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x213a
23rd Dec 2008, 07:43
We have just moved house from a basement flat that suffered from damp. The landlady (who herself has issues with the agency) has claimed a set of curtains are not the original and it needs to be repainted etc. The landlady is pretty ok, when we first moved in we reported the damp problem to the agency but they did nothing. We resorted to dealing with the landlady directly. She supplied us with a few tins of paint to cover the bad patches.

Yesterday, the landlady went to check the meter readings and phoned us to comment on the different curtains and the fact it really needs a whole repaint. Also, the landlady commented on the oven not being clean enough as it was brand new when we moved in 18 months ago. It is very clean save for a few browned patches on the grill racks/shelves which will not scrub back to chrome.
Our deposit is £750 that we are due back and I have a feeling that the letting agency (which is a national one N****w**d) is going to try and withold some of our deposit.
We decided to move as the flat was advertised as for proffessionals but, due to the local uni expanding the grants have been upped to allow more student accomodation. We ended up with 24hr party people above us (wooden flooring also).
Where exactly do I stand if they try to withold some of our deposit? Does anyone here have experience of this? Is it feasable or cost effective to threaten or carry out legal action if they do? Where do I start?
This letting agency has a reputation for witholding deposits or parts of, apparently.

Cheers.

Alloa Akbar
23rd Dec 2008, 08:02
Whilst I am sure that some on here will offer advice as to the legalities of your predicament, I was in an identical situation a few years ago with a house i rented. In the two years we lived there, a few scuffs appeared on the wall on the stairs, so I bought paint of a very similar colour and repainted the whole lot..

when I moved out I lost part of my deposit as the landlady did not like the new colour. I also had deductions for cleaning the wheely bin (It was clean anyway!!) and scrubbing the drive. wtf??

Landlords will always try and use your deposit for repairs that they ought to be liable for, either that or penalise you for fair wear and tear.

Not much use, I know, but at least you know you aren't the only poor sod being ripped off.:rolleyes:

x213a
23rd Dec 2008, 08:10
Is it feasable to even try and oppose/ take legal action if they do withold? Its not the money-its the principle. Since we submitted thy notice we noticed a definite shift from being a 'customer' to an admin case in their attitude towards us.

spittingimage
23rd Dec 2008, 08:15
You have my sympathy on this one but I fear you are on a loser. Others may have a different perspective - and a remedy. I do hope so.

We lost all our deposit on a flat when first married, by the landlord demanding that the flat be repainted white. We had never even bought a pot of paint ! There were sundry other ridiculous demands, not one of which was down to us.

Clearly they knew they had us over a barrel because the flat was not in the UK and we got these demands on return to Blighty.

If I found myself in a similar situation again, I would assume that I could kiss the deposit goodbye and I would cease rental payments a month or two before the lease was up.

Fitter2
23rd Dec 2008, 08:23
How long ago did you move in, and last renew the lease?

There is now a legal requirement for deposits for private lets to be held by an independant body, and an appropriate appeal procedure in case of disputes.

The Tenancy Deposit Scheme came into force on the 6th April 2007. If you are not protecting a tenant’s deposit you will be ordered to repay three times the amount to the tenant so find out how you can protect deposits and resolve disputes.

See Landlords and letting agents: Tenancy deposit scheme : Directgov - Tenancy Deposit (http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/TenancyDeposit/DG_066380)

Parapunter
23rd Dec 2008, 08:24
I did that once, the landlord was not amused. We'd realised what we were dealing with when the boiler broke down & the landlord sent round what can only be described as a man at deaths door with a carrier bag of tools.

It was quit while you're not that far behind time. The joys of rented accomodation in this country.

No Irish, no dogs, no blacks. No change it seems.

gingernut
23rd Dec 2008, 08:25
It's a big scam,and the letting agencies won't give a hoot. They do have some sort of "trade body," but they'll be more interested in representing the agency, rather than helping you.

SHELTER may offer practical advice.

Whilst,

If I found myself in a similar situation again, I would assume that I could kiss the deposit goodbye and I would cease rental payments a month or two before the lease was up.

probably won't be advocated by a lawyer, it's probably your only realistic redress.

Remember also, the only person who can actually force you to leave your home is a judge.

I'm guessing these actions may affect your credit rating though? (Sorry not a lawyer, just dealt with these people.)

====================================

Just re-read your post, see you've already left. Try SHELTER.

x213a
23rd Dec 2008, 08:29
We are in the new house now, moved last week although our lease does not expire until tomorrow on the old place. We moved there 18 months ago, before the new deposit rules I think. Do I have any legal standing or do I just have to take it as one of life's hard lessons and one of the perks of letting?

Octopussy2
23rd Dec 2008, 09:09
If they withhold all or some of the money (I have had experience of this too, in the past - as others have said, it seems to be standard practice by these people) and you feel it's unjustified, you could bring a claim in the local small claims court.

One thing that would help though is evidence of the condition of the place - you say the lease expires tomorow - do you still have keys? If you do, get round there and take some photos of anything you think might be helpful to your claim (eg. to show that the place was left clean etc).

Then, if the agency does withhold some of the deposit, go down to your local court and pick up the forms that tell you how to make a claim in the small claims court (the Citizen's Advice Bureau or your library may have some information too) - you don't need a lawyer and it's pretty straightforward. The first step is to write a "letter before action", asking for your money back and setting a deadline for repayment, failing which you will commence proceedings. That may provoke a response - if it doesn't, you can decide at that stage whether you want to take the matter further.

Remember, the landlady/agency have to make an allowance for "fair wear and tear" on the property, you're not obliged to hand it back in exactly the same condition (though it should of course be as clean as possible etc)

Good luck!

parabellum
23rd Dec 2008, 09:23
There was once a rule that a landlord/lady had to repaint the place every seven years so, if paintwork comes into any dispute, it would be worth finding out when the place was last painted. Citizens Advice may be able to update you on a landlord/lady's responsibilites towards a tenant.

Beatriz Fontana
23rd Dec 2008, 09:25
x213a,

I had problems with a place I had earlier this year - great agency but a landlord that didn't want to know. There were a number of structural issues beginning to occur that, because the landlord was wanting to sell, it seemed that he gave up.

Every contract has a general wear and tear clause contained within, so the odd stain on the oven shelf really shouldn't matter a jot. Your landlady will have to prove that the curtains were not the originals, but the fact that curtains are there and that curtains were on the original inventory shouldn't matter (unless the inventory states "pink flowery curtains in lounge", in which case you'd need to switch back from the sober striped ones upon leaving :})

In the end I moved out, but before then, it was a lot of re-reading of the small print of the contract, numerous trips to citizen's advice to decipher said small print, visits to the local council, a very good solicitor and a letter to my MP (I'm a direct action type of gal).

It's a complete minefield, all I can suggest is really scrutinise the small print and never sit on a problem. And if that fails, I'm sure ppruners could find a friendly journalist who would be very interested in your letting agents!! :ok:

Alloa Akbar
23rd Dec 2008, 09:39
Thats a good point Bea... Your MP, i have used mine twice, and damn good he was too.. that said my local MP was a liberal, and took great delight in stirring up a hornets nest..:ok:

12Watt Tim
23rd Dec 2008, 12:24
Demand copies of receipts for all work done for which the deposit has been withheld. This might work if she is just chancing it to pocket the money. In the end, if you can't manage a friendly agreement, threaten her with small-claims court if you think you are in the right. even if you don't think you are likely to win, the small chance of a claim against her (and the subsequent problems with credit ratings) might bring her towards a settlement.

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Dec 2008, 12:46
The problem with this sort of case is that there are always 2 sides to every argument and we have, so far only heard one.

Mrs SFFP and I purchased a second property a couple of years back precisely for the purpose of letting, all part of our retirement plan you know :ok:

A young professional couple moved in who were as nice as pie but treated the place absolutely appallingly. Fortunately for us our letting agent, who is well versed in these matters had the foresight to take lots of pictures of the property prior to it being let and lots of pictures at the end of the letting period which proved conclusively all the points with regards to damage etc that the tenants subsequently disputed. I find it hard to believe that a national company as quoted in the OP does not provide a similar service to protect both tenants and landlords and the end of tenancy agreements, or that in todays digital age landlords and tenants don't do the same themselves :rolleyes:

There is a very clear and precise statement in tenancy agreements along the lines of the tenants needing to hand the property back to the landlords in the condition they originally found it in so that it is fit for immediate letting. Failure to do so means the loss of some/all of the security deposit and rightly so, in our case it took me 4 weeks to get our place back ship shape and bristol fashion which is a months rent lost because a pair of very clarty youngsters were too lazy to clean up after themselves :}

x213a
23rd Dec 2008, 13:20
Inventory was done today. They want £55 for new curtains and a proffesional cleaning of the oven flue. That is small fry money but my bone of contention is that we do not need to officially hand over keys until tomorrow but did it early due to Christmas and their office closing etc etc.
I have spoken directly to the landlady who has explained that the deposit is not actually held by her, or the letting agency but by some new Govt scheme that actually favours tenants. She has also said that if we do dispute it we should put it in writing to Northwoods and she will have the final say, and that such a small amount is not really worth her hassle.
I have decided to just leave it at that and take the hit for £55. At the end of the day the landlady has been great but the letting agents have been a pain in the arse. I dont want to cause any hassle for the landlady.

Cheers for the advice anyway chaps. Had I been stung for hundreds then I would have kicked up a real fuss but £55 is not worth anybody's time I figure.

Alloa Akbar
23rd Dec 2008, 14:01
Smart move fella. Forget it and have a nice Christmas in the new place:ok:

Beatriz Fontana
23rd Dec 2008, 14:12
Good man! £55 is a reasonable night out in these parts and I'm sure you could go without for just the one night and a bit of feeling like you've got away with it! :ok:

Dushan
23rd Dec 2008, 14:40
Living in a place assumes normal wear and tear. A new tenant would always expect a new paint job. Not previous tenant's responsibility. Obviously the place has to be cleaned before a new tenant moves in. Again the old tenant is gone, the landlord has to make the place in a "move in" condition.

The purpose of deposits is to ensure there is no abnormal damage (broken walls, bathroom fixtures, missing appliances). Why not deduct the deposit amount from the last month's rent? That way the landlord has no additional money held, and if he truly believes that you owe him something he would have to prove it in small claims court.

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Dec 2008, 15:02
Dushan,

I suspect you have never been a landlord and have certainly never had the privilege of living in military accommodation, if you had you would know that you are very wrong indeed.

The tenant, in normal circumstances moves into a perfectly habitable abode that is clean, tidy and in good order, maintenance and decoration wise. The tenant willingly, important distinction here I might add, willingly signs a contract that states in legalise that at the end of the tenancy agreement they will hand back the property in the same clean, tidy and acceptable decorative state, excepting what is deemed as fair wear and tear as they originally found it.

Most landlords are very practical and will decorate the property in magnolia or some other neutral colour from top to bottom to enable tenants to easily cover the marks and muck that some folk deem acceptable. A visit to Wickes etc will show that a 20ltr tub of builders emulsion, rollers, brushes etc will cost less than 30 quid and it takes less than a day to flash over the walls to make good, believe me I have done it to a 3 floor/2 bed property with ease :ok:

The tenancy agreement is quite clear, the condition the landlord hands the property over to you on day 1 is the condition the landlord is legally entitled to expect the tenant to hand the property back in, hence the deposit is retained to make good as per the contract..............simple as :ok:

stagger
23rd Dec 2008, 16:22
The tenancy agreement is quite clear, the condition the landlord hands the property over to you on day 1 is the condition the landlord is legally entitled to expect the tenant to hand the property back in...

Aside from "fair" or "reasonable" wear and tear - as you note earlier in your post.

According to the Association of Residential Letting Agents...

Information Sheets | ARLA (http://www.arla.co.uk/infosheets/list.aspx?id=7#)

Fair wear and tear – this means making an allowance for: -

-The original age, quality and condition of any item at commencement of the tenancy
-The average useful lifespan to value ratio (depreciation) of the item -
-The reasonable expected usage of such an item
-The number and type of occupants in the property
-The length of the tenants occupancy

It follows therefore (and is an established legal tenet) that a landlord is not entitled to charge his tenants the full cost for having any part of his property, or any fixture or fitting, ".....put back to the condition it was at the start of the tenancy."

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Dec 2008, 18:07
Stagger,

The classic fair wear and tear verses accidental damage conundrum.

The tenancy agreements that I have entered into so far have stated simply and clearly that the property must be handed back to the landlord in "tenentable condition" and the agreement goes into a whole swathe of specifics to clarify that.

This in the opinion of the letting agent means that walls should be washed or where negligently marked,chipped or damaged they should be repaired and repainted.

Carpets should be properly cleaned, where they are worn through use is OK but where they are simply marked because of carelessness is not OK.

Kitchens and all appliances should be thoroughly cleaned.

Windows should be cleaned inside and out and all woodwork should be cleaned or where negligently marked it should be repainted.

If I let my property to a tenant in a clean, tidy and functional condition then it is not unreasonable of me to expect it to be returned to me in the same condition. The tenancy agreement takes all the supposition out of this by setting down clear and precise guidelines for the tenant, who willings signs on day one that they agree with the terms and conditions.

The problem comes with the tenant who believes that after being in a property for a period of time the accumulated muck and grime is fair wear and tear when it clearly is not.

Lance Murdoch
23rd Dec 2008, 18:13
Was in a similar situation to x213a about a year ago. I had rented a flat on the 7th floor of a block of 12. A few months before I moved out a roof drain developed a leak and the water cascaded down the block into every flat directly beneath including mine, of course. I informed the letting agent in writing with a photo of the damage.

When I move out surprisingly I didnt get my deposit back. After asking the letting agent on the phone why I was told that it was being held pending payment from the building management company paying for said water damage. I wrote a letter asking for my deposit back, no reply. Looked at the Which website and got the forms from the local magistrates court. Sent a standard letter downloaded from the Which website giving a deadline for my deposit to be returned to me. On the very day of the deadline (who'd have thunk it!) I got a very apologetic phone call from the letting agent offering to return my deposit.

In conclusion I would not trust the average letting agent as far as I could kick them. Often they are trying to pull a fast one and they trade on peoples ignorance of the law and lack of confidence in dealing with them.
When moving out of a rented house always take photos of the condition of all rooms and ask them to itemise and send receipts for any deductions from deposits.

General_Kirby
23rd Dec 2008, 19:44
Our former and current lettings agents were a joke. They tried to sting us for loads of things. They are always trying to pull a fast one and I don't trust any of them as far as I can throw them. As has been mentioned you can get 3 times the deposit back from them if they havent protected your deposit with an independant scheme.

eticket
23rd Dec 2008, 20:01
Tenants. I could tell you about feckin tenants.

The latest trick that we have been stiffed with comes after a tenant leaves and is long gone. (In this case to India.)

The tenant, genuinely working in a white collar position for one of the UK's biggest remaining companies, gives notice. The agent goes round, signs off on the property and is assured by various means that the gas/electricity bills etc. are all paid up. The Tenant gets their deposit back in full. We don't hold it anymore. We aren't to be trusted you understand.

Except the bills haven't been paid.

Three - four months before they moved out they changed suppliers, (without our knowledge or permission). They also gave our name (the landlord) as the person who will be responsible for paying the bills.

Unbeknownst to us they leave the country. (They gave us a false UK address that they could be contacted at and that all mail should be sent on to.) A few days later, whilst we are repainting the property, we find on the door mat the first county court summons for non-payment. The reminders and the assorted dire threat letters had all been sent out, but of course the tenants had been throwing them away.

Bustards.

We then get weeks of grief and stress trying to cancel court appearances and solicitors letters etc. - which once they are in motion are never easy to stop.

And tenants winge about their deposits. Ha!

In addition to a refundable deposit there should be a compulsory non-returnable signing-on fee.

This would help to cover situations where a tenant wants to move out as their partner has been sent to prison following a dawn raid on the property. (Drugs and much much worse.) (False references and referees were given to our agent). The rent hadn't been paid for three months and the remaining tenant, now basically a penniless single-mum, really wants out.

However unless she is formally evicted the Council won't supply alternative accommodation etc. We wait for papers to be served etc. We wait for a court date. I have to take a day off work and attend otherwise she could win the case. We win, but the Judge then amazingly, and not asked for by either party, gives a three week stay of execution before we can take possession of the by now empty property. How much have we lost in Rent, legal fees etc.? Who protects us from tenants. No-one.

We treat tenants fairly and don't quibble about normal wear and tear. It is a rare one that treats us fairly in return.

Dushan
23rd Dec 2008, 20:02
Seldomfitforpurpose,
I am, and have been a landlord for many years.

I would never expect a tenant to sign such an agreement, and no sane tenant should. Part of the reason people move is to get rid of "the accumulated muck and grime" as you put it. Once out, the tenant gives me an opportunity to improve and tidy up the place properly. You can never expect someone who is moving out to put in 100% effort cleaning a property they don't own.

I always allow at least a month to go by between tenants. You work that into the price of rent.

I don't know what military accommodation has to do with this...

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Dec 2008, 20:08
"You can never expect someone who is moving out to put in 100% effort cleaning a property they don't own."

Why................................especially if it's a requirement of the tenancy agreement and they want to have their deposit returned in full then surely it's a no brainer :confused:

Dushan
23rd Dec 2008, 20:39
Why................................

For the same reason you don't take the same care of a rented car as you would of your own, or dry clean a rented tux before you return it. It is just human nature. Also the reason you rent it is so you don't have to be concerned with its maintenance and upkeep. I don't know where you find these people who are willing to sign such an agreement, but even if they did, to me all that means is that once they are gone there isn't a soiled mattress left behind and a broken toilet bowl or a smashed window.

The condition they "found it in" means empty, undamaged, and nothing, like appliances, missing.

747 jock
23rd Dec 2008, 20:47
If I let my property to a tenant in a clean, tidy and functional condition then it is not unreasonable of me to expect it to be returned to me in the same condition.

Wouldn't this be the same as Avis leasing a car to someone for 2 years, then expecting it to returned in exactly the same condition as when the lease started?
Part of the leasing fee (or rent, in the case of a building) should be budgeted for losses due to fair wear and tear.


Why................................especially if it's a requirement of the tenancy agreement and they want to have their deposit returned in full then surely it's a no brainer

Just because something is stated in the tenancy agreement doesn't mean that it is legal and could be enforced.

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Dec 2008, 21:56
Perhaps you those who doubt would like to contact our letting agent Atwell Martin, they are all over Wilts and the like, and ask them for a copy of their standard letting agreement which will confirm what I have alluded to...........in fact I would think that most of the major agencies have similar clauses............

As regards Avis heres a thought, if Avis took a 100 quid security deposit as part of their contract which was only refundable provided the car was returned clean and tidy etc how many of you would get the hoover and sponge out to ensure your money was returned................but as they dont it's a very poor analogy guys :=

Dushan
23rd Dec 2008, 22:11
As regards Avis heres a thought, if Avis took a 100 quid security deposit as part of their contract which was only refundable provided the car was returned clean and tidy etc how many of you would get the hoover and sponge out to ensure your money was returned................but as they dont it's a very poor analogy guys :=

Actually Avis has a lot more than 100 quid. They have your credit card number. If they discover damage to the car , after you had it, they will charge the repair to the card. However if the transmission is broken, it's tough titties. They will most definitely not charge the price of the wash and cleaning. However if you were transporting sand in the trunk and half of it is still in all the nooks and cranies, they will charge the cost of cleaning as it was over and above the regular wear and tear.

Seldomfitforpurpose
23rd Dec 2008, 22:47
Crikey chaps this is all getting a little bit difficult................but rather than try more rationale with you both please feel free to contact Atwell Martin: Chartered Surveyors, estate agents, residential sales, lettings, commercial and investment property in Wiltshire, Devizes, Chippenham, Calne, Swindon and London (http://www.atwellmartin.co.uk/) and ask them for a copy of their standard letting agreement, and all will suddenly become apparent :ok:

747 jock
24th Dec 2008, 08:30
Seldom,

My comments about the standard that a property should be returned in, were in reply to your post #14, which contradicts what you later say.

There is a very clear and precise statement in tenancy agreements along the lines of the tenants needing to hand the property back to the landlords in the condition they originally found it in so that it is fit for immediate letting.

"In the condition they originally found it" No mention of fair wear and tear.
However, you later state that
Carpets should be properly cleaned, where they are worn through use is OK .
How can a worn carpet be classed as being "in the original condition"?.

StudentInDebt
24th Dec 2008, 08:46
ask them for a copy of their standard letting agreement, and all will suddenly become apparentIt doesn't really matter what their standard letting agreement states, if clauses in it are unlawful then they are unenforceable. The Tenancy Deposit Scheme was introduced in the main to protect tenants from unscrupulous landlords who view their tenants as a means to make-over their property every time it becomes vacant or simply as a cash-cow. After being presented with a £250 deduction for cleaning carpets and an oven (in a small flat and which we had already steam-cleaned ourselves) and several letters telling us about the terms of our tenancy agreement I found that a small-claims court summons reduced the amount owed to £0 in short order :hmm:

stagger
24th Dec 2008, 09:33
It doesn't really matter what their standard letting agreement states, if clauses in it are unlawful then they are unenforceable.

Indeed.

For a detailed analysis....

http://www.oft.gov.uk/shared_oft/reports/unfair_contract_terms/oft356.pdf

Bottom line - just because a clause appears in a tenancy agreement that doesn't mean it's lawful or enforceable.

al446
24th Dec 2008, 10:20
Never mind SFFP's Atwell Martin: Chartered Surveyors, estate agents, residential sales, lettings, commercial and investment property in Wiltshire, Devizes, Chippenham, Calne, Swindon and London (http://www.atwellmartin.co.uk/), just nip in to WH Smiths where you can pick up a standard tenancy agreement as shot through with legal holes as most that are described here are.

gingernut
24th Dec 2008, 10:49
Leave a makeral under the floor board, or between the roof joists.

Seldomfitforpurpose
24th Dec 2008, 11:55
It's starting to sound like I am not going to be cut out for this landlord malarkey as it would seem, as evidenced by some of the posters on here, that the power of the pikey is always going to win :eek:

Maybe the 34 years I have spent in the RAF, with still more to go has made me naive enough to believe that by entering into an agreement folk would have integrity to fulfil their obligations but it looks as if the advice being offered here is basically, Landlords....go [email protected] yourselves :(...........and folk wonder why the country is going to the dogs............:{

Dushan
24th Dec 2008, 12:20
and folk wonder why the country is going to the dogs............

Arf, arf!!

Beatriz Fontana
24th Dec 2008, 12:53
Leave a makeral under the floor board, or between the roof joists.

Or, if you know that the next tenants will be in soon, hide one of those Mosque Clocks with the alarm set at 0600.

bnt
24th Dec 2008, 23:00
You can never expect someone who is moving out to put in 100% effort cleaning a property they don't own.
Then I must be some kind of rare bird, since that's exactly what I did earlier this month. I left a place in better condition than it was when I moved in. I had found hair everywhere, papers on Obstetrics, and a washing machine filter full of mangled credit cards and bra underwires. :oh:

Between that place, previous places, and the new place I'm sharing, I've learned a lot about what is serviceable and what is not. I wish landlords and builders would put more thought in to how you or tenants are supposed to maintain a place after moving in! If I ever buy my own place, to rent or not, these are some of the factors I'll be looking at sorting:
- wall-to-wall carpets! This is the one thing I never want to see again (though I'm currently stuck with one again). They wear unevenly (high traffic areas), and tenants can't repair them. To clean them properly, you have to completely empty a room, then get specialist equipment and/or people in: and you wonder why tenants leave them ratty? Wood or tile floors are easily swept, and small rugs can be beaten, washed, or even replaced.
- white PVA on the walls is fine, and let the tenants know that they're welcome to repaint. (I've done it before, as a previous commenter has: not expensive or difficult as long as there are few fiddly areas. You can even make a party out of it - get friends over for beer and brushes.)
- kitchens and bathrooms need to have sealed floors without carpets, because they're going to get wet, in use or when cleaned. (Obvious? You'd think so, but my new place has mouldy W2W carpet in the bathroom.) Preferably with drains in the floor, so that the floors can be swabbed clean quickly, with no fiddling about with buckets. (A friend's place in Denmark has a grippy tile floor that slopes to a drain under the shower - very serviceable indeed.)
- Nooks & crannies are a nightmare: stuff falls in, dirt gathers, mice find homes. Either seal up fittings & appliances, flush to the floor, or let them be moved so people can clean behind them.

I wouldn't go as far as Le Corbusier, who saw houses as "machines for living in", but if only as much though went in to home serviceability as goes in to e.g. an aircraft's serviceability. It's unfair to blame tenants for this kind of bad design.

PS: if you think your current landlord is bad, have a read of what this guy (http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/rnr/964514051.html) is offering. He's complaining that his For Rent ads are being removed from Craigslist, and thinks it's religious discrimination... it's not. :ooh:

cockney steve
24th Dec 2008, 23:58
PS: if you think your current landlord is bad, have a read of what this guy is offering. He's complaining that his For Rent ads are being removed from Craigslist, and thinks it's religious discrimination... it's not.

That there is a real, live , screw-loose, certifiable....NUTTER :}

His agreement wants rolling-up and inserting rectally.

Advice given is good.....if rent is one month's as bond, simply stop paying when you give notice (naughty, but effective)

call agent or landlord, for a mutual inspection,a few days before termination of tenancy....any items in contention should be photographed agreement of condition, inventory etc. should be signed by both parties ....upon leaving, rectified faults should be signed-off, evidence should be produced that meters have been read,etc. both parties should sign copies of gas and electricity readings.

If the landlord has signed that the property is acceptable at the time the keys are returned,the only justification for holding the bond, is if a final bill has not been shown, settled, for utilities/rates.

Getting recompense from a bad tenant who stopped paying rent and wrecked the place, is much harder.

I know one landlord who was stuck with a bitch who moved in with every intention to defraud him....he lost patience and turfed out her possessions and changed the locks.....police arrested him, he had to let her back in and it took him another 2 months to legally evict her.
she had all the law books,just smirked at him...one of the few cases where i would have liked to see her have an "accident" one dark night.

yes, I had a tenant who was disruptive,damaged the flat, took a load of the inventory, left without paying the rent for 2 months...she was vouched for by her parents,who, once she was in, unilaterally decided that they were no longer responsible........we'll see!