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View Full Version : Hysterical media portrayal of "Cold" Weather


fireflybob
6th Jan 2009, 09:42
It's a lovely morning here in Liverpool - was out on the roads at 8 am - minus 4 deg C on the gauge - clear blue skies, a few icy patches on the side roads but no problem so long as you drive sensibly.

Am amazed (maybe I shouldn't be!) at the dire media warnings about how "cold" it is and how the traffic is flowing normally (!) despite the awful conditions.

Heh guys its winter and guess what it gets cold in winter and we get ice and snow! Some of us can recall winters in the UK when the temps were down to minus 20 degrees C!!

Ok I know low temps can be a problem especially for older folk on small pensions having to pay the heating bills - that is another issue - they have all my sympathies etc.

But do we need all there dire warnings not to go out walking in the hills etc?

tony draper
6th Jan 2009, 09:57
There was a item on the local BBC News here last night re it first started transmitting fifty years ago,they showed some film clips of the winter in 1959 oh boy! this country would be a disaster area if we ever got a winter like that again,and the commentator on the clip said this winter is not as bad as last years or the year before but is still causing problems.
:uhoh:

Rollingthunder
6th Jan 2009, 10:04
We are talking about geologic time, a span of time we do not have the ken of.

Blacksheep
6th Jan 2009, 10:04
When I were a lad, if the school heating broke down (did it ever work?) we were advised to dress up warm and bring in gloves with the fingers cut off.

(Allegedly, the binary system came about as a result of teachers and children wearing mittens in the winter of 1947.)

1DC
6th Jan 2009, 10:26
Ah the winter of 1947, i was seven at the time and one of the memories is getting up well before dawn and biking six miles with my Dad to the coal gas depot and then standing in a queue for hours for coke. We walked back with two bikes loaded with as many full sacks as we could carry, i remember i had two and my Dad had many more. It took all day in freezing weather, snow everywhere, what an adventure for me. If it happened today i suppose social services would have been round to accuse my parents of child exploitation and took me away for a better life in some home or other....

Romeo India Xray
6th Jan 2009, 10:33
It was -23 when I came to work yesterday morning. Things on the up now but looks like we won't see anything above 0 for a good while. I LOVE a proper winter (less cold walkarounds, de-icing and weather delays, and the ladies walking around looking like Eskimos).

RIX

forget
6th Jan 2009, 10:53
1963, coldest winter since 1740. I remember it very well. I was into the tenth month of a one year course at RAF Yatesbury, Wiltshire. Home for Xmas and New Year and, then the time came to get back, 250 miles away. TV wasn’t what it is now and I had no idea that Wiltshire was under 3 feet of snow. Sunday morning came and I set out, hitch hiking from Durham which, in uniform, was by far the easiest transport.

The closer I got to Yatesbury the more I realised that things weren’t normal - and I was soon relying on Army four wheel drive Bedfords running mercy missions.

I got to Yatesbury at around 8 o’clock Monday morning. The A4 was just passable with 13 foot drifts (true!) running alongside it. I decided to get dropped off at a side gate rather than check in at the guard room. I eventually got to my billet - which was empty.

B*gger this I thought, I’ll be snow clearing for a week if I stay here. Solution. Hot bath, back onto the A4 via the side gate – and a 250 mile hitch back to Durham.

24 hours later a telephone call to the guard room told me not to bother coming back - for a week.

Yoof of today - :bored:

BlueDiamond
6th Jan 2009, 11:47
... getting up well before dawn and biking six miles with my Dad to the coal gas depot and then standing in a queue for hours for coke. We walked back with two bikes loaded with as many full sacks as we could carry,
Luxury!...

Gnirren
6th Jan 2009, 11:53
Christ, how about I just save you some time here.

YouTube - Four Yorkshiremen (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=13JK5kChbRw&feature=PlayList&p=CDFEA6D52E5CC0EC&index=10)

ShyTorque
6th Jan 2009, 12:08
1947 was the year that my grandfather, a railway line welder, and his colleagues were trapped in a tunnel for nearly three days, caused by a major snow storm. They took shelter and then got snowed in.

