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BigBoeing
25th Oct 2008, 11:17
Just got a nice £60 pound tax, sorry fine, and 3 points. Now I know I need to tell my insurance but do I have to tell them right now or just when I renew? Ta

Howard Hughes
25th Oct 2008, 11:25
I'm not in the UK, but in Oz you would only need to tell them at renewal time and only if they ask you!:eek:

Who are you insured with? I can then read the terms on their website and let you know my opinion.:ok:

TURIN
25th Oct 2008, 11:33
Give em a ring and ask?

I had the same issue and it wasn't a problem. :ok:

BigBoeing
25th Oct 2008, 11:48
Im insured with Bell and not to keen to ring them and ask unless I really know I have to tell them now. Last time I was charged £26 for changing my mother dob by one year. (Since refunded after my prolonged complaining).

preduk
25th Oct 2008, 11:54
Phone them, don't give them any details and just ask a general question.

Howard Hughes
25th Oct 2008, 12:20
1 Please tell us immediately
If you or any driver named on your policy, have been disqualified from driving or
have had your licence revoked
Important
You must tell us about any material changes in circumstances as we may not be able to offer cover in every case. Failure to notify Bell may mean that you will be unable to make a claim under this policy of insurance.1 Your duty to us
We will only provide you with the cover set out in this policy if:if you or anyone else claiming cover under this policy has kept to all the terms and conditions of the policy; and
From my reading of the policy document (http://www.bell.co.uk/PolicyBooks/BELL.pdf) (I am not a legal eagle, but did previously work for an insurance company), I would say that you are only required to notify them if a question on your original proposal asked if you had any 'speeding tickets' or 'points on your licence'.

Otherwise you are only required to notify them if you or any other driver gets disqualified.

They do however slip this in at the end, just to cover all bases...

You should tell us of any material change to your circumstances. To make these changes please call us on 0871 882 1100. Remember, failure to tell us of a material change could invalidate your policy. If you are unsure which changes are material donít hesitate to call us and ask us.
But I would read 'material circumstances' to once again be anything that you outlined in your original proposal, provided those details have not changed, then you do not need to advise them. But phoning them may be prudent in this case.

I hope this makes some sense, it is very late here now!;)

Rainboe
25th Oct 2008, 12:26
Until you actually get the points, I don't think you have to tell them (remember something about 'innocent until proven guilty'?). However, if you still have the prosecution hanging over you and you have to renew, then I think you need to tell them it is impending as it is then a factor in your renewal.

Romeo India Xray
25th Oct 2008, 12:34
Phone them, don't give them any details and just ask a general question.


I tried that with a different company - all i got back was something like:

"Sorry, we can't speak to anyone without giving us a policy number and confirming details"

Generally I would not advise anyone to withold info from these cretins. You can guarentee that if you need to claim they will do everything in their power to get out of payment unless you have protected no claims (and then they will only hand over grudgingly).

I had the "pleasure" of N Wales police trashing my clean licence after sending notification to a wrong address (even though they had my correct address available). I was driving around for 6 months before the DVLA contacted me to tell me my licence would be suspended if I did not surrender it as per the court ruling!!! First I knew about it.

I sent a letter to the insurance company stating I would be contesting this and therefore had not been "found guilty" as I had not been given chance to answer the case against me. The insurance company tried to load my premium in respect of this letter (by a healthy lump). Of course the McDonalds reject who called me relating to this failed to see any logic, but after about 30 minutes of wrangling I managed to speak to a manager who agreed to "hold" the premium increase until my case had been re-heard. I was advised that had I not notified them my insurance would have been invalid.

Case was re-opened. Prosecution soliciter couldn't put up a counter argument - points removed, fine dropped and costs awarded. Insurance company still wanted the extra payment (surprise surprise). They backed down when I started talking about getting the recorded transcripts from them and launching a civil case against them.

RIX

Fly-by-Wife
25th Oct 2008, 13:58
I have noticed that the standard speeding ticket fixed penalty seems to make no difference to our insurance premiums. I believe that it is now the norm rather than the exception for drivers to have a speeding penalty (usually for 33 in a 30 zone), and the insurers recognize the stupidity of the whole situation.

My wife has occasionally had 3 penalty points on her license - 3 times in 15 years or so, none overlapping - and the insurance quotes have never been affected.

Indeed, it has always been far cheaper to insure my car with her as a second driver - even with the 3 points on her license - than just me on my own.

Such is the perceived restraining influence of the fairer sex!

FBW

BigBoeing
25th Oct 2008, 14:32
Cheers for all the replies. I rang them, Cardiff offices must be shut as got straight through to Bangalore. Eventually asked my question and yes I should tell them now, but it won't affect my premium till I renew, and not by much.

niknak
25th Oct 2008, 21:20
Just to clarify, in the UK you are legally required to tell your insurer immediately of any circumstance in which you have been convicted of a motoring offence, whether you get points or not. Failure to do so invalidates your insurance policy.
As to whether you get an increase in your premium immediately or at renewal seems to be variable depending on your insurer, but it's still worth shopping around and using a good old fashioned broker to do the leg work for you.
A lot of people don't realise that they can check all the internet sites you know of and more, and save a lot of hassle, particularly if the plod have invited you to contribute financially to their annual picnic and given you points in recognition of your driving skills.