PDA

View Full Version : Brits "Swaggering Across Europe Like Barons"!


ONTPax
3rd Feb 2009, 12:37
. . . an interesting piece from yesterday's LA TIMES. Can any of you relate?

ONTPax

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Crisis affects Britons in rustic corner of France - Los Angeles Times (http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/world/la-fg-brits-in-france2-2009feb02,3,447284.story)

From the Los Angeles Times

Crisis affects Britons in rustic corner of France

Thousands of Britons have moved to the idyllic Dordogne. But with the global financial meltdown, their fat years there have gone on a crash diet.

By Henry Chu

February 2, 2009

Reporting from Eymet, France — They call this the "land of 1,001 chateaux" -- and maybe as many B&Bs with full English breakfast.

In the shadow of crooked, half-timbered buildings in this French medieval town, British-accented English burbles through the weekly market like water in the centuries-old fountain on the town square. Down a side street, past stands of pungent French cheeses, a glass-fronted shop hawks baked beans, Marmite and other specialites britanniques.

Members of the local cricket club go to bat on a nearby sports ground. And every Thursday, the fish-and-chips man pops round in his cart.

Over the last 20 years, a longing for life in the slow lane has turned this beautiful, rustic region of southwest France, known as the Dordogne, into a magnet for so many British retirees and young families that some call it Dordogneshire.

The cross-channel invasion has been greased by the strength of the British pound, which for years allowed Brits to swagger across Europe like barons. (emphasis added) But since autumn, the global recession has pulled the once-mighty pound to Earth.

Tourists and expatriate Brits used to getting 1.35 euros for every pound now speak painfully of parity between the two currencies. Suddenly, the British find themselves paying attention to the prices on menus, or doing new calculations on overseas mortgages.

In France, it means the fat years have gone on a crash diet, humbling British transplants whose incomes, even modest ones, fed lives drizzled with sunshine and local wine.

"Myself and many others with English pensions, it's not funny at all. I've lost maybe 20%, 25%," said Clin Bond, 74, who lives in a nearby village. "I have to pull in my horns a bit."

Gone are the small luxuries -- dinner at the local brasserie, a quick trip to Spain -- that added even more romance to life here. Instead, Bond said, mass contentment among the British expats has given way to a "mass 'grizzle': moaning, groaning and complaining."

Media reports have told of some Britons packing up and moving back to their homeland. But residents insist there has been only a trickle of people who have gone back, if that.

That, though, could be due to lack of opportunity as much as lack of desire. Britons who hear their native land beckoning are likely to be squeezed on both sides: In France, their pounds are worth less than ever, yet neither are they certain of finding a home or a job in credit-crunched, recession-racked Britain.

The only choice for many is to stick it out, stretching their cash as far as possible.

"You have to think twice now. The renovations on my house, they're going to have to wait," said Julie Grant, a breeder of champion springer spaniels who moved here about two years ago for the laid-back lifestyle and open spaces.

For the moment, Grant, 49, is leaving as much of her savings in Britain as she can, relying instead on the euro earnings from her pet-grooming business here in Eymet.

She is one of an estimated 20,000 to 25,000 Britons, out of an overall population of 400,000, who have settled in this region, a dreamy collage of green fields, rustling trees, crumbling farmhouses and picturesque villages huddling beneath moss-covered stone churches built during the Middle Ages.

Ties to the British Isles stretch back at least as far as that era, to the castle-storming, tankard-raising days of the Plantagenet kings, starting with Henry II and his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine, who ruled England in the 12th century.

Many of the new crop of immigrants have, in fact, come across the channel in search of a bygone Britain, albeit one of more recent vintage.

"Dordogne has always been seen by the Brits as the England of the '50s in terms of landscape, gastronomy, the environment," said Alexandra Thevenet, who works for a development company in the Dordogne and for the local Franco-British Chamber of Commerce. "Historically, we've had a lot of British retirees . . . who had a lot of big purchasing power, who used to come over here and buy castles and have them renovated for a fraction of the cost of what it would have cost them in the U.K."

The steady stream of Britons swelled into a flood after 2001, when discount airlines such as Ryanair launched flights from Britain to the area. The profile of newcomers changed as well, from the silver-haired set to people in their 30s and 40s looking to escape the rat race. Five times as many Britons as any other nationality moved here.