1963 was a bit chilly, too. It was the year my younger brother was born on Christmas day. My father walked three miles almost up to his waist in snow to get to the nursing home to see my mother after being called to say the baby had arrived; he always joked that he never forgave my brother for making him miss his Christmas lunch. We had a tracked snow plough stuck at the top of our road for almost three weeks that year after it's diesel fuel waxed up in the cold and it couldn't be restarted. We also had thick ice on the inside of the bedroom windows and on the window sills. The only heating we had was a coal fire downstairs, which also provided the hot water via a back boiler. I got proficient at lighting that fire at a very early age. :ok:

Just turned down the central heating this very morning..

But give me a very cold, dry winter over a mild damp one, anytime. Far healthier for us, for the environment and the garden. :)

tony draper
6th Jan 2009, 12:08
Up here them four lucky buggas would have been regarded as middle class.
:rolleyes:

Parapunter
6th Jan 2009, 12:26
Beeb website had this this morning:

Severe weather is warning issued

Now that is the worst spell of weather I've seen in a while.


*slams door on way out*

Kolibear
6th Jan 2009, 12:31
But give me a very cold, dry winter over a mild damp one, anytime

Agree 100% with that ! its not the temperature that get you, its the humidity.

Because we've not had any snow for many years, the early/mid ninties is the last big fall I can remember, there is a generation of motorists who have no idea of how to drive in snow.

A couple of years back, I was stuck behind a young guy at a T-junction. It was a little snowy and the junction has a slight gradient. That driver's idea of how to pull away was 'rev engine, dump clutch' "Why are my wheels spinning??? Dunno, I'll give it more power & see if that makes a difference. " I have to confess that I crawled passed him in 2nd gear & left him to it.

angels
6th Jan 2009, 13:26
Ah, the winter of '63!

Got me first proper bike and couldn't ride it for a month due to the snow.

Still, being near the North Downs meant that sledging (in the non-cricketing way) became second nature.

I also had to help Dad with the coke. A hundredweight a sack!

Forkandles
6th Jan 2009, 14:01
I also had to help Dad with the coke. A hundredweight a sack!

That's a street price of 1.5 million GBP per sack in todays prices! Did he have Colombian friends that used to visit, angels?

Charlie Foxtrot India
6th Jan 2009, 14:17
I was born April 1963, reckon that's why I've always hated the cold.

It was 36 degrees (C not F!) here today :E

shobakker
6th Jan 2009, 14:20
It is quite funny to watch the cars struggling to mount the speed hump at the top of our road - wheels spinning engines revving....:rolleyes:

Minus 5 when I dropped the kids off this morning, brilliant sunshine and a cloudless blue sky - what fabulous weather and just what winter should bring. Now if only we could get a foot or so of snow to top it all off....:)

lexxity
6th Jan 2009, 14:30
Just turned down the central heating this very morning..


Turned it down! BAH! Mine is turned off at the mo and just the fire in in the living room. :ok:

Standard Noise
6th Jan 2009, 14:47
Just battered a hole in the pond for the fish to surface. Ice was 2 inches thick, a week ago it was just 3/4 of an inch.

Silly f**ker of an engineer washed his car at work on Sunday morning, car park is a slope and hey presto, ice on the car park.:ugh: Arsehole!

angels
6th Jan 2009, 14:49
Oops, lexxi has lost her glasses again and appears to have left a fag burning on the armchair....

Gnirren
6th Jan 2009, 14:55
This all somehow fits in with the doomsday global warming we're-all-about-to-die, right...?

Capt.KAOS
6th Jan 2009, 15:22
The winter of 1963.... yep remember it all...

200 km traditional dutch skating (Elfsteden) race in -18 Celsius with bitter cold winds from the east. The winner did it in 10:59 hours, almost twice as long as the fastest time (1985). From 10.000 starters, only 136 reached the finish.

