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V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 17:53
As a collector of vintage cookbooks, I found a dandy called "The Great British Breakfast."

According to the book, the British have long been known for their substantial breakfasts, originating from the Saxon and mediaeval times when two main meals were eaten; breakfast at about eight or nine in the morning, and the other at around four in the afternoon.

Breakfast was considered the main, masculine meal. "Ladies" would usually defer to lighter fare later, consisting of tea and cakes. The "masculine" breakfast consisted of something like kedgeree of cod, devilled pheasant, mutton chops, omelettes, sausages and potatoes, and an assortment of cheeses and cold meats.

I have met a few Brits in "real life" and on the net, and every one of them enjoyed a good breakfast. One chap even admitted that his idea of a really good time was making whoppee all night, then feasting on scrambled eggs and cold salmon at dawn. I thought that was rather romantic -
sans the cold salmon, though.

So, knowing there is an abundance of those from the UK on Pprune, I was wondering what you would consider to be a "great British breakfast"?

And for those not from the UK, what makes a breakfast "great," or do you even have breakfast?

brickhistory
29th Dec 2008, 17:57
Eggs, potatos/onions, biscuits and gravy, thick bacon, coffee, juice.


Followed by a long nap...










What is this "beans on toast" fetish I've seen some Brits partake?

isi3000
29th Dec 2008, 18:03
Don't have breakfast :(. Usually no time...

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:05
Eggs, potatos/onions, biscuits and gravy, thick bacon, coffee, juice.

brick, "biscuits and gravy?" You must be from the south.

As to beans on toast, I'm curious too. I vaguely remember cold navy bean sandwiches as something that would be eaten while in -- what else --
the British navy.

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:07
Don't have breakfast http://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/sowee.gif. Usually no time...

I suspect that will be a common answer. What do you eat when you have time though, say on weekends and holidays?

BDiONU
29th Dec 2008, 18:09
I doubt that was a normal breakfast in medieval times. The vast majority of UK citizens rarely had the wherewithal to eat meat regularly. Plus there was a church prohibition on eating meat during certain fasting days.
The majority of the populace ate bread and vegetables. It was a great thing to join the British Navy where you could eat meat 3 or 4 times a week. The term a 'square meal' came from the Navy where sailors were served food on a square 'plate'.

Anyhoo onto what makes a British Breakfast (also known as full English, full Scots, full Welsh etc. dependant on your location) would be:
Bacon
Sausage
Eggs (fried or scrambled)
fried bread (not waffles or hash browns)
baked beans
mushrooms
Black pudding
Tomatoes (real not plum)

Toast
Tea/coffee

or
Loch Fyne kippers :-)

BD

Gonzo
29th Dec 2008, 18:11
Thick cut smoked bacon, pork sausages, baked beans, grilled tomatoes, saute potatoes (ideally refried left over roast potatoes from yesterday's dinner), fried bread, nice cup of tea and orange juice.

That to me is the Full English. However, usually I just have some toasted homemade bread, juice and tea.

I am also partial to US-style waffles/pancakes with maple suyrup and bacon.

BDiONU
29th Dec 2008, 18:12
As to beans on toast, I'm curious too.
Hot Heinz Baked Beans on toasted white bread which has been buttered. A lovely snack redolent of childhood :-)

BD

merlinxx
29th Dec 2008, 18:16
Ask all the regional folks:.................

Me tis 2/3 eggs (runny yokes), 2/5 bacon. 2/3 sausages, loads of bubble (for the yank Cousins tis like home fries with greens in it), mushrooms (big flat caps), black (or white/black pudding), tomatoes, fried bread ---------------------

Oh bollocks just ask Admeral Drapes, he'll give the definitive:ok:

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 18:17
OK, OK. Lets get this clear. V2 was asking a question about British breakfasts. In GB PLC, biscuits come in packets (ideally with chocolate on them) and are a snack item. Gravy (trust me, we're right on this) is a sauce made from the juices of roasted meat thickened with a roux. Grits are something we de-ice roads with (granted that's probably the best use for the American vomit inspired brekky fare).

A true British breakfast is a combination of the following:

Eggs (just fried or scrambled, OK?)
Bacon (still flexible and not burnt to a crisp)
Sausages (available in vast and interesting varieties this side of the pond)
Tomatoes (You do know how to pronounce that, don't you?)
Potatoes (see above)
Black Pudding
Fried Bread (toast is for whimps)
Mushrooms (MUST be fried in butter

A nice hot cup of strong PG Tips tea - none of that 'half caff skinny latte' crap. If you want coffee here it comes in two varieties - black or white (add sugar to taste)

In the days of the Raj, Kedgeree was an option but hey, every culture has a dark side in it's hidden past.:ok:

Parapunter
29th Dec 2008, 18:18
Toast & Marmite every morning with a coffee that dissolves the spoon. The full fry a coupla times a year. Tis the times we live in:(

Haricots au sauce tomate is also a personal favourite.

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:18
I doubt that was a normal breakfast in medieval times. The vast majority of UK citizens rarely had the wherewithal to eat meat regularly. Plus there was a church prohibition on eating meat during certain fasting days.

I thought about that too - went back to the book. Apparently, that was eaten by the upper classes. The working class or working-class poor would usually have porridge or 'gruel.'

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:21
Thick cut smoked bacon, pork sausages, baked beans, grilled tomatoes, saute potatoes (ideally refried left over roast potatoes from yesterday's dinner), fried bread, nice cup of tea and orange juice.

When I visited Australia, their breakfast menus were similar - especially the grilled tomato with the eggs instead of catsup or "tomato sauce" as they call it.

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 18:21
Damn! Baked beans - forgot about those - absolutely essential.

Also all of the above must be liberally smothered in your choice of either Heinz Tomato ketchup (American, I do believe) or preferably HP Sauce (quintissentialy British)

Parapunter
29th Dec 2008, 18:24
A discussion on breakfasts around the world is nothing less than proof positive that travel not only fails to broaden the mind but also that Ockers & Murcans are barely housetrained savages- Gravy on biscuits. Animals!:p


McDoo - next time you're slathering on thr HP, take a look at the bottle & think on - not as quintessentially British as you might believe.:eek:

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:24
OK, OK. Lets get this clear. V2 was asking a question about British breakfasts.

McDoo, the British cookbook inspired the topic, but Pprune is an international forum, so all are free to respond. I am curious about breakfast in all parts of the world.

Thank-you for your extensive list of what constitutes a genuine British breakfast. This is most interesting!

BTW, what is black pudding?????

Oh, (singing) ".....you say toe-matoe, I say toe-may-toe...let's call the whole thing off." lol!

Parapunter
29th Dec 2008, 18:26
BTW, what is black pudding?????


Frickin lovely. That's what it is.

CUNIM
29th Dec 2008, 18:26
Also add to the lists above slices of fried Bramley apple which gives a nice sharp taste to all the grease:ok: Fried tomatoes are better for you than raw ones and for me offset the fried bread health hazard - well I believe it!!

flower
29th Dec 2008, 18:27
Only time I have a full British is when staying in hotels then provided there are NO baked beans ( vile stuff) or black pudding it truly sets you up for the day.

Mostly It's either cereal or toast with fruit juice on regular days.