"Most people that came over fell in love with the area. It's more an irrational decision, as in 'God, it's beautiful -- let's go and live there,' " Thevenet said.

Many set themselves up as contractors, real estate agents, restaurateurs and owners of small businesses, often catering to fellow Britons. But that now works against them, with the pound so weak.

Tony Martin, who moved here five years ago, started a business to help Anglophone newcomers make the transition to living in France. Membership hit a peak at the end of 2007, but "slowed right the way down" last summer.

Many of his clients are "feeling the pinch and cutting back," said Martin, 64. But "people who came over here with the intention of making it for life, their view hasn't changed. . . . They feel that the lifestyle and the whole cultural thing is so advantageous that even if it means struggling, they'd rather do it here than struggle in the U.K."

That's how Lisa and Wayne Handshaw see it after living 18 months in Eymet. Their move was a leap in the dark at the time. For the first nine months, to keep open a lifeline back to Britain, Lisa commuted between France and her job in north England as a courthouse manager.

The couple and their two children traded in their three-bedroom house in Britain for a $390,000 six-bedroom home in Eymet on the banks of the gentle Dropt River, which they run as a bed-and-breakfast.

Until now, 80% of their guests have been British, and the Handshaws don't know how the uncertain economic climate will affect them.

"I still have my scary moments," said Lisa, 43.

But she and her husband say their quality of life has greatly improved. They enjoy moments of idyllic sweetness when they listen to their daughters recite French poems learned in school, or feed the quacking ducks on the river.

"We say we're richer in our life, not richer in our pocket," Lisa said. "It's all good."
[email protected]

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 12:45
Why the title of this thread?

You pick up on one small, fairly insignificant line in the article which is made with no evidence whatsoever to back it up, implying bad behaviour by Brits living abroad. You then make that line the title of your post when the article is actually about Brits who were dumb enough to leave their saving in the UK having to tighten their belts a bit.

Your explanation please?

Desert Diner
3rd Feb 2009, 12:50
After the past 6 years of so of spending many a holiday in Ireland with my ever depreciating green backs, I know how they will feel in the future:}

GOLF_BRAVO_ZULU
3rd Feb 2009, 14:02
5h1t happens; and it has. They are Brits, though, so they’ll get over it. In the meantime, tradition requires them to drip/bind like hell. It’s what we do; but in the words of that chap McArthur, we will return (well I won’t because I wouldn’t live in Frogreich for gold clock.)

I also query the Thread title in relation to the main theme of the article. Trans-Atlantic banter?

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 14:19
Capt stable:

Why the title of this thread?

You pick up on one small, fairly insignificant line in the article which is made with no evidence whatsoever to back it up, implying bad behaviour by Brits living abroad. You then make that line the title of your post when the article is actually about Brits who were dumb enough to leave their saving in the UK having to tighten their belts a bit.

Your explanation please?

Thank you for the wonderful example of the infamous 'British irony.'

Substitute any other nationality and I'm sure you'd be fine with it, right?

No other group gets tarred with outlandish stereotypes that you are happy to go along with, right?

Again, sir, thank you for a good chuckle to start my day.

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 14:27
Thank you for those assumptions, all of which are incorrect. And do you wish to address the subject of the thread, or simply to attack me?

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 14:36
On the contrary, I paid you a compliment.

I thoroughly enjoyed the irony.

Please, carry on...

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 14:39
OK - I understand that you don't want to address the thread subject itself, and if you meanSubstitute any other nationality and I'm sure you'd be fine with it, right?

No other group gets tarred with outlandish stereotypes that you are happy to go along with, right?as a compliment, I think there are people here who might disagree.

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 14:43
Which is the wonder that is Jet Blast...

Would you have commented on the article if the nationality had been American? Or Greek? Or Polish?

If so, then you truly are a wonder. There are many here who would not.

I, on the other hand, found it delicious to see a bit of 'return fire.'

Obviously, I am not as advanced or civilized as thee.

See? It's a compliment.

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 14:46
Once again, you make assumptions that are not founded in anything but your own preconceptions and prejudices. As you may have seen, I am not the only one to query the title of the thread in relation to the article.Obviously, I am not as advanced or civilized as thee.There we have to agree to agree.

sisemen
3rd Feb 2009, 14:53
As a Brit who departed those fair shores for an existence "dununnda", and who rabidly supports Australia in the Ashes (well, perhaps not in the coming series - one likes to be on the winning side!) I view this exchange of ideas with wonderment. :E

Gentlemen. Seconds Out. Round 2.....:D

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 15:04
siseman, me too!

