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denis555
29th Dec 2008, 09:33
Saying goodnight to the Vicar after midnight mass I wished him a 'Merry Christmas' to which he grabbed my hand and pointedly wished me a 'Happy Christmas!'

On Boxing day my very 'Churchy' neighbours did the same with a very definite 'Happy Christmas'

Has this become a religious divide?

Is 'Merry' too secular? Is it too close to 'Drunk'???

Never noticed this before...:confused:

denis555
29th Dec 2008, 11:37
Since the Dean bought it up at the same time as me noticing the usage, could this be some sort of new directive that is being currently advised by Church authorities? ( Although, as you say the Dean says to use either )

DAL208
29th Dec 2008, 13:33
its 'Merry Christmas' and 'Happy New Year'.

End of. Facto.

Keef
29th Dec 2008, 14:16
Since the Dean bought it up at the same time as me noticing the usage, could this be some sort of new directive that is being currently advised by Church authorities? ( Although, as you say the Dean says to use either )

There's been nothing official that I've heard of.

I tend to say "Merry Christmas" to the happy faces, and "Happy Christmas" to the sad ones.

Oh - and "fancy a whisky?" to the ones with a wicked grin.

G-CPTN
29th Dec 2008, 14:30
its 'Merry Christmas' and 'Happy New Year'.
I agree, though many have a Merry New Year (at least over the few days of the anniversary) . . .

Beatriz Fontana
29th Dec 2008, 18:23
Totally agree. It's Merry Christmas and Happy New Year.

Merry harks back to the mainly Victorian hijacking of the more merry of Pagan rituals for the Christian festival, i.e. feasting and lots of drinking. Some Christians are distancing themselves from the Pagan attributes and settling for the "happy".

If you ask me, it's the start of the slippery slope toward "happy holidays". Stop it now!

Union Jack
29th Dec 2008, 18:47
In Scotland you will often find that it's a case of "Happy Christmas" and a "Good New Year", as in "A Good New Year to one and all and many may you see" **

Jack

PS ** = English translation of Doric version!

22 Degree Halo
29th Dec 2008, 19:09
Herry Christmas, Mappy New Year:}

merlinxx
29th Dec 2008, 19:21
God rest ye Gerry Mental men, and a crappy New Year:ok:


From the Labour Party Central Office:E:mad:em

Miserlou
29th Dec 2008, 20:25
I to was beaten to it but had fully intended starting this very thread.

'Happy' Christmas is a sure sign that the linguistic standard of the country is falling or, perhaps worse, going yankey.

We could ban all religious holidays though.

ExSp33db1rd
29th Dec 2008, 21:14
We could ban all religious holidays though.

But still have the day off, of course !

World's Gone Mad - why can't we LEAVE EVERYTHING ALONE !!! It wasn't broke, so don't fix it.

I'll have a Merry ( next ) Christmas - thank you Vicar.

It's worse than ordering me to have a nice day.

NWSRG
29th Dec 2008, 21:17
Sad and pathetic!

As a non-PC Christian, I'm more than happy with Merry Christmas! The individuals who want to make an issue of the symantecs need to get a life...

Buster Hyman
29th Dec 2008, 21:31
Don't care either way but...when you think of it in the context of what Christmas is all about, then maybe Happy is correct?:confused:

You don't say Merry Birthday do you!

Beatriz Fontana
29th Dec 2008, 22:26
You don't say Merry Birthday do you!

Ah, go on, next birthday, I dare ya! :}

Buster Hyman
29th Dec 2008, 22:46
No, not now...it's the principle of the matter!!!

Miserlou
29th Dec 2008, 23:22
By cancelling the 'religious' part of the celebration I mean to reflect my sympathy with the Prince Regent in Blackadder's Christmas Carol. He didn't want to hear the "terribly depressing story about the chap who gets born on Christmas day, shoots his mouth off about everything under the sun and then comes a cropper with a couple of rum coves on top of a hill in jolly arab-land."
"You mean Jesus", says Blackadder.
"Yes that's the fellow. Keep him out of it. Always spoils the Xmas atmos!"

Paradise Lost
29th Dec 2008, 23:33
No need to get too stressed boys and girls.....christmas will soon be deleted lest it may offend other religious groups and New Year will take place in February in harmony with the chinese calendar.
Seasons greetings...........:confused:

Beatriz Fontana
29th Dec 2008, 23:36
It's not Happy Christmas. Not according to Slade, Shakin' Stevens or Nat King Cole. Or the song that starts "We wish you a merry Christmas".

End of.

Unless one of our North American breatheren can enlighten us with a "Happy Christmas" song... And happy holidays doesn't count. :}

fireflybob
30th Dec 2008, 01:05
The main Christian celebration is, of course, Easter and not Christmas.

So Happy Easter!

Happy Christmas too! (http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=eZL5-qiWNeA)

AA SLF
30th Dec 2008, 04:05
In this part of North America it has ALWAYS been MERRY CHRISTMAS and
HAPPY NEW YEAR. End Of!!!


Reading around the Internet during this "Festive Period", the ONLY PLACE I have seen "happy christmas" used has been on UK sites. So there - tis NOT a yank thing at all, tis merely another of those huggy-fluffists actions from the tree huggers in the UK . . . :rolleyes: :)

Hobo
30th Dec 2008, 05:42
I thought it was "Abi Titmuss and a prosperous New year"

Welcome to the Official Site of Abi Titmuss (http://www.abititmuss.co.uk/)

Blacksheep
30th Dec 2008, 08:27
I always understood "Happy" as being the state of pleasure that results from being pleased with something nice and "Merry" to mean joyous and cheerful - and thus a particular kind of happy.

Happiness is a sustained state that can last right through a year, whereas being merry is more intense and lasts for a limited time.

Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year...

...and may God rest ye merry, gentlemen. :ok:

Impress to inflate
30th Dec 2008, 10:33
Bahh Mumbug !!

Blacksheep
30th Dec 2008, 14:13
Mumbug? That sounds like a good name for the opposite of Man Flu. :ok:

Rwy in Sight
30th Dec 2008, 18:02
Happy merry or whatever. Even under good conditions (healthy in family etc) the end of year holiday's season sucks large time. So I see no difference to the wording.

Rwy in Sight