BDiONU
29th Dec 2008, 18:28
BTW, what is black pudding?????
Black pudding, as made in the UK, is a blend of onions, pork fat, oatmeal, flavourings - and blood (usually from a pig). As long as animals have been slaughtered to provide food, blood sausages like black pudding have been in existence. Sources indicate that the corpulent sausage had its origins in ancient Greece, and Homer's Odyssey makes poetic reference to the roasting of a stomach stuffed with blood and fat.

BD

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 18:29
Gravy on biscuits.

So you have never had proper biscuits and gravy then? :p

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 18:29
Which reminds me. Brickhistory - the British beans on toast fetish is a quality high fibre dietry requirement. The beans are made by Heinz which, I reiterate, is an American company...How come you guys are still starting the day with Canadian fare? (waffles, maple syrup etc..)

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:29
We Canadians would never say "black pudding."

It would be considered politically incorrect! :p

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 18:37
(waffles, maple syrup etc..)

You left out pancakes (called griddle cakes in some parts of the country). I have my waffles and/or pancakes with peanut butter and maple syrup. Excellent. ;)

I make waffles and pancakes from scratch, including whipping the egg white and folding them into the batter. For my wife I will fry bacon until just crisp and lay a few strips on top of the uncooked side of the pancake batter just before I flip them over to finish cooking them, she does not use peanut butter on her pancakes.

I also add ground cinnamon and fresh grated nutmeg to the basic batter.

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 18:39
V2 -please accept my humble apologies- I didn't realise that you were a Canuck. Waffles and maple syrup are are favourite of mine when I'm in your neck of the woods - I too have a great interest in foods of the world and was merely defending the Great British Breakfast.

So come on y'all which country in IYHO does the best breakfast? Sorry, but nobody's allowed to suggest Germany....:yuk:

Gypsy_Air
29th Dec 2008, 18:41
A breakfast related question: In Scotland, it's common to put salt in porridge, but to me it has always been a sweet dish.
In your opinion, which is better; salt or sweet porridge, and which is more "correct"?

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:42
BTW....a typical Canadian breakfast would be a double-double (coffee with double the cream and sugar) at a Tim Hortons franchise, a long john donut (or honey crueller if you're French/Canadian) and a stale box of Timbits (donut holes) to go.

The stale Timbits come in handy in case your car gets stuck in the snow in the parking lot. When thrown under the wheels, they are a useful facsimilie for gravel.

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:46
V2 -please accept my humble apologies- I didn't realise that you were a Canuck. Waffles and maple syrup are are favourite of mine when I'm in your neck of the woods - I too have a great interest in foods of the world and was merely defending the Great British Breakfast.

No problem, luv. All Brits and Aussies think I'm American. It's part of the Canadian identity.:8

corsair
29th Dec 2008, 18:49
I think the best selection of breakfasts. I ever saw was in the Metropole hotel in Hanoi. It seemed to cover the world. British, European, American, Japanese, Chinese and few others I didn't recognise.

I played safe though.

The 'full Irish' is pretty much the same as the English version with the addition of white pudding which I suppose is the same as black pudding without the blood. I always think it's funny how we in this part of the world are often squeamish about the stuff them funny continentals like to eat. Yet we happily wolf down a black pudding (blood sausage) and a white sausage containing all kinds of unmentionables with relish.

The Ulster fry is a variation on the same but isn't reserved just for breakfast.

It's pretty much the same throughout the British isles.

Hotels usually let you pick and choose what you want, so you won't be confronted by anything you don't really want. I like white pudding but doubtful about black pudding, call me racist if you like. But it's the blood thing:oh:

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 18:50
I think the best selection of breakfasts. I ever saw was in the Metropole hotel in Hanoi. It seemed to cover the world. British, European, American, Japanese, Chinese and few others I didn't recognise.

Thanks forthe tip. I am going on assignment next year to Vietnam.

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 18:54
So come on y'all which country in IYHO does the best breakfast?

Well for variety it would have to be the US, as one can get a traditional breakfast from any country here, even German. :p

On a serious note; in the US what is considered a normal brealfast varies widely from region to region. For just one example, just try and find biscuits and gravy in Califorina up to Washington State or anywhere in the Northeast.

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 19:00
I'm warming to the Russian breakfast concept - but do I really have to have the cornflakes with my vodka?:E

BDiONU
29th Dec 2008, 19:06
Well for variety it would have to be the US, as one can get a traditional breakfast from any country here,
But not a british one, IMHO and experience American sausages are tiny little hard things and the bacon is cooked to a crisp and inedible.

BD

Wingswinger
29th Dec 2008, 19:14
The "Highlander"

To start:

Porage made with jumbo organic oats, not your girly Quaker, Scott's or Reddybrek stuff, and made with full cream milk, not water. A large measure of single highland malt whiskey added at the simmering stage. Glenmorangie 10-year-old will do. Salted to taste and sweetened with heather honey.

followed by:

A pair of Arbroath Smokies and poached eggs.

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 19:16
According to an ex girlfriend, American sausages are actually tiny little soft things ;)

V2 if you're off to Vietnam beware of breakfast or indeed any other meal. Check out their latest best selling celebrity cook book...

'Hung Lo's 100 ways to Wok your dog':E

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 19:19
But not a British one

Oh yes you can, trust me. I can take you to a restaurant here, even in little ole Oklahoma City, where you can have full British breakfast including imported English style bacon cooked the way you Brits like it.

I guess a true American breakfast would be corn cakes fried over an open fire with dried/smoked Buffalo (Bison.) jerky. As that was what American Indians had for breakfast before you pesky Europeans showed up. :p

Loose rivets
29th Dec 2008, 19:39
con, don't you know the difference between a Buffalo and a Bison:confused:

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 19:43
LR It's a Brummie joke - Yow carn wash your hands in a Buffalo...

(I can do the 'Kipper Tie' one if you loik too):E

lexxity
29th Dec 2008, 19:51
just try and find biscuits and gravy in Califorina up to Washington State

You can find them in Colorado and Nevada. That is not gravy though, it looks like vomit.

A bacon and fried egg buttie is just the job for breakfast a couple of times a year. :ok:

Normally it's crumpets of a morning here.

CUNIM
29th Dec 2008, 19:54
Well if you want a proper breakfast, the Aussies have you beat with a steak with a fried egg or two on top plus various other bits according to taste plus our staple diet - BEETROOT:ok::ok::ok::ok::ok::ok: Plus tea boiled over a fire. Grouse tucker.

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 19:56
Crumpet in the morning?

Lexy you're spot on - who needs breakfast until lunchtime:ok:

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 20:10
I know what "crumpet" is. hehehe

The whoopie-scrambled egg-cold salmon guy filled me in on that.

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 20:15
Well if you want a proper breakfast, the Aussies have you beat with a steak with a fried egg or two on top plus various other bits according to taste plus our staple diet - BEETROOThttp://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/thumbs.gifhttp://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/thumbs.gifhttp://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/thumbs.gifhttp://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/thumbs.gifhttp://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/thumbs.gifhttp://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/thumbs.gif Plus tea boiled over a fire. Grouse tucker.

Cunim, ahhh, the memories. Beetroot on everything - even the burgers at McOz. My Aussie friends liked my "pigs in blanket," which is a pancake wrapped around a sausage.

I'm not much of a brekkie person. Typical breakfast in Oz was a lammington. And please hold that solidified petroleum product a.k.a. "Vegemite."

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 20:20
V2 if you're off to Vietnam beware of breakfast or indeed any other meal. Check out their latest best selling celebrity cook book...