Juud
3rd Feb 2009, 15:07
The titling of this thread will come as no surprise to any long-time reader of the CC Forum.
Seeing as how the same thread starter used to delight in frequently posting on that forum whatever rubbish article he could find putting western CC in a bad light. :rolleyes:

Observed modus operandi:

Find a suitable article on the net
Post the article on a forum where it will offend
Phrase the thread title for maximum offense
Sit back and enjoy

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 15:12
Ahhh - thanks for the illumination, Juud.

I don't go into the CC forum as a rule - I might find ladies (or gentlemen!) in a state of undress and I wouldn't want to embarrass them... :uhoh:

I find it amusing that brickhistory is unable to distinguish between my antagonism to the previous US Administration (to which I freely admit) and anti-Americanism, which I fervently deny, and for which he has no evidence whatsoever. But then, lack of evidence never stopped him in the past.

Effluent Man
3rd Feb 2009, 15:19
IMHO there's not a great deal of truth in it either.OK the GBP has lost value but most of these people have their gaffs bought and paid for.When you consider the cost of Council Tax,Heating etc they are probably no worse off in France even at parity with the Euro.
You can eat well in most provincial restaurants in France for 20 Euros. Last saturday night we paid £65 for three courses and a couple of drinks each.Presumably if they want to come home their house has gained 30% in value too due to the exchange rate.

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 15:20
M'lud, stopped me from what?

Enjoying a bit of irony?

ONTPax
3rd Feb 2009, 15:36
Captain Stable wrote:

Why the title of this thread?

Why not? The author was painting with a rather broad brush with some generalizations and stereo-types and that sentence seemed to jump off the page and practically attack me. Remember, I didn't write it. I'm merely bringing this article to you. Please don't kill the messenger. I get enough of THAT from Danny, flyblue, TightSlot and, of course, my dear, dear friend Juud! ;) Hopefully, she still remembers another good newspaper article I forwarded to her and will take that into consideration when the time comes to review my "double secret probation" in being barred from making comments on the CC discussion forum. :ouch:

You pick up on one small, fairly insignificant line in the article which is made with no evidence whatsoever to back it up, implying bad behaviour by Brits living abroad. You then make that line the title of your post when the article is actually about Brits who were dumb enough to leave their saving in the UK having to tighten their belts a bit.

Talk to the above mentioned moderators. They'll fill you in. Or better yet, check out the now-deleted-by-the-moderators discussion thread listed below, thankfully preserved courtesy of GOOGLE. I consider it a near masterpiece, as it apparently caused more steam to billow from the ears of certain folks here at PPRuNe than could have possibly been generated by the brand new boiler on "Tornado!" All in good fun I say. :ok: Where is everyone's sense of humour? :confused:

ryanair calendary 2008 - PPRuNe Forums (http://209.85.173.132/search?q=cache:qUTbDFovLCIJ:www.pprune.org/cabin-crew/351747-ryanair-calendary-2008-a.html)

Your explanation please?

On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, I consider myself a professional pot-stirrer. Unless I'm grossly mistaken, I believe yours has been adequately stirred! Pip! Pip! Cheerio, good boy! :p

On the other days of the week, I tend to behave myself. One of life's mysteries, I guess! :p

ONTPax

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 15:41
On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, I consider myself a professional pot-stirrer.And on the others you still don't know what day it is? :E

CargoMatatu
3rd Feb 2009, 15:58
Brilliant! This is better than telly! :D

ONTPax
3rd Feb 2009, 16:01
Captain Stable wrote:

And on the others you still don't know what day it is?

Yes, like many of the participants of this bulletin board, I am frequently a victim of severe "jet lag". I believe this is one of those times.

What day is it? What time zone is this? If it's Tuesday, does that mean I'm supposed to be in NTA, LHR or ORD? :eek:

ONTPax

ONTPax
3rd Feb 2009, 16:08
CargoMatatu wrote:

Brilliant! This is better than telly!

Considering the so-called "quality" of television these days, I'm not quite so sure that's a compliment! :suspect:

May I suggest a letter-writing campaign or something similar along those lines to the moderators of this bulletin board, stating your desire to have my banishment lifted? The sooner I return to posting INTERESTING and THOUGHT PROVOKING comments to the CC forum, the sooner the entertainment value can be re-instated! :D :ok:

ONTPax

Rainboe
3rd Feb 2009, 16:29
Yet another idiotic thread title! The content of the article is hardly new. Falling exchange rate?- Brits bitch about falling income. Rising exchange rate?- Brits bitch that the value of their property abroad has 'fallen'. Brits stop bitching?- watch out, something's wrong!

Did you know that 40% of Palm Jumeirah is owned by Brits. And prices have fallen 40%, with another estimated 20% to go? Now there IS going to be some bitching!

Shack37
3rd Feb 2009, 17:03
Thread title is a little provocative but hardly offensive. Following the links to previous examples of ONTpax posts, supposedly also offensive, it seems to me there is an over abundance of sensitivity and PC where moderation would better serve the thread.

See also: The £ and your Holiday and The € versus the £ threads for more examples of a lost sense of humour and a trembling upper lip instead of a stiff one.

RIP Free speech and the once Great British sense of humour.

s37

Mariner9
3rd Feb 2009, 17:12
A Baron, as the erudite prooners amongst us will be well aware, is the lowest rank in the British nobility.

Personally, when abroad, one emulates loftier personages such as a Viscount or a Lord to ensure Johnny foreigner knows his place.

A Baron would simply not do :=

Shack37
3rd Feb 2009, 17:16
Personally, when abroad, one emulates loftier personages such as a Viscount or a Lord to ensure Johnny foreigner knows his place


Ah yes, Archer, Black, Snapes, Moonie, Truscott and A.N. Other spring to mind.:ok:

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 17:19
For us 'Muricans, a baron would do.

After all, the only royalty we have are the Kennedys.



A swim anyone?

Shack37
3rd Feb 2009, 17:27
Brickhistory (slight thread drift). Why are you suddenly a probationer with just one post? You have a history going back to Gettysburg.

Would that be Kennedy "The Robber Baron"?:confused:

s37

Captain Stable
3rd Feb 2009, 17:28
Personally, when abroad, one emulates loftier personages such as a Viscount or a Lord"Lord" is a title accorded to most of the "nobility" in the UK, with the exception of the Monarch and Baronets.

In ascending order, the ranks of the nobility are:-
Baronet (introduce by James I & VI in order to raise money - plus ça change...)
Baron (what most of the jumped-up oik politicians the the House of Lords have been granted - see above re raising money :E )
Viscount
Earl (the only title to come from Anglo-Saxon roots rather than Norman)
Marquess
DukeAll the above are hereditary except for life peers who are all Barons. I believe there are still quite a few hereditary Barons.

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 17:37
shack, I left in a huff several weeks ago due to arbitrary and capricious mod'ding. Threads pulled that weren't out of bounds, posts deleted seemingly just for the hell of it. Finally was banned for, to me, a pretty innocuous post.

Fun meter then pegged and I told pprune to cancel and delete my account as I did not want them to count me as part of their numbers and thus ads' rates.

Obviously, I am addicted and lack self-discipline.

Thus, back to lowly probationer.

Humility is good for the soul they say...

That would be the scions of "The Robber Baron."

The prince of Camelot (seemed to like his drugs and mafia girlfriends, but at least he kept it behind doors), the earl of Chappaquidick (sp?) who overwhelmed the nation with his driving abilities while intoxicated, his gallant respect for the lady in the car and not bothering her while she was under water, and his promptness in attending to civic duties by reporting the accident to the police sometime much later the next day.

edited to add: Not to mention holding court while a young knight decided to impose prima nocturne with a young lady who wasn't even getting married some years later.

Of course, the princess of Camelot made a recent rare public appearance by seeking an audience in the House of Lords. The pesky unwashed wanted to know far too much of her private life - lawsuit by former maid, tax issues (de rigour for DC now), and an income that is no one's business despite the law governing such.

So, as you can see, we need our royalty and live vicariously through yours. Or at least those wacky Brit expats.

OFSO
3rd Feb 2009, 19:41
Would someone enlighten me as to just how Barons swagger ?

I guess the required information may be found in an episode of "Black Adder", probably series two, and as soon as I get the show number I'll rush to the DVD rack and - wahaaaay ! - get it out.