Remember watching the race on the television of my grandpa, endless snow plains, lonely skaters fighting against the ice cold wind, snowed under track hardly recognizable, heroic...

http://www.seniorplaza.nl/Paping2.gif

http://images.vpro.nl/img.db?10198264+s%28400%29

http://images.vpro.nl/img.db?10218423+s%28400%29

Storminnorm
6th Jan 2009, 15:25
Allus wer a bit ODD they cloggies!
Erwtensoep is lekker though!

Probably needed quite a few bowls after that! :ok:

tony draper
6th Jan 2009, 15:30
I think science should give itself the new goal of researching into genetic engineering methods that cause us to hibernate for two months after Xmas, because January and February are a total pain in the arse.
:)

frostbite
6th Jan 2009, 15:32
Will never forget the snow and fog of '59. We moved house (60 miles) in the worst of it and the new house was in an unmade road. In fact the road was worse than unmade, worse than a ploughed field with 2' ruts.

Those removal men certainly earned their money that day.

Storminnorm
6th Jan 2009, 15:36
Capt Drapes, move to the Isle of Wight!
I have it on good authority that they hibernate! :ok:

mr fish
6th Jan 2009, 15:41
i had a typical pub "argument" with some student hippie types at the weekend.
"so, if global warming is happening now, how do you explain this very cold weather" says i,
"global warming theory dictates weather will not just get hotter, but will also become more unpredictable" say hippie types.
"oh, like cold in winter and storms in summer" says i.
"thats about the sum of it" say climate types.
"all bu:mad:it, and its one shot on the black, you cheating f:mad:ers", says i !!!

Storminnorm
6th Jan 2009, 15:45
What the **** is this doing to the Ozone layer, or has some
T*sser been and gone and fixed all that now?:confused:

mustpost
6th Jan 2009, 15:48
the Isle of Wight!
I have it on good authority that they hibernate

Shurely the Forest of Dean?

west lakes
6th Jan 2009, 15:51
A cold Cumbria

Looking north along, a part frozen, Derwentwater towards Keswick with a snow topped Skiddaw in the background
http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd161/west_lakes/fuji%20shots/DSCF0844.jpg

Looking south
http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd161/west_lakes/fuji%20shots/DSCF0847.jpg

Ice is about 4inches thick near the shore
http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd161/west_lakes/fuji%20shots/DSCF0845.jpg

But not further out
http://i225.photobucket.com/albums/dd161/west_lakes/fuji%20shots/DSCF0846.jpg

Had an interesting lunch in the carpark, those were taken from, a nice gentle slope from the road to the lake - covered in a sheet of ice.
Lots of folk using the, reverse out, point car up hill towards exit, put plenty of revs on, slide backwards with drive wheels spinning! Look confused:\

Krystal n chips
6th Jan 2009, 17:18
Ahem, probably the only reason the weather in "UK" is receiveing such prominence is.....

BBC NEWS | UK | Arctic snap expected to continue (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7812861.stm)

Can't wait for the "Arctic Hell to continue!" and, of course, "Heroic Londoners vow to beat Arctic blitz!"...headlines...:rolleyes:

However, the cold can be entertaining....the Beeb showed a delightful clip of a 4x4 tank thing on a snow covered hill in Glos ( I think) doing a series of "S" lunges before ending up on the verge....:ok::E......poor soul probably never realised what those "terribly convenient for hanging stuff on levers" were actually for. Sorry, one shouldn't laugh at others misfortunes.....:D:E

But there is clearly a more sinister reason behind the cold weather.....

"Russia in new Cold War offensive"!

Exclusive!:from our Moscow correspondent.

As Britain shudders to a halt in the grip of the Arctic winds and freezing conditions, is it purely by chance that Russia has decided to cut gas supplies to the West ?. Of course not, Russian scientists have been embarked on a top-secret project to bring the West to it's knees by changing the weather to such an extent they can now drop the temperatures as low as they like while holding the West to ransom with gas supplies from Russia".