'Hung Lo's 100 ways to Wok your dog'http://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/evil.gif

Well, doggone it, McDoo, you sure know how kill the appetite.
Perhaps I'll stick to buying a loaf of French bread and some cheese from the Montagnards....or maybe I'll find some left-over C-rations, courtesy of the U.S. Army.

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 20:23
Strewth maties - ya can't knock Vegemite - er, well actually it's a crock compared to Marmite (the Real Thing) Good for breakfast, lunch, tea and dinner IMHO:ok:

corsair
29th Dec 2008, 20:32
Don't mind him V2, the food is great in Vietnam. They do great French bread too, rare enough in Asia. If I could wangle a job there. I would go.:ok:

Foss
29th Dec 2008, 20:33
Easy, an Ulster fry, with one of the highest rates if not the highest rate of heart disease in the world we have this beat. (or not beating, depending on paramedics)

This is best done using lard. If you put a piece of cooked food on a piece of newspaper and it doesn't go translucent, you're skimping on the lard.

Potato bread, fried.
Soda bread, fried.
Large pork sausages, fried.
Large rashers of backbacon, fried.
Mushrooms, fried. (optional)
Ordinary white bread, fried.
Hash browns are making an appearance, fried.
Tomato, fried. (optional)
White or black pudding, fried. (optional)
HP Sauce, Daddy's Sauce or red sauce depending on class.
Large cup of very strong tea. Then another.
AND ABSOLUTELY NO BAKED BEANS - NO.

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 20:40
Don't mind him V2, the food is great in Vietnam. They do great French bread too, rare enough in Asia. If I could wangle a job there. I would go.

corsair, Yes, Vietnam is certainly an emerging economy and very tourist friendly. I am so looking forward to it.

BTW, I once knew a U.S.M.C. pilot who flew in 'nam during the war, and he also flew the corsair (later). What a magnificent plane. Sends goosepimples down my spine when he told me as soon as he started up the engine, "That baby wanted to fly."

McDoo
29th Dec 2008, 20:45
Foss, how's about yer fried the beans too? Would that make 'em more palatable?:ok:

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 20:46
You left out pancakes (called griddle cakes in some parts of the country). I have my waffles and/or pancakes with peanut butter and maple syrup. Excellent. http://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/wink2.gif

I make waffles and pancakes from scratch, including whipping the egg white and folding them into the batter. For my wife I will fry bacon until just crisp and lay a few strips on top of the uncooked side of the pancake batter just before I flip them over to finish cooking them, she does not use peanut butter on her pancakes.

I also add ground cinnamon and fresh grated nutmeg to the basic batter.

con-pilot, you are a master pancake maker. I usually just buy the Aunt Jemima mix. Griddle temp. is the key - or so I'm told. Do you spit on it like the cowboys do - and when the spit jumps it's the right temp?

Fresh grated nutmeg is oh, so good! It's good for the sex life too - or so I'm told. hehehe

I love banana-walnut pancakes.

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 20:50
Foss, geeze......that fry-up is Code 3!

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 21:06
Do you spit on it like the cowboys do

Naw, I just wait until the the little red light goes out on the electric griddle. ;)

con, don't you know the difference between a Buffalo and a Bison

When I was a little tyke growing up in New Mexico and Texas I was told that they were Buffaloes, then I found out that in actuality they are really Bison.


(I blame John Wayne. :p)

G-CPTN
29th Dec 2008, 21:14
don't you know the difference between a Buffalo and a Bison You can't wash your hands in a Buffalo . . .

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 21:19
This here what be a Bison.

http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c246/con-pilot/Bull_Bison_in_Mud_Volcano_Area-750p.jpg

Shack37
29th Dec 2008, 21:25
Potato bread, fried.
Soda bread, fried.



Ahhh, fried soda bread and taty farls, the stuff of dreams.

s37

G-CPTN
29th Dec 2008, 21:27
Had those at our local wildlife park - they had a sign 'These animals are DANGAROOS'
(IIRC)

BlueWolf
29th Dec 2008, 21:29
Sausage, egg, bacon, baked beans, tomatoes, mushrooms, spuds (form optional), toast (vegemite compulsory, anything else optional), tea AND coffee, orange juice.

Seems to be much the same here in Pomgolia as at home, apart from the strange blood sausage thing. Haven't felt the need to sample it as yet. :uhoh:

Back home in less than a week.

Beatriz Fontana
29th Dec 2008, 21:33
Is my dad winding me up? He reckons the best British breakfast by far was the cooked breakfast that British Rail used to serve in the 1960s. Any of the more seasoned contributors here able to back up the claim?

Whirlygig
29th Dec 2008, 21:34
Foss, careful - I might invite myself round for one of your breakfasts!! I thought I was the only one who didn't like baked beans!

Just one tiny little point - you made a typo - it should be "white AND black pudding!, not "or"!

Cheers

Whirls

G-CPTN
29th Dec 2008, 21:35
apart from the strange blood sausage thing. Haven't felt the need to sample it as yet.You should - it's quite sweet . . .

Foss
29th Dec 2008, 21:42
McDoo frying baked beans :yuk: Would that make them refried beans? Dunno, standby for yank corrections. ;)

Whirls Hate them. See if anyone puts them on your plate by accident, it's an emergency shuffle of food on the plate so they don't even touch anything.
Shack I could live on those two. More the tatty bread though.

Rollingthunder
29th Dec 2008, 22:19
When you're talking about breakfast in Vietnam, you're probably talking about one of three things: pho, sticky rice or some sort of French bread.

Pho (pronounced "fuh") is soup with rice or wheat based noodles that's flavored with a meat such as chicken, pork or beef. Fresh ingredients are added to the soup or act as a topping for the soup. These ingredients may include any combination of the following: preserved cabbage, chopped chilies, roasted peanuts, shallots, bean sprouts, cilantro, basil, lime, Vietnamese parsley and garlic. A fish or chile sauce is almost always served with the soup. Pho makes occasional appearances at other meals as a starter course.

In many rural areas, sticky rice or xoi rules the breakfast table. Often the rice is steamed with brown sugar and mung beans. The rice is then wrapped in coconut or bamboo leaves.

In the late 1800's, the French took over every Vietnamese city they could get their wily hands on. The result of decades of French rule - as it applies to breakfast - is the abundance of French-influenced breads that are still widely consumed in Vietnam. French bread is available in most restaurants. It's common in metropolitan areas to see women carrying burlap bags full of baguettes on their heads to sell on the street. It's even easy to find a good crepe in fancier restaurants.

Fruit is often served as or with breakfast. Mango and dragon fruit - a unique regional fruit from the cactus family - are particularly prevalent.

Pho

http://www.foodiechat.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/07/beef%20pho.jpg

Bishopscourt
29th Dec 2008, 22:26
The Ulster Fry is the king of breakfasts. However I would also have a fried pancake and fried wheaten bread.

BombayDuck
29th Dec 2008, 22:29
That's it. Foss, I'm coming to Ireland. I also get to meet the Idiot's servant!

I'm not really sure what an Indian breakfast is* (way too many options) but we made do with toast-and-butter on weekdays and something English on weekends!

Now that I'm here in Blighty and cooking me own food, I get to make my breakfast as English as I want (unless I'm late - then cereal in cold milk it is :(). So I mix and match between scrambled/fried eggs, mushrooms, baked beans, sausages, bacon and of course, toast to go with it.

