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Romeo India Xray
28th Aug 2008, 05:48
It has now been a year since I took a better job in a nicer place (out of the UK and into E Europe). Already promoted, with significantly better salary than in the UK :D

Other benefits - no chavs (except British tourists), no stealth taxes, excellent transport links, friendly people, low cost of living (and drinking :}) ... the list goes on :)

Here's over to anyone else who has made the plunge and ditched Old Blighty (or wherever you are originally from), and is now enjoying a better life. Or maybe you tried it and didn't like it. Please share your experiences.

RIX

p.s. Mods, sorry if this one has been done before, but I couldn't find anything recent of similar ilk.

ChrisVJ
28th Aug 2008, 06:20
Twenty years last April. Many ups and downs, never a day`s regret.

asiaseen
28th Aug 2008, 06:36
19 years last Tuesday and no regrets. My daughter has just phoned me to say that she and her family have got visas for Oz and will be gone by Christmas

Somerset
28th Aug 2008, 06:37
6 years in Australia (UK originally). Could never go back to the chavs. Once you've been to Queensland, Romford just doesn't seem to cut it anymore.

v6g
28th Aug 2008, 07:47
Canada for me, 6 years now. Couple of weeks a year is enough to remind me why I left.

obgraham
28th Aug 2008, 07:59
60 years this month!

course I was only 2 then!!

luoto
28th Aug 2008, 08:01
Likewise late 90s... going back to UK even to visit is sadly painful:)

Rather be Gardening
28th Aug 2008, 08:07
Lived in Australia for 8 years, went to Uni and stayed on teaching for a bit. Lovely country, but I preferred Britain. Yes, there's a lot wrong with this country, but there's more that's right with it and, having travelled to over 35 different countries so far, it is still the most beautiful in my eyes.

Mind you, living in Pembrokeshire helps!

Lon More
28th Aug 2008, 08:11
Left the UK on the4th of January 1970. and have lived in the Benelux since. Been back on holidays and have actually gone as far as to buy a second house near Folkestone to retire to. However i'm becoming less and less enchanted with the idea (despite having a Spitfire and a Hurricane in the back garden) and may sell up there when the housing market improves again.

1DC
28th Aug 2008, 08:18
Youngest daughter is an Australian citizen, she comes home every 18 months or so and thinks the UK is a little bit different every time and the change is not for the better. Compared to the place she left 10 years ago, it has lost it's identity as the place she knew. She came home this Christmas and had a friday night out with her old mates, she said that she never thought the day would come when she would feel nervous because of pending trouble in a UK pub/club. It happened three times in one night, didn't bother her mates who were used to it, but she just wanted to be away from it.She has had the same experience in Oz, once in ten years..
We usually visit her each year and would be happy to live there, however over the years we think Oz is becoming more of a rat race than it was when we first started to go.Probably the same could be said for most countries of the world.
Notwithstanding the above i would never have believed that a government could have destroyed a way of life in a country the way the British government has in ten years. I cannot think of anything they have done that they could be proud of.


I expect i will soon get a few examples, but i can't think of any..

winglit
28th Aug 2008, 08:19
It's been two years for me.

Moved to the Dominican Republic to become a station engineer for a charter airline. Since then I have become even more disenfranchised with the UK. I think it has something to do with the fact I only get to read the Daily Mail during turnrounds! Those journos are doing a pretty good job of destroying my home country with a little help from Gordon & co.

Unfortunately I still see my fair share of chavs, but they are only here for a fortnight. They usually stay in their all-inclusive resorts and leave with alcohol poisoning and sunburn!

I have to go back to the UK even now and then on business or to catch up with family, but i don't look forward to it. My view on the UK is that she is FULL and everyone has a tale of woe to tell. A lot of people seem very ANGRY as well.

Romeo India Xray
28th Aug 2008, 08:22
Thanks for all your replies! I am solidly in the "depressed when simply visiting" group. First time I went back as SLF it took me nearly an hour just to get through passport control at EMA - we were the only arrival at the time. That set the tone for the whole visit. :uhoh:

Anyways, great to hear your stories, please do keep them coming!

RIX

p.s. 1DC and Winglit - totally agree with you. I simply can't associate myself with the England of today - The one 10 years ago was problematic but it didn't stop me being proud to be British - now I try to hide the fact.

Hagbard the Amateur
28th Aug 2008, 09:12
14 years in Switzerland, I haven't looked back and I won't be going back to Blighty except on the occasional business. I'm in a central European location so also have the freedom to access other countries too quite quickly (Italy - 4 hours. France - 45 minutes. Germany - 30 minutes.) Also, one of the best public transport systems in the world.

I miss pies, sausages, bacon and banter but I feel at the moment with all the street crime, little hitler prohibition, high prices and low government sincerity, nothing could draw me back.

Charlie Foxtrot India
28th Aug 2008, 12:43
Left England in 1986, lived in Jersey for seven years then came to Australia in 1993 where I have lived ever since. Go back every couple of years to see the folks in England and catch the Jersey Battle of Britain air display, feel more "at home" in Jersey than England.

Do I miss it? I miss my friends and family, I miss the sense of humour, I miss the village pubs, I miss the farm smells, I miss my home town (Winchester). I miss real cider and chocolate that tastes like chocolate, Hellman's mayonnaise, Shreddies, Weetabix, Marmite and Golden Shred and various other breakfasty things!

I would go back to Jersey to live (if I won the lottery!) but would never live in England again. I feel so foreign there, it's not the sme place I grew up in..

paulc
28th Aug 2008, 14:42
Charlie Fox India - have lived in Winchester all my life and it has changed a lot in that time. Traffic is still bad, parking is worse, chavs taking over. My old secondary school is no longer there (Monty) but the infant / juniors are (Weeke). However it is home and have only ever found one other place that I would seriously consider leaving friends and family for.

SpringHeeledJack
28th Aug 2008, 14:42
Slight thread drift, but the words of this chap seemed to resonate with a few people that I was chatting with last night.....

Nemanja Vidic puts Manchester United future in doubt | Manchester United - Times Online (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/sport/football/premier_league/manchester_united/article4617393.ece)

However, for the sum of 50 grand a week, I might be able to tolerate it :}


Regards



SHJ

airship
28th Aug 2008, 14:44
Do you realise who we all are (yes, I finally left the UK after being made redundunt 3 times over a period of 2 years between 1983-85)...?!

Yes, we're economic migrants. We're the same species that regularly spend (important sums) endeavouring to come to the UK and elsewhere by being smuggled across frontiers in the backs of trucks or using false passports or visas. We never ran the risk of suffocating to death with another 20-30 fellow economic migrants. We never disappeared without a trace whilst traversing the straits of Gibraltar or other watery frontier.

A moment of true reflection and sobriety is required here IMHO folks...?! :rolleyes: Whilst congratulating ourselves for making the best decisions we ever made in our feeble lives perhaps, let's not denigrate those who stayed put. And acknowledge that it does not properly explain why we could do it all by simply hopping onto a scheduled flight, whereas many others go through a whole other process. Still feel you've accomplished something exceptional...?! :rolleyes:

Shack37
28th Aug 2008, 15:26
Airship,
I don't read any self congratulation or denigrating comments in any of the preceding posts. What I read are people expressing some sadness at leaving the UK behind but also contentment that they made the right decision.
I've lived on and off in N Spain for many years until making the permanent move two years ago. I have no doubts or regrets. My wife being from those parts and having local friends helps a lot and economically and socially we are in a different world.
s37

CherokeeDriver
28th Aug 2008, 15:34
I've got to finish an MBA starting in September, and plan to be out of here by summer next year. Not exactly an economic migrant, just someone who doesn't want their kids 'ejukated' in UK schools.

airship
28th Aug 2008, 15:37
Shack37, you obviously don't read what people post. The 1st post here went: Out of the UK for good!

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
It has now been a year since I took a better job in a nicer place (out of the UK and into E Europe). Already promoted, with significantly better salary than in the UK

Other benefits - no chavs (except British tourists), no stealth taxes, excellent transport links, friendly people, low cost of living (and drinking ) ... the list goes on

Here's over to anyone else who has made the plunge and ditched Old Blighty (or wherever you are originally from), and is now enjoying a better life. Or maybe you tried it and didn't like it. Please share your experiences.

RIX
I get the impression that the originator of this thread was at least somwhat thumbing his nose at all those who hadn't (yet) followed his own example. Hope that suffices.

621andy
28th Aug 2008, 15:43
Do I miss it? I miss my friends and family, I miss the sense of humour, I miss the village pubs, I miss the farm smells, I miss my home town (Winchester). I miss real cider and chocolate that tastes like chocolate, Hellman's mayonnaise, Shreddies, Weetabix, Marmite and Golden Shred and various other breakfasty things!


I miss the humour and pubs, the rest you can get online or in 'specialist' shops:} The advantage of going back once or twice a year, is to stock up on Marmite and other sh1t they won't sell on the mainland...and I agree about choccy too;)

Scooby Don't
28th Aug 2008, 16:07
Airship - this seems to me like a genuine wish from phonetic alphabet to hear of peoples' experiences. Ho hum.

I left the UK in 2004 to go to Canada as an uneconomic migrant! Really; I took a 30% pay cut. For the sake of a more enjoyable job and healthier bank balance, I'm now in the UAE but have gained a Canadian wife and Canadian pets so there's only one country that counts as home in the sense that I wish to return there once my desert time is done. The Great White North.

I've only been back to the UK for 2 weeks (plus one connection through LHR) in the last 4 years. Leaving the terminal at Glasgow Chavport, I asked a taxi driver to take me to Paisley railway station; maybe a mile from the airport. He complained that it wasn't far enough, and said no taxi would take me there. I ended up going to Queen Street station in Glasgow and avoided tipping the b*stard. There, I got on a train towards my mother's home and had standing room only for the next 90 minutes. No one tried to mug me or con me in Edinburgh, but the old unease when leaving the pub or getting on a bus came flooding back.

I see I'm not alone in missing the chocolate and Hellman's! The latter in Canada is a step down from the UK supply, and in the UAE it's a travesty that it even calls itself Hellman's on the label. North American chocolate is dire, but thankfully there are a few importers of the good stuff in Canada. Other than some of the goodies in UK supermarkets that I remember, such as the sandwiches in Tesco, Sainsbury and M&S, there's not much else to miss in Canada. The UAE is a different matter, where good bread is almost impossible to find.

Ultimately, it seems that whatever made the UK great has been ditched as incompatable with the New Labour ethos. The old elitism was combined with social mobility, and gave some impetus to those of intelligence yet limited means. Now, the elitism based on intelligence, education and social standing has been replaced with the cult of celebrity. It all started to unravel when Princess Diana died and the TV stations flicked the Queen Mother switch [they'd been waiting for years for her to die, and were ready for it - when she actually died, they underdid the story since by then they'd decided that Diana was more important] for the wrong person. That "outpouring of grief" was NOT British in character. To paraphrase Churchill, it wasn't the end, but it was the beginning of the end....

Caractacus
28th Aug 2008, 16:23
Fraggle Rock. Best kept secret in the 'British' Isles especially as it is not part of the 'Ukay'.

Visit 'accross' a few times a year and hate it. Aggressive people, overcrowded, horribly commercial and some of the wierdest attitudes I have ever encountered.

The shame is that ten years ago it was alright.

What went wrong?

Lon More
28th Aug 2008, 16:23
UK chocolate:yuk:, Hellman's Mayonnaise,:yuk::yuk:
Both travesties of the real thing. Get some of the real thing, like Godiva choccles from Brussel or proper French mayonnaise.

As for British bread - it tastes like it's genetically linked to toilet paper - and feels like it would make a pretty good substitute for it

dazdaz
28th Aug 2008, 16:30
I note with fascination reading how life is in other countries, salaries, living style. sunny days relaxing by the pool. I imagine most of you have retained your UK citizenship? And you know why?

Come the big C or other serious medical conditions, private medical insurance putting a limit on your policy......Fly back to the good old UK and get free treatment. You turned your back on the UK why should us tax payers subsidise your treatment when your medical insurance limits your treatment. I'm not saying this is the case of all the posters. But what insurance company would continue to pay $$$$$/££££££ for long term kidney dialysis for example.

Daz

Lon More
28th Aug 2008, 16:40
Hadn't thought of tht DazDaz. But there are reciprocal agreements so living in one EEC country makes you elligible for treatment in all.


BTW, strange that a certain person who loudly champions the joys of living on the Iberian Peninsula is not very forthcoming here:)

vee-tail-1
28th Aug 2008, 16:54
Its 30 years since I bought a derelict watermill in a Welsh village in N Pembrokeshire.
Then everyone (except me) spoke Welsh, and as the only foreigner it took a while before people accepted me into their community. After that it was like gaining another family. But now the Welsh have gone and everyone is an incomer. We have some retired English ladies who have renovated small cottages in traditional style. We have two young families who grow most of their own food and like me use water power for electricity. The village is not as pretty as those in the Cotswolds, but it has its own charm and rural atmosphere. However perhaps we needed to be reminded of what England is like, for a chav family has bought the cottage in the village centre and is turning it into a puppie farm. They have excavated the hillside, and let raw sewage and rock debris into the river which runs through the village. As if that was not enough now electric fences and metal bars are appearing, making the old Welsh cottage appear like a cross between a zoo and a prison. The barking of dogs and the shouts of their owners are heard all day. My complaints are received with insults, and the local council / environment agency seem unable to do anything.
What is it with chavs, where did they come from, how did they get to infest the UK, what went wrong when every UK city has become a no go area at night, full of young aggressive drunks. I used to like England, but moved west to get more space and fresh air, but now the chavs seem to be following me. :{

621andy
28th Aug 2008, 16:58
I imagine most of you have retained your UK citizenship?

Yes, but only cos my passport is valid for another year. I've been waiting for the new eye scan,fingerprint,stool sample, bollix to bed in, before forking out the dosh for a German pass.

A Brit mate of mine who lives in France and has French citizenship(along with his parents and brother) asked last week if I would give up my Brit passport when it expires next year. I replied yes, because I don't feel British any more. I see how the UK is going, see the Chavs on their hols(worked in cyprus last year:hmm:), and see the price of everything(and I'm living in Swissland:eek:), plus the increased risk of being targeted by certain middle eastern religious nutters, and I feel no desire to renew my 'membership'.

OFSO
28th Aug 2008, 17:23
I left England in 1968 for an international civil service job in Germany when it was obvious which way things were heading (downhill, for example) in England. Never regretted it for one minute.

I retired here to Catalunia in 1992. Still have British nationality but only because Catalunia (which is officially recognised now as a nation) doesn't YET have Catalan citizenship, and I don't fancy being "Spanish".

I believe that for most people, there's one country more than any other which will suit them - for some, indeed, it may be the country of their birth - but the only way to find out is to learn a few languages and travel, work here and there, and see for yourself what the rest of the world is like. Accept it, reject it, but only after you've been there.

RaF

dazdaz
28th Aug 2008, 17:49
Lon More...... In that case, why do I still need (and pay for) medical insurance for my 'Chav' hols to Spain?

Daz

Union Jack
28th Aug 2008, 18:04
The shame is that ten years ago it was alright.

What went wrong?

In a word, well two words, almost everything. When Anthony Charles Lynton Blair became Prime Minister, I took two sheets of A4 lined paper, and headed them respectively "Good things done by the Labour Government" and "Bad things done by the Labour Government". Today, they are both full up on both sides but the trouble is that the reason that the former is full up is because I ran out of space on the latter, and I had this completely blank sheet of paper available ......

And, no, I am not joking, and I do appreciate that any alternative party in power might not have done a great deal better. It is just that the Labour Party has so greatly diminished this country in so very many ways over the last eleven years that it really just does not bear thinking about, not least because I am committed to remaining domiciled here for family reasons.

Jack

rodthesod
28th Aug 2008, 18:05
dazdaz


You turned your back on the UK why should us tax payers subsidise your treatment when your medical insurance limits your treatment.


I left UK 4 years ago when I retired and have no regrets, not even having to pay UK taxes on my pensions - so actually I'm subsidising your care. I pay high enough private medical premiums here to receive UNLIMITED medicare in the excellent hospitals here in Turkey.

rts

hull city
28th Aug 2008, 18:31
RIX

Could you provide any information on living conditions in Latvia for UK citizens.

The usual stuff, cost of renting, cost of living and average salaries.

I have been offered a position as an engineer with an airline and would really appreciate any answers you could provide asap.

I have added a posting on the Nordic forum.

Thanks

Scooby Don't
28th Aug 2008, 19:20
No offense dazdaz, but you're talking boll*cks. I've had medical treatment in both Canada and the UAE, paid for by my taxes in the former and medical insurance in the latter. In neither case did it cost the UK taxpayer anything.

As for retaining UK citienship, it's my birthright. End of story. I don't have any other citizenship anyway. Back in the days when Australia was a penal colony and Virginia was a Crown Colony, would you have expected the transported shoplifters and emigrant indentured servants to give up their birthright???? No difference now, except that shoplifters get legal aid in the UK and Australia wouldn't accept them.

Loose rivets
28th Aug 2008, 22:40
As one who has commuted between the US and UK for many, many years, I just don't know where I would like to live if I had to choose and then stay put.

Casting aside the family thing, just living in the US can be fantastic...so why then do I get homesick?:{ Bloody daft. My son stood in the lush green of the Frinton farmland this spring and told his very Texan wife that he couldn't wait to get out of our boring little town when he was a teenager. Now he thinks it's beautiful. Apparently, he's not alone, many folk come home to roost in their dotage.

The littleuns could see how beautiful it was...mind you, they don't remember it in cold weather.

This continuous wet hasn't bothered me this summer, the alternative was 110f day after day after day. In southern Texas, it doesn't let up at night, and can still be hot till December. That sucks:uhoh:

Back in Essex, I'm running my Son-I-L's diddy BMW and just not thinking about the price of fuel when I top up. If I did, I wouldn't be going anywhere.

My cars in the US cost $12.50cents for an "MOT" type inspection. The road tax is so little that I don't even know how much it is. Insurance, well, we've discussed that one on a different thread, but it stings a bit but not much more than here. Mind you, I wouldn't want to own a hot car here. Cameras, crowded...everything, well until you get to the lake district. But then, the roads are so skinny I have to put the wing mirrors in all the time. Quaint yes, but costly in car wear. Salt on the roads? Forgot about that. Don't see much rust in the southern states.

Houses? Well, if my parts don't explode, I intend to show the Texans how to build a solid house. At last, one can now get auto-claved concrete without having to have it shipped a thousand miles or two.

So much of America needs air-con. Well not needs, but it's best with it. F:mad:in fans. My aim is to never hear another fan in my life. That brings me to trucks. F:mad:in trucks. I would swap my car for a Moggie, if I could be spared seeing another truck. I have grown to detest them with a passion.

Here, speed cameras. Loss of civil liberty...everywhere. Violence. Sooner walk around in Texas than...flippin heck...Walton on Naze. The seaside town I grew up in. Bloke stabbed in the head last week. He didn't make it. When I was young, if someone got punched it was a big deal.

Over crowding. Just can't believe it. When I started the thread "Who are all these people?" It got some interest, but soon went over to immigration. It's got little to do with that, it's just breeeeeeeeeeeeding. Good old selfish gene. Mark my words, there are over 100 million people in the UK, I just don't care what the CIA think...or want to tell us. Horrible, I spend ages looking longingly at old photos.

I'm orf for another drink. I'm beginning to not want to live anywhere.:*

James 1077
29th Aug 2008, 01:31
6 months for me - and easily the best decision I've ever made!

Metro man
29th Aug 2008, 02:47
Left Jan 1980, last trip back was five years ago. Ties well and truly gone now, no close relatives left there anymore. Going back there would be similar to moving to a foreign country.

Question is with all the choices available why go to a place with terrible weather, ridiculous tax levels, high cost of living, drug problem, political correctness, overcrowded, chav culture, gun/knife crime, failing public services etc ect etc ?

I can watch British TV on cable, I can shop online. There are very few things to attract me back there to live.

There is a whole world out there and what is a good option at one stage in your life may be unsuitable at another. Trick is knowing how to be in the right place at the right time. At the moment I'm in a great place for work and raising a family, however in 25 years time when I want to retire it will be too crowded, fast paced and expensive. At the moment my potential retirement destination isn't great for the kids or earning a living, but for just two of us on a decent retirement income it will be fantastic.

Ogre
29th Aug 2008, 03:21
Admittedly it's just over 12 months for me, but I think it was a good decision. The part of the UK I was in was slowly becoming more and more dangerous, with an influx of Eastern European migrants. Most of them were quite happy to find work and try and fit in, but the minority seemed to be just there to cause trouble. This added to the locals who just wanted to make trouble meant that at times it was like having your own little world war 3! Between that and "I'm alright Jack" Brits it was very much a case of fend for yourself and sod you al.
People say that Australia is 10 years behind the UK, but I beg to differ. The health service does cost you (even Medicare) but you have more than enough doctors and the option to shop around for prescriptions and get the best price. If you are unfortunate enough to need hospital care the facilities are excellent and the waiting lists are short.
Yes the shops don't open late every night, the car dealers don't work on a Sunday, and on public holidays the only things that appear to be open are the bottle shops and "adult" shops. Saying that, I feel safer walking down the local streets (dimly lit though they are) at any time of the day or night than I did in the UK since I was a pre-teenager.
As far as the community and public safety are concerned I would say that my part of Australia is exactly what the UK was 10 or more years ago. I just pray they don't race to catch up!

Somerset
29th Aug 2008, 05:22
I agree, Ogre.

I feel safer walking the streets of Brisbane at midnight than I did walking around most English town centres at lunchtime.

mary_hinge
29th Aug 2008, 07:29
We plan and being away from the UK by the years end. Chuff Chart on kitchen wall being ticked off. Attic and garage stuff going on e-bay and to the car boot. House let arranged (we can't sell reason 12 on the list of pros and cons for getting out) New job secured. The children have already packed.

We knew we had made the right choice in getting out, the above posts pretty much confirm that!

Romeo India Xray
29th Aug 2008, 07:32
Hull City - I will PM you with as much information as you want. I was a regular visitor to Latvia for 11 years before moving here, so could probably write a book. Same goes for anyone else who wants info on the Baltic States.

Airship, my intention with starting this thread was to see who is in the same boat as me, if they share my motivation and feelings or possibly they have found pitfalls. No malice of any kind intended (I recognise that emigration is not suitable for everyone).

The medical care issue is relevant, but here is not an issue. A few weeks ago I had to see a doctor with a recurrent problem I have had for over 10 years and the NHS have dailed to sort out. No NHS here and I forgot to take my medical insurance certificate. I was dreading how much it would cost - initial GP consultation was equivalent to 50p. Follow up with consultants (a whole day of tests) would have cost about £5 if I had not had my certificate there. Result - Diagnosis and treatment for a complaint that the NHS had failed to identify for more than 10 years!!!

There are a few things I miss, namely friends and relatives. I just can't find anything else left there that I am ABLE to miss!

As for citizenship, I will be applying here as soon as I meet the eligability requirements.

So any other stories, please keep them coming - it is good to hear of all the people this has worked for, and to hear any problems that may arise in the future.

RIX

larssnowpharter
29th Aug 2008, 09:22
daz daz

Come the big C or other serious medical conditions, private medical insurance putting a limit on your policy......Fly back to the good old UK and get free treatment. You turned your back on the UK why should us tax payers subsidise your treatment when your medical insurance limits your treatment

Let me put this simply. Total bollox!

Except in certain circumstances non UK residents are required to to pay for their health care in the UK. Forgot the SI number but check it out yerself.

One left the UK about 12 yrs ago. Enjoy returning for a couple of weeks to see family and friends but prefer the values in SE Asia.

ZFT
29th Aug 2008, 09:32
Except in certain circumstances non UK residents are required to to pay for their health care in the UK.


Oh so true. A non res UK citizen has less rights that a bl00dy tourist or illegal immigrant.

panda-k-bear
29th Aug 2008, 09:39
Now, now, boys.

Daz:
In that case, why do I still need (and pay for) medical insurance for my 'Chav' hols to Spain?


Did you not get whatever the new equivalent of an E111 form is - it's now a little credit card sized thingy? If you had that you wouldn't need private insurance inside the EU.



10 years ago last month I left Blighty. And it certainly is not the country I left. I'm still proud to be British but mine is really a tale of two cities. Mrs p-k-b's family is in the south east of Blighty. It's horrible - built up, dirty, full of no-hope yobbos (I typed "youths" first but corrected it to "yoboos" - they aren't necessarily youths) hanging around causing trouble and vandalising things. It feels threatening, dark and utterly depressing. The roads are a nightmare, the M4 is hell on Earth, drivers are a lot, lot worse and a lot more aggressive than when I lived there. Speed cameras are everywhere, as are plastic policemen but not real ones. Secrity cameras are pointing everywhere - what a place!