Coming soon to "a tabloid of your choice" no doubt. :rolleyes:

The Grudian of course, will provide a full geo-political assessment of the countries the air has covered, an analysis of the pollutants and chemicals it contains.....and a very nice map and statistics of the effects of global warming...;)

CUNIM
6th Jan 2009, 17:27
In 1963 I had a BSA 250 and was out drinking with my friends and ended up quite relaxed. Had to do about 20 miles in ratar$ed condition in minus numbdynumb temperature. By the time I got home I was completely sober. It took me quite a while to regain movement in my pinkies, or blueys as they were. So I learned to drink sufficient and then use the BSA to drive home gradually sobering up - no hangover:ok::ok::ok:

acmi48
6th Jan 2009, 17:27
west lakes

think the police there are skating on thin ice with that statement

unstable ice

some language challenged people may not understand the meaning

i like it tho'

ShyTorque
6th Jan 2009, 17:33
Because we've not had any snow for many years, the early/mid ninties is the last big fall I can remember, there is a generation of motorists who have no idea of how to drive in snow.

How right you are. I was driving on sheet ice this afternoon (country park, ungritted roads) with the dogs in the back of the car. 30 mph, nice and steady, plenty of room for the car in front of me. Along behind came a neanderthal in a 1998 Ford Escort. Sped up behind me, sat about 5 metres from my rear bumper. I knew there was a "stop" junction coming up ahead and I didn't want him that close as he was evidently oblivious to braking distances in those conditions. I indicated left and pulled to the side to let him past. I gently braked and gave him plenty of room and a good view ahead to go past. His tiny unevolved brain was obviously confused by this so he slowed down with me and waited behind. I waved him by and got a "d***head" sign from him in return. He then realised how slippery it was and drove at 20 mph or less all the way to the junction. :ugh:

chiglet
6th Jan 2009, 17:46
In Feb '63, I was under canvas during a "R & I" [Reliability and Initiative] camp on a dusused aerodrome on the Glos/Wilts border. When we struck camp, we removed all the Poles and guys [fnarr, fnarr] and the tents were still standing. Dec '63, I had to hich from Aberdeen to RAF Buchan, in a brand new pair of shoes.....:ugh:
In Jan, [I think]1968 I rode my motorcycle from Dukkie to Brum airport [was stationed there at the time and the temperature was -12C....:{
From Congleton to Lichfield, it was Freezing Fog. I had an open face helmet. The visor iced over, my scarf froze to my beard, I stopped at every transport cafe on the A34 and A51 to get a hot drink and some food. After this trip, I had no feeling whatever in the middle two fingers of both hands for about a fortnight...
Ahhh, nostalgia

west lakes
6th Jan 2009, 18:52
Don't know if you are hinting at it, lakes,

Primarily the inability to work out that if they set off across the slope, built up a bit of speed they wouldn't have been sat there wheels spinning. It was a demonstration on the lack of winter driving skills a lot have.

unstable ice

True!
Reports state that folks(kids) have been walking out towards the edge of the ice with large rocks to play at breaking it (Yep we all did that in our time). But the edge is about 50m from shore and the ice thins a lot, also the lake level has dropped so the ice at the edge is in places unsupported

V2-OMG!
6th Jan 2009, 18:53
Compared to the media coverage of the economic meltdown, the cold weather is only a dusting.

The former drives my broker crazy. Speaking of which, I haven't heard from him lately. I never even received the obsequious Christmas card.

corsair
6th Jan 2009, 19:06
Well one casualty to be regretted by this cold spell was my brother in law's Jag, which slid down a hilly ungritted road only to stopped by a nice wall. It was a very nice Jag too, bought for only €30k with low mileage. One of four cars that morning on that stretch. One apparently flipped over a wall and the driver was only saved from a spectacular demise by some tree branches. The drop beyond being quite considerable apparently.

I rode a motorcycle for years, ice or snow. I found that if you basically rode with the wheels lined up with the kerb, you didn't fall off, much. Another time, I was caught on the dual carriageway in a blizzard and like shytorque found myself being tailgated, only it was truck. One slip and I was flatter than a beer left overnight. On that same memorable and terrifying ride, we were all overflown by a helicopter following the road. He was very very low. I'm not sure who was in more danger, him or me.