Happy times!

(*poha? Idli? Dosa? parathas with chhole?! Damned if I know)

V2-OMG!
29th Dec 2008, 22:45
Rollingthunder, you are bang-on about Pho and the Indo-French influence. Many street vendors sell it as a breakfast (or all-day sustenance), and it is delicious.

Vietnamese cuisine is fabulous, and there are many restaurants in my area which were started by the great migration of boat people after the fall of Saigon. I like the beef ball or seafood based Pho best. The broth is so fragrant, and the bean sprouts and fresh lime are a refreshing addition.

The salad rolls are also delicious. (prawns, rice noodle and lettuce wrapped in rice paper) and then dipped into a hot peanut sauce.

Thanks for your great reminder about Pho.

In this context, your handle is interesting. You must be familiar with "Operation Rolling Thunder" which was the bombardment from 1965 - 1969.

brickhistory
29th Dec 2008, 23:04
What is it with beans and you people for breakfast?


Someone earlier referred to grits - I'm afraid I can't help you out with an argument; I can't stand them without a pound of sugar in them.

Regarding American biscuits versus the refined sweet cookie thing of the old country, even there there are heavenly variations - yeast, buttermilk, sourdough, and then the gravy made with the ham/sausage/steak drippings.

Ahhh...


I think I need a smoke now.....

Rollingthunder
29th Dec 2008, 23:05
Yes I am familiar with that sad affair but wasn't there then. Also familiar with Dylan's tour and was there.

Handle taken from a dark and stormy night in the mountains . :)

S'land
29th Dec 2008, 23:18
Beatriz Fontana:
No, your Dad is NOT winding you up. In the "good old days" the food on British Railways was very good. Well, in the actual restaurant cars at least. It was a hangover from the days before nationalisation. when each of the old private railway companies was known for a specific meal. The best breakfast was on the old Great Western Railway and the Western Region of BR continued to serve the GWR breakfast into the early seventies. When I was about seven years old my Father and Uncle took me on a series of trips just to sample the best meals on the different railway regions. I cannot remember them all but the Western Region breakfast is one that I do remember. You sat down in the dining car in London and had just about finished eating when you arrived in Bristol. I think lunch was supposed to be best on the old East Coast route up to Edinburgh, but am not 100% certain.

For a really great "British" breakfast you should see the menu for the one served to the Prince Regent and his retinue at the Angel Inn in Guildford. I cannot remember all of the details, but there were a large number of sheep and chickens consumed.

Parapunter
29th Dec 2008, 23:31
There's a caff round here that does the 'workers breakfast' This is essentially 12 rashers of bacon & a mug of builders.

Jesus wept, you'd have to be obsessed to eat half a piggy of a morning. Mind you, the place is always packed.:confused:

con-pilot
29th Dec 2008, 23:41
Pho alert. (And a bit of thread drift.)

For you folks here that happen to stay near KIAD (Washington DC Dulles Airport) there is an excellent Pho restaurant in the same little shopping strip that the Dulles Marriott Suites is located, very near KIAD. The first exit leaving the airport actually.

PHO 2000

I use to order catering from the restaurant for flights. The owner would come in early before normal opening to prepare the food. Once he came in at 03:00, now that's customer service! The price was very reasonable. The passengers would love it for a change from standard corporate catering.

Let me tell you, there was nothing better than having a lunch of nice hot Pho and fresh spring rolls half way across the Atlantic on our way from Washington DC to London. :ok:

Found a link;

Pho 2000 Vietnamese Restaurant - Herndon, VA 20170 | Metromix Washington D.C. (http://dc.metromix.com/restaurants/asian/pho-2000-vietnamese-restaurant-virginia/457000/content)

Dushan
30th Dec 2008, 00:21
Ordinary white bread, fried.

One found himself stranded at Heathrow, in the late 90's due to a horrendous snow storm and extreme cold (2" and -5c). The airline put one in the hotel and the stay included a buffet breakfast. What looked like French toast, turned out to be fried bread. The most disgusting food one ever tasted. One "ate" it all the way back across the Atlantic during an 8 hour flight. Yack...:}:}:}

Matari
30th Dec 2008, 00:28
I travel a bit, and I'm always asked where I like to eat.

Folks think I'm crazy when I say Aberdeen, Scotland. But I'm serious. Best curry in the world in the evening, washed down by several pints, followed by a hearty Scottish breakfast in the morning. No need -- or room for -- lunch.

pzu
30th Dec 2008, 00:34
V2-OMG! said

We Canadians would never say "black pudding."

It would be considered politically incorrect!

You could always opt for the "bi-lingual" - BOUDIN NOIR

Seriously whilst I am no great Francophile I find that they can do a superb version though as a Yorkshireman I must confess the best 'Black Pudding' is from Bury in L^*"ashire!!!

Eggs prefer mine Scrambled or Poached on Marmite wholemeal toast with the fried bread (white) on the side

Sausages pork with seasoning
Baked Beans (refried)
Potatoes (refried)
Field Mushrooms
Tomatoes (Plum, tinned & yes refried)

and that other great Northern Delicacy - PeasePudding (fried)

Tea - Yorkshire of course and yes Orange juice freshly squeezed

As a starter Weetabix or PawPaw & lime juice, or (& only if my Mum does it) Porridge

PZU - Out of Africa (Retired)

Sultan Ismail
30th Dec 2008, 02:34
Four pages on and no one has mentioned Smoked Haddock, surely the first course of the Great British Breakfast, and Kippers aren't far behind.

In Bali H'ai the standard breakfast is Nasi Lemak which translates directly as Greasy Rice, so you know what you're in for. It's a handful of glutinous rice, with a helping of sambals, anchovies, fried peanuts, slices of cucumber and half a boiled egg, all wrapped in a pandan leaf.

Fried bread was great when one could still get proper fat, the real cholesterol stuff, but now its sunflower oil, palm oil, peanut oil and crankcase oil. Oh, for a good old slice of fried bread, and those kippers of course.

V2-OMG!
30th Dec 2008, 03:03
Yes I am familiar with that sad affair but wasn't there then. Also familiar with Dylan's tour and was there.

Handle taken from a dark and stormy night in the mountains .

Rollingthunder, what exactly do you mean by "Dylan's tour?" I do not mean to be trite, but the first thing that came to mind was Bob Dylan.

I like the rip of thunder on those dark and stormy nights -
but I'm afraid he dog is always shaking and shivering under the bed!

V2-OMG!
30th Dec 2008, 03:08
You could always opt for the "bi-lingual" - BOUDIN NOIR

ha! ha! But the Francophones would probably want to hold a referendum first. Oui or Non??

V2-OMG!
30th Dec 2008, 03:12
Dushan & Sultan, gee, this "fried bread" is obviously a big thing.

It is unheard of in Canada - but the First Nations' people have "bannock" which is fried dough.

Sultan, thanks for mentioning kippers. I have always thought of it as being stereotypically British, and was wondering why no one had mentioned it.

Rollingthunder
30th Dec 2008, 03:45
Rollingthunder, what exactly do you mean by "Dylan's tour?" I do not mean to be trite, but the first thing that came to mind was Bob Dylan.


Yes the Rolling Thunder Revue.

Thank you, I'm here all week.

Krystal n chips
30th Dec 2008, 04:41
The best aspect of the British Breakfast, is that it is completely alien to the "thoughts" of the Health and Food "we know what is best for you !" f£$kwit Police".....which makes it all the more enjoyable !. :ok::E

See below for a picture of food heaven. An excellent piece by Michael Henderson who, as it happens, is also IMHO, one of the better cricket correspondents and always worth reading.

Leave the great British breakfast alone - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/michaelhenderson/3556684/Leave-the-great-British-breakfast-alone.html)

However, there are some issues which have to be addressed...notably the inclusion of black pudding and marmite.....both substances have a more relevant use in life...notably as surfacing material for roads!. Those who are addicted to their consumption are, it's fair to say, invariably close to being sectioned under the Mental Health Act....for fairly obvious reasons. :E

Dushan, awww, bless.....what a sensitive palate and digestive system you must have.....just for you then, a little further insight concerning fried bread to revive the memory..just scroll down to fried bread..enjoy !...:D:E..mind you, if you really want a culinary experience to test your body's immune system, I suggest you visit "Greasy Lil's" truck stop on the A5 in Staffordshire next time you are in the UK....you may wish to bring your lawyer and Doctor as well.....:)

BBC - Food - Recipes - Stress-free full English breakfast (http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/stressfreefullenglis_67721.shtml)

And finally, Aberdeen. Got to be ( unashamed plug here ) the Cafe Royal "all day breafast"...with chips !....that's real chips for the cousins, not the french frie...ahem, desecration variety...;).....and er, yes, one does eat the black pudding in said establishment.....one has to make sacrifices to one's principals at times when confronted with quality. ;):E

Blacksheep
30th Dec 2008, 07:56
We stayed at the "Eagle" in Thornaby, not a particularly grand place but the breakfast was a true English one. A big pot of proper black breakfast tea, with which one could partake of the buffet - a pair of kippers with bread and butter; eggs - fried, poached, boiled or scrambled on toast; sausages; bacon; sliced ham; baked beans; grilled tomatoes; black pudding; devilled kidneys; kedgeree; porrage and for the wimps they even had cereals and orange juice. Now that's what I call Bed & Breakfast! :ok:

They used to do something similar in the old KTM (Keretapi Tanah Melayu or Malay States Railway) Hotel at the Kuala Lumpur railway station, where they even ironed the newspapers so you didn't get inky fingers when reading them. Unfortunately its been modernised now, with the obligatory MacDonalds (:yuk:)

My own preference is for Teh Tarek with Roti Chanai and Kari Ayam or Kari Kambing. ("Pulled" tea with several pieces of grilled, layered (i.e."puffed") bread and some chicken or lamb curry.) Then my food tastes are a bit mixed up - half English and half Asian.

shedhead
30th Dec 2008, 08:56
I suggest you visit "Greasy Lil's" truck stop on the A5 in Staffordshire
Aah Greasy lils! been going there for thirty years, one of the true culinary delights of the area.real food at a decent price, you can feel it clogging the arteries at fifty paces.I would recommend it to every ppruner. you can get directions to it from over fifty miles away such is its fame!

Mac the Knife
30th Dec 2008, 09:27
Venison boerewors - shoot your own bokkie for the best taste

Yum :ok:

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 09:44
Ulster fry cont.
Can't believe I forgot.
Pancakes, fried.
(Warning - they are super absorbent of the lard, but delicious)
Vegetable roll, fried.
Don't be fooled, it's sausage meat in a roll with a few scallions and onions in it, they're the vegetables. It's just slices of a giant sausage to put next to the sausage.

Pho - love that, and make variations for a starter at dinner parties, but I'm not sure about soup for breakfast.

Kippers - tried 'em, hate 'em.

Just for a laugh I stuck Ulster fry into google. :D It's quite popular.
Northern Ireland - Not just famous for counter insurrection warfare but also causing cardio pulmonary heart disease.

Standard Noise
30th Dec 2008, 10:06
What's the difference between the PIRA and an Ulster fry?
The Ulster fry's still killing people.

Mrs Noise won't let me have lard in the house, gotta make do with veg oil.:{ She near took a buckle in her eye when I produced a tub of duck fat for the Christmas roast spuds. Noisy jnr loved it though ha, ha. 2-1 to the boys.

Pork sausages by Cookstown (if available)
Wheaten bread fried (instead of white bread)
White AND black pudding.
'Breakfast slice' fried.
HP sauce (no imposters will be tolerated)
And a pot of Punjana, boiled to beejaysus and strong enough to float the Titanic and the Canberra on at the same time.

Hash browns - in the words of the good Rev Dr 'NEVER! NEVER! NEVER! NEVER!'
To my knowledge, Mc Donalds have yet to patent the Ulster Fry.
And if they even think about it, it's war!!!!

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 11:09
Standard
http://www.augk18.dsl.pipex.com/Smileys/laughing.gif
So it's not an ounce, not an ounce of lard eh. Fat fight, excellent.
Caught a furriner trying to cook tattie bread in extra virgin olive oil once in my house.
She's under the patio now.

As for the hash browns, they are new, but difficult as it may be to embrace, there are more modern, different, ways of frying potatoes.
But fair enough, you wouldn't see them too often on a menu.

Breakfast slice, that's just square vegetable roll.

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd113/Gfwfos/belfastcity.jpg
Amazingly, one of the best heart units in the country, just up the road.

Blacksheep
30th Dec 2008, 13:04
Amazingly, one of the best heart units in the countryHuh! Nothing amazing about it. They just get more practice than anybody else. ;)

Union Jack
30th Dec 2008, 13:30
We Canadians would never say "black pudding."

It would be considered politically incorrect!

Not half as politically incorrect as its Navy nickname!

Jack

PS Enjoyed a lovely Eggs Benedict for breakfast on Boxing Day ....

Richard Taylor
30th Dec 2008, 13:38
Remember being on a week's course in Hessle about 10yrs ago, & being treated each morn to a full English breakfast. Under the shadow of the Humber Bridge:

Bacon
Sausage
Black Pud
Beans
Fried Tomato
Egg
Hash Brown
Tomato Sauce - LOTS of Tomato Sauce

And lots of tea!

Probably taken 5yrs off my life, & today doubtful I would be able to wolf that lot down!

:):bored::\:ooh:= :yuk:

Standard Noise
30th Dec 2008, 14:18
today doubtful that I would be able to wolf that lot down!
You know what they say, practice makes perfect!:D

I remember a story recounted on numerous occasions of when Daddy Noise worked in the 'Yard. He was working on a German bound vessel and some German shipyard workers had come across to familiarise themselves. The Ulster hospitality kicked in and the visiting engineers stayed at family homes rather than in hotels. Come Sunday morning, Mummy Noise starts cooking the fry (six of us, a two pan job). Our German guest nearly bust a lung when he saw smoked bacon rashers being dangled over the pan. In his broken English he asked to have it raw on the side of the plate. Loved the rest of the fry apparently.
It takes all sorts.

Only time I ever had fried potato products was when Daddy Noise remembered to boil some spuds on the Saturday evening then slice and fry them on the Sunday morn.
I had you down as a traditionalist Foss, but maybe times do change (at least elsewhere).
BTW, if you ever stay at the Ballygally Castle, they do a fab fry to soak up the excess Uncle Arthur's on a Sunday morning.:)

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 14:32
Does anyone know if that wonderful dish from the extreme
Northern end of Britain has been mentioned?
I refer, of course, to porridge! Wonderful stuff, and keeps
you so regular as well! ;)

Union Jack
30th Dec 2008, 14:36
V2-OMG

One chap even admitted that his idea of a really good time was making whoppee all night, then feasting on scrambled eggs and cold salmon at dawn. I thought that was rather romantic -
sans the cold salmon, though

It would have made even more sense if he had made it clear that the dish in question was almost certainly scrambled egg with smoked salmon - a surprisingly delicious combination.

Jack

PS Does "making whoppee all night" involve whips or was he just incontinent.....?:)

isi3000
30th Dec 2008, 14:44
which is better; salt or sweet porridge, and which is more "correct"?

Salt in porridge just seems wrong :yuk:. Always sugar although I tend to put in maple syrup instead :E

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 14:51
Oh aye Standard, traditionalist through and through, would only have hash browns once every other blue moon.
Instead of shelling out 10 fortunes for the Ballygally though, the Pit Stop is pretty good.

(For everyone else, the Pit Stop is a large cafe in an industrial estate, not pretty, but packed)

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 14:52
Salt in porridge is the ONLY proper way to eat the stuff.
It is, after all, made from oats. :ok:

brickhistory
30th Dec 2008, 15:04
And you have the nerve to denigrate grits?! :p

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 15:21
Salt in porridge is wrong, but still not as bad as grits Brick.

Standard Noise
30th Dec 2008, 15:22
The Pit Stop!? Is that place still on the go? I remember when it was a burger van at the entrance of the scrapyard. Lovely bacon and egg soda, but not a patch on that place Daddy Noise used to take me to up near the docks, Benny's, if memory serves. They'd wrap yer soda up in plain loaf wrappers fer til take it away (kept the grease in!)
Haute cuisine eat yer heart out, the frys will take care of mine.:}

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 15:22
I deny it totally!!! Never in my total existance have I denegrated
a SINGLE grit!

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 15:24
Aye, the Pit Stop is a big place now, oddly a new van still stands in the carpark if you want to eat a fry standing up in the rain.

brickhistory
30th Dec 2008, 15:27
By the way, fried grits are fantastic!




I see a trend here.....

Standard Noise
30th Dec 2008, 15:30
I remember when I worked for the Donegans, one of our lads would walk into town (relatively speaking, as he only lived about 300 yds from the top of Gray's Hill roundabout) every day to The Penguin for a fry. Must have been a good and big portion, that boy made me look slim.

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 15:32
You started it Brick!
Porridge makes GREAT oat cakes if left in the pan overnight,
then fried up the next day! Delicious! That's why you put
salt in it!

El Grifo
30th Dec 2008, 16:10
Whilst I can in no way claim to have lead a sheltered life, I have to confess, even after watching a thousand Westerns as a kid, I have no friggin idea what "grits" consist of.

Anybody care to enlighten :eek:

La Grifa is back in Scotland for a couple of days, so I am cooking for myself and visiting daughter right now.

We had an excellent Chinese carry out last night and a top notch English Breakfast at the marina this morning. :ok:

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 16:14
NO, Sorry about your lack of experience.
Google it! :ok:

OK then, a type of "porridge" made from corn as opposed to
wheat or barley. That better? (Ooops, forgot OATS.)

Some of the cousins seem to enjoy it.

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 16:21
Bloody hell, The Penguin, that must be gone.

For El Grifo...

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd113/Gfwfos/grits.jpg

Snot.

El Grifo
30th Dec 2008, 16:24
Not wishing to "pish on your chips" as they colourfully proclaim north of the UK divide, but traditional porridge is of course made from oats, not wheat or barley. Is that better :ok:


Having googled "grits" as you suggested, it or they look quite appetising to me.

Then again, I am a well known haggis afficionado :eek:


Cheers Foss, spotted that on the ubiquitous "google"


PS. sharp bit o' editin there normin

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 16:29
Sorry about the mis-info Grif, Finger trouble!
Info amended.

El Grifo
30th Dec 2008, 16:35
Cool, consider yer chips un-pished on ;)


You're a bit busy on the forums (fori) (nahhhh) today stormin.

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 16:38
Can't sleep!

brickhistory
30th Dec 2008, 16:39
Grits are ground up sand, er, hominy, er corn or maize. It was/is a staple of the American South as it was cheap due to the plentiful availability of corn.

Crushed to nearly sub-atomic levels, they are then boiled to death (are we sure this isn't an English food?!), and served as a starch or filler. It was the porridge of its time.

They are most often taken with salt, sugar (although this is frowned upon), or 'red-eye' gravy which is a thin runoff from salt-cured ham.

It's something to avoid and go for the good stuff at a large breakfast.

Now as to all the baked beans at breakfast crowd, that dish is something that is perennially served at cook-outs and equally avoided.

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 16:41
And the yanks try to blame cattle for all the Methane!

The Real Slim Shady
30th Dec 2008, 16:43
Bally's Breakfast buffet.

Every combination you can pile on a plate!

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 17:01
Used to live in a transport cafe. Cyrils Cafe, London Rd, Coventry.
Run by a super lady called Ivy.
The food was absolutely wonderful! Put on about 2 stones!
She sold up to some "developer" in 1968 'ish. £1 000 000.
Last heard of her she was in a mansion in Weymouth.

El Grifo
30th Dec 2008, 17:04
Hey, the eurocentimo has just dropped.

Gofio they call it round them here parts.

We might have even exported it to the US, hell our guys founded San Antonio Texas.

The old folks swear by it, staple diet for hundreds of years.

check it out :-Gofio - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gofio)


El G.

PS.Check out the picture on the top R/H of the wiki page, does that not just make your mouth water :D

Storminnorm
30th Dec 2008, 17:08
There you go Grif, Canarian grits! Wonderful!

merlinxx
30th Dec 2008, 17:17
Bubble & Squeak:ok::ok::ok::ok:

Grits is shite:*:\

V2-OMG!
30th Dec 2008, 17:40
THANKS for all your great replies. This has turned into a great thread....
and it's making me hungry (sans blood sausage). I might even start eating breakfast again!

The cookbook that got this started is bloody hilarious, i.e. the chapter on the " Modern Matrimonial Breakfast."

"The critical period in matrimony is breakfast time. A somnolent, tousle-haired figure in a dressing-gown open to the navel will slump into the nearest chair and wait head in hands for his wife to heat up the coffee, waving aside other nourishment. You will long since have learnt not to say a bright 'goodmorning.' The only response is silence; and the tactful thing to do is to slide across the papers, so that, after due pause, he can study the cricket scores and the television programmes. Any discussion of the day's arrangements must be left for later, since at this point it will simply be met with: 'Christ, what do you expect me to say at this time in the morning?'"

V2-OMG!
30th Dec 2008, 17:54
V2-OMG

"One chap even admitted that his idea of a really good time was making whoppee all night, then feasting on scrambled eggs and cold salmon at dawn. I thought that was rather romantic -
sans the cold salmon, though"

It would have made even more sense if he had made it clear that the dish in question was almost certainly scrambled egg with smoked salmon - a surprisingly delicious combination.

Jack

PS Does "making whoppee all night" involve whips or was he just incontinent.....?http://static.pprune.org/images/smilies/smile.gif

Jack, Ahhh yes, smoked salmon and scrambled eggs - so elegante!

This blog has been very educational too - i.e. those other pre-breakfast "formalities," or what you Brits call "a bit of crumpet."

North Americans are more vulgar. "Making whoppee" is the common colloquialism. If it incorporates incontinence, we call it "Making wet whoppee." If it involves whips, chains, etc. we call it "Making wild whoppee." And if it involves incontinence and whips, chains, etc. it is known as "Making wet 'n wild whoppee."

I still prefer our colloquialisms over the too-cute "bit of crumpet." However, I'd take the latter over something like, "Would you like my blood sausage?" That would just be a bit too "unceremonious."

Matari
30th Dec 2008, 17:54
El Grifo:

We might have even exported it to the US, hell our guys founded San Antonio Texas.

Highly unlikely that the Spaniards exported traditional southern U.S. grits to the U.S. The Spaniards would have, however, encountered a highly developed native American culinary tradition based on corn, with corn masa being the staple starch product.

I was born and raised in South Texas, and grits were as foreign to me as haggis. It wasn't until I ended up in Louisiana did i see my first plate of grits. What a shocker.

TexMex breakfast consists of soft flour tortilla tacos filled with potatos, spicy chorizo, migas (sausage and egg) or refried beans.

Ms. G's Tacos N' More Breakfast Tacos - McAllen Texas Mexican Restaurant (http://www.msgstacosnmore.com/breakfasttacos.html)

Another interesting culinary tradition in South Texas is the tamale, given away by the dozen at local churches on Christmas eve.

Tamale - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamale)

El Grifo
30th Dec 2008, 18:11
Well you know us island people, we always hope for the best :ok:

The San Antonio bit is more solid I am happy to say.

Here is an extract from good ole wiki :-

The Mission San Antonio was moved to its third and final site on Alamo Plaza in 1724 because of hurricane flooding at the previous location.[2]

At eleven o'clock on the morning of March 9, 1731, sixteen families (56 people) from the Canary Islands, often referred to as the "Canary Islanders," arrived at the Presidio of San Antonio de Bexar in the Province of Texas. By royal decree of the King of Spain, they founded La Villa de San Fernando and established the first civil government in Texas.[3] The Marquis of Casafuerte, Viceroy of Spain, (King of Spain) bestowed upon each Canary Island family titles of nobility.[4] Many descendants of these first settlers still reside in San Antonio.[5]

We have a delegation from San Antonio visit our Island periodocally.
They arrive in what they recall being traditional Lanzarteno dress.

A bit like a Canarian turning up in what they think passes for Scottish traditional dress, but hell at least they try :ok:

Foss
30th Dec 2008, 18:25
Matari
My darling beloved ex from South Carolina (the one who fed me grits and laughed) got me into Huevos rancheros for brekkie, holding the refried beans. The other change is that instead of saying 'I'd like some Huevos rancheros for breakfast, want some?' I just say 'Want some Tex Mex?' and the Huevos rancheros part is understood by whoever I'm making them for because you sound a bit of a plank from a spaghetti western saying Huevos rancheros in an Northern Ireland accent. My experience of Huevos rancheros also got me into chilli in a big way so I don't often have takers for my Huevos rancheros.
Or Tex Mex. ;)

S'land
30th Dec 2008, 18:29
A couple of years ago I had an excellent breakfast at the Braeside Café in Mt. Macedon in OZ. Poached eggs, fantastic sausage, mushrooms, tomatoes, hollandaise sauce and a superb chutney. The local agent for the company that I worked for at the time took me there saying that it would be a breakfast to remember. It was.

G-CPTN
30th Dec 2008, 18:35
Rumpy Pumpy . . .

Matari
30th Dec 2008, 18:53
El Grifo:

One interesting historical excursion is the "Mission Trail" tour in San Antonio. It covers four or five 17th century mission churches, culminating in the most famous "San Antonio de Bexar" (Alamo) mission. Canary Islanders are mentioned in many of the documents of the time.

San Antonio Missions National Historical Park (U.S. National Park Service) (http://www.nps.gov/saan/)

To stay on the breakfast theme, if you are ever in these parts make sure you try the pan dulces, the Mexican breakfast pastries.

RicoPanDeDulce.com - View category Pan Dulce Pictures (http://www.ricopandedulce.com/)

Foss:

To avoid sounding too much like a gringo, instead of huevos rancheros just ask for "migas"..mas or menos the same stuff, but with the local name. And hope you are not in closed quarters afterwards ;).

GetTheFlick
31st Dec 2008, 03:20
El Grifo,

If left to amateurs, grits are a disaster. If you ever visit the South, stop in at any Waffle House (preferably in the morning) and try some. I recommend their dish -- "Cheesy Eggs".

2 eggs scrambled with cheese
3 slices of bacon (crispy)
1 serving of grits

Put a serving of butter (actually margarine) in the grits and stir. Break up the bacon over the grits, stir again. Then blend in the eggs (with cheese.) My buddy used to call it "Puppy chow" but trust me -- it's good eatin'.

Now, if you really want to go whole hog -- stop in a Cracker Barrel and order....

"The Cracker Barrel’s Country Boy Breakfast ®

Just loosen your belt and enjoy your choice of Country Ham, Pork Chops, Sirloin Steak, Tenderloin Steak, Country Fried Steak or Chicken Fried Chicken, Three Eggs* cooked to order, Fried Apples, Hashbrown Casserole, Grits, Sawmill Gravy,Homemade Buttermilk Biscuits, real Butter and the best Preserves, Jam n’ Apple Butter (on request) we could find. "

You'd best be hungry if you hope to stand a chance with that one. And unless you plan on working in the fields everyday, you can't eat like that often without weighing 300 lbs. and picking up a nickname like "Tiny". :ok:

Don Brown

kangaroota
31st Dec 2008, 03:51
I like to start the day with a whisker biscuit. Then I'll get out of bed and cook something.;)

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Dec 2008, 11:34
Grits = maize porridge = pap = ugali. Pretty much a staple in Southern Africa. Most of us grew up on the stuff.

As a breakfast dish, generally eaten with milk and sugar on winter mornings. Some folks put Marmite in it rather than milk and sugar.

Wingswinger has the right idea re oats. Make them with full cream milk rather than water. Fry a sliced apple and a handful of raisins in butter with a bit of cinnamon and a big spoon of brown sugar. Pour this over the bowl of oats porridge, a dash of whisky and slather in cream. Nothing better on a cold morning.

The Pomgolians would call a Saffer Sunday morning breakfast a mixed grill. Eggs, bacon, steak, lamb chops, pork chops, devilled kidneys, liver, sausages, kippers, fried mushrooms, fried bananas, fried tomatoes, toast and tea. One is absolutely useless until 4pm after one of those.

Foss
31st Dec 2008, 11:46
Solid yours is just the other extreme.
The Ulster fry is bread, with bread and side order of bread and usual extras. Yours is meat, another kind of meat and an extra helping of meat, with extras.

Parapunter
31st Dec 2008, 12:10
Make them with full cream milk rather than water. Fry a sliced apple and a handful of raisins in butter with a bit of cinnamon and a big spoon of brown sugar. Pour this over the bowl of oats porridge, a dash of whisky and slather in cream. Nothing better on a cold morning.

By the time you've ponced about with that, it'llbe just the thing for a cold lunchtime.:p

Solid Rust Twotter
31st Dec 2008, 12:32
Nah, takes about ten minutes to fry up, Mr Punter.

Mr Foss, nothing wrong with lots of meat. One has been reliably informed it builds good strong armour plated arteries. Can't complain about that.....:ok:

G-CPTN
31st Dec 2008, 13:27
Heterocyclic Amines in Cooked Meats - National Cancer Institute (http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Risk/heterocyclic-amines)
Barbecue Meat Chemicals:Grilling and Cancer - WorldHealth.net (http://www.worldhealth.net/news/barbecue_meat_chemicalsgrilling_and_canc)
Grilled chicken from seven national restaurant chains contains a dangerous carcinogen called PhIP, prompting the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine (PCRM) to file a lawsuit against the restaurants
Grilled chicken contains cancer-causing agent (http://www.foodconsumer.org/777/8/Grilled_chicken_contains_cancer-causing_agent.shtml)
However:- Marinating a steak in red wine or beer can cut down the number of cancer-causing agents produced when it is fried or grilled, research suggests.
Meat cooked in this way contains relatively high levels of cancer-causing compounds called heterocyclic amines (HAs).
BBC NEWS | Health | Marinating 'may cut cancer risk' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7804571.stm)

Foss
31st Dec 2008, 13:44
Flip sake G-CPTN that's good news. ;)

Don't eat it'll kill ya.
Don't fry it, it'll kill ya, don't grill it, it'll kill ya. Don't eat too much, it'll kill ya.
Marinading in red wine helps, but more than one glass of red wine a day...
...it'll kill ya.

I'm just going to lie down in the sun and see if I can photosynthesize. But then what happens if you lie in the sun too much? It'll kill ya.


Solid
Pork chops for breakfast just seem odd I have to say.

GroundedSLF
31st Dec 2008, 14:10
Its got to be the following:
Eggs (fried or scrambled)
Bacon (smoked or unsmoked) but NOT burnt to a crisp!
Sausage (proper - not those casino chip things from the USA)
Tomato - fresh - not tinned, either grilled or fried
Fried bread (preferably with a soft fried egg on top)
Mushrooms (fried)
Potato (fried)
Beans (optional)
Black Pudding (if you are north of Watford)

All covered with LOADS of worcestershire sauce (http://uk.wrs.yahoo.com/_ylt=A1f4cfrjiltJ8NAAVQpLBQx./SIG=13i38f7vv/EXP=1230822499/**http%3a//uk.search.yahoo.com/search%3fei=UTF-8%26rd=r2%26fr=yfp-t-501%26p=worcestershire%2bsauce)

`nuff said!

:D

radeng
31st Dec 2008, 14:35
Foss,

>Pork chops for breakfast just seem odd I have to say.<

Not uncommon in the 19th century. Try looking in Jerome K. Herome's 'Three Men in a Boat' for an example.

Ma'am
31st Dec 2008, 16:13
Best breakfast is soft boiled egg and soldiers - fab!

Track Coastal
31st Dec 2008, 16:52
Eggs Benedict...in Port Douglas on a Sunday morning (market day). I fish she peruses.

Foss
31st Dec 2008, 16:54
Aye Radeng, I read about it before, just out of fashion I suppose.

goudie
31st Dec 2008, 17:14
I onced ordered a 'full English breakfast' in a Dublin hotel. ''You'll have a full Irish one and like it'' said the waitress. Like it? I loved every morsel.

V2-OMG!
11th May 2010, 18:15
Resurrected....I have a question.

Yesterday I was at Safeway, one of N. America's major grocery chains, and noticed English "bangers" in the sausage section. Now, I've seen Italian sausage, honey-beer sausage, honey-garlic sausage, pork and beef sausage...but this is the first time I've seen English bangers.

I was tempted to give 'em a try, but it was the whitish colour that turned me off. Why are they white. Is it just the casing or ???

Secondly, why do the Brits love "bangers" so much? What makes them special? Should I give them a try?

Pending your reply.....

con-pilot
11th May 2010, 18:25
Basically V2, they don't suck. :p

I like to cook mine over a hot gas grill until they are nearly charred on the outside. Yummy, yummy.

Oh, I pre-cook them in a good dark or amber beer. I rough chop some onion and a green bell pepper, place them in a frying pan, add a bottle of dark or amber beer, minus a few sips, bring the beer to a boil, add the sausages and more or less steam them for about ten minutes.

Then off to the grill to finish.

Hum, come to think about it, that is how I cook all large sausages. :ok:

Um... lifting...
11th May 2010, 18:30
Whenever I steam sausages, be they Italian in Peroni, Brats in Brau, Kielbasa in whatever the beer of opportunity is, some of the beer just doesn't quite make it into the heated vessel... strange, that...

Foss, around election time in the U.S. the question is generally: "Red or Blue?". In New Mexico, at whatever time, the question is always: "Red or Green?".

rgbrock1
11th May 2010, 18:34
Those who cook with beer are all going to Lucifer's Place after death.
It is a sacrilege to waste beer as an ingredient in a recipe.

Beer is meant to a. be opened. b. poured correctly into an appropriate glass or stein and c. drank accordingly.

Any other use of beer is a sin. A mortal sin at that. And whomever sins like this can spend the rest of their days repenting all to no avail.

:}:ok::eek::D:=

V2-OMG!
11th May 2010, 18:38
Basically V2, they don't suck. http://images.ibsrv.net/ibsrv/res/src:www.pprune.org/get/images/smilies/tongue.gif

I like to cook mine over a hot gas grill until they are nearly charred on the outside. Yummy, yummy.

Oh, I pre-cook them in a good dark or amber beer. I rough chop some onion and a green bell pepper, place them in a frying pan, add a bottle of dark or amber beer, minus a few sips, bring the beer to a boil, add the sausages and more or less steam them for about ten minutes.

Then off to the grill to finish.

Hum, come to think about it, that is how I cook all large sausages.

gee con, you have convinced me. I like the idea of adding beer and veggies to the pan. I'm going to have a go at those bangers.

BTW, I like the way you cook some of the largest "sausages" on pprune best. hehehe

A man who can cook and fly....what more would any woman want?

p.s. And please take care during this scarey tornado season.

Um... lifting...
11th May 2010, 18:40
Spoken like a paratrooper... but then... paratroopers have been shown to eat pretty nearly anything (C-Rats, K-Rats, MREs, Rat-Rats, Cat Food, building materials, glass, etc...)... as long as they have beer to wash it down with. Or failing beer, whisky, moonshine, drain cleaner, Brasso, or antifreeze.

Taking culinary or drinking advice from a paratrooper is like taking parking advice from a tank driver. Occasionally useful, but only within the narrowest of contexts.

G-CPTN
11th May 2010, 18:41
Some 'English' sausages appear white before cooking.
IMO good ones are brown (even before cooking).

IMO sausages should be fried (or grilled), turning frequently (until 'browned'). I like the outside to be crisp, though this isn't essential.

You can also bake sausages in the oven, either in a dish with a lid or open-topped.

Sausagelinks - How to cook sausages (http://www.sausagelinks.co.uk/recipe_cooking.asp)

rgbrock1
11th May 2010, 18:45
You forgot to add insects to the list of foods airborne daddies like to eat!

Especially these kind:

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/45453000/jpg/_45453281_oman6_spider_466x300.jpg

One can also wash it all down with motor oil. But the sludge in motor oil tends to leave gritty substances between ones teeth. :ok: