Taylor, was elected in a landslide result using the campaign slogan “He killed my ma, he killed my pa, but I will vote for him”. Nice people. Liberia was founded and colonised by black Americans to demonstrate what slave stock could achieve. They certainly showed us. Forgive my heretical belief that had a black instead of a white tribe earlier come to dominate South Africa, its opponents would not have been banished to Robben island. They would have been butchered and buried there.

When asked about the problem of Africa, Harold Macmillan suggested building a high wall around the continent and every century or so removing a brick to check on progress. I suspect that over entire millennia, the view would prove bleak and unvarying.

Visiting a state in West Africa a few years ago, I wandered onto a beach and marvelled at the golden sands and at the sunlight catching on the Atlantic surf. It allowed me to forget for a moment the local news that day of soldiers seizing a schoolboy and pitching him head-first into an operating cement-machine. Almost forget. Then I spotted a group of villagers beating a stray dog to death for their sport. A metaphor of sorts for all that is wrong, another link in a word-association chain that goes something like Famine… Drought… Overpopulation… Deforestation… Conflict… Barbarism… Cruelty… Machetes… Child Soldiers… Massacres… Diamonds… Warlords…Tyranny… Corruption… Despair… Disease… Aids… Africa.

Africa remains the heart of darkness. Africa is hell.

Solid Rust Twotter
22nd Jan 2012, 07:31
All this stuff is just the tip of the iceberg. The corruption and nepotism in the ruling party goes right to the bone and is destroying SA. Where is the conscience of the world now?

Call to scrutinise Zuma family deals | News24 (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Politics/Call-to-scrutinise-Zuma-family-deals-20110829)

Councillors need risk benefits - Salga | News24 (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Councillors-need-risk-benefits-Salga-20120120)

Councillors not doing their jobs resulting in protests now want danger pay? WTF!?

iafrica.com | news | sa news | Ministry denies furniture claim (http://news.iafrica.com/sa/774015.html)

iafrica.com | news | sa news | Premier 'detained' sheriff (http://news.iafrica.com/sa/773539.html)

iafrica.com | news | sa news | Zuma's nephew hits 181km/h (http://news.iafrica.com/sa/774095.html)

ANCYL blames Cabinet for Limpopo issues | News24 (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Politics/ANCYL-blames-Cabinet-for-Limpopo-issues-20120119)

Police escorts for govt officials | News24 (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/Police-escorts-for-govt-officials-20120121)

No crisis in Limpopo, just challenges - ANC | News24 (http://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/Politics/No-crisis-in-Limpopo-just-challenges-ANC-20120120)

Capetonian
22nd Jan 2012, 10:35
In support of SRT's statement, I've just opened this email from a friend on the Garden Route. Sad reality ..... the conscience of the world ..... don't be silly, they suffer from monochromatic vision.

Ja nee, Les, ja nee. Here in little out of the way Sedgefield our crime has escalated by 75% the past year. Assaults and muggings being part of it. Our poor Malawian gardener’s brother was knifed to death at a telephone booth in Smutsville a year ago and so it goes. Then they go on the rampage twice within two months through our little town, toy-toying and tipping dirt bins all over our streets. The previous ANC led council, seeing that the DA was likely to take over in Sedgefield, cut our municipal budget down to zero for last year while Sedgefielders pay no less that R16million into the combined Knysna/Sedgefield budget. It is just plain savagery and the stealing and cheating continues and the shocking behaviour with it.

When old Tony Leon of the DA had that “Gatvol” campaign all those years ago, he was severely criticized for being racist and uncooperative. Well, I’m gatvol and they can call me what they like.

cavortingcheetah
22nd Jan 2012, 10:59
Desmond, dear boy, where are you when your people need you?

BlueWolf
22nd Jan 2012, 12:32
It's by someone called James Jackson, Capetonian, according to this:

Why Africa has gone to Hell (http://iluvsa.********.com/2012/01/why-africa-has-gone-to-hell.html)]

Capetonian
22nd Jan 2012, 12:59
Thank you for that reference BlueWolf. I hadn't even tried to find the reference. Interesting as he is the same writer whom I quoted here http://www.pprune.org/6970921-post1377.html in a different context.

Of course some of our fellow Ppruners consider that he is racist, like most people who state unpalatable truths, and thus by assocation and by agreeing with him, so am I. Guess what? That's fine. Racism is more often in the accuser than the accused.

unstable load
23rd Jan 2012, 05:52
Of course some of our fellow Ppruners consider that he is racist, like most people who state unpalatable truths, and thus by assocation and by agreeing with him, so am I. Guess what? That's fine. Racism is more often in the accuser than the accused.

Move over, Cape. You need to make room in the corner for the ones that'll be joining you, soon. You bring the beer, I'll light the fire...

Capetonian
23rd Jan 2012, 08:48
There's a little plek for you around the braai whenever you turn up!

Edit : Plek = place (as far as I know but Ii never really learnt the taal!)

vulcanised
23rd Jan 2012, 11:47
There's a little plek for you around the braai


For those that don't know, that could be an invitation or a threat.

Solid Rust Twotter
23rd Jan 2012, 12:04
...that could be an invitation or a threat.


"If you don't cease and desist immediately, we're going to invite you round and fill you up with steak and beer. Be warned!":}

unstable load
23rd Jan 2012, 13:26
Ed Zackery!
Well said, that man!
Bring the real stuff with you please, Mr Twotty.:ok:None of that mass produced wee if you are joining us.....

Capetonian
24th Jan 2012, 13:26
Eskom Public Announcement

"Eish, we have good news and bed news... "

"Eh, the bed news is thet the sheet is going to hit the fen weeth thees powa seetuation."

"Howeva, the good news is thet the fen is not going to be wekking."

Capetonian
24th Jan 2012, 20:09
This is the first of a 5 part series on BBC Four. Starts at 2200Z tonight. Should be worth watching.

The World Against Apartheid: Have You Heard from Johannesburg?
The Road to Resistance

Series 1 - Episode 1 of 5

New series. The story of the struggle to end segregation in South Africa, beginning in March 1960, when the killing of unarmed protesters in the town of Sharpeville gained international attention. The country's government subsequently cracked down on the leadership of black resistance movement the African National Congress, jailing Nelson Mandela for life. However, deputy leader Oliver Tambo escaped into exile in London, from where he began a campaign to draw attention to the crimes of the apartheid regime

Solid Rust Twotter
13th Feb 2012, 12:24
Already close to being a one party state, the pilferati are doing their level best to push SA out a little further over the abyss.


S.Africa's Zuma wants to review constitutional court's power

South African President Jacob Zuma, who has repeatedly butted heads with the judiciary, said in an interview published Monday he wants to review the powers of the country's highest court.

"We don't want to review the Constitutional Court, we want to review its powers," Zuma told The Star newspaper.

"It is after experience that some of the decisions are not decisions that every other judge in the Constitutional Court agrees with," he added.

Zuma has already locked horns with the Constitutional Court, which ruled last year the president could not unilaterally extend the term of then-chief justice Sandile Ngcobo.

Zuma responded by instead appointing Mogoeng Mogoeng, a judge criticised by opposition and activist groups as anti-gay, lenient on rapists and close to Zuma.

Created in 2004, the 11-judge court has the final say on constitutional matters.

"There are dissenting judgements which we read. You will find that the dissenting one has more logic than the one that enjoyed the majority. What do you do in that case? That's what has made the issue to become the issue of concern," Zuma said.

He said judges are "influenced by what's happening and influenced by you guys (the media)."

But he also said it was part of the democratic process for the courts to challenge his decisions.

The interview comes as Zuma's administration heads Wednesday to the Supreme Court of Appeal for arguments on whether prosecutors should have dropped corruption charges against him in 2009, a move that cleared his path to the presidency but has clouded his time in office.

South Africa's main opposition party, the Democratic Alliance, brought the case, questioning the constitutionality of the decision to drop charges that Zuma received bribes as part of a multi-billion-dollar arms deal.

The same court last year overturned Zuma's appointment of a national director of public prosecutions who was seen as an ally of the president but faced questions over his qualifications.

The Supreme Court of Appeal is the highest court for criminal matters.


S.Africa's Zuma wants to review constitutional court's power - Yahoo! (http://za.news.yahoo.com/africas-zuma-wants-review-constitutional-courts-power-093418990.html)

Solid Rust Twotter
22nd Feb 2012, 09:00
Another gem from Hayibo...

SAA asks for R6-billion bailout, didn’t know airliners were re-usable

JOHANNESBURG. South African Airways has conceded that fuelling its aircraft with a “50-50 blend of Methóde Cap Classique and Chanel No 5” may have contributed to spiralling costs that will force taxpayers to produce another R6-billion bailout. Meanwhile a suggestion that it might be cheaper to fly R6-billion in banknotes directly to a vault in Zurich has been hailed by the airliner as “pure genius”.

The beleaguered national carrier seemed to be turning a corner in 2009, when it was shortlisted for Colombia’s prestigious Golden Mule award, given annually to the airline that ships the greatest tonnage of drugs abroad with the least oversight by airline staff.

However, this week the airline announced that it needed a bailout of almost R6-billion rand, triggering outrage from the Democratic Alliance which has insisted that SAA either be privatised or “have a massive car-boot-sale and tombola” to try to recoup some losses.

This morning the national carrier conceded that some cuts could probably be made before the taxpayers endured their ritual mugging by the airline, but said that finding the exact cause of the excesses would be difficult.

“We’re pretty new to this whole austerity fad,” explained SAA spokesman, Jefferson Airplane. “I mean, we’ve only recently discovered that jet fuel is much cheaper and slightly more effective than the champagne-perfume mix we’ve been using until now.”

However, Airplane admitted that the airline’s biggest mistake in recent years had been its failure to realise that aircraft were re-usable.

“We screwed the pooch on that one,” he said. “We had no idea that those babies are good for, like, hundreds of flying hours.”

He said that aircraft had been replaced after every flight, with the once-used jets dumped near Cape Town International Airport and Lanseria in Midrand, “in Delft and Diepsloot, because that’s where government dumps anything it doesn’t want to deal with”.

The DA responded angrily to Airplane’s statements, saying that it would be slightly more cost-effective for SAA “just to pack all the bail-out dosh in suitcases and fly it straight to Swiss bank vaults”.

According to SAA insiders, the DA’s suggestion has “revolutionized” the parastatal’s thinking about its future business model.

“We’re a bit embarrassed that we didn’t think of that option ourselves,” admitted one executive. “It would certainly have been much easier than pretending to try to run a real business for all these years.”

dfdasein
8th Mar 2012, 09:51
http://s890.vuclip.com/ff/cb/ffcbaf6c4410911eec3eb400b187660f/ba63207/BrutalRoadRage_ffcb_w_2.3gp?c=414026424&u=991006918&s=BNeGrY

Solid Rust Twotter
8th Mar 2012, 10:29
Not restricted to SA. Matatu drivers pretty much all over Africa generally consider themselves above the law, and drive accordingly.

Of course there's much wailing, gnashing of teeth and rending of garments when one carry ten people more than he's equipped for, spears into an oncoming truck while passing another vehicle on a blind corner. Always someone else's fault when that happens...

Solid Rust Twotter
11th Mar 2012, 07:32
Words fail me...

Motlanthe linked to bribes?
Sun, 11 Mar 2012 7:12

Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe's romantic partner Gugu Mtshali has allegedly been linked to a scheme to 'buy' government approval for a plan to sell helicopters to Iran, according to a report by the Sunday Times.

Mtshali, former De Beers executive Raisaka Masebelanga and others allegedly met with representatives of 360 Aviation to solicit a bribe of R104-million.

This was in an attempt to secure a R2-billion deal to allow a 'front' company to supply US-made Bell helicopters and spare parts to the National Iranian Oil Company via South Africa, the newspaper reported.

Managing director of 360 Aviation Barry Oberholzer said: "We believe we were being asked [for] a bribe... in exchange for [government] support".

Motlanthe said he was unaware that Mtshali had any connection to the company.

His spokesman, Thabo Masebe said: "He has at no stage discussed such a matter with any person, including the department of trade and industry".

Mtshali told the newspaper that she had never attended a "formal meeting" with 360 Aviation.

However, the Sunday Times claimed to have an audio recording of the meeting, on which Mtshali's voice was allegedly heard.

The alleged deal reportedly failed because 360 Aviation could not reach an agreement with the National Iranian Oil Company.

The United States, which manufactures the Bell helicopters, prohibits the sale of military equipment to Iran .

Govt defends ConCourt assessment
2012-02-23 13:36

Cape Town - The government maintains that a proposed assessment of the Constitutional Court's judgments is not an attempt to undermine judicial independence.

Spokesperson Jimmy Manyi said on Thursday that Cabinet had reinforced both President Jacob Zuma's message and Justice and Constitutional Development Minister Jeff Radebe's statement by "welcoming debate and discourse which is characteristic of our constitutional democracy".

Cabinet held its regular fortnightly meeting on Wednesday.

Manyi said in Cape Town that the justice and constitutional development department further clarified the point that this "is an assessment of the impact of the judgments of the Constitutional Court on the transformation of society".

"It is also an evaluation of the impact of our jurisprudence on the democratisation process," he told reporters.

Independence

"Cabinet advises that this should not be misconstrued as an attempt to undermine the independence of the judiciary and the rule of law as entrenched in our Constitution."

Last week, the Star newspaper reported that Zuma wanted to review the Court's powers.

"We don't want to review the Constitutional Court, we want to review its powers," Zuma said during an interview.

"It is after experience that some of the decisions are not decisions that every other judge in the Constitutional Court agrees with."

He questioned the logic of having split judgments and said judges were being influenced by the media.

"How could you say that [the] judgment is absolutely correct when the judges themselves have different views about it?" Zuma told the newspaper.

He said that if decisions by Parliament could be challenged, there was nothing wrong with questioning the judiciary.

Criticism

This has been strongly criticised from various quarters.

Among others, Dene Smuts of the DA said Zuma would find he was on the path to a full-blown confrontation with the Constitutional Court if his remarks really "mean what they seem to mean", because the court itself decided the constitutionality of constitutional amendments.

"It is apparent from the president's remarks that irritation with some of the court's judgments lies at the root of the desire for review," she said.

Also last week, the Black Lawyers' Association (BLA) said the executive and the legislature did not have the power to amend or review the Constitutional Court's powers.

"The only way... is to divorce the current constitutional democracy and remarry parliamentary sovereignty," BLA president Pritzman Mabunda said.

If this route was followed, it may be subjected to constitutional scrutiny by the Constitutional Court, which was the subject matter, he said.

- SAPA

Don't politicise blue light crash - MEC
2012-02-23 08:20


Johannesburg - The crash in which West Rand teenager Thomas Ferreira was severely injured was an accident like any other, Gauteng local government and housing MEC Humphrey Mmemezi said on Wednesday.

"Let's just remember that about 14 000 people die annually on South Africa's roads," he said, according to Beeld newspaper.

"People should not be ridiculous and politicise this accident, just because a blue light vehicle was involved. This was an accident just like any other.

"If you take the annual road death toll into account, blue light vehicles are not responsible for even one percent of these incidents. We should just be thankful that Ferreira is improving," he said.

Mmemezi was in the official car that knocked Ferreira off his motorcycle on November 5.

Witnesses allege that the car jumped a red light, and that Mmemezi was immediately whisked from the scene by two bodyguards.

Ferreira was in a coma for weeks and is still recovering at the Riverfield Lodge Rehabilitation Centre in Fourways, Johannesburg.

"All good people in South Africa are overjoyed that Thomas is making such a miraculous recovery. I'm glad he's getting better," Mmemezi told Beeld.

- SAPA

Murdered KZN woman 'worked in community'
2012-03-10 07:25

Johannesburg - The KwaZulu-Natal MEC for Social Development Weziwe Thusi on Friday condemned the killing of an elderly woman who was abducted from Jozini and was found dead in Ubombo.

Reita van Vuljk, 66, had been missing since her Toyota Hilux was found overturned near Hluhluwe on Monday, said Colonel Jay Naicker.

"She has worked with the department in an effort to establish a child and youth care centre and it is very sad that she was killed in the very same community she tried to help," Thusi said.

She commended the police and the community for putting the alleged perpetrators behind bars.

"On Wednesday, investigations led police to a 23-year-old man who had allegedly been seen driving the bakkie when it overturned," he said.

The man was arrested.

He gave the police details of where Van Vuljk's body could be found.

A search, by a number of police units, led to the discovery of the body near a cliff in Ubombo.

Two more men had been arrested and all three were expected to appear in the Ubombo Magistrate's Court on Monday on charges of robbery, kidnapping and murder.

- SAPA

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Mar 2012, 07:52
Tender aged tenderpeneurs? The corruption is becoming even more blatant while the authorities look the other way. Rome is burning. Perhaps it's time to put down the fiddle and address the problems in govt. Those who squeaked loudest for this are notable by their silence on the matter.

iafrica.com | news | sa news | Matric pupil scores tender (http://news.iafrica.com/sa/783729.html)

Matric pupil scores tender
Mon, 12 Mar 2012 11:03


A company run by a matric pupil has been awarded an R800 000 tender by a KwaZulu-Natal municipality to build a gravel road, the Mercury newspaper reported on Monday.

According to the report, Bheka Nxumalo, a pupil at Ixopo's Little Flower Secondary School, runs the company ZDN Trading that is allegedly owned by his elder brother, Zamokwakhe Nxumalo.

ZDN trading was awarded the tender by the Sisonke district municipality, of which the Ubuhlebezwe local municipality is a part.

According to the report the elder Nxumalo, who resigned as a director of the company in 2009, is the mayor of this municipality.

At the time the tender was awarded the elder Nxumalo was a councillor in the municipality and treasurer of the ANC's Harry Gwala region (Sisonke).

The newspaper quoted Zamokwakhe Nxumalo saying he had nothing to do with the company, but reported it had proof he went on a site visit with rival bidders in 2010. At the time Bheka Nxumalo was 16 years old.

Solid Rust Twotter
14th Mar 2012, 14:04
More skullduggery from this shower? Who'da thunk it...?:rolleyes:

South Africa: Cover-Up on E-Tolling Project Reminiscent of Pre-1994 Tactics

Inkatha Freedom Party (Durban)Email Print Share South Africa: Cover-Up on E-Tolling Project Reminiscent of Pre-1994 Tactics
11 March 2012 Comment
press release

The IFP said today that it was shocked to learn the real reasons behind government's push to ensure the controversial Gauteng e-tolling project succeeds.

It is reported today, that the Public Investment Corporation - an investment manager for state institutions - has bought R17 billion in SANRAL bonds. 89% of this investment is made-up of the Government Employees Pension Funds.

"Finally it is clear why government wants to save this project at all cost, despite it being unfeasible and despite it receiving so much public resistance. These types of cover-ups were prevalent during the apartheid regime, but never could one have imagined such a huge cover-up in our post-democratic dispensation," said Narend Singh MP, the IFP's spokesperson on Finance and on the e-tolling project.

It is now clear that there are huge economic issues at stake. If the tolling project fails, Government will not only have to bail-out SANRAL, but it will also have to bail-out the civil servants' pension funds as well.

"It is clear that Government finds itself between a rock and a very hard place," said Singh.

He added, "This matrix that we find ourselves in now is totally untenable, especially since the pensions of ordinary citizens are at stake. Government has misled the public. We believe that this might possibly be one of the biggest post-democratic era scandals to date. I will raise this matter at the next possible opportunity at Parliament, as the taxpayer deserves answers on this matter," concluded Singh.

unstable load
17th Mar 2012, 06:39
Those who squeaked loudest for this are notable by their silence on the matter.
Nah, mate.
Probably patting themselves on the back for finally allowing Africa the opportunity to achieve equilibrium.

Why Whites Wont Apologise for Apartheid - YouTube

Tableview
20th Mar 2012, 18:27
20 YEARS AFTER THE 1992 REFERENDUM

By F W de Klerk

At the end of 1991 the National Party lost a key bye-election in Virginia to the Conservative Party. The Conservatives crowed that we had also lost our mandate to continue with the constitutional negotiations and demanded a whites-only election. Their claims were greatly amplified on 19 February 1992 when the National Party lost another key bye-election - in Potchefstroom. Its majority of 2 000 in the 1989 election was wiped out and replaced by a CP majority of 2 140 votes. The CP’s claim that we had lost our mandate to negotiate seemed to have been vindicated.

We had for some time promised that we would hold a referendum at some time to enable the white electorate to express its views on the negotiation process. Our defeat in Potchefstroom convinced me to do so as soon as possible. I accordingly announced my decision to hold a referendum to the NP leadership and caucus the next morning. I did not put the question to a vote - which I might well have lost - but decided to use my powers as party leader to decide on the issue myself. I was determined to resign if we lost the referendum.

The question we put to the electorate on 17 March 1992 was “Do you support the continuation of the reform process that the State President started on 2 February 1990 and which is aimed at a new constitution through negotiations?”

In the run-up to the referendum I told audiences that I was not asking for a blank cheque. I said that we had already reached broad consensus in the negotiations on a number of key points regarding the future constitution. These included a multi-party democratic system; a parliament comprising an upper and lower house; the necessity for a Bill of Rights; the separation of powers; the independence of the judiciary; proportional representation; a strong regional basis for the future dispensation; the maintenance of language and cultural rights; and community-based education for those who want it.

I said that there were a number of issues on which we were still seeking consensus. They included the prevention of domination and the abuse of power; effective protection of minorities; the protection of property rights; career security for public servants; a market-based free enterprise economy; maximum constitutional protection for regional and municipal government; and the dispersal of the powers that were then concentrated in the hands of the State President.

I truly believe that it was on 17 March 1992 that the great majority of white South Africans finally and decisively turned their backs on 350 years of white domination. In my victory speech on 18 March 1992 I said that they had finally closed the book on apartheid. “The White electorate has reached out, through this landslide win for the YES vote, to all our compatriots, to all other South Africans and the message of this referendum is: Today, in a certain sense, is the real birthday of the new South African nation.”

The mandate that we received enabled us to proceed with the negotiations and to nail down virtually all the goals that I listed in my pre-referendum speeches.

Now, ironically, almost exactly twenty years later, many of the fundamental provisions of the constitution that we subsequently negotiated and adopted are under threat.

On 5 March the ANC released policy discussion papers claiming that the ‘first transition’ had served its purpose and should now make way for a ‘second transition’. The discussion papers proposed that the present provincial system should be amended and that the property rights should be reviewed to facilitate land reform.

This followed the announcement the previous week of the government’s plan to ‘review’ the judgments of the constitutional court, accompanied by dark rumblings from the President regarding the need to review the court’s powers. It coincided with the South African Languages Bill that would effectively strip Afrikaans and seven black indigenous languages of their official status.

Our Constitution has served us well. It has provided a firm foundation for the development of our ‘rainbow’ nation. It has provided the framework for sustained economic growth and impressive social development.

Our failure to make substantial progress against poverty, inequality and unemployment cannot be ascribed to any shortcoming in the Constitution - but rather to inappropriate policies. The Constitution is under pressure not because it is standing in the way of transformation - but because it is limiting the power of the executive and the legislature to do as they please.

The time has come for all our communities - not just white South Africans as was the case twenty years ago - to stand up for the values and rights on which our new society has been based. Their response will - in a very real sense - determine the sustainability of the new South African nation that I believed was born on 17 March 1992.

dfdasein
20th Mar 2012, 22:27
SA to review Zuma corruption case
A South African court rules that the 2009 decision to drop corruption charges against President Jacob Zuma can be reviewed.

BBC News - South African Jacob Zuma corruption case to be reviewed (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-17442486)

Solid Rust Twotter
22nd Mar 2012, 08:22
You couldn't make this up.

'DA undermines democracy'
Wed, 21 Mar 2012 7:50


The African National Congress on Tuesday accused the Democratic Alliance (DA) of using the courts to undermine democracy.

The ANC’s Keith Khoza said the party would be challenging the Supreme Court of Appeals ruling regarding charges that were dropped against President Jacob Zuma.

The Presidency's Mac Maharaj said the judgment does not in any way affect Mokotedi Mpshe's 2009 decision to drop the charges.

“The President’s legal team are currently studying the full judgment to ascertain any implications.”

The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld the DA’s appeal to get access to the record of the decision to drop charges against Zuma.

The court also ordered the National Prosecuting Authority to lodge the record of the decision with the court, but excluded Zuma's protected statements.

Oh, the irony...

One shot in S'ville protest
Wed, 21 Mar 2012 8:05

Shots were fired in Sharpeville on Tuesday evening and one person was wounded, Gauteng police said.

"An ambulance is currently taking that person to hospital," said Constable Tshishiwa Mitileni.

It was not known if the victim was a man or woman.

Mitileni said roads were blockaded and a church tent had also been set alight.

"Police are having problems...because people are stoning us and the police vehicles."

No officers were injured. No arrests had been made yet.

Residents marched earlier on Tuesday because the main Human Rights Day celebrations were being held in Kliptown, Soweto.

"It [the public holiday] is over the Sharpeville massacre. The people from Sharpeville are striking because they don't understand why [the celebrations] are now in Kliptown," said Mitileni.

Human Rights Day was previously known as Sharpeville Day to commemorate the shooting of 69 black protesters by apartheid police in Mrach 1960.

70 arrested in Sharpeville
Thu, 22 Mar 2012 7:19

Seventy people were arrested in Sharpeville, in southern Gauteng, during protests, police said on Wednesday.

"Protesters allegedly broke into a Usave shop and a Boxer Supermarket and looted the groceries inside," Warrant Officer Aubrey Moopeloa said.

They will appear in the Vereeninging Magistrate's court soon.

Sharpeville residents burnt tyres and marched on Tuesday because the main Human Rights Day celebrations were being held in Kliptown, Soweto.

Human Rights Day was previously known as Sharpeville Day to commemorate the shooting of 69 black protesters by the police in 1960.

Gauteng provincial police spokesperson Lt-Col Lungelo Dlamini said protests in Sharpeville and Kya Sands had ended on Wednesday.

"Crowds in Kya Sands informal settlement dispersed around 11am," Lt-Col Lungelo Dlamini said.

About 150 residents of Kya Sands were protesting earlier on Wednesday over service delivery issues.

Dlamini said some roads in Sharpeville were still blocked due to the rocks that were packed out by angry residents.

Meanwhile the carnage continues...

Bedridden man (81) beaten
Thu, 22 Mar 2012 7:52

An elderly couple and their caregiver were attacked in their home in Summerstrand, Port Elizabeth and their house robbed, it was reported on Thursday.

The 81-year-old man, who is bedridden, was beaten up in his bed, according to the Herald Online.

The attackers then moved on to his caregiver. Afterwards, the man's 74-year-old wife was tied up in her bed, gagged, then kicked and hit with a screwdriver.

They carried the two women to the man's bedroom and boiled the kettle, threatening to pour boiling water over the trio unless they handed over the safe keys.

Police said the robbery appeared to be well planned. Valuables worth about R100 000 were stolen. One of the attackers was arrested while running through neighbouring gardens trying to escape.

Humewood station commander Brigadier Ronald Koll believed the group had been involved in a series of other robberies.

Solid Rust Twotter
26th Mar 2012, 16:03
And it continues...

Aurora ‘was virtually run as a Ponzi scheme’
2012-03-25
Jacques Pauw

The liquidators of the disgraced – and politically connected – mine Aurora have revealed that the company only has R2 000 left in 10 bank accounts, leaving workers with no hope of ever being paid.

Media24 Investigations has established that the SA Revenue Service (Sars) has now launched a full-scale forensic audit into suspected dodgy gold deals.

Mine workers at Aurora’s troubled Orkney and Grootvlei mines, who have not been paid for almost three years, started getting emergency food aid last week.

The Sars audit comes as Aurora’s financial statements show that between September 2009 and May 2010, the company sold R130 million of gold to Rand Refinery.

In the same period, however, Aurora paid out R260 million to itself and creditors from its 10 accounts, raising suspicion that the company sold far more gold than it officially declared.

Aurora liquidator Gert de Wet of KaapVaal Trust told City Press that he couldn’t find any labour contracts between the company and its workers. There was no payroll either.

Aurora took over the running of the two mines towards the end of 2009 when the owner, Pamodzi Gold, went into liquidation. At the time, the mines were fully operational.

Aurora itself was liquidated in October last year. The company used an affiliate, Kaunda Global Mining Resources, to run the mines.

De Wet says there is also no evidence that the company ever paid a percentage of the workers’ wages to the Workman’s Compensation Fund (UIF). He can also not find any evidence that Aurora paid VAT on its transactions.

This has opened up the company and its directors – among them President Jacob Zuma’s nephew, Khulubuse Zuma, and Nelson Mandela’s grandson, Zondwa Mandela – to charges of fraud and corruption.

“Aurora was bankrupt from the start,” said De Wet. “It is almost a Ponzi scheme.”

He says the liquidators would “try their best”, but it did not seem there was any money left to pay the workers.

Pamodzi liquidator Johan Engelbrect told City Press he would take legal action against Aurora directors this week to compel them to repay the millions of rands of damage caused to the mines.

De Wet confirmed allegations from workers that Aurora management concealed gold and that not all transactions were properly reflected.

Engelbrecht agreed that the running of Aurora boiled down to virtually a “Ponzi scheme”, and mentioned prima facie evidence of fraud and theft committed by its directors.

Workers at the Orkney mine say last month alone electrical cable worth more than R3 million was removed.

In October 2009, Aurora took control of Pamodzi Gold’s two mines and seven mine shafts. It promised a R600 million investment in the tired mine, as well as job security for the mine workers and educational bursaries for their children.

Six months later, it stopped paying its workers. Several shafts are nothing more than stripped skeletons.

Aurora has been accused of destroying 5 300 jobs, impoverishing 42 000 people and polluting wetlands.

Aurora is currently involved in an insolvency hearing in the Pretoria High Court. One of the issues to be decided is liability for selling the mine’s assets.

If Aurora is found to be liable, it will possibly face civil and criminal charges. The company owes workers about R20 million in salaries. Each worker is owed about R180 000, on average.

Gideon du Plessis, trade union Solidarity’s deputy general secretary, said it was “very unlikely” that workers would get their outstanding salaries and compensation for the pain and suffering they had endured.

“We would like to see the perpetrators end up in jail,” he said.

A raft of court orders instructing Aurora and Zuma to make payments of millions to various parties – including workers – have been ignored.

Cosatu North West secretary Solly Phetoe said their political connections made them “untouchable”.

“These directors will not be held accountable because they are related to Nelson Mandela and Jacob Zuma,” he said.

Aurora commercial director Thulani Ngubane did not respond to requests for comment.
Source: City Press http://www.citypress.co.za/Business/...cheme-20120324

Solid Rust Twotter
28th Mar 2012, 17:50
Is this what was envisioned? Just another African basket case in the making. To be honest, the writer comes across as far more optimistic than reality warrants. Little or no will to address the country's problems while burrowing ever deeper into the gravy trough can only have one outcome.

Mandela Dream Fades With a Quarter of South Africans Jobless
By Mike Cohen - Mar 27, 2012

When Nelson Mandela came to power in 1994 he reached out to South Africa’s poor and to its rich by promising jobs and a secure climate for business. Eighteen years later, his country has a 24 percent unemployment rate and a debate over nationalizing mines is deterring investment.

Economic growth is less than half the 7 percent level the government says is needed to make inroads into the highest jobless rate of 61 countries tracked by Bloomberg. Stocks have underperformed Brazil and Peru. The ruling African National Congress is considering raising mine taxes and President Jacob Zuma’s government is pushing through a secrecy law that could impede reporting on state corruption.

“They’ve got to make South Africa a much more attractive place for investment,” Mark Mobius, who oversees about $40 billion as executive chairman of Franklin Templeton’s Emerging Markets Group, said in an interview this month in Dubai. “I’m not only talking about foreign investment,” he said. “I’m talking about local investment.”

A lack of opportunity for poor black South Africans, who constitute 90 percent of the population of 50.6 million, has fueled violent street protests and given impetus to a push by the ANC’s youth wing for the seizing of mines, banks and land. That, together with inadequate power supplies and a labor system as rigid as in France and Sweden, is pushing investors to consider alternatives from Australia to Peru.

Missed Opportunity

Policy uncertainty is preventing the country with the world’s biggest mineral reserves, as assessed by Citigroup Inc. in 2010, from fully benefiting from demand in China and India. South Africa attracted $4 billion in mining investment in the first nine months of last year while Australia, a country that exports many of the same minerals to China, got $34 billion.

Between 1994 and 2010 South Africa secured $46.8 billion in foreign direct investment, according to the United Nations. That’s an eighth of what Brazil has attracted and less than in Turkey, Malaysia, South Korea, Colombia and Peru. Foreign direct investment in South Africa fell from $9 billion in 2008 to $5.4 billion in 2009 and $1.5 billion in 2010.

“The debate about nationalization, as championed by the youth league, has been very damaging to South Africa’s image in the eyes of the investor community,” said Prince Mashile, chief executive officer of Johannesburg’s Forum for Public Dialogue, an independent research institute, in an interview. “It planted seeds of uncertainty.”

Lagging Behind

South Africa’s stock markets also have underperformed other emerging markets. Since the end of June 1995 an index of the biggest companies has risen fourfold when measured in dollars, less than a third of the rate of the benchmark index in Brazil and a fourth of the gain posted by Peru’s key index. This year international investors are selling South African equities at the fastest pace since 2008.

In 2008 Rio Tinto Group (RIO) halted work on a $2.7 billion aluminum smelter in South Africa because of the power shortage and expansion of the world’s biggest ferrochrome industry has slowed. Last year AngloGold Ashanti Ltd. (ANG) scaled back an $800 million plan to extend the world’s deepest gold mine.

Rio says it’s considering or building investments in countries including Guinea, Mongolia and Mozambique, while AngloGold is examining opportunities in Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo and Australia.

Since May 9, 2009, when Zuma became president, South African foreign-currency bonds have returned 37 percent, less than the 46 percent average of emerging market dollar bonds tracked in the JP Morgan EMBI Emerging Market Bond Indices. The benchmark dollar bond yields 4.06 percent compared with 3.48 percent for the comparable Brazilian bond and 2.20 percent for U.S. Treasuries.

Capital Controls

The government blames some of the lack of progress on the economy handed to it by the apartheid state: a sanctions-hobbled economy that had grown at an annual average of about 1.2 percent since 1980 and was still under capital controls.

“Constructing something out of the mess we had pre-1994 is not an easy task,” Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan told reporters in Cape Town on Feb. 22. “Some of the skepticism of the state is legitimate.”

Living standards for most poor South Africans have improved since 1994: More than 90 percent have access to clean water, up from about 62 percent; more than three-quarters of households are electrified, from 51 percent; and the number of people receiving welfare grants has risen more than five-fold to almost 16 million.

Not Zimbabwe

South Africa has among the best infrastructure systems and most developed financial markets in Africa, and should attract new interest from investors as the global economy stabilizes and risk appetite returns, said Jeremy Gardiner, a director at Investec Asset Management, the nation’s biggest independent money manager.

“South Africa is not going to go the way of Zimbabwe,” he said in a March 22 interview from Cape Town. “We shoot ourselves in the foot sometimes,” by failing to convey the country’s true potential.

Since the first democratic elections the economy has expanded in every quarter except for four, the country’s benchmark stock index rose to a record this year and interest rates are at a 30-year low. Foreign direct investment rose to 42.1 billion rand last year ($5.6 billion), according the South African Reserve Bank.

“The country is a very different country from what it was in 1994,” Mashile said.

Still, a malfunctioning education system excludes millions of black youths from the mainstream economy and much of the population lives in one of the country’s 2,700 shantytowns. The Gini coefficient, a measure of income inequality, is 0.68, one of the highest in the world and more than the 0.67 at the end of white segregationist rule.

Like France

The World Economic Forum’s 2011-2012 Global Competitiveness Report ranked South Africa 139th out of 142 countries in terms of the competitiveness of its hiring and firing practices, just behind France and Sweden and ahead of Portugal. It was 138th in flexibility in determining wages, just after Sweden, and 127th, after Mali, in the quality of its primary education system.

“We’re right at the very, very bottom of labor flexibility internationally,” said Andrew Levy, who heads his own labor research company and advises multinationals. If nothing is done, “the implications are social unrest, mass populist movements arising, looting, violence, who knows? We’re going to lose our position as the economic powerhouse of the continent unless something changes.”

Profits Tax

The ruling party will debate policy changes at conferences in June and December. While an ANC-commissioned study found after a more than two-year debate that seizing mines would be an “unmitigated economic disaster,” it recommended imposing a 50 percent tax on the profits of mining companies earning returns in excess of 15 percent, levies on the sale of prospecting rights and more taxes on companies based in offshore tax havens.

“Those are very intrusive measures,” Peter Leon, head of Africa mining and energy projects at law firm Webber Wentzel, said in an interview in Cape Town last month. “The government and the ANC have a big job on their hands to assure investors that this is a safe country to invest in.”

Since November, Moody’s Investors Service and Fitch Ratings have cut South Africa’s credit-rating outlook to negative from stable, citing heightened political risk and concerns over growth. The country is rated A3 by Moody’s and BBB+ by Fitch.

Eurasia Group, a New-York-based risk analysis company, identified South Africa in a Jan. 3 report as one of the top geopolitical areas with potential for instability in 2012 because of the “ascent of populism” within the ANC. Other countries named were North Korea, Pakistan and Egypt.

No Turning Back

The ANC’s Youth League, whose leader, Julius Malema, was expelled from the party on Feb. 29 for undermining the party, says it won’t abandon its campaign for the state seizure of mines, no matter what the party decides.

“We are quite aware there is general concern among the investor community” about nationalization, Enoch Godongwana, chairman of the ANC’s economic policy committee, said in a Feb. 6 interview in Cape Town. “We are going to bed the matter down in December. I may well say the debate is not necessary but I can’t stop those who want to raise it from raising it.”

London-based Anglo American Plc (AAL), Australia’s BHP Billiton Ltd. (BHP) and Xstrata Plc (XTA) of Zug, Switzerland, own mines in South Africa, the world’s biggest producer of platinum, manganese and vanadium.

Judicial Independence?

Even more damaging to the legacy of Mandela, now 93 and in poor health, are proposed new restrictions on media freedom and judicial independence. South Africa’s first black president had hailed those rights as primordial when the constitution was formulated in 1996.

On November 22, the ruling party used its majority in the National Assembly to pass a law that proposed jail sentences of as long as 25 years for anyone obtaining classified information, even if its disclosure was in the public interest.

Last month, the government announced plans to review how judgments of the Constitutional Court, the country’s highest court, had impacted “on the transformation of society.” The opposition Democratic Alliance said the decision placed the court’s independence at risk. Yesterday the country’s Department of Justice said rulings of the Supreme Court will be reviewed as well.

“There is a tendency of those in government and some close to it to blame the constitution for the inability of the government to deliver,” said George Bizos, a lawyer who defended Mandela in his 1960s treason trial. “There are worrying signs.”

To contact the reporter on this story: Mike Cohen in Cape Town at [email protected]

To contact the editor responsible for this story: Andrew J. Barden at [email protected]

®2012 BLOOMBERG L.P. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Solid Rust Twotter
15th Apr 2012, 06:11
You couldn't make up this stuff...

Acting magistrate gets bail
Rahima Essop | 2 Day(s) Ago

An acting magistrate who was arrested for driving a stolen car has been released on R5,000 bail.

He briefly appeared in the Krugersdorp Magistrate’s Court on Gauteng’s West Rand on Friday morning.

Last week, Rhodes Kgotso Thuwe and Solomon Sejwane were spotted while driving the stolen vehicle.

Police believe the car was used to rob a scrap metal company in Krugersdorp.

The business was robbed of more than R110,000 by three men posing as police officers.

The state did not oppose Thuwe’s bail application.

Senjwane is also accused of being involved in the armed robbery.

The company owner recognised them after they drove past his business.

Sejwane claimed he was assaulted by police and appeared in court with a bandage over his head.

In an affidavit read out in court, he told officials that he still had to prepare several judgments and asked to be released from custody.

His bail ruling will be made on Monday.


The politics of tolerance. This regime and the old lot have very little to separate them.

'She tried to run over Mazibuko'
Sun, 15 Apr 2012 7:14


A South African Democratic Teachers' Union (Sadtu) member tried to run over DA Parliamentary leader Lindiwe Mazibuko with a car, the party said on Saturday.

"A Sadtu official, Honjiswa Mrwebi, who is also a teacher and chairperson of the Hewu-branch of the union in the Whittlesea area outside Queenstown purposefully and with intent tried to run... Mazibuko over with her vehicle on Friday," said Edmund van Vuuren in a statement.

Van Vuuren was accompanying Mazibuko and school pupils on a 12km walk on Friday to highlight the problems with scholar transport in the area.

"This woman, who openly advocated violence, must be subjected to a departmental inquest and punitive measures instituted against her if found guilty," said van Vuuren.

He said he had started proceedings to have Mrwebi's actions investigated by the superintendent-general of the department of education.

The Dispatch Online reported that Mrwebi had admitted she had wanted to hit Mazibuko with her car because she accused the DA member of "wasting" the children's time.

Mazibuko on Saturday called the incident a "non-event" by a "rogue teacher".

"It was a non-event. When we were walking on the road the occasional car would pass by and I remember one almost hitting me but I not aware of some evil plot," said Mazibuko.

"I didn't realise who was behind the wheel. I wasn't aware of a plot to harm me. We were not trying to engage this rogue teacher who was trying to create some sort of a ruckus... I don't really care either way," she said.

Sadtu spokesperson Nomusa Cembi said she could not comment on the matter because she was unaware of the incident. Provincial secretary Mncekeleli Ndongeni could not be immediately reached for comment.

Van Vuuren said: "The DA in the Eastern Cape is contemplating laying criminal charges against this woman, who is contributing to the further decay of society's moral fibre."

This kind of thing made headline news around the world when it happened in Zim a while back. Unfortunately, it happens so often in SA it barely counts as news any more.

Farmer beaten, set alight
Thu, 12 Apr 2012 9:17


A Free State farmer is recovering in a Vereeniging clinic after being attacked and set alight outside his farm gate near Heilbron, a newspaper reported on Thursday.

Christo Janse van Rensburg (36) sustained second- and third-degree burns when two men threw a petrol-bomb through his open bakkie window as he arrived home around 10pm on Tuesday, the Beeld newspaper reported.

His wife Connie told the newspaper that when her husband jumped out of his car and rolled on the ground, his assailants attacked him with a metal pipe and tried to force him back into the burning vehicle.

When this failed, they tried to stab him, then poured more petrol over him and set him alight.

Van Rensburg stripped and ran 200 metres to his farmhouse for help.

"My husband fought very hard. When I heard him screaming, I switched the lights on and the attackers must have taken fright, because they fled," she said.

Solid Rust Twotter
15th Apr 2012, 06:16
...And the guardians of law and order doing their usual sterling job...

'Mdludli won't be probed' - IPID
Fri, 13 Apr 2012 4:14


Serious corruption allegations against crime intelligence boss Richard Mdludli would not at this stage be tackled by the police's watchdog directorate, IPID executive director Francois Beukman said on Friday.

Beukman told reporters that since the claims involved abuse of the secret services account, the matter did not fall under the mandate of the Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID), but rightly belonged with the Inspector-General of Intelligence, Faith Radebe.

"Remember that in terms of the IPID act we have specific areas of focus and matters in the intelligence field — crime intelligence, political intelligence — that is the prerogative of the inspector general of intelligence," he said.

"In terms of the issues that have been raised in the media so far, it is indicated that it flows from matters relating to the secret services account, so that falls within the parametres of the inspector general."

Beukman added however: "Of course if there are any other matters — any member of the police involved in systemic corruption — we can look at that."

He confirmed that under the new legislation governing the directorate, it was free to investigate abuses even when it did not receive a complaint from the public or the government.

Crucially, the amended law also obliges the police to implement the findings of the watchdog, giving it teeth where before, Beukman noted, its recommendations were often ignored.

The act, which led to the renaming of the former Independent Complaints Directorate on April 1, also makes it plain that the IPID's mandate "includes corruption matters within the police".

But IPID spokesman Moses Dlamini pointed out that this did not pertain to the minister of police or the national commissioner, who [the commissioner] is not a member of the SAPS in terms of the South African Police Service Act.

Allegations of criminal misconduct have been levelled against Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa and Mdludli — reportedly tipped to be the country's next national police commissioner — and the finance chief of the Crime Intelligence Division (CID), Solly Lazarus.

They are said to have sanctioned the abuse of millions of rands from the secret service account for lavish homes, luxury cars and private travel, but have denied any wrongdoing.

Mdludli is also alleged to have appointed family members to the CID's covert agent programme, enabling them to get salaries and benefits at the taxpayer's expense.

The claims have been made by senior CID and Hawks staff in a leaked secret report handed to Radebe.

This is only one saga dogging Mdludli, who was sidelined by now suspended national police commissioner Bheki Cele last year, but was recently reinstated in his post after fraud charges against him were withdrawn in December.

In February, prosecutors withdrew charges against Mdludli and three others stemming from the 1999 murder of his love rival Oupa Ramogibe, and established an inquest to determine whether the state had enough evidence for a trial.

The inquest heard this week that key evidence in the case had been destroyed.

IPID's Dlamini recalled on Friday that in 2009, the body arrested one of the men who was charged along with Mdludli in the murder case — Colonel Nkosana Ximba — after investigating a complaint of torture against him.

But that case was struck off the roll last year because witnesses failed to appear in court.

The Mail & Guardian reported on Friday that a statement presented to the murder inquest this week detailed the rapid promotions of Mdludli's co-accused through the ranks of the SAPS.

Ximba, it noted, was promoted from Constable to Colonel in 2010.

Words fail me.



I suppose the money is better spent on more important things like flash parties and luxury cars for the pilferati.

Premier breaks promise?
Thu, 12 Apr 2012 9:04


Gauteng Premier Nomvula Mokonyane has backed down on a promise to help cover blue-light accident victim Thomas Ferreira's medical costs, according to a newspaper report on Thursday.

Mokonyane originally told Ferreira's parents and the media that her department would help cover expenses.

Ferreira (19) was knocked off his motorcycle by the speeding car of local government and housing MEC Humphrey Mmemezi on 5 November.

Mokonyane asked local government and housing department head Mongezi Monyane to manage negotiations about Ferreira's accident costs.

He told Beeld newspaper on Wednesday that he thought there had been a misunderstanding about what the premier said.

"If the premier's office or my office had to pay the costs, I don't know what budget this was supposed to have come out of," he said.

Ferreira was brain-damaged in the accident and spent weeks in a coma. He was only recently discharged from a rehabilitation centre.

Mokonyane visited the family on 8 November and publicly promised — in front of the media and Ferreira's family — to cover the medical costs.

In a press statement issued later that day, Mokonyane's spokesperson Xoli Mngambi said, among other things, that: "Mokonyane made a promise to the family that the provincial government will take care of Ferreira's medical costs."

According to the Ferreiras, their son's medical bills already amount to over R1-million.

The family's lawyer Karl Schuler has applied for an interim payout from the Road Accident Fund (RAF).

Monyane told Beeld that he had contacted a senior RAF official to try to expedite the process.

That would be the Road Accident Fund bankrupted recently by the long fingered ANC cronies who were put in charge, no?

http://stat2.iaf.cdn.playfair.co.za/assets/13/1659/191699/904762.JPEG
iafrica.com | news | sa news | Premier breaks promise? (http://news.iafrica.com/sa/789040.html)

I suppose backpedaling with your snout in the gravy trough can be difficult...

KAG
21st Apr 2012, 12:09
Well, south Africa is one of the violent country in the world, with one of th highest crime level, something has failed there.

It is estimated that a woman born in South Africa has a greater chance of being raped than learning how to read.


JOHANNESBURG, South Africa — A cell-phone video of a 17-year-old girl being gang raped has gone viral in South Africa, in an incident that has shocked a country with one of the highest rates of rape in the world.

The 10-minute video shows a group of young men taking turns raping the girl, who is said to be mentally disabled. According to reports, she cries and pleads with them to stop, and at the end, they offer her 2 rand (25 cents) to keep quiet.

In a disturbing twist, the video was passed around by teenagers on social networks, and only came to light after a concerned mother alerted a local tabloid, which contacted police in Soweto township, southwest of Johannesburg.

The gang-rape video has elicited an outpouring of anger in South Africa, where horrifying stories about rapes of women, children and even babies are everyday news.

The women’s league of the ruling African National Congress party called the incident “sadistic,” and said it raises questions about South African society and the way boys are being brought up.

“When does it become acceptable amongst a group of peers to rape a girl and laugh about it? It just makes one sick to the stomach,” the women's league said.

A popular radio talk show host, Redi Tlhabi, broke down when discussing the incident on air. “I was too distraught & lost my composure,” she later wrote on Twitter.

A widely cited study from 2009 found that one in four South African men had admitted to rape, and most cases are never prosecuted. More than 66,000 rapes and other sexual assaults were reported for the year ending in March 2011, according to the latest police statistics.

TZ350
21st Apr 2012, 21:51
[quote] KAG

" Well, south Africa is one of the violent country in the world, with one of th highest crime level, something has failed there. " [quote]



Yeah, apartheid was ended. But don't worry........... France too, has a few festering racial problems of it's own......................so you'll have something in common :hmm:

I saw an interview with the :mad: Minister for women and children, Lulu Xingwana, regarding this gang rape, and, surprise, surprise...........she blamed the legacy of apartheid for the incidence of black on black rape :hmm:, not the barbarity of the black population.

Taking responsibility for the total breakdown of society in the country since their lot came to into pillage, oops, run the country, isn't an option I guess.

Tableview
22nd Apr 2012, 07:37
Well, south Africa is one of the violent country in the world, with one of th highest crime level, something has failed there.Thanks for pointing that out, I'm sure none us had realised, and your profoundly helpful and insightful analysis has been a revelation.

Can I suggest you write with your suggestions to :

President Jacob Zuma
Tuynhuys
Pleinstraat
Kaapstad 8001
R S A

He may be a little busy right now as he's just married his fourth wife but I'm sure in the fullness of time he'll find a moment to thank you for your assistance in running his country.

It is estimated that a woman born in South Africa has a greater chance of being raped than learning how to read.
Really? By whom? Do you have a source for this pearl of wisdom?

unstable load
22nd Apr 2012, 15:49
It does sometimes seem that the indigeni have elevated it to a national pastime, Tableview.:mad:

Following hot on the heels of the mentally ill girl being gang raped and videoed was the mentally ill boy being raped.....add to that the various gardeners/beggars/burglars/HIV positives raping all ages and it starts to form a grim picture that that statement may hold a glimmer of sad truth.

Tableview
22nd Apr 2012, 16:03
I quite agree, it's just that we really didn't need it pointed out by someone who has possibly never set foot in the country but who delights in every opportunity to knock the English speaking world and its undeniable problems.

Solid Rust Twotter
1st May 2012, 08:26
Looks like the constitution has now come to mean absolutely squat to those in power. They cook up their own laws to enrich themselves, remain in power and dodge prosecution. Yet absolute silence still prevails from those in the West who hopped around squeaking frantically to put this lot in power.

Top cop accused of covering up shooting
BRETT HORNER | 01 April, 2012 00:49

Nine explosive affidavits detail how SA's acting national police commissioner, Lieutenant-General Nhlan-hla Mkhwanazi, admitted to colleagues that he helped cover up the killing of an unarmed suspect - which he had witnessed.

The Sunday Times has seen extracts of the damning statements, which were compiled by shocked police officers present at the meeting in Durban last month.

The affidavits have been filed with public protector Thuli Madonsela.

The police officers state that, on March 5, Mkhwanazi told the meeting that he would take to the "grave" details of the shooting by an elite special task force, which he headed at the time - unless called to testify at an inquiry.

Madonsela is contemplating an investigation. Her spokesman, Kga-lalelo Masibi, said: "The public protector is not in a position to comment about the fate of the police commissioner."

Her office added that a decision on the investigation would be made this week.

This week, Mkhwanazi refused to comment. But his spokesman, Brigadier Lindela Mashigo, said there was another version to the story.

"Please note that, as it should be obvious to you, there is another side to this story, namely the version of the acting national commissioner," he said. He refused to provide the Sunday Times with Mkhwanazi's version.

It's believed the incident occurred after 2005, when Mkhwanazi became head of the elite special task force.

Mkhwanazi headed the force, which he commanded for six years, before his appointment as acting national police commissioner in October last year.

Extracts from affidavits given to the public protector by DA police shadow minister Dianne Kohler Barnard confirm Mkhwanazi's admission.

One read: "Mkhwanazi then unequivocally confessed to being present when this deceased was arrested 'unarmed' and then later shot and killed in his presence, and to date has done nothing about it."

Said another: "He mentioned an incident where the subject was neutralised wrongfully in his presence ... he was part of that operation where a suspect was murdered in cold blood."

Each of the nine accounts contains similar allegations, and all corroborate Mkhwanazi's refusal to sign a statement after the killing.

"He stated that he will go to his grave with that incident, as he refused to make a statement," wrote another officer.

None of those who authored the affidavits have been identified for fear of reprisals, after Mkhwanazi recently vowed to fire those responsible for leaking a report to the Sunday Times that revealed more than 27000 officers were incompetent to handle firearms.

The affidavits were compiled by junior and senior cops with ranks "across the board", said Kohler Barnard. She added the statements were signed and notarised, and the originals given to Madonsela's office.

She said: "The acting national police commissioner must be suspended with immediate effect."

This comes four months after a Sunday Times investigation exposed an alleged police hit squad operating in KwaZulu-Natal.

The shocking exposé revealed that the Organised Crime Unit at Cato Manor operated as an alleged hit squad, executing suspects and then holding booze-fuelled parties.

About 51 suspicious killings have been linked to the alleged hit squad, which has since been closed down by police top brass.

Following the meeting on March 5, Mkhwanazi led a delegation to the family of killed taxi boss Bongani Mkhize, who was allegedly gunned down by the Cato Manor unit in 2009, and promised to act against police brutality.

Two weeks ago, he released a statement saying: "Such officers must face the full brunt of the law, and their incarceration must be a reminder to other police officers of the consequences of abusing their powers."

In October, when the Sunday Times compiled a profile of Mkhwanazi shortly after his appointment, a former task force operative, who asked not to be identified for security reasons, conceded that Mkhwanazi, who joined the police service in 1993, had personally joined major raids and the unit's signature operations to ambush criminals during robberies.

"He has been on the ground outside a lot, so you can say he's an action man," the operative said.

"It's just hard for me to see how [Mkhwanazi] has the experience to run the entire police force."

The special task force has rescued scores of hostages under Mkhwan-azi's command and used unorthodox methods to catch criminals.

In December 2007, 11 cash-in-transit robbers were shot dead by his crack team in an incident close to the Carousel casino near Pretoria.

Former colleagues describe him as a man who hates bureaucracy and "red tape" and is suspicious of the media.

Mkhwanazi - who is trained in the use of explosives, holds bomb-disposal certification and has completed a counter-terrorism course with the FBI in the US - also said: "What I know best is fighting crime."

Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa has previously defended his appointment, hailing him a "tried-and-tested cop" who had "excellently distinguished" himself.

This followed criticism of President Jacob Zuma for installing Mkhwanazi in the hot seat after national commissioner General Bheki Cele was suspended.

"For the record, the minister at the time the acting national police commissioner was appointed was stating the commissioner's policing career CV because some in society had questioned his credentials," said Mthethwa's spokesman, Zweli Mnisi.
Source: http://www.timeslive.co.za/local/201...ng-up-shooting

Suspended anti-corruption prosecutor Glynnis Breytenbach was shot at three weeks ago while driving home. Breytenbach, who prosecuted crime intelligence boss Richard Mdluli until the case was withdrawn by her superiors in December, was suspended by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) this morning. She told City Press she is convinced the shooting was related to her work. "I have been followed for some time. It happened late in the evening of April 11 on the N14 while I was driving home. Two shots were fired, but both missed." Breytenbach said she was still being followed. She reported the shooting to the Hawks. Last Wednesday morning two BMW motorcycles tried to force her off the road while she was driving home from the gym. "A metro police car came by and they backed off," she said. Breytenbach is the head of the Specialised Commercial Crimes Unit in Pretoria. Apart from the Mdluli matter, she was also working on the arms deal investigation and on a mining rights case involving Kumba and politically connected Imperial Crown Trading (ICT). Her lawyer Gerhard Wagenaar confirmed her suspension by acting NPA head Advocate Nomgcobo Jiba on Monday, saying the official reason given by the NPA was that his client allegedly abused her powers in the Kumba fraud case. Breytenbach was the prosecutor in a case concerning the awarding of mining rights at Sishen to ICT. Kumba subsequently laid a charge of fraud against ICT, and Breytenbach was appointed as prosecutor. ICT's directors and legal representatives subsequently complained to the NPA that Breytenbach was seen as being too close to Kumba and its legal representatives. Breytenbach denies any wrongdoing. Her supporters in and outside the NPA believe the Kumba complaint is a red herring and that her persistence to prosecute Mdluli led to her suspension by her bosses in the NPA. NPA spokesperson Bulelwa Makeke confirmed Breytenbach's suspension. "She has been provided with reasons for her suspension after she was given more than enough time to respond. "The next step will be an internal disciplinary hearing where all allegations will be addressed substantively." The NPA denied that Breytenbach's suspension was linked to her insistence that the Mdluli case continued. Last week, Breytenbach provided Jiba with a memorandum, outlining her reasons why the Mdluli case should never have been withdrawn.

Cacophonix
1st May 2012, 23:02
As an old Saffer I am proud of the bloody ou plek...

Let rock...

"Master Jack" 4 Jacks and a Jill - YouTube

Caco

Solid Rust Twotter
6th May 2012, 06:40
Not enough to actually stick around though...


Although there's little left of which to be proud.

Tableview
6th May 2012, 08:17
Caco, thank you for reminding me about 4 Jacks and a Jill, what a great band they were. Their music is sometimes played on 567 Cape Talk when they do the 'Golden Oldies' on weekends and public holidays. No doubt you remember 'Substitute' by Clout, which gets the odd airing too. Glenda Hyam and Bernie Millar were friends of mine but I last saw them just after Bernie's bru Al (Hunter) died - he was also a muso (drummer). He and his wife Jenny were a duo that did the hotel circuits, can't remember what they sang as. I still see Jen from time to time when I'm in Joeys, which isn't that often. We all used to hang around with Des and Dawn Lindberg too, who had a beautiful house in Zeekoevlei and were the most most wonderful hosts and entertainers. I have lovely photo I took of Al and Jen on Clifton beach which I'll post if I can find it, just before they left to go overseas on the SA Vaal.

4 Jacks and a Jill's song also get played sometimes on a Dutch Radio station I often listen to, that plays 'oldies' de heele dag lang, as Karike Keuzenkamp (sp?) was originally from Holland.

Glenda and Richard Hyam split some years before Glenda formed Clout. After Glenda married Bernie Millar she left Clout and he disbanded Circus. Sandy and Bones joined Clout.
Bernie/Glenda formed showband ‘Pedigree’ which opened at Plumb Crazy in Joburg in 1978. Bernie (main vocals, drums, bass), Glenda (keyboards, vocals), Alan Hunter (Bernie’s brother – drums, vocals), Jenny Cantan (Alan’s wife – main vocals),

I'm also proud of the ou plek, disgusted by what's going on now, just listened to the news on the radio about a priest who allegedly raped a 10 year girl after a prayer meeting. The police are part of the problem rather than being the solution, and so it gaans an.

I spend as much time there as I can and hopefully in the near future it will be more, but the golden days are over. I'm glad I'll always have the memories.

Solid Rust Twotter
8th May 2012, 07:43
From Hayibo in response to 160000 (yup, you read it correctly) prisoners scheduled for early release...

Zuma reduces sentences so MPs get same leniency when they go to jail


PRETORIA. The Presidency has confirmed that Jacob Zuma’s controversial decision to reduce sentences for many prisoners – including Jackie Selebi and Schabir Shaik – was a way of “paying it forward” so that the same leniency would be shown to current government officials when they inevitably find themselves in jail in the future.

Explaining that South Africa’s jails were drastically overcrowded – mainly with former police officers, ranging from Constables to Commissioners – spokesman Shawshank Simenya said it was only a matter of time before most of them found themselves back in their old jobs.

“Whether we release them now, or they escape by walking out of a holding cell, they’re going to get out, and when they do, they’re going to be reappointed thanks to the miracle of Cadre Deployment,” said Simenya. “We just thought it would be nice to speed up the process a bit, and hope they’ll remember us when we find ourselves legally compromised in the near future.”

According to Department of Corrections spokesjailer, Flippie Klink, inmates are thrilled at the prospect of early release.

“They’re like little kids at Christmas,” he said. “Some of them stayed up all night, packing their knifes, drugs and robes of office.”

Meanwhile, proposals are being put before the parliamentary sub-committee on MP Cribs ‘n Bling that would require prisons to build at least one ministerial home inside their grounds, to “save on admin hassles later when the Comrade inevitably finds him- or herself redeployed to the slammer” to serve eight days of a ten-year sentence for corruption.

The proposal has reportedly drawn praise from ministers, who will not have to travel as far to enjoy a Sunday braai with their closest friends and business associates.

Interior designers throughout South Africa are reportedly thrilled at the opportunity to work with a new “brutalist, concrete vibe” and are busily at work on sketches showing their plans for softening the traditional harsh prison lines with throw pillows, and exciting possibilities with 24-hour floodlighting.

Schabir Shaik was not available for comment, as he is reportedly in a critical condition on the back nine at the Durban Golf Course, having bogeyed the par-four.

Source

Solid Rust Twotter
8th May 2012, 15:00
More Hayibo...

Whites want to be traditional leaders to experience pimped lifestyle


NKANDLA. Inspired by the conservative megalomania of South Africa’s traditional leaders, dissolute white citizens say they also want the right be appointed as chiefs. “We just want to see what it’s like being paid a million bucks a year by taxpayers to do that whole Pimp My Kraal thing, while appealing to some vague idea of tradition to justify it all,” said one.

The country’s traditional leaders made headlines on the weekend after calling for the protection of gay rights to be removed from the Constitution.

“Gayness is un-African,” explained spokesman Versailles Vilakazi this morning. “It was imported here from Europe, and must be rejected along with all other non-traditional European influences. Except for soccer. And BMWs. Those aren’t tainted by gayness. Although we could do with less bum-patting in soccer. And the Z4 is kind of camp. But we’ll let those slide for now.”

He added that the anti-gay move was just the first of many demands the National House of Traditional Leaders would be making this year.

“Next on the list is a petition that Parliament officially recognize that literate women are witches,” he said. “After which we’ll be calling on the United Nations to declare everything that happened after 900AD null and void.”

Asked why traditional leaders should continue to be funded by taxpayers whose way of life they rejected as un-African, Vilakazi said, “Shut up.”

However, this morning dissolute white South Africans gave their support to the system of traditional leadership, saying that it sounded “rad”.

“Wall to wall wives, more leopard-print than Mafia Wife Day at the Versace warehouse – what’s not to love?” asked Boksburg debt collector Knuckles Koen.

Bienkie Botha, under house-arrest for impersonating a person, said she also wanted to be able to hand down legally binding judgements without having spent a day in law school.

“I could be Princess Bienkie of the AmaBotha,” she said, massaging the raw skin under her electronic ankle tag. “And the government would have to give me a salary just because I say it’s my culture!”

Botha’s mother, Bilharzia, apologized for her daughter’s views, saying that she meant no disrespect to her current traditional leader.

“We already have a Chief who rules by decrees approved and defended by a coterie of hand-picked courtiers. She’s called Helen Zille,” she said.

Source



Many a truth in jest.

unstable load
9th May 2012, 20:22
Indeed, Brother Twottie!!

Tableview
12th May 2012, 20:10
What a difference a regime change makes :

1989 :
http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w497/pprunemike/WITW06MAY12.jpg

2009
http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w497/pprunemike/JNB01.jpg

http://i1078.photobucket.com/albums/w497/pprunemike/JNB02.jpg

Cacophonix
14th May 2012, 13:39
IOL | News for South Africa and the world (http://www.iol.co.za/dailynews/news/sa-born-military-pilot-gets-uk-bravery-award-1.1295753?ot=inmsa.ArticlePrintPageLayout.ot)


A KwaZulu-Natal man who was rejected by the South African Air Force is to be awarded the highly coveted Distinguished Flying Cross for completing dangerous combat missions as a pilot for Britain’s Royal Air Force (RAF).

Luke Flemington, an RAF flight lieutenant, will be awarded the medal at a ceremony due to be held at Windsor Castle, one of the official residences of Queen Elizabeth II, later this year.

The former Maritzburg College pupil will be honoured for rescuing trapped British and foreign workers from an oil field in Libya at the beginning of the revolution in February last year.

During the mission, Flemington’s Hercules C-130 aircraft came under attack from Libyan soldiers.

He said he was the captain of one of three Hercules planes sent into Libya in February at the start of the civil war.


Caco

Tableview
17th May 2012, 16:12
The police are part of the problem when they should be part of the solution.

Yes, cops are involved in hijackings
May 17 2012 at 07:48am
By SHAIN GERMANER


INLSA

Major-General Phumzo Gela held a special press briefing at the SAPS office in Parkwood, Joburg, in connection with the recent spate of blue-light hijackings by men in police uniform and admitted to police involvement.

Seven hijackings in two weeks have persuaded investigators that a gang of police impersonators are terrorising the northern and eastern suburbs.

However, police higher-ups are saying the crimes could not have been committed without the help of corrupt police officers.

This latest development came after The Star’s report on Monday of an incident on Main Road in Bryanston, where resident Ryan Pickford was hijacked and subjected to almost two hours of verbal abuse at gunpoint after being “arrested” by men claiming to be police officers.

Numerous other similar incidents have been reported to The Star since the story appeared. The police say four other incidents have been confirmed in seven days. However, another two incidents that took place earlier this month have also come to The Star’s attention.

In all seven cases, the drivers of expensive cars have been pulled over by unmarked vehicles using a blue light.

After pulling over, the victims were approached by men in full police uniform and carrying R5 rifles, who would handcuff and “arrest” them.

The victims’ cars would then be stolen, with the victim driven around in the back of the “police” vehicle for hours before being dropped off a few kilometres from where they were hijacked.

In the majority of the incidents, the three to five gang members were seen driving a white Golf GTI.

Now the police are warning Joburg residents to avoid pulling over in deserted areas at night and suggest driving to well-lit and populated places (such as petrol stations) before coming to a stop.

The Gauteng police’s head of visible policing, Major-General Phumzo Gela, said it was well within a driver’s right to drive to the nearest police station when being pursued by police vehicles – marked or unmarked – and that a police officer must give his identity if asked for it.

“These are your rights. We are here to serve you,” said Gela.

He called on residents in the affected areas to report any information that might assist to 10111, as five of the cases had been centralised and a task team put together to deal with them.

Suspicious-looking blue-light vehicles should be remembered, with residents taking down registration numbers and any other details, including the name tags and badges of police officers when pulled over.

“We can’t deny that members of the police force are involved,” Gela said, adding that police commanders would be investigating their forces to root out any potential officers supporting this gang with equipment or uniforms.

Gela also asked that the public not forget all the good work done by the police over the past two years, a time in which crime statistics in Gauteng had dropped steadily.

Police have not identified any suspects in the blue-light gang that has stolen at least seven cars.

None of the victims in the hijackings have been harmed.


Gangs in uniform have been stalking Gauteng drivers for years

* Ryan Pickford was pulled over by a white Golf GTI on Friday after visiting his son and wife in high care at Morningside Clinic.

He had been driving up Main Road in Bryanston at around 8pm when the car signalled for him to pull over.

The officers asked to search his car, and when he said no, they harassed him for a few minutes until he agreed.

The officers, in full uniform and carrying R5 rifles and handguns, instructed him to get out of the vehicle, and when he obliged, they handcuffed him.

They led him to their car, and another man drove off in his Porsche Cayenne.

When he was handcuffed in the back seat, he was informed that he was being hijacked. He was kept at gunpoint for almost an hour-and-a-half and was harassed verbally before being dropped off in the veld in Centurion.

* Rahendra Naidoo was also a victim of what appears to be the same men driving the same car.

On May 7 he was pulled over in Sonnebloem Road in Midrand by five uniformed men, who were also wielding heavy rifles.

The men told him that his Mazda MPS had been reported stolen, and arrested him.

One of the men drove off in his car, and he was placed in the back of a white Golf GTI.

The criminals spent a large portion of the three-hour kidnapping asking Naidoo for the details of his car's tracking system, before eventually shoving him into the car's boot.

He was reassured that he would not be hurt and that the men were “professionals”, before being dropped off in a secluded area in Lombardy East. His car was recovered in Soweto a few days later.

* On May 9, just days after Rahendra Naidoo was relieved of his car, another man, whose identity has not been determined by The Star, was also stopped by a blue-light gang travelling in a Golf GTI.

The man had been making his way past Blue Valley golf course on Beauly Avenue in Midrand.

A source at the man's vehicle-tracking company said he had also been pulled over by men claiming to be police officers before being taken from the scene and dumped dozens of kilometres away several hours later. The location of the man's Audi RS4 is unknown.

* The IOL's own motoring editor, Jason Woosey, experienced his own “police” hijacking in Bryanston in 2010.

He had also been travelling through Bryanston when he was pulled over by a black Audi with a blue light near the corner of William Nicol and Main Road.

The uniformed men kidnapped him and left him in Modderfontein after stealing his car. The case was reported at the Douglasdale police station in March 2010. No arrests have been made.

* Kyle Goncalves was also a victim in June 2010, but of a gang bold enough to use a marked police vehicle. Driving along Baart Avenue in Raslow, Centurion, the men told him to get out of his Golf GTI.

“As I jumped out and presented my licence, two of the cops grabbed me and threw me in the back seat of my car. I was with these guys for about three hours, making four stops on the way.

“I then had a black bag put over my head and was dragged through the veld, where I was left alone for a couple of minutes, thinking that I was going to die,” said Goncalves.

Another group of people picked the traumatised man up and told him to relax as they were “the drop-off guys”.

They dropped him off in Pretoria and told him to run and not look back, or else he would be killed.

Mac the Knife
17th May 2012, 18:02
While all you miserabilists delight in quoting all these deplorable incidents it might be worth pointing out that the reason why these stories come out is because we still for the moment have a magnificent and free press (arguably freer than in the UK).

Mac :ok:

There are a large number of decent, ethical, hard-working people of all colours in this great country of ours who are striving in their own ways to make it what it could be.

Amandla!

Solid Rust Twotter
17th May 2012, 18:44
Unfortunately this self serving government and their muzzling of freedom of speech and of the press (Secrecy Bill) are doing their damnedest to destroy what could be a beacon of hope in Africa. Add to that rampant corruption and widespread decay of what used to be a working infrastructure and economy, and you have a carbon copy of what happened in Zim. We're not too far from the event horizon where the slide into decay cannot be stopped. Some think we're already beyond that point. I pray they're wrong.

unstable load
19th May 2012, 06:37
Mac,
While all you miserabilists delight in quoting all these deplorable incidents it might be worth pointing out that the reason why these stories come out is because we still for the moment have a magnificent and free press (arguably freer than in the UK).
They are hard at work fixing that little inconvenience.:rolleyes:

Tableview
19th May 2012, 07:02
Whilst I'd like to share Mac's optimism, and I certainly agree with what he's said, there are greater forces working to destroy what the whites built up. When one looks at the evolution of democracy in Africa, there is little room for optimism.

Time will, I hope, prove me wrong.

Mac the Knife
19th May 2012, 07:50
It isn't optimism, just a refusal to keep harping on the bad side as you lot do.

The Information Bill has been largely defeated, thanks to the outcry from all over the non-ANC spectrum!

We all of us need to work hard, have faith, embrace our brothers and sisters, and reject the nattering nabobs of negativism.

Mac :ok:

Tableview
19th May 2012, 13:01
This report is from the Economist. It has also been reported in the Mail and Guardian, arguably SA most outspoken news medium, but not quite in the same detail .
ANCWL: Artwork violates Zuma's right to humane treatment - Mail & Guardian Online (http://mg.co.za/article/2012-05-19-ancwl-painting-violates-presidents-right-to-humane-treatment)Jacob Zuma

Portrait of a president

May 18th 2012, 16:38 by D.G. | JOHANNESBURG




http://media.economist.com/sites/default/files/imagecache/full-width/images/2012/05/blogs/baobab/20120519_map505.jpg
UNLIKE Britain's queen, President Jacob Zuma does not often have his portrait painted. But a new likeness by a South African artist, Brett Murray, now showing at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg, has the nation agog and the ruling African National Congress (ANC) frothing at the mouth.
In truth, hardly anyone had heard about the painting until the ANC issued a statement on May 17th expressing its "outrage" over the "disgusting" depiction of its revered leader and demanding its immediate removal from the gallery and the website of the only newspaper until then to give it any coverage. The portrait, the ANC thundered, was a violation of Mr Zuma's constitutional right to dignity and therefore illegal.
This sent South Africans rushing to the internet to see what all the fuss was about. There they found a stylised picture in yellow, black and pink of a bespectacled fully-dressed man, barely recognisable as Mr Zuma save for the characteristic bump at the back of his shaven head, looking sideways in an apparent heroic Leninesque pose, but with his genitals hanging out of his unzipped trousers. The painting, entitled "The Spear", is now splashed across the pages of virtually every newspaper in the land. It has just been sold for 136,000 rand (about $16,400).
Mr Zuma, who has four wives, two exes and 22 children by ten different women, was charged in 2005 with raping a struggle comrade's daughter, but was later acquitted. Two years ago a cartoon was published, depicting the president unbuckling his belt, about to rape a blindfolded "Lady Justice" being held down by his henchmen. Mr Zuma is suing the artist, Zapiro, South Africa's best-known political caricaturist, and the publishers of the cartoon for 5m rand. So the legal threats now being issued by the ANC are not to be taken lightly.
The ruckus has sparked off a lively debate over the limits of artistic licence versus an individual's right to dignity in a country where the freedom of the press is being squeezed. According to the catalogue of Mr Murray's exhibition at the gallery, the artist was simply trying to expose in a humorous manner the ruling elite's greed and paucity of morals. But Mr Murray has hit a nerve in a party not given to laughter when it is being criticised, however jokily.

Mac the Knife
19th May 2012, 13:19
If something like "The Spear" had happened in ANY other African country the artist would already (at best) be languishing in jail. But Brett Murray is quite safe, though the lawyers may chunter for a while.

As it is, the ANC may begin to appreciate the truth of the Streisand effect - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Streisand_effect)

Good size tool that. How easy it would have been just to grin and turn it to their advantage!

Mac

hellsbrink
19th May 2012, 14:38
Let me get this straight. The "Wummins Lib" lot in ZA are up in arms about a painting which makes someone who appears to be a bit of a d*** look like a d*** because of the appearance of his d.... genitals. So, "Man made to look stupid(er)" is something that offends those who scream about belittling women and want men to be (slightly less) "equal" to them?

I'm confused, I need a beer to settle my brain.


If something like "The Spear" had happened in ANY other African country the artist would already (at best) be languishing in jail.

Same could go for a hell of a lot of other countries around the world, including "Western" ones. If you did something like that about a British PM it would be lighting a cigarette in a gunpowder store, people would even write "strong letters to the editor" as well as screaming for the artist to be banged up (most of the rest would just stand there drooling whilst laughing because "it's a willy".). There wouldn't be an option, the "outraged" would force the plod to arrest the artist on some obscure "public decency" or "obscenity" law.

Tableview
19th May 2012, 19:10
Free press ..... for now :

As Pieter Dirk Uys said : "You have freedom of speech. It stops just after you've spoken!"

Honourable member: The ANC gets cocky (http://storify.com/mg_reporter/the-presidential-jewels)

http://cdn.mg.co.za/crop/content/images/2011/02/09/zuma_promo_ss.jpg/300x278 (http://storify.com/mg_reporter/the-presidential-jewels)

Jacob Zuma's penis has been thrust into the social media spotlight, setting angry ANC members aquiver. We took the debate in hand and tried unsuccessfully to keep the puns to a minimum (http://storify.com/mg_reporter/the-presidential-jewels)

Solid Rust Twotter
20th May 2012, 06:53
Seems the ANC got a court order forcing the artist to paint out the dick. Apparently Zuma is ticked off because the artist painted out his face and left the willy dangling.:}

Solid Rust Twotter
20th May 2012, 08:25
Another peek into the incestuous little nest of snakes running SA...

From the Mail & Guardian.

The realm where politics and business merge is a murky arena that threatens our democracy.
The suspension of advocate Glynnis Breytenbach has brought into focus the machinations of a vast and complex array of political and economic interests.

Both because of her personality and her position — as head prosecutor of the Pretoria specialised commercial crime unit — she finds herself at the confluence of forces that have the potential to determine our destiny as a nation.

She is now a central figure in a battle over two cases: the withdrawal of fraud charges against police spy boss and murder suspect Richard Mdluli and the criminal case lodged by mining giant Kumba in relation to the way in which shelf company Imperial Crown Trading obtained a prospecting licence over Kumba's hugely profitable Sishen mine.

The two cases appear on the face of it to be unrelated.

In reality, they are part of the same matrix of the covert, informal exercise of power that represents a threat to our democratic and constitutional order.

It would be naive to pretend that big corporations such as Kumba, or indeed influential prosecutors such as Breytenbach, never trade in that informal realm, where the rules of power smudge the lines of legal and commercial rectitude.

But what has come to distinguish the Zuma administration is a contempt for legality, a world-view in which legal problems, commercial interests and political patronage are traded seamlessly and shamelessly.

It was Zuma's son Duduzane and his friends the Guptas who were cut into a potential multibillion-rand deal with Arcelor-Mittal, the company that had previously shared the mining rights with Kumba.

When news broke that Imperial Crown Trading had secured mineral rights over an existing mine, all the big players — including executives from Kumba, Arcelor-Mittal, Duduzane and Ajay Gupta — were in London for Zuma's state visit.

Business Day later quoted an unnamed senior Kumba source saying: "Zuma wanted to know how is it possible for everyone to win."

It was less than two weeks later that the Gupta's employee, Jagdish Parekh, was cut into Imperial Crown Trading with a 50% stake.

Another report noted that Kumba's board was split over how to deal with the problem, with one faction, said to be led by Gupta business partner Lazarus Zim, in favour of a "political solution".

But in the end, Kumba pressed charges against Imperial Crown — charges that have the potential to unlock the truth of what went on inside the company and at the highest reaches of government — as well as torpedo, finally, the enormous windfall Imperial Crown stood to gain.

Kumba has been accused, in turn, of manipulative behaviour in its own mining-rights application, but implicit in the course of action the company has taken is the willingness to subject events and actions — including its own — to the rigours and public scrutiny of courts of law.

It is that challenge that Zuma and his favoured officials seemingly seek repeatedly to avoid.

As part of the Imperial Crown investigation directed by Breytenbach, raids were carried out on the company and the department of mineral resources.

Imperial Crown has challenged the legality of those raids and the documents seized remain sealed.

As part of its case, it alleged an improper relationship between Kumba and Breytenbach and it is this claim, vehemently denied by Breytenbach, that serves as the supposed basis for the suspension of the prosecutor.

But observers suggest that Imperial Crown — and its patrons — fear that judgment may go against them, meaning that powerful new evidence would have been placed at Breytenbach's disposal, were it not for her suspension.

In the other eye of the twin storms in which Breytenbach is swept up, stands Richard Mdluli.

It can be no coincidence that Breytenbach was suspended the Monday after she informed acting national director of public prosecutions Nomgcobo Jiba that she would seek a judicial review of the decision to withdraw charges against Mdluli, a man who seemingly writes routinely to the president about his legal troubles and watches them disappear as Zuma moves his pawns about.

Jiba, for one, is hopelessly conflicted.

It was Mdluli who came to her rescue when she was suspended over her alleged involvement in a plot to have then Scorpions Gauteng boss Gerrie Nel arrested.

Nel had earned her enmity by prosecuting her husband, Booker Nhantsi, for stealing a client’s money out of his firm's trust account.

Zuma expunged Nhantsi's criminal record in September 2010, in an "act of mercy".

In January 2011, he chose Nhantsi's wife to take over from Menzi Simelane as the most senior decision maker in the criminal justice system.

How neat is that?

Mdluli, meanwhile, is back at work, with the sole power among policemen to approve bugging applications and joined the president at this week's Workers Day rally.

The dread we should be feeling is not about what may be happening in secret, it is about what is happening right in front of us.

Solid Rust Twotter
21st May 2012, 07:08
More from Hayibo...

Art critics demand governing role as Zuma painting buyer ‘just likes penises’

JOHANNESBURG. As a controversial painting of Jacob Zuma continues to rile the ANC, art critics say that if the ruling party is going to start dispensing art criticism then they would like a chance to dictate government policy. Meanwhile, the German collector who bought the painting said he had not realized it was a satirical portrait of the President. “I just like huge black penises,” explained Gunther Knutsach.

In an utterly opaque statement issued by a mime in a tank of formaldehyde this morning, art critics said that the controversy – “a juvenile knee-jerk response to a juvenile knee-jerk painting” – could have been avoided if they were more involved in the national discourse.

“In many ways art criticism and politics are the same thing,” gestured the spokesmime. “We both make sweeping but ultimately fatuous statements about things we don’t understand, while claiming moral authority that makes us immune to criticism. But critics don’t get paid in cash donations or farms in Limpopo, and that’s not fair. It’s our turn now.”

Critic and academic Knave L. Gayzer, agreed.

“We’re going to give those visual illiterates in government a piece of our classically proportioned, perfectly lit, white cube collective artistic mind and tell them exactly how they should be doing their jobs,” he said. “It’s time to go Deconstructionist on their asses. And by Deconstructionist I don’t mean the propensity of RDP houses to collapse when it rains.”

He confirmed that fine art academics from around the country were planning to apply for massive financial grants to spend the next two years seriously thinking about this issue because “if Parliament can spend millions doing f*ck-all, so can we”.

One preliminary formal analysis, released by Professor of Fine Art, Windsor N. Newton, focused on the recent clash between DA and Cosatu supporters in Johannesburg.

“We posit that rather than irreconcilable political ideologies and well-aimed half-bricks, it was the ubiquitous post-modern post-structuralist hegemony of the legacy of colonial pictorial logic that ultimately led to bloodshed,” explained Newton.

When asked for clarification, he said, “DA blue and Cosatu red together, in one place? Ugh.”

Meanwhile, Mr Knutsach says he is delighted with his purchase.

“It’s going straight in the bunker,” he said.

CathayBrat
22nd May 2012, 13:09
Jacob Zuma 'The Spear' painting defaced ahead of court action - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/africaandindianocean/southafrica/9281847/Jacob-Zuma-The-Spear-painting-defaced-ahead-of-court-action.html)

Although freedom of speech is protected in South Africa, the ANC believes that the "vulgar" painting is an exception to the rule.

Hmmmmmm, is it the exception because of the subject, or do the old obscenity laws from the Nats still apply?

bob johns
22nd May 2012, 13:39
As a mere interested observer, how are the farmers faring these days and how difficult is it to leave RSA and go to Australia, if you wish with some assets intact ? Is there any difficulty with the current administration in Australia ? as I have heard , this Australian gov. seem to be making things a bit difficult for certain applicants particularly white ones from pretty well anywhere . Just curious but best wishes and good luck anyway.

unstable load
23rd May 2012, 07:17
and how difficult is it to leave RSA and go to Australia,
It's easy to (physically) leave SA, but not so easy to go to Aus any more.
As for the farmers, it is no better, but certainly no worse which is good, in a perverse way, I suppose.:ugh::mad::mad::mad:
http://www.news24.com/search?q=farm%20killings

I see that "The Times" is running " The Spear" artist Murray on the cover this am and reminding folks that he has always been an activist, which may be a surprise to those screaming " Racist" if they were capable of stopping and contemplating that snippet for a few seconds.....:p:E

Cacophonix
23rd May 2012, 07:25
Currently in SA and would be amused by the "Zuma member" embroglio if it was not for the many pitiful facets of the current dispensation that this affair "exposes".

Tis a pity that the ANC could not move as quickly as they have in the case of this work of art as they they are slow to chase corruption, deliver services etc.

Caco

Tableview
23rd May 2012, 13:10
2012-05-22-jacob-zuma - Mail & Guardian Online (http://mg.co.za/cartoon/2012-05-22-jacob-zuma/)

The question is, should we laugh or cry?
http://mg.co.za/cartoon/2012-05-22-jacob-zuma/

Solid Rust Twotter
31st May 2012, 14:40
Even Zapiro, a staunch supporter in the past, has had enough of this shower...

http://cdn.mg.co.za/content/cartoons/2012/05/29/12_05_29.gif

Tableview
1st Jun 2012, 11:05
I am amazed .......... for only one reason, that being that it has taken so long for this to emerge.



Gautrain: Massive secret payoffs

The Mail & Guardian can reveal the first evidence suggestive of bribery in the R26-billion Gautrain contract.
http://cdn.mg.co.za/crop/content/images/2012/06/01/GAUTRAIN007_i2e.jpg/610x350/
More than a quarter of a billion rand was paid as “commission” to a shadowy Tunisian fixer.

The money came from Canadian multinational Bombardier Transportation, the lead partner in the Bombela consortium that won the tender in 2005 to build and operate the Gauteng rapid-rail system.

Although there is no specific evidence of onward flow to politicians and officials, the Bombardier payment is remarkably similar to the billion rand in commissions – which investigators regard in part as intended bribes – splurged by Britain’s BAE Systems during the controversial arms deal.

Similarities in the Bombardier and BAE payments include like-worded agency contracts, very large offshore payments in case the tender is won and even a related cast of characters.

The Tunisian who received the Bombardier commission is Youssef Zarrouk, an international arms and projects fixer who was influential in the notoriously corrupt regime of Ben Ali, the first president toppled in the Arab Spring last year.

In a call from Tunisia this week, Zarrouk confirmed receiving millions of dollars from Bombardier as its “agent”, but both he and Bombardier denied bribery. Bombardier insisted it followed best practice in such agreements and Zarrouk said: “No, no, no, no, these people of Bombardier, they don’t want corruption.”

The M&G has obtained an early version of the “representative agreement” between Bombardier and Zarrouk’s Tunis-based All Trade Company.
Our Coverage



The Editorial: Greasing the Gautrain wheels (http://mg.co.za/article/2012-05-31-greasing-the-gautrain-wheels)
All aboard the Gautrain, comrades (http://mg.co.za/article/2012-05-17-all-aboard-the-gautrain-comrades)




It envisaged a success fee of 6% of the contract value. Based on Bombardier’s reported $900-million (now R7.65-billion) share of the Gautrain contract, this would have given Zarrouk a commission of $54-million.
But Zarrouk said that Bombardier had subsequently whittled down the amount. He claimed not to remember the final figure.

Another source with knowledge of the situation, who asked not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the matter, said that the final figure was now $35-million (about R300-million).

Arms deal echo
At the time of the 2002 to 2005 Bombardier campaign to win the Gautrain contract, Zarrouk was close to Jean-Marc Pizano, a Frenchman with a long history in South African arms projects through his local company Advanced Technologies & Engineering (ATE).

The latter upgraded Mirages for the apartheid regime, helped to introduce arms deal fall guy Schabir Shaik to the arms trade in the mid-90s and got its own slice of the arms deal pie by producing navigation and weapons systems for BAE Systems.

Pizano became a significant player in the Gautrain campaign, tasking staff at ATE to help. Zarrouk claimed to have paid him an $8-million share of his commission, but Pizano told the M&G: “That is an absolute lie. I would be glad if that was the case, but it is a lie. I have not heard from him in the past three or four years, which is good … He took a lot of money, I suppose, but I never received a cent for my involvement in good faith.”

One of Pizano’s partners in ATE was Richard Charter, a key local agent for BAE during its campaign for arms-deal tenders.

An affidavit from Britain’s Serious Fraud Office, previously reported on by the M&G, details how BAE paid an offshore company of Charter’s more than £26-million, including $4-million in December 1999 as the contract between BAE and the South African government for the sale of military jets was signed.

Charter died in a 2003 kayaking incident on the Orange River that is yet to be fully explained.

The version of the representative agreement between Bombardier and Zarrouk’s All Trade Company obtained by the M&G is remarkably similar to the commission agreements used by BAE in its arms deal campaign. They are vague pro-forma contracts referring to “products” to be marketed in “territories” with a set percentage payable on successful conclusion of a deal. Details of territories and products are specified in addendums. Both contain strict anti-bribery clauses. Although these may help to shield companies like BAE and Bombardier by placing the legal onus on the agent, the question arises whether the payment of success fees of such magnitude are not incentives to bribe. Historically, this has often been the case.

Court claim
The first hint that large sums of money might have changed hands to secure the Gautrain tender for Bombela came when connected businessman Peter-Paul Ngwenya filed summons against Bombardier in the South Gauteng High Court last year.

In the particulars of his claim, Ngwenya described himself as “an influential individual in political circles, having been a former Robben Island prisoner”.

He claimed that, in late 2003, he had entered into an oral agreement with Bombardier – the latter “represented by Jean-Marc Pizano and/or Richard Charter and/or Yousef Zarrouk” – under which he would join the company’s lobbying effort in exchange for a $7-million (R60-million now) success fee should it win the Gautrain tender. He demanded $6.55-million, claiming he had received only $450 000.

In responding papers, Bombardier claimed that the matter should have been referred to arbitration in London under the terms of a “settlement and release agreement” signed by itself, Ngwenya and Zarrouk in an earlier attempt to resolve the dispute. Bombardier attached a largely blacked-out copy of the agreement, obscuring all detail of the underlying facts.

The matter is heading for court next month, when Bombardier wants proceedings to be stayed in favour of the London arbitration, which would be held behind closed doors. Ngwenya has filed an opposing affidavit insisting the matter should be heard in open court. Bombardier, he claimed, “appears to believe that its conduct may have been improper and seeks to shield this from the South African courts, the South African authorities and citizens”.

Dealing with the background to the dispute, he accuses Bombardier of having been “very reluctant” to record its relationship in writing and of interposing Zarrouk, “a Tunisian … who had no ties or contact with South Africa into the relationship as the apparent paymaster”.

Connectivity
It appears to be common cause, however, that Ngwenya was contracted by Zarrouk, whether or not it was at the latter’s behest or, as claimed by Ngwenya, at Bombardier’s.
Zarrouk this week confirmed having paid Ngwenya, without giving an amount. “I paid Mr Ngwenya what I must pay him.”

Whereas Pizano’s attractiveness to the Bombardier campaign may have been his experience in obtaining military and aviation tenders internationally, Ngwenya’s may have had more to do with his local connectivity.

Ngwenya knew Gauteng politicians who served on the “political committee” that had to ratify the tender decision and was close to Jeff Radebe, then the national transport minister, with whom he was detained for anti-apartheid activity and later jailed on Robben Island.

The M&G has obtained a memorandum sent by Pizano to Bombardier in November 2004, two months before Bombela and the competing Gauliwe consortium were to submit their “best and final offers” to the Gauteng government evaluation team.

In it, Pizano expressed concern at the tight deadline, “the overriding fact that our price is much higher than the competition” and whether “our black [empowerment] partners are as credible as those of the competition”.

Lateral actions
He proposed a plan of action, including reviewing technical and financial aspects of Bombela’s bid and “an assessment of our BEE position under the responsibility of PP [Ngwenya]”.

He also proposed “lateral actions”, which included “to widen our support base within the government and start to lobby with the minister of transport … [Ngweya] to organise a briefing to the minister of transport and possibly a meeting”.

Asked this week whether he had in fact used his influence with Radebe, who is now justice and constitutional development minister, Ngwenya said: “I never did that. In fact, if I could [influence him] I would call him now and say ‘give me a good judge [in the suit against Bombardier]’.”

Radebe, through his director general, Nonkululeko Sindane, said he wished to “state very categorically that Mr Ngwenya never approached or lobbied him in any manner or form” on the transaction. He also denied knowing of or meeting Zarrouk and emphasised that the Gautrain was a provincial project brought to the national government only “very late in the process” for information and alignment with other transport systems. “The minister was never involved whatsoever in any project procurement process.”

Bombardier, although stopping short of confirming it had paid Zarrouk, defended its approach this week. “Bombardier does not condone making any payments to win contracts. Bombardier maintains and will continue to maintain the highest standards of ethical behaviour in all of our dealings worldwide. We have a strict code of conduct. We follow local and international laws and regulations in every country in which we operate,” it said.

“The selection and retention of any such representative is done in accordance with international standards and regulations and follows a rigorous process, including due diligence that complies with all local and international laws and regulations.”

Jack van der Merwe, chief executive of the Gautrain Management Agency that oversees Bombela’s carrying out of the Gautrain contract on behalf of the Gauteng provincial government, said he was unaware of the agreement between Bombardier and Zarrouk, but that he would take it up.

“The concession agreement between the Gauteng provincial government and the Bombela Concession Company is very specific on bribery and corruption. Based on this, I have referred the copy of the ‘representative agreement’ to Bombardier for explanation and to indicate what the status of this ‘representative agreement’ is and if any payments have in fact taken place. Based on its response and any additional information that the M&G has, a decision will be taken on the way forward,” Van der Merwe said.

Pizano said he was unaware of any bribes potentially paid from Zarrouk’s commission.

The fixer: Youssef ‘Grandpa’ Zarrouk
Now in his 60s, Youssef Zarrouk is described by French investigative journalists Lénaïg Bredoux and Mathieu Magnaudeix as “un personage de l’ombre” – a shadowy character – in their book Tunis Connection, which examines French-Tunisian networks of influence during the reign of deposed Tunisian president Ben Ali.

Zarrouk is widely held to have had considerable access to Ali’s corrupt regime inter alia through an association with one of Ali’s sons in law, and across the Mediterranean to the French establishment through links among others to Charles Pasqua, the French political éminence grise who served as minister in successive administrations. Pasqua was convicted in 2009 for his role in “Angolagate” after a string of scandals.

Bredoux and Magnaudeix say that in 1999, when Pasqua’s son “fled to Tunisia to escape a court case in which he was accused of having received $2.5 million in secret commissions … the kid of the former interior minister was hosted by his friend Zarrouk in a ‘superb house’ in Sidi Bou Said, complete with swimming pool and an ‘unbeatable view of the Mediterranean’”.

The journalists describe Zarrouk as “an unparalleled ‘sniffer-outer’ of business opportunities for major firms who wanted to invest in Tunisia, Libya and Algeria … The man specialises in the sale of trains, power stations, planes and arms. ‘I have never sold a single gun,’ he assures us one evening in his garden in Bristol; everyone who knows him laughed out loud at this claim.”

They say, however, that Zarrouk’s influence had waned as the presidential son-in-law fell from grace, and that many French companies had stopped using his fixing services. He admitted: “Before, I did a lot of work with France. Less so nowadays: French business prefers to work with those who are close to power.”

Zarrouk is listed as having been a director in 2001 to 2005 of Pan African Airways, which tried without success to acquire a stake in South African Airways as a launch-pad for a continental airline. Other directors at Pan African included Richard Charter, Peter-Paul Ngwenya, Tokyo Sexwale associate Mikki Xayiya and Abbey Chikane, brother of Frank Chikane, who was director-general in Thabo Mbeki’s presidency.

THE EX-PRISONER: Sibusiso Peter-Paul Ngwenya

Peter-Paul Ngwenya is the executive chair of Makana Investment Corporation, set up to assist former political prisoners through BEE deals. He has served on numerous boards, including a stint in the late 1990s and early 2000s as a non-executive director of M&G Media Ltd, which publishes the Mail & Guardian.

After his 1991 release from Robben Island, where he had spent six years for ANC activities, he worked for Engen and later SA Breweries.

Most recently Ngwenya attracted controversy when the “ground coverage intelligence report” attributed to now-suspended police intelligence boss Richard Mdluli claimed that he had hosted the so-called “Mvela Group” at a January 2010 event in KwaZulu-Natal.

This group, named after Human Settlements Minister Tokyo Sexwale’s company was supposedly plotting against President Jacob Zuma. – Stefaans Brümmer

Solid Rust Twotter
6th Jun 2012, 07:53
A socialist disaster in the making. Screwing the productive 10% to give handouts to the unproductive 90% isn't going to work, just as deracialising something using racist means is a non starter, but this govt just doesn't get it. Still nothing but deafening silence from those who agitated in support of this shower.

From the South African Institute of Race Relations

Link: http://www.sairr.org.za/sairr-today-...-31st-may-2012


Introduction

In the post-apartheid period, the ruling African National Congress (ANC) has persisted in its determination to implement a National Democratic Revolution (NDR). The ANC makes no secret of this, regularly re-affirming this objective at its five-yearly national conferences. Its commitment to continuing revolution has enormous ramifications for the country and has already cost South Africa dearly. Yet neither the goals of the NDR nor the thinking which underpins it has ever been given much attention by the Media. The topic seems to be off-limits to the Press, which earlier generally ignored the first stage of the revolution – the people’s war strategy which gave the ANC its domination over the new South Africa – and now largely overlooks the NDR and its ramifications.

Milestones in the development of the National Democratic Revolution

The ANC’s NDR has its roots in Lenin’s theory of imperialism, as articulated in 1917. According to Lenin, the living standards of the working classes in industrialised Europe were then improving rather than deteriorating (contrary to what Marx had predicted) solely because the imperial powers were able ruthlessly to exploit the brown and black masses in their colonies.

However, this theory was difficult to apply in South Africa, which had gained independence from Britain as early as 1910. But in 1950 the Communist Party of South Africa (CPSA) found a way around this obstacle by stating that South Africa had ‘the characteristics of both an imperialist state and a colony within a single, indivisible, geographical, political, and economic entity’. In this ‘colonialism of a special type’, white South Africa was effectively an ‘imperialist state’ and black South Africa was its ‘colony’. This meant that the wealth of white South Africans had nothing to do with enterprise, skill, or technological advantage but derived solely from the exploitation and impoverishment of black South Africans. This idea, though developed more than 60 years ago, remains central to the NDR today.

This theory was further endorsed by the South African Communist Party (SACP) in its 1962 programme, Road to South African Freedom. Here, the SACP urged a ‘national democratic revolution to destroy white domination’. The ANC, it said, must overthrow the ‘colonial state of white supremacy’, ‘democratise’ the new state by ‘making it fully representative of the population of South Africa’, use the new state to suppress the former ruling classes and transform society, and then defend the gains of the revolution through a ‘vigorous and vigilant dictatorship…by the people against the former dominating and exploiting classes’ and any attempt to ‘restore white colonialism’;

At the Morogoro Conference in 1969, the ANC endorsed this perspective and committed itself to a national democratic revolution (NDR) to correct ‘historical injustices’ by destroying existing economic and social relationships. This would give rise to a new society based on the core provisions of the Freedom Charter: a document adopted in 1955 with significant communist input.

ANC commitment to the NDR

At its national conferences at Mafikeng (in 1997), Stellenbosch (in 2002), and Polokwane (in 2007), the ANC repeatedly recommitted itself to the NDR via the Strategy and Tactics document it has adopted at each of these gatherings.

The Mafikeng document identified the key goal of the NDR as being ‘to liberate Africans in particular and black people in general from political and economic bondage’ by transforming the machinery of state, using a cadre policy to give the ANC control over ‘all centres of power’, ‘redistributing wealth and income’, and ‘de-racialising South African society’ through ‘a consistent programme of affirmative action’.

The Stellenbosch document mainly reaffirmed the 1997 one but included a short Preface which stressed the need to ‘eliminate apartheid property relations’ through ‘the deracialisation of…wealth, including land’ and the ‘redistribution of wealth and income’. This would involve a ‘continuing struggle’ which would intensify over time. ‘Because property relations are at the core of all social systems’, the tensions arising from redistribution would have to be managed via ‘dexterity in tact and firmness in principle’.

The Polokwane document (the current one) reaffirmed the need for affirmative action until such time ‘as all centres of power and influence become broadly representative of the country’s demographics’. It called for the ‘de-racialisation’ of wealth (including land), along with management and the professions. It also urged a strong state able to ‘direct national development’ and stressed the importance of cadre deployment to all centres of power.