Talking of cold spells, I remember long ones in the eighties. Weeks they lasted. There were actually icicles hanging off buildings. Something you only see in places like Canada normally.

Widger
6th Jan 2009, 23:46
I remember talking to a Norwegian Taxi driver in Tromso some years ago about how impressive their snow driving skills were. He said it is still carnage, the first day it snows, everyone is skidding and crashing, they all go home, put winter tyres on (studs) and then all is calm. The trouble with the UK is that we generally use summer tyres all year round.

Noah Zark.
7th Jan 2009, 00:21
We are all huddled around a candle. If the temperature drops by another few degrees, we might light it!

StaceyF
7th Jan 2009, 05:51
But do we need all there dire warnings not to go out walking in the hills etc?

Yesterday morning on GMTV(?) there was an article on how to dress up warmly. :ugh::ugh::ugh:

I jest ye not, "wrap the scarf around your neck and tie it loosely" :mad:

driftdown
7th Jan 2009, 06:57
Jeez, whatever happened to common sense and thinking?

There is no hope if people have to be advised how to dress up warmly. This is on par with the allergy warning "contains nuts" found on packets of peanuts :ugh:

Richard Taylor
7th Jan 2009, 06:59
I hear it's snowing in London & The Home Counties! :eek:

Tell me it ain't so...:}

ShyTorque
7th Jan 2009, 10:04
In UK we live in a dumbed-down society so it's perhaps to be expected.

We are being dumbed-down because the government don't want anyone to be more clever than themselves. :suspect:

Those others (in this case the media), in a position to influence the general population, are also dumbed-down. They obviously see a need to give what they see as "clever advice" to the dumbed-down population, with respect to something that in previous times would have been seen as common sense. :rolleyes:

angels
7th Jan 2009, 10:13
Richard - a belated acknowledgement that it was indeed snowing here in the Smoke, but twas minimal stuff (in town itself, may have been thicker in the sticks) and didn't last very long.

Blacksheep
7th Jan 2009, 10:25
Yesterday morning on GMTV(?) there was an article on how to dress up warmly. I jest ye not, "wrap the scarf around your neck and tie it loosely" They should have experienced Granny Arnold dressing one up for the walk to school. :uhoh:

Roald Amundsen would have been in trouble if he'd tried to get out the front door dressed as the photos of him at the Pole portray him. :rolleyes:

Storminnorm
7th Jan 2009, 11:33
Brave, or foolish? chap on the telly this morning recounting
the tale of how he leapt into a frozen lake to rescue his dog
that had run out onto the ice and fallen through it.
He leapt in to drag it back out! Give that man a medal!!!
And a hot drink and blanket! :ok:

Romeo India Xray
7th Jan 2009, 12:00
"I remember talking to a Norwegian Taxi driver in Tromso some years ago about how impressive their snow driving skills were. He said it is still carnage, the first day it snows, everyone is skidding and crashing, they all go home, put winter tyres on (studs) and then all is calm. The trouble with the UK is that we generally use summer tyres all year round."

Yes, most people here are on winter tyres now. Just as well really. Crossing the river on the way home I noticed it is now fully frozen. The Daugava in Riga is similar in size and (I would imagine) current to the Thames in London. I love to see it frozen. Should have the ice fishermen going out there soon - always nice to see some guys sitting in the middle of the river, freezing their nuts off while fishing - not for me though!

RIX

maffie
7th Jan 2009, 12:23
@ driftdown

But peanuts aren't nuts. They're peas....

(Source QI - Stephen Fry)

Matt

tony draper
7th Jan 2009, 12:30
Never come across a bag of salted roasted peas before.:uhoh:

Standard Noise
7th Jan 2009, 12:51
Maybe not Mr D, but this weather certainly brings out enough nuts, most of whom need a roasting!

Had to laugh at the footage the other day of the Freelander coming a cropper in Glouchestecestershire. Pillock!

StaceyF
8th Jan 2009, 19:04
Jeez, whatever happened to common sense and thinking?

There is no hope if people have to be advised how to dress up warmly. This is on par with the allergy warning "contains nuts" found on packets of peanuts :ugh:

Well I didn't think it could get any better but I obviously overestimated the dumb-Brit mentality.

On my local radio station on the way into work this morning, I listened in disbelief to their "roving reporter" conducting an interview with a guy from a national, well-known, mobile windscreen replacement outfit.

It turns out, and this was an education to me :ugh::ugh:, that pouring boiling water out of a kettle onto a frozen car windscreen isn't good for it.

It also transpires that a good quality de-icer is recommended and that placing newspapers (or a blanket) over your windscreen at night apparently will stop frost forming on the screen.

The comprehensive school education system has done exactly what the UK Government wants it to do :mad::mad:

Beatriz Fontana
8th Jan 2009, 20:35
I'm a firm believer in "the wrong type of cold weather". Yesterday, Bavaria, -8C daytime, about -14C overnight. Southern UK today, -2C at the lowest. And the Bavarian cold was much more bearable.

Over there, it's snow tyres and appropriate clothing. Here? I had a car come towards me sideways on a back road on black ice, and I've seen plenty of folks walking around with less than warm attire.

We just can't do the extremes in the UK. Mizzly dark days, bring 'em on.

arcniz
9th Jan 2009, 08:08
Climate researchers have long noted that periods of explosive vulcanism are often followed, within a year or two, by cooler and wetter weather in the Northern Hemisphere. This is attributed to dust particles and sulfur dioxide blown into the Stratosphere, where they may linger long. One has seen persuasive numerical correlations, with 18 to 24 months delay, for exceptional rainfall amounts and low temperatures following Krakatoa, El Chichon, and Mt. Pinatubo eruptions, with many other similar links plausible,

A non-official weather theory that seems at least highly possible is that a run of very high energy nuclear weapons testing in 1960-62 raised so many particles into the stratosphere that sunlight was radically reduced - in time for '63. Link (http://www.john-daly.com/bigbangs.htm)


The winter of '63 was so cold that most of Northern Europe had the hardest freeze within living memory. In Switzerland, for example, all large lakes North of the Alps froze solid enough for people and vehicles to move on them, driving the Switz-Germany border police on the Bodensee to distraction (plus many broken limbs) and providing a wonderful experience for schoolchildren and adults to walk and wander on the new-found solid territory such as the Lake of Zurich, normally a puddle more than a mile across and some 26 miles long.

http://www.bürkliplatz.ch/1963_seegfroerni/thumbs/1963_seegfoerni_02.jpg (http://www.bürkliplatz.ch/1963_seegfroerni/images/1963_seegfoerni_02.jpg)

http://www.bürkliplatz.ch/1963_seegfroerni/thumbs/1963_seegfoerni_03.jpg (http://www.bürkliplatz.ch/1963_seegfroerni/images/1963_seegfoerni_03.jpg)

Wod
9th Jan 2009, 08:34
Love the nostalgia.

Was born Feb 1940. My mum used to tell me that home milk deliveries were discontinued except for nursing mums like her. Delivery by hand pulled sled apparently.

Vaguely remember '47. Train tried to proceed north of Grantham, but was forced to retreat. Trainload of folk, including me and Mum, looking for accommodation.. Taxi driver pulled up at police station, where desk Seargent said "Try Mrs Bloggs, who sometimes takes boarders, otherwise we'll have to put you up in the cells". To my eternal disappointment, Mrs Bloggs took us in.

'63 I was a full blown adult, and I have no special memories of that one.

I agree with so many other posters; I'm surprised that people are surprised. It's called winter weather.

It is also one reason why I've chosen to stay in Australia. Temperature down below 30°C today for the first time this week.

Blacksheep
9th Jan 2009, 10:32
Never come across a bag of salted roasted peas before

You live simple, sheltered lives up there in Gateshead, tony. :rolleyes:

Roasted Salted Peas (http://www.angryalmond.com/index.php?main_page=index&cPath=7&zenid=c92780da81e9417f457409fa81749fec) and other stuff.

Just battered a hole in the pond for the fish to surface. Ice was 2 inches thick, a week ago it was just 3/4 of an inch.
We found some goldfish in a pond in the back garden of a house we bought in Ruislip. We had to leave them to fend for themselves through the winter, when we found the pond frozen over during a Xmas visit to UK. Next spring they were all swimming around happily. I say all, but where there had been eleven medium sized goldfish, there were now five large ones... :uhoh:

tony draper
9th Jan 2009, 10:46
I blame this weather on all these dammed satellite dishes,same thing happened back end of the sixties with all the BBC2 aerials going up.
:uhoh:

Flying Binghi
9th Jan 2009, 11:19
The problem is that people are confusing weather with climate...

Oh dear, sounds like somebody dooont know their left foot from their right foot - AFP: Despite deep chill, global warming is still a peril: scientists (http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gTi25-Z96dsSIk740Pv1hIZuOpug)

corsair
9th Jan 2009, 13:00
Cold snaps are routinely seized upon by a dwindling rearguard of climate skeptics as "proof" that climate change is exaggerated or an outright fabrication, Jouzel said.

But that is no reason for serious climate scientists to exaggerate either, he added.

"It also up to us to be careful to not say every time we have a hot summer, 'See, it's global warming!'," he said.


'dwindling rearguard', hmm, somehow that's wishful thinking.

I wish they would pay more attention to the last line too. Because they do exaggerate which makes us in the dwindling rearguard even more suspicious.

mr fish
9th Jan 2009, 15:15
WEST LAKES post-32 shows a police notice saying KEEP OFF the ice, when did they gain the power?
which law is being broken?
p.s, i'm not a fan of the police:)

west lakes
9th Jan 2009, 15:29
Mr F
I suspect they could not actually prosecute anyone for ignoring it, but were making an effort to "strongly" warn people not to go on it.
The Ice was thick near the shore but had been tested from a boat and was thin & dangerous further out.

Are you suggesting that they should not have put one there and it would be acceptable if someone was injured or died as a result?

Storminnorm
9th Jan 2009, 15:41
Winter of '63 was spent at RAF St Athan.
Had to venture out delivering COAL to the many Southwalians
in the area that were snowed in.
Problem was that they all insisted that you had a drink with
them for being so helpful in bringing the coal.
Can't remember getting back to camp very clearly. Hazy is
the best description I can think of.
On one occasion we had to go to clear the road near Aberthaw
which was blocked by one hell of a snowdrift.
We estimated it to be 32 feet deep at one point.
Once again the urns of "tea" mixed with more than a little rum
made an appearance, Chaos resulted, but we did clear the road, eventually!

As an add on, one of my friends set off to go to his home in Northampton,
Despite the warnings that everything was impassable because of the snow.
He DID make it there and back in his Wolesley 1600, no problem, he said!

mr fish
9th Jan 2009, 18:22
west lakes, i'm not suggesting anything one way or another mate.
just seems like yet another example of the boys in blue sticking their nose in.
if people chose to take themselves out of the gene pool by walking on thin ice, burying themselves in sand, walking along cliffs, climbing trees etc,
so be it, but to try and impose some sort of psudo police power over any activity which might seem to some foolhardy is a (imho) rocky slope.:(
p.s, next post refers to traumatised folk picking up the pieces etc:ok:

lexxity
9th Jan 2009, 21:34
and I've seen plenty of folks walking around with less than warm attire.

That would include my Nana. Stupid woman won't wear a hat or gloves because a hat is a fallacy and her gloves are "slippy" and her other pair or for Sunday only. Then she complains that she is cold.

Beatriz Fontana
9th Jan 2009, 21:39
Just driven home from my local Royal British Legion... -6.5C and foggy. Not pleasant on the back roads at all.

Storminnorm
9th Jan 2009, 22:10
lexxity, you could buy her another pair for roughing it in. :rolleyes: