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419
18th Dec 2008, 14:06
I've recently been on holiday to the USA, and whilst on the flight over, I noticed that my Bose headphones were badly cracked and were in danger of falling apart.

I sent an e-mail to Bose UK, enquiring about a possible repair and waited for a reply.
I hadn't heard anything for a few days, so I e-mailed Bose USA. I had a reply within 2 hours informing me that a repair wasn't possible but I could trade the damaged headphones in and get a new pair for $100. The problem was that this had to be done by post, and as I was travelling, I didn't have a fixed address for the return to be sent to.
I phoned the customer service dept and explained the problem, and they agreed to let me do the exchange at a local Bose outlet.

From the first e-mail to getting the replacement in my hand was approx 6 hours and $100. (about £70)

After 17 days, I've finally had a reply from Bose UK. They can also offer an exchange. This will cost £120.24 :* , must be done by post and will take up to 3 weeks!

Burnt Fishtrousers
18th Dec 2008, 14:19
I went to IKEA and wanted a breakfast bar with a rounded radius on the end. If I had the requisite carpentry skills I could have done it myself. IKEA inform me it will be a 7 week turnaround and is done in Germany. I go to the local chippy, select some oak.He does it in an hour...and at the same cost.

Its ironic that a Swedish company operating in the UK have to go to Germany to saw some wood...You think with all the pine trees in Sweden someone somewhere would know how to do this...after all the wood dashboard on my wifes Saab seems pretty complex....or perhaps this was contacted out to a Polish man in Solihull who used to do Rover dashes

sisemen
18th Dec 2008, 14:35
The trouble is BFT (and there's a name from the past - welcome back!) is that IKEA produce x million of the same item. The machines are set up for it, the contracts are set in stone and the individual stores and ordering processes couldn't cope.

If you want bespoke stuff then patronise your local man. :ok:

Der absolute Hammer
18th Dec 2008, 14:53
Well, since the service you receive from Americans is what you would like and expect to receive, perhaps the service you receive from the English tells you something about the English?

Davaar
18th Dec 2008, 15:04
A friend was captain of a CAF C 130 in the Far East. Engine trouble. Landed at USAF base. Investigated problem. Contacted Ottawa. Would take some weeks to have replacement engine sent out. Made arrangements to stay at USAF Mess. Next day went to appraise situation at aircraft. Engine worked perfectly. How to explain the mystery? Inquiries made. "Ah! What the hell? We just did an engine change! On your way, Bud!"

OFSO
18th Dec 2008, 15:09
Its ironic that a Swedish company operating in the UK have to go to Germany to saw some wood...You think with all the pine trees in Sweden someone somewhere would know how to do this...after all the wood dashboard on my wifes Saab seems pretty complex....or perhaps this was contacted out to a Polish man in Solihull who used to do Rover dashes

Look into Ikea's business dealings deeply enough - I had to some eight years ago - and you will find that they are registered as a charitable organisation in the Netherlands, old chap. Sweden ? They like to give that impression.....

merlinxx
18th Dec 2008, 15:10
Giving good service is a dirty expression in the UK:ugh:

If we all worked this way, hell I can't say any more, just about to explode:mad::mad::mad::mad::mad:


Reaches for the good malt and says BLOLLOCKS:E

anotherthing
18th Dec 2008, 15:27
419 -

I had completely the opposite experience with Bose UK. I had a Bose Lifestyle Home Theatre System which I bought in 1998. In 2006, after several house moves (I was in the military), the multi disc changer eventually packed up.

I phoned the Bose HQ and they suggested a Heath Robinson approach to try to remedy the fault, whilst on the phone. I tried to no avail. They then asked me to send the whole unit (minus speakers etc) to them.

I no longer had the receipt, and they were aware of the age of the system (8 years old to that point). 4 days after sending it off, I received the unit back, fixed totally free of charge, I did not even have to pay for the postage from Bose to my house.

Needless to say, when I came to upgrade the system, I decided to buy Bose again, but upon reading review, found out the Bose DVD player on their cinema system is not the best, so went elsewhere.

However, I'd have no qualms about buying other Bose products in the future.... I suppose that although it shouldn't be so, it might just depend on who you happen to first speak to when you start these dialogues... I dipped in :ok:

Lance Murdoch
18th Dec 2008, 18:16
I remember on one of my frequent visits to the USA visiting a gen-you-ine British Pub. As I said to an American friend at the time that the establishment would never be a convincing British Pub because 1. the bar staff were cheerful and actually wanted to serve the customers, 2. There was no drunk skinhead at the end of the bar looking to fill in anyone who looked at him the wrong way and 3. the toilets had been cleaned in the last six months:D

VinRouge
18th Dec 2008, 20:51
I dont like the USAs tipping culture. Especially if you have below-par service then are given the evils for refusing to tip. I couldnt give a crap if you have poor wages. Good service or you dont get tipped. It, in my mind, is effectively begging for the employed. cultural thing I suppose.

I also resent the 'baggers' you get in many supermarkets. Last time I checked, I had arms and could pack myself. Womans head nearly dropped off when I brought back old shopping bags and started packing my groceries in Wal Mart.

Davaar
18th Dec 2008, 20:56
I also resent the 'baggers' you get in many supermarkets. Last time I checked, I had arms and could pack myself. Womans head nearly dropped off when I brought back old shopping bags and started packing my groceries in Wal Mart.

Why would a convenience provided by management, free, to help the customer, provoke you to resentment?


cultural thing I suppose.

VinRouge
18th Dec 2008, 21:02
It was the reaction, almost that I was doing something wrong that got me. Its also the fact the baggers expect paying and tell you that you cant take the trolley outside, instead only THEY can push it...

Very odd!

brickhistory
18th Dec 2008, 21:10
VR, you don't have to tip in the US.

Bad service = no/bad tip.

Once, I had crap service, left a crap tip. Waiter had the gall to come out after me to complain. I was happy to oblige to his face, then to his manager's. Funny how that worked out...(I also called the credit card company to ensure nothing 'extra' was added after the fact and to watch for credit fraud.)



There's still a grocery store with human workers in it?!

Where?

Everything around here now is self-scan, self-bag, self-carry out to the car.

Crosshair
18th Dec 2008, 21:20
Familiarity breeds contempt.

Davaar
18th Dec 2008, 21:35
Its also the fact the baggers expect paying and tell you that you cant take the trolley outside,

I have lived here since January, 1965, and in that time I have never paid a bagger nor received a hint that I should. The bagging is usually done by the "cashier". When one orders a car pick up, all one has to do is drive to the pickup door and the bagged groceries are delivered to the car. Even there I have never been asked to pay and I notice that most people do not tip. I always do. Here we have one of your cultural differences. Canadians are frequently as tight as the traditional mackerel's *rs*, whereas Americans (which I am not ..... I wish!) are typically generous.

I do not go looking for bad service, and rarely do I meet it. If I do, I do not tip.

West Coast
18th Dec 2008, 22:18
If you get lousy service, leave a penny. If you leave nothing, many simply think you forgot. Leaving a penny leaves no doubt as to your thoughts.

bugg smasher
18th Dec 2008, 23:17
Some of the restaurants I have visited recently had the gall (originally typed in ‘gaul’, spell checker picked it up, because it’s French I suppose) to automatically tack on a 20% service charge, a small print note explaining that anything ‘extra’ you’d like to leave, on top of that mind you, would be ‘greatly appreciated’.

In many US cities, NYC being one of them, tipping significant percentages is now considered a wait-staff birthright.

Alarmingly, there is also a website restaurant workers can now go to and publish the names of those customers, derived from credit card information, who they feel have cheated them out of their rightful earnings.

419
18th Dec 2008, 23:28
Well, since the service you receive from Americans is what you would like and expect to receive, perhaps the service you receive from the English tells you something about the English?

I couldn't agree more.
The problem with a very large majority of the English is that they don't want to make a fuss or complain as it's "not the right thing to do". I used to be the same, but not any more.

Where possible, I refuse to deal with any company that gives poor customer service. I've lost count of the times I've walked out of shops (after informing the staff, or if possible the manager of the reason why) because it appeared that the staff couldn't give a toss about the customers.
On one occasion I was in a very large supermarket on a busy Saturday afternoon, and there were very long queues at all checkouts. The one I was waiting for was moving very slowly due to the cashier being about 16 years old, and having a sticker on her uniform stating "under training".

I called for the store manager and asked him if he thought it was a good idea to put someone with zero experience on a till at the busiest time of the week, and all he said was that the store didn't employ enough trained staff to put on all the checkouts. (supermarket chain with profits of over £1bn last year).
He didn't say anything when I handed him my very full trolley and told him that he had better employ someone else to return all the goods to the shelves, and promptly walked out.

con-pilot
18th Dec 2008, 23:41
There's still a grocery store with human workers in it?!

Where?

Everything around here now is self-scan, self-bag, self-carry out to the car.

If that ain't the truth.

I did make a bit of a fool of myself the other day in one of our local supermarkets. All of my purchases were in five plastic shopping bags and were placed in the cart, well I saw no need to push the cart out to the parking lot, put the bags in my car and then walk 100 yards to place the cart in one of those 'cart corrals'. So I just picked up the five bags and started toward the door. I had not taken two steps when this young kid comes running up to me exclaiming, "Oh please, don't try and carry that out your car, please let me help you."

Well, excuse me, so I fixed my irate glare on his eyes and said, "I may appear elderly to you young man and I do have a slight limp, however, let me assure you that I am very capable of carrying my own groceries out to my car."

I was not shouting, I never shout, I was merely speaking in an authoritative voice.

The kid looked up at me and replied, "I was not talking to you sir, I was addressing the lady behind you, whom you are now blocking."

I look behind me and see this little old lady trying to carry her groceries out.

Oops, "Oh, er, well, huh good for you young man, carry on then and I'll just get out of the way." :O

preduk
18th Dec 2008, 23:49
Haha good one Con-Pilot! :}

Worst place for tipping, Toronto, why do you tip the bar staff for pouring you a quick drink? Every time they buy a drink they leave a tip!

Best place for tipping, Beijing they don't do it at all :p

Brakes on
19th Dec 2008, 00:47
Or Japan or even taxi-drivers in Taiwan (at least up to about some years ago). I hope they haven't been globalised by now.

chiglet
19th Dec 2008, 01:34
When I left school [1962] I got a job at the first Supermarket in Manchester. It was called "Blowers"...why? I dunnow, but as a "Third Assistant Warehouseman, one of my duties was to "Pack, Carry and Deposit the customers shopping into her car. [and it nearly always was a lady] OOI, I always refused any "tips".... pride in the job :ok:

Bucket
19th Dec 2008, 01:45
We are getting away from the point of the thread which was about service not tipping.

:rolleyes:

Rollingthunder
19th Dec 2008, 01:48
No difference.

Hello, I work for an airline. I get free travel. I can get anywhere in the world in 24 hours. If you don't make this right to my satisfaction, I will come to you, climb down your throat and eat your liver.

henry crun
19th Dec 2008, 02:05
UK service, don't make me laugh.

I wanted to send some wine to someone in UK as a Christmas present, so I selected what appeared to be a large retailer offering a good selection of wine.

I emailed their customer dept. and asked if I could be assured of delivery on 18th Dec, this being the only day I was sure the receipient would be at home to sign for it.
"Yes sir" was the reply, place your order at least 24 hours prior and ask for express delivery, for which there will be a small extra charge.

On the 16th I rang their order line, placed the order with all the details they required, and stressed that delivery must be on the 18th.
"Just one moment sir, I will check with my supervisor to make sure we can do that........................................................ ............................................................ ........
thats OK sir, we will do that".

What day did they try and deliver it ? the 17th of course. :ugh:

Loose rivets
19th Dec 2008, 08:22
I bounced an idea here to extended family, who are always starting some business or another...it was to start a restaurant where the standards were very high, but aimed at genteel people that normally couldn't afford a high class place. SIL looked at me with half closed eyes.

No tipping. Ordering on the net (to save tonnes of food being wasted.) Savings would be passed on.

No mention of money whatsoever...all done ahead of time. Regulars eventually have credit.

Real table cloths, cutlery that is smooth and doesn't look like a load of old scrap metal.

NO noise of crocks and cutlery being thrown about. No trash music. No noise of A/C.

Staff that know your name, at least the main client in the group.

No nipping out for a fag.

No tits with hats on back to front...in fact a smart casual dress code.

No rif-raf.

In fact, nobody allowed in that I don't like.


SIL's eyes nearly closed, and her lips were pressed together. I looked about me. It was her nightclub.

Noise...lots of it, mostly coming from the food engineering department, though it was almost drowned by the washing up being done in a giant cement mixer. Girls with millions of $$$$ stuck down their frocks. Clouds of smoke coming in the doors. Tits with hats on the wrong way round. Hat with Tits the right way round. People that don't think a glass is necessary. No ceiling! Just huge tubes painted grotesque colours. Kari-fcuking-oki at strength TEN. Somebody 'playing' a Juke-box, in competition with the person with a microphone stuck up their nose. People tying yellow ribbons to old oak trees. Ten gallon hats. Big fluorescent beer signs flickering away and going ZZZZZZZZTTTT ZZZZZZZZZZZZTTTT with 50 year old short circuits smelling of burning. Plates of Mexican beans in brown glue going past. Those triangular chips that go with the brown glue. Waiter's fingers covered in brown glue. Some gay guys yucking it up in a corner. A huge girl sobbing her eyes out cos she'd been left with twenty-one children...and they weren't ever hers. Something furry that moved occasionally, on the chair beside the huge girl. The smell of bean-induced efflux. Broken trophies for BEST PUB of the YEAR. 1955 and 56. An old man that had been sitting motionless there since 1955 or 56. An armed guard. The man that helped the armed guard when he fell over drunk. A lost Possum and the usual group of people trying to help it. And some other things.



SIL finally spoke at last, and with a certain authority. "It'll never work..." She said. "...people want a good time when they go out."

innuendo
19th Dec 2008, 08:27
I guess there is all kinds of service. The other day in the supermarket checkout the bagger says to me, "Sir, I see these muffins expire in one day, would you like me to replace them with ones that have more time to go?"

I took the time to find the duty manager and mention the young lad by name. I hope he prospers.

anotherthing
19th Dec 2008, 10:14
innuendo -

you'll probably have gotten him fired for costing the company money!!

Evanelpus
19th Dec 2008, 12:08
UK Customer Support tends not to have the US obligatory "Y'all have a nice day" at the end of the conversation.

Davaar
19th Dec 2008, 13:21
[QUOTE]UK Customer Support tends not to have the US obligatory "Y'all have a nice day" at the end of the conversation.

Yes. But which is better: an insincere (let's assume) "Y'all have a nice day!" or, as in Britain, a sincere "F*ck you!"

Katamarino
19th Dec 2008, 14:17
I was impressed by Mountain Hardware, when my tent-rod on my new tent broke. I was emailed an offer to 'service my pole'. A most attractive offer which I took them up on.

Evanelpus
19th Dec 2008, 14:22
Yes. But which is better: an insincere (let's assume) "Y'all have a nice day!" or, as in Britain, a sincere "F*ck you!"

Never, anyway, most of the UK customer service industry is in bloody India!

Nick Riviera
19th Dec 2008, 16:43
Once left a good tip after a fabulous meal with great service at an out of the way restaurant in Koh Samui. Walking away from the place we were surprised to find the waitress running after us to inform us that we had left too much money which she was keen to give back to us.

AMF
19th Dec 2008, 16:50
Worst service incident I ever had in my life was years ago in the UK. Had finally gotten out of the sandpit, landed late in London, and from the hotel went looking for my first taste in weeks of some non-compound brewed beverage. Wandered into small, nice-looking, mostly-empty pub with perhaps 8 patrons, and not wanting to interrupt, sat politely at the bar waiting to be served by either of the 2 bartenders there who were engaged in chatting a bit with the "regulars" when they weren't pecking away at the registers. I sat there literally 3 feet away in front of them for 5 minutes not either of them glancing up, beginning to feel invisible, and when 5 became 10 minutes of being ignored one of them finally aknowledged me and I ordered a beer. Whereupon the [email protected] looked up at the clock and told me "I'm sorry Sir, it's a minute past time" or something to that effect.

Considering my de-hydrated state of mind, I'm still proud of myself for not dragging him, and his co-consipirator, across the bar and beating their sorry a$$es, along with anyone else who wanted some.

Gainesy
19th Dec 2008, 17:27
Rivets, which bit of Essex was that?:E

TRC
19th Dec 2008, 19:25
But which is better: an insincere (let's assume) "Y'all have a nice day!" or, as in Britain, a sincere "F*ck you!"


At least if you get the "F*ck you", you know that they mean it.

galaxy flyer
19th Dec 2008, 22:05
Davaar

Your story about the CAF C-130 is touching and I don't doubt you for a nanosecond, BUT, I want to know where that was?? In 17 years of horsing C-5s around, I never experienced that kind of service at any base, USAF or otherwise. If even hinted at "crew rest", the mechs were off the plane faster than the Road Runner.

OTOH, a friend of mine needed an engine change in Kadena. They settled into a long "vacation" waiting for that to happen. The mechs point to a hangar and say, "we think there is TF-39 in there". Sure enough was one, been shipped there several years earlier for some reason and never used, still covered in plastic. Off they were the next day! So good s**t happens, too

GF

smo-kin-hole
19th Dec 2008, 23:13
Loose Rivets:
Great club description. You are probably a pilot or at least in aviation. Your job is fun and you want a quiet, serene restaurant in the off-times. But do you think the residents of that bar have fun jobs and want the same thing?

There is something about cubicle dwelling that rots the soul. I did it for two years. I'll dig ditches before I do that again. Cubicle dwellers want noise, chaos, drunks, bad clothing, loose morals, anything to forget what they did all day. Chaos amd noise is their version of liberation.

At least thats my theory. I could not stand the club you described. Have a good one.:ugh:

Davaar
19th Dec 2008, 23:40
Galaxy, I'd ask the chap, but he is dead now. He was a Colonel in the CAF and later captain on 707s in one of the airlines.

I can tell you this, though, that one of my own small clients not far from Ottawa was struggling to get going as an aircraft manufacturer. Rather to my astonishment he was able to recruit the talent to design and manufacture a 2/4 seat high wing dual control monoplane, very sturdy. He was looking for a propeller and it appeared a suitable product was available in the US. After chit-chat to and fro, the manufacturer delivered a new propeller on spec. It duly worked well. he upshot was that the maker said they could keep it gratis, so long as they used the maker's name in advertising.

I have a nephew who is modestly senior in the British forces and has spent several detachments to the Middle East. He says the Brits could not function there for a day without American generosity in materiel.

Rollingthunder
20th Dec 2008, 00:54
MFI has ceased trading. That should cut overall complaints by .00002%

Scumbag O'Riley
20th Dec 2008, 02:01
Yeah, well, the US is a lot worse than it used to be.

The UK is a lot better than it used to be.

Still some time until they meet in the middle, but they are closing.

That is unless you need to talk to a bank, a seller of gas/electricity, or provider of mobile minutes/texts. Then you will find service is getting worse on the UK side too, especially if there is latency on the line.

brickhistory
20th Dec 2008, 02:53
My dream is to run a B&B in Sedona.

With the beauty of the place and good customer service, it's gonna be successful. That's what nearly everyone wants, personable, quality attention to detail.

Already found the place.

Now just have to come up with the $2M asking price. :{

con-pilot
20th Dec 2008, 05:06
I have always wanted to have a D&B. Dinner & Bed, screw breakfast, I don't want to get up that early anymore. :p

(I flew for a guy that thought an early morning departure was around 10 AM. Loved it! To bad he ended up in prison. :()

Now just have to come up with the $2M asking price.

Let me check my Piggy Bank.


Nope, sorry, just $1,999,991.00 short. Bummer. :(

brickhistory
20th Dec 2008, 18:02
I have always wanted to have a D&B. Dinner & Bed, screw breakfast,


Umm, isn't that how the 'game' is played?

And, to keep the post on track with the thread, one would hope that 'customer service' wasn't lacking...






No, no, don't get up. I'll let myself out...