ThreadBaron
3rd Feb 2009, 19:58
Hurumph!!!

Someone called?

Swagger - v.(used without object)
To walk or strut with a defiant or insolent air

We Barons long since gave up the swagger as we found it hurt our aging knees and defiance and insolence has long since been usurped by chavdom.

Haven't had a good 'Hurumph!' in ages.

galaxy flyer
3rd Feb 2009, 20:02
Reference the thread title.....

I read it and immediately assumed the article was about "drunk as a Lord" British hooligans following that strangely violent game of "footie".

Disappointed to read about how down and out quiet Britons are in a quiet part of France.

GF

con-pilot
3rd Feb 2009, 20:14
You do know that one can buy an English title. Someone posted a link to a site that had all kinds of titles for sale, from a Knighthood up to Lord. Think it was Lord Tony Draper.

Sadly us Yanks can't use the title in the US. :sad:

Hum, Lord Con, doesn't sound half bad. :p



(I do know a real live Lord, actually a very nice guy. Don't think he swaggers around France however.)

iws
3rd Feb 2009, 20:17
Americans do NOT have Royalty. I wish they would stop pretending.

Lord of Beamonds - (my inherited Manorial Title which pre-dates all these
Johnny-come-lately Dukes, Earls etc.

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 20:20
Let's see, CEO of Microsoft or Lord of the Dancehaux.

I think I know which one I'd choose to be.




Damn those peasant German forebears of mine...

iws
3rd Feb 2009, 20:22
Class, dear boy.........

con-pilot
3rd Feb 2009, 20:45
Class, dear boy.........


HA!

You have obviously not met some of the titled English nobility that I have. :p

CR2
3rd Feb 2009, 21:23
Bloody hell..... What's the matter with you lot? Closed minded little Englanders is what I see here. And Yeah, I am a Brit, read the Torygraph and live happily in New York, married to a Yanquistani ( :-) ).

Grow up. FFS, this jingoism is starting to make me puke. So GWB wasn't the greatest? Big deal, neither was Bliar. We've had one great leader since Churchill, the rest are... well politicians, all full of :mad: whatever their colo(u)rs.

I am really disgusted at some of the shite that is written on here. We should never, ever forget the ties forged throughout the last century. Some of the children writing here are too young to understand.

Rant over, because if I really speak my mind Flappy and La Bleu will spank me. :E

Edit to say: This applies to the general anti-Cousinism on this board too.

brickhistory
3rd Feb 2009, 21:37
Closed minded little Englanders

Redundant perhaps?

I am a Brit, read the Torygraph and live happily in New York, married to a Yanquistani

Oh, so you're the guy on that cancelled Brooke Shields (that's a tall, nice drink of water) show, "Lipstick Jungle" or some such?

We should never, ever forget the ties forged throughout the last century. Some of the children writing here are too young to understand.

That topic is often discussed. The US was either late to the fray or butting in when not required. And, of course, it was all a means to break the Empire/bankrupt the same, or generate obscene war profits for the Jews who control the US behind the scenes. (Did I miss any?)

Edit to say: This applies to the general anti-Cousinism on this board too.


Careful: next to aviation, that's probably your highest traffic generator. Watch the bottom line...

CR2
3rd Feb 2009, 21:46
Brick, you forgot that Churchill had FDR wrapped around his little finger :}

Anti-Cousinism: well, we all enjoy a little joke at each other's expense, that's fine. The Ozzies call it Sledging (dunno what a friendly insult has to do with a snow transport conveyance, but thats another story. Maybe Buster can explain... though he's a crossdresser, so better take what he says with a pinch of salt :O )

Late into the game? Nah. Just in time. The US didn't guarantee Poland's borders...

Errr... Brooke Shields? :confused:

ONTPax
3rd Feb 2009, 22:38
With this heated discussion regarding Baronets, Barons, Viscounts, Earls, Marquess and Dukes, did anyone else here note the class-conscious evacuation procedures of US Airways Flight 1549? :ok:

Now remember folks, before offense is taken, please bear in mind that I am merely passing this along to you. Some other wag added the "Coach class" and "First class" wording to an otherwise unblemished photo. :=

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v101/milespost/44d9b2a6.jpg

The photo made the rounds on the Net under the title, "Another Good Reason To Upgrade To First Class!"