A discussion document, prepared for the national general council of the ANC in September 2010 said the global financial crisis had demonstrated ‘the bankruptcy of neo-liberalism’ and opened up space for ‘progressive alternatives’. The discussion document identified the Freedom Charter as the ANC’s ‘lodestar’, and said the major current task of the NDR was to ‘build a national democratic society’ which would address the historical injustice via the redistribution of land and other resources, affirmative action, and ‘the eradication of apartheid production relations’.

In 2012 the ANC has released a new discussion document on ‘The Second Transition: Building a National Democratic Society and the Balance of Forces in 2012’. This has been prepared for the ANC’s policy conference in June and its national conference at Mangaung in December this year. Though it repeats many of the same themes, it puts particular emphasis on the need for ‘freedom from socio-economic bondage’. This, it says, requires ‘a second transition’ that moves beyond democratisation (the focus of the first transition) to ‘the social and economic transformation of South Africa over the next 30 to 50 years’.

This second transition must achieve ‘real and visible progress in reducing wealth and income inequalities and in changing racial…patterns of wealth and income’. An earlier leaked draft spoke of the need to change the Constitution to make this possible. The final document is more carefully worded, but nevertheless says the current ‘framework’ (a code word for the Constitution?) ‘has proved inadequate and even inappropriate for a second social and economic transformation phase’. The implication is that this framework will thus have to be changed. In addition, the document suggests that the ANC is no longer willing to stick to an earlier ‘implicit bargain’, in which the organisation ‘committed to macroeconomic stability and international openness’, while ‘white business agreed to participate in capital reform to modify the racial structures of asset ownership and invest in national priorities’. Since this approach has not succeeded in solving poverty, unemployment and inequality, many more interventions are now needed.

The Strategy and Tactics documents, along with the 2010 and 2012 discussion documents outlined above, are public documents which are carefully phrased and often express worthy aims (to heighten state efficiency, increase economic growth, expand infrastructure, and improve education). However, they also make it clear that the ANC’s key objective is not to reduce inequality by growing the economic pie but rather by taking existing wealth from whites and transferring it to blacks. Though progress in the redistribution of wealth has thus far been slow, the ANC expects its pace to quicken as the balance of forces shifts further in favour of this.

According to the SACP and the Congress of South African Trade Unions (Cosatu), the NDR provides the foundation for a shift to a socialist and then communist society. The ANC does not overtly espouse this goal. Instead, it stresses that the NDR is necessary to liberate blacks from ‘political and economic bondage’ (ie from the exploitation implicit in colonialism of a special type), for only then will South Africa become a full democracy.

Some consequences of the NDR to date

In the political sphere:
First, from 1984 to 1994, the people’s war strategy was used to give the ANC the degree of domination needed to drive the NDR forward in the post-apartheid era. This required, in particular, the weakening or elimination of black opposition – and the people’s war was singularly successful in achieving this.

Second, the ANC sees itself not as an ordinary political party bound by the ordinary rules of the political game but as a national liberation movement responsible for implementing the NDR and thus as uniquely entitled to rule. This makes it contemptuous of Parliament, opposition parties, a free press, an autonomous SABC, independent civil society, and adverse electoral outcomes, as in the Western Cape. Hence, contrary to what many journalists have said, there is nothing ‘baffling’ about its recent initiatives to clamp down on the Press or weaken the Democratic Alliance in a variety of ways.

Third, the ANC does not regard itself as bound by the Constitution. It sees this not as a solemn pact but simply as a tactical compromise which can readily be changed as the balance of power shifts in the ANC’s favour. This stance has long been hinted at by ANC leaders, but is now being more openly expressed. Thus far, despite its attitude towards the Constitution, the ANC has nevertheless generally avoided overt damaging amendments to the text, such as those on floor crossing. Instead, various constitutional provisions have simply, in practice, been disregarded. These include Parliament’s duty to hold the executive to account, the need for a new electoral system after 1999, and the prohibition of cadre deployment. The NDR also means, of course, that the ANC has no principled commitment to key constitutional safeguards, including press freedom, property rights, and an independent Judiciary.

Fourth, cadre deployment has been used to give the ANC control over all the ‘levers of state power’, including parastatals and the public broadcaster. The aim is to use cadre deployment to extend ANC control to the Judiciary, the Press, business, universities, and influential organisations in civil society.

In the economic sphere:
First, the ANC has repeatedly emphasised the need for demographic representivity in employment in both the public and the private sectors. This has also been made an overt demand of both the Employment Equity Act and some elements in the black economic empowerment (BEE) codes.

Second, the goal of demographic representivity in all spheres means that targets for redistribution that fall short of this are likely to be increased in due course. Thus, for example, in revising the Mining Charter in 2010, the minister – along with many journalists – implied it was a big ‘concession’ that the ownership target was being kept at 26% by 2014; and this target may well be raised in time.

Third, part of the ANC’s aim has been to increase the power of the black working class, which the organisation sees as the main driver of the NDR. The ANC includes within this class both those who have jobs and those who do not, and may of course regard the unemployed as particularly important in driving the revolution forward. This explains policies such as the Labour Relations Act of 1995, the Basic Conditions of Employment Act of 1997, and the labour bills now in the pipeline, all of which build union power while helping to price the unskilled and inexperienced out of the job market. They also thus play an important part in generating the ‘ticking time bomb’ of massive youth unemployment.

Fourth, implementation of the NDR requires a strong ‘developmental’ state and provides a continual impetus towards ever more state intervention.

In the social sphere:
First, the NDR promotes an increasing dependence on the Government. The aim is seemingly not to encourage self-reliance and economic independence but rather to ensure that people rely on the State for money, goods, and services given to them via social grants, free housing, free basic electricity and water, free education, free health care for many, and subsidised transport.

Second, key additional aims (at least for Cosatu and the SACP) are to ‘roll back’ market provision in areas such as health and education. In the context of National Health Insurance proposals, for instance, Cosatu would like to ‘get rid’ of private health care and bring all health care services under state control, which will further reinforce dependency on the Government.

Third, similar thinking seems to underpin current proposals on land reform and rural development. As the Land Tenure Security Bill of 2010 shows – and the green paper on land reform of 2011 demonstrates even further – the aim is no longer to build up a new generation of independent black farmers owning their own land. Instead, land reform beneficiaries are to be confined to leasehold ownership, while communal land tenure in former homeland areas will be retained. In addition, those who move to the proposed new agri-villages will have nothing but temporary permits to live and farm in these settlements and will be subject to eviction by state officials if they don’t farm well enough. Far from extending land ownership to many more black South Africans, the 2010 bill and the green paper will bring about incremental land nationalisation. There will be no big-bang approach, but the Government will gradually assume ownership of ever more land while more and more South Africans find themselves without individual ownership and dependent on the State’s permission for their occupation of the land on which they live or work.

Important countervailing factors

From within the ANC:
First, the ANC recognises that the ‘balance of forces’ must be correct before progress can be made with the NDR. As with other revolutionary movements, it accepts that it may be necessary to take one step back – though its ultimate aim is then to take two steps forward.

Second, the ANC understands that the collapse of the Soviet Union brought about a fundamental shift in the global environment. This has inhibited the rapid post-apartheid implementation of the NDR which it had earlier anticipated. It continually monitors the global environment and has drawn comfort from the global economic crisis which began in 2008 and the way in which this has helped to discredit free markets. The ANC nevertheless feels the pressures arising from globalisation. These include the importance of export markets, the need for more international competitiveness, and the need to attract foreign investment.

Third, the Government has long been anxious to retain ‘sovereignty’ over South Africa. This was a key reason for the ANC’s adoption of Gear, which it saw as essential to bring down the budget deficit and avoid a debt trap which could have led to structural adjustment programmes under the International Monetary Fund (IMF) or World Bank.

Fourth, as the ANC recognised at Polokwane, affirmative action and BEE have ‘opened up enticing opportunities’ for its cadres, including ‘unprecedented opportunities for individual material gain’. This has led to corruption and bureaucratic indifference. Cosatu and the SACP are more blunt, saying it has led to a crass materialism which threatens to derail the NDR.

The ANC’s discussion documents in 2010 and 2012 also recognise that its cadres are increasingly involved in factional strife, that state resources are being used to fight internal battles within the organisation, and that the votes of ANC members are being ‘bought’ to influence electoral outcomes. This is all part of the ‘challenge of incumbency’, it says. It is thus (once again) seeking to develop ‘new’ cadres with strong self-discipline and revolutionary morality, but these attempts are no more likely to succeed than earlier efforts have done.

Constraints outside the ANC:
First, key constraints are to be found in South Africa’s long tradition of critical vigilance, coupled with its still strong Judiciary, its powerful independent Press, its vibrant official opposition, and its diverse and often outspoken civil society;

Second, South Africa also has a well-established market system and a strong private sector with top quality companies and high-level skills. Moreover, the ANC understands the importance of business in generating tax revenues and generally seeks to keep it on side;

Third, South Africa has an independent central bank and a pragmatic National Treasury, at least at senior levels.

Conclusion

The ANC’s commitment to the NDR means that the emphasis since 1994 has not been on stimulating growth but rather on bringing about the redistribution of existing wealth from whites to blacks. This is particularly evident in BEE rules, in mining and water laws, in land reform policies, and in recurrent calls for nationalisation (which could be used to prepare the way for confiscatory taxes or other interventions, as in the mining sector). Full implementation of the NDR will deter investment, stall economic growth, worsen poverty, and increase dependency on the State. It will undermine the Constitution, give the ANC totalitarian control, and betray the bright hopes of the 1994 transition. Fortunately, there are many countervailing factors that militate against the success of the NDR. However, there is also no room for complacency. Instead, it is vital to alert South Africans to the threats implicit in the NDR and to do very much more to expose its false premises and damaging outcomes.





Key sources in chronological order:
Strategy and Tactics of the ANC, National Conference, Morogoro, 1969
Strategy and Tactics of the ANC, National Conference, Mafikeng, 1997
Strategy and Tactics of the ANC, (Preface), National Conference, Stellenbosch, 2002
Strategy and Tactics of the ANC, National Conference, Polokwane, 2007
Building a National Democratic Society: Strategy and Tactics and the balance of forces in 2010 (Discussion document prepared for the National General Council, September 20-24 2010)
Economic Transformation Discussion Document for the 2010 National General Council
Leadership Renewal, Discipline and Organisational Culture, discussion document for the 2010 National General Council
The Second Transition: Building a national democratic society and the balance of forces in 2012,
discussion document for the ANC policy conference in June 2012

Solid Rust Twotter
6th Jun 2012, 07:57
...And of course nationalising everything will guarantee stability and prosperity. You can see how well that went with Aurora once the cronies got their sticky little paws on it. Have these folks learned nothing from that?

THE National Union of Metalworkers of SA has urged workers to elect an ANC leadership that will support nationalisation, while Cosatu was urged to review its decision not to nominate its preferred leaders of the ruling party.

In a frank report on the second day of Numsa's ninth congress in Durban yesterday, Numsa general secretary Irvin Jim said workers had been taken for granted despite their contributions to the ANC's electoral victories .

"The leadership to be elected in 2012 across all components of the alliance must indeed champion a radical programme to change the face of South Africa through a revolutionary agenda, and that must be the basis of electing the leadership of Cosatu, SACP and the ANC.

"Numsa is going to insist on the implementation of the revolutionary programme of the ANC - the Freedom Charter - and the leadership to be elected in December 2012 must be a leadership that is equal to the task of implementing the Freedom Charter," said Jim.

"The revolutionary agenda consists of the equal sharing of the country's wealth, popular nationalisation of strategic economic sectors and a new job-led economic growth path."

He said delegates should ask themselves whether the ANC leadership elected in Polokwane had fulfilled their mandate, adding that the working class had yet to benefit from the successive post-apartheid ANC-led governments.

"Once the Freedom Charter and its basic tenets have been dumped, we as a revolutionary formation shall be left with no option but to ask a question ... why must Cosatu call on workers to continue to vote for the ANC if it has taken a decision not to implement the Freedom Charter?

"Why should black and African workers not simply directly vote for the DA? This particular question does not arise because we are giving up on our ANC, or that we have suddenly become DA supporters, as others may want us to believe. But we are posing this question because the working class deserves better and the ANC must deliver on the expectations of the working class," he said.

Numsa, which has been highly critical of the ANC government, has been on the receiving end of harsh criticism by the ruling party's secretary- general Gwede Mantashe and the SACP.

The Western Cape delegation proposed that Cosatu should revisit its resolution not to propose its preferred ANC leadership line-up for Mangaung. At the same time, the Eastern Cape region called on members not to support the re-election of the current ANC leadership as it had "failed the working class ". The proposals have still to be debated .

In his address, President Jacob Zuma said the ANC needed the working class on its national executive committee to steer it away from a "dangerous" direction.

"We need tried-and-tested cadres of the working class to be in the national executive committee of the ANC, thus allowing you to influence the direction the government takes. I believe in my humble opinion that our revolution is somewhat [at] a crossroads and the danger is that it might take any direction and not the one that we want. The question that we must all ask ourselves is: are we conscious about it? [A] revolution is made by people, changed by people and sold by people," he said.

Zuma said he believed workers had taken their task within the ANC casually, thinking the ruling party would drive itself.

He said by its virtue of being a broad church, [the ANC] could be influenced by anybody to a particular direction, for as long as that person was in the majority.

Solid Rust Twotter
19th Jun 2012, 12:39
Facepalm moment. You really couldn't make up stuff like this...

From Moneyweb ...

A local Gauteng municipality had apparently decided to celebrate the fact that it had been issued with a qualified audit by ordering a batch of t-shirts be made to mark the event.

This disconcerting yet amusing anecdote was shared with the Gauteng Provincial Legislature on Friday by Premier Nomvula Mokonyane during the delivery of her political report.

The municipality, which Mokonyane would not name, had apparently been confused because “in English ‘qualified’ means you have passed.”

Municipalities across South Africa repeatedly come under fire from the Auditor General for poor financial management.

A qualified audit is generally issued where the auditor general finds deviations from generally accepted accounting principles in the annual financials of the municipality.

Although preferable to an adverse report or a disclaimer, it is the ambition of provincial and national government to ensure that municipalities strive towards achieving unqualified or clean audit findings.

The municipality had apparently sent Mokonyane one of the shirts to which she responded “I can’t wear this t-shirt; it can’t even be used as pyjamas.

“I have kept it as a souvenir,” she added.