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denis555
9th Sep 2008, 08:06
Hats off to the father who rescued his daughter after she disappeared down a drain during the floods.

His quick thinking in rushing to the river some way away staggered me. I guess that I would have faffed around for ages trying to get into the drain before I even began to think about where the water would be flowing into - by which time it would be too late.

angels
9th Sep 2008, 08:50
You never really know how you're going to act in a crisis until one occurs.

I was 19 and staying with my sister on a BAOR army camp (B-I-L was in NI) in Soltau. I was in the Naafi when a heavily pregnant girl slumped to the floor moaning and saying, "The baby's coming."

I'd always thought I would be the hero when something like this happened. Instead I just gawped and thought, "What the **** do I do?" I stared at the girl on the till who was equally non-plussed. "Go to the guard room," she said.

I had no idea where the guardroom was and rushed out onto the parade ground. There was one person crossing it. Flat cap, swagger stick. I rushed up to him and started babbling like an incoherent idiot (which I was I suppose).

"SHUT UP!!" he bellowed at me. I did. Then, gently, "Now calm down son, what's happening?"

It worked. I told him. He arranged things.

I was hopeless! It really taught me a lesson which came in useful later in life. But that's another story.

And well done to that dad! :ok:

Beatriz Fontana
9th Sep 2008, 08:59
In times of adversity there are the people who freak and the people who can handle it, and you don't really know which one you'll be until the particular situation hits one.

But there's something about dealing with a crisis involving someone close to you that changes the rules - there have been cases of people finding super-strength for instance.

Did I hear right that the chap is a RAF sergeant? Top bloke.

denis555
9th Sep 2008, 11:11
Did I hear right that the chap is a RAF sergeant? Top bloke


Correct - maybe it's a military trait - to train your mind to think clearly in an emergency.

I know I would be faffing around for ages at the mouth of the manhole desperatly trying to reach inside - and not make the connection with the river outlet.

airship
9th Sep 2008, 13:10
Presence of mind when your toddler disappears But what if you were simply enjoying dinner at the local taverna...? :sad:

ShyTorque
10th Sep 2008, 21:51
This story of this brought back some scary memories for me. My middle son, as a toddler, suddenly disappeared one freezing cold March day, in my in-laws' garden.

I had gone out to the coal store to get coal to light the fire. One minute he was there, yet when I turned round after filling the scuttle he was gone. I assumed he had gone back inside, so I went in. He wasn't there. Back in the garden, I spotted the soles of his shoes just at the surface of the water in the fish pond; he was completely underwater, vertically head down.

I pulled him out backwards by the seat of his trousers, his lungs were full of water, he wasn't breathing and his eyes were glazed. I stuck him over my knee, still holding him upside down and pumped his chest with my inner arm. Water gushed out of him. I kept pumping him out for what seemed an age but in reality was probably only a few seconds. Suddenly he coughed and screamed and I knew he would be OK. I'd never been so shaken up. :eek:

The pond is now long gone and he's 23 and a uni graduate.

brickhistory
11th Sep 2008, 01:50
ST,

Jeezus! That would be scary!
I'm glad for both your now grown son the the RAF Sgt's child's sake that it turned out well.

Captain Stable
11th Sep 2008, 08:35
A while ago I was at a Dive Club that shared premises with a restaurant/beach club in Jordan. There was also a (fairly shallow) swimming pool. We were discussing our forthcoming dive when there was a bit of a commotion and splashing. I looked up to see some locals just staring nonplussed at a kid (girl, maybe 9 or 10 yrs) in difficulty in the pool. Nobody moved. It took me a few (micro?)seconds to get over my bemusement that nobody closer did anything and then I just got up, strode (fast) towards them, jumped in and fished her out. She coughed up a lot of water but was otherwise unharmed. She hadn't gone nearly as far as ShyTorque's son. Family looked at me, didn't even say thank you. You're welcome.

LordGrumpy
11th Sep 2008, 10:16
It has been reported that the dog that was with this little girl, is now missing.

whiz
11th Sep 2008, 11:17
A while ago I was at a Dive Club that shared premises with a restaurant/beach club in Jordan. There was also a (fairly shallow) swimming pool. We were discussing our forthcoming dive when there was a bit of a commotion and splashing. I looked up to see some locals just staring nonplussed at a kid (girl, maybe 9 or 10 yrs) in difficulty in the pool. Nobody moved. It took me a few (micro?)seconds to get over my bemusement that nobody closer did anything and then I just got up, strode (fast) towards them, jumped in and fished her out. She coughed up a lot of water but was otherwise unharmed. She hadn't gone nearly as far as ShyTorque's son. Family looked at me, didn't even say thank you. You're welcome.

I had an uncannilly similar experience by a swimming pool in Florida. My wife and I were sitting at a poolside table when a family arrived close by. Mum and Dad hit the sun loungers as the kids - at a guess I'd say son aged 4 and daughter aged 7- prepared to get into the pool. The kids only had one set of arm bands between them so chose to wear one each. It wasn't long before the young boy was in trouble, he had gotten out of his depth and the one arm which was afloat was in turn forcing the opposite side of his body and head under water. I sat there almost transfixed, everything in slow motion and waiting for someone else to react... no-one did. My wife shouted 'go get him' so I did. I fished him out and sat him on the side of the pool. Mum & Dad had no idea what happened, probably still don't :rolleyes:

Rossian
11th Sep 2008, 14:41
A long time ago I dragged a kid out of the Camel Estuary as he was being swept along on the outgoing tide. When returned to his parents, his mother shouted at him and Pa, awakened from under his copy of the Daily Mirror, took in my dripping appearance (and my aircrew watch) and opined "I hope you don't think I'm going to pay for that fookin' watch".
The Ancient Mariner

Atishoo
11th Sep 2008, 20:43
Lol Rossian,

What a dipstick, and how ungrateful some people are!!

You should have replied by saying "no but you nearly paid for your Son's life you idiot" :D

Um... lifting...
11th Sep 2008, 21:23
Friends have told me of similar experiences... some people are embarassed to the point of mortification that some stranger saved their child while they were helpless or clueless... and some people are just *rseholes.

Spent many years doing helicopter search & rescue. It's the job, and one doesn't expect to be thanked... which is good, because it seldom happened. One night years ago launched to find jet skier who had become lost in the maze of sawgrass around a river delta as sunset approached. She had the sense to know she was lost, so shoved the jet ski firmly into the weeds and spent the night on it (we didn't find her that night). First light went out again and located her in short order, not much the worse for wear, and directed a sheriff's boat (also looking) that was quite nearby to pick her up and get her back home. Nothing special about the case, we went back and thought nothing of it.

A few days later a fat envelope arrives at my office via post. In said envelope were four smaller envelopes, each with the name of one of my crew. I thumb open mine and there is a card with a short handwritten note from the girl's parents briefly thanking me/us. This brightened my day and I made the rounds with the other envelopes dropping them off with the other lads. Two of them told me that: "In X years of doing this... this is the first time anybody ever said 'thank you'"

Years later, at work on a weekday, not flying (but in flight suit, along with a lot of other people), colleague happens to be flying by when large sailboat apparently sheds its keel weight in a deep channel, turns turtle and sinks in the blink of an eye in hundreds of fathoms. The couple aboard and their border collie (with lifebelt) escape boat and are winched aboard helicopter and brought in. Dog decides that every person in one of these funny suits is deserving of being jumped upon and licked. That is gratitude. "If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you... that is the principal difference between a dog and a man."

visibility3miles
13th Sep 2008, 23:15
Sometimes screaming at the top of your lungs when you are in desperate need of help, or running around like an idiot begging for help is the right thing to do.

Even if you can't be Superman in a particular situation, relying on the kindness of strangers to rise to the occasion is often the right thing to do.

Most people can empathize with the worst fears of others, and will feel glad if they can help, or will try their best to avoid the worst.