I believe I see a Baron (or could he be a Duke-in-training?) using extreme "swagger" as he's entering that lifeboat! :p

ONTPax

ShyTorque
3rd Feb 2009, 23:01
You do know that one can buy an English title. Someone posted a link to a site that had all kinds of titles for sale, from a Knighthood up to Lord.

I'm on first name terms with a local English Baron and he does swagger a little. He doesn't go to France very often.

He's Polish. :hmm:

Shack37
3rd Feb 2009, 23:25
BH



Obviously, I am addicted and lack self-discipline.

Thus, back to lowly probationer.

Humility is good for the soul they say...



Welcome back anyway.

s37

tony draper
3rd Feb 2009, 23:29
We gave J Edgar Hoover a Knighthood, he could not use the title Stateside of course, he preferred to be called Your Ladyship anyway,in private that is.
:E

brickhistory
4th Feb 2009, 00:47
Unlike, perhaps, the 'lady' who toppled your king in the 1930s.

Woof...

CR2
4th Feb 2009, 02:04
Brick... give it a ******* rest.... you're arguing with peeps who are generally pro-cousinstan...

Now, make some kind of anti-socialist statement, so we can get of the fluffies wound up :-) and give Flappy and La Bleu some overtime.

brickhistory
4th Feb 2009, 10:48
cr2, believe it or not, on this thread, my comments have been meant tongue in cheek.

Mr. Draper's comments about Hoover were spot on.

From that I made the leap to a historically ugly woman. That then tied the thread back to royalty...

As we're generally referring to the UK in particular, and Europe in general, I would have thought any comments about socialism superflous.


My bad...

BenThere
4th Feb 2009, 11:35
Unlike, perhaps, the 'lady' who toppled your king in the 1930s

And then Churchill was bred of Yankee stock thus giving him the backbone to orchestrate the saving of the Queen later on.

Captain Stable
4th Feb 2009, 11:41
Americans do NOT have Royalty. I wish they would stop pretending.No, but they DID have Duke Ellington, and he was definitely OK. :ok:

BenThere
4th Feb 2009, 11:55
Also King Gillette - "Give 'em the razors, sell 'em the blades."

ONTPax
4th Feb 2009, 16:12
<> The Dukes of Hazard

<> King Taco (an ethnic fast-food franchise here in CA)

<> Cornelius Vanderbuilt (a Robber Baron)

<> Jack Lord (appeared in the TV series "Hawaii Five-O")

<> Paul Goldenberg (the King of big-screen TV retail sales)

<> King Paul (a has-been porn star) :eek:

<> Alan King (comedian)

ONTPax :D

ONTPax
4th Feb 2009, 16:46
Shack37 wrote:

Thread title is a little provocative but hardly offensive. Following the links to previous examples of ONTpax posts, supposedly also offensive, it seems to me there is an over abundance of sensitivity and PC where moderation would better serve the thread.

Oh, you've noticed that, too?

My philosophy is to make an attempt at keeping the conversation "lively" and to advance "thought provoking" and "stimulating" input. I guess, in this day and age, that is politically incorrect. Better to have everyone waltzing along on the same page, sharing the same thoughts and not saying anything that might ruffle some feathers. :ugh:

Hauntingly similar to what was depicted in an episode of the old TV series THE TWILIGHT ZONE entitled "It's A Good Life".

"It's a good thing! It's a very good thing!" :uhoh:

I can't help myself, but I keep drawing parallels between little Anthony Fremont and the PPRuNe moderators! :eek:

It's a Good Life (The Twilight Zone) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_a_Good_Life_(The_Twilight_Zone))

YouTube - It's A good Life/ pt. 1(classic ZonE) (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xfGWvexg90w)
YouTube - It's a good life/ pt. 2 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gi21BDWmKyQ&feature=related)
YouTube - It's A good Life/ pt. 3 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qk1NNVs6O3c&feature=related)

Wished-Into-The-Cornfield ONTPax :sad:

GOLF_BRAVO_ZULU
10th Feb 2009, 14:49
ONTPax. You are neglecting some other worthy "titled" Amuracuns; like Earl Scruggs, the noted banjo botherer


http://www.earlscruggs.com/images/main2_02.jpg

King Gillette, the sharp blade in Industry.

http://cache.eb.com/eb/image?id=68344&rendTypeId=4