But then my family live in rural Lincolnshire. Exactly the opposite. Largely friendly neighbours. Well behaved (generally) kids. People will help out if you're in trouble. Still a load of speed cameras and reduced speed limits (so now you're stuck behind lorry drivers running at 40 everywhere - and don't say "use public transport"... there ain't any!). Country pubs with beer gardens. Good food, organic, bought in farm shops, not Tesco or Asda.

The idyllic parts of Britain do still exist. You just have to get away from the built up bits to enjoy them. And that's getting harder to do as more and more built up areas spring up.

corsair
29th Aug 2008, 10:40
I'm amazed that this thread has gone to three pages AND is in Jetblast and no one has stepped in to defend Britain or have a go at you guys for slagging off same.

Which is interesting in itself. I can't imagine a similar thread in an American, French, German or indeed Irish forum getting off so lightly!

It does seem to point to a particular British or English way of seeing their country! An insight into the British character perhaps?

Rather be Gardening
29th Aug 2008, 15:39
Er... Corsair, I said I preferred it to anywhere else in the world, but that's just my opinion. Wouldn't insist on anyone else seeing things the same way, so perhaps you're right about the insight into British character. :)

Loose rivets
29th Aug 2008, 16:11
It may surprise many folks, but even people that have paid for British medicine all their lives, become disqualified after living abroad for a small part of a year. I've been told 90 days, but have also heard a different figure. It cost me a lot of money not knowing that.

This law has been in place since 1948.

Nowadays, people like me travel routinely to see their children and grandchildren. To deny them medicine is to my mind a crime. Again, I pay to support those that have never paid.:mad::mad:

Still, one can be repatriated quite easily, but what a total farce.

In 1948, no doubt when people sailed, they would not come home for a long time...if ever. "They are expected to make arrangements in the country they are living in." Sic.

Now I just want to see my young'uns without further depleting my meager funds.

airship
29th Aug 2008, 16:20
I'm amazed that this thread has gone to three pages AND is in Jetblast and no one has stepped in to defend Britain or have a go at you guys for slagging off same. Just in case you missed my post or it was otherwise suitably alchohol-imbibed, here it is again:

Do you realise who we all are (yes, I finally left the UK after being made redundunt 3 times over a period of 2 years between 1983-85)...?!

Yes, we're economic migrants. We're the same species that regularly spend (important sums) endeavouring to come to the UK and elsewhere by being smuggled across frontiers in the backs of trucks or using false passports or visas. We never ran the risk of suffocating to death with another 20-30 fellow economic migrants. We never disappeared without a trace whilst traversing the straits of Gibraltar or other watery frontier.

A moment of true reflection and sobriety is required here IMHO folks...?! Whilst congratulating ourselves for making the best decisions we ever made in our feeble lives perhaps, let's not denigrate those who stayed put. And acknowledge that it does not properly explain why we could do it all by simply hopping onto a scheduled flight, whereas many others go through a whole other process. Still feel you've accomplished something exceptional...?!

And let's face it, the day will probably arrive when today's retirees, believing that they could look forward to some form of index-linked pension from UK whilst abroad, do indeed move abroad. But like all the British emigrés to Canada or those who had a tiny pension in Zimbabwe have since discovered...?! :rolleyes: What might happen should the Conservatives win the next UK election? As part of the process of extricating themselves from the EU, would they 'freeze' UK pension entitlements for all UK citizens currently residing or in retirement in other EU countries, at the date of their departure...?! Rubbish you say?! Well, just ask the Brits who retired to Canada and would be in extremely dire straits were it not for a generous Canadian social-security system! And that was well before any prospective UK government expressed any real desires to have less to do with the EU...

No doubt, there'll still be a fair few EU-haters out there in 10-20 years time who will nevertheless be grateful that there's an EU court of human rights of sorts which might allow them some redress, their own UK government having thrown their requests out with the rest of the annoying spam from overseas...?! :mad:

winglit
30th Aug 2008, 10:51
I know if I needed specialist medical attention, I'm staying put. I certainly wouldn't become a medical tourist for treatment in the UK. I mean who in their right mind would want to choose a British NHS hospital? I would wager that there are hospitals in the third world that are cleaner than NHS ones.

For example you don't hear of MRSA cases here in the Dominican Republic.

The way that I see it, mainly by talking with my fellow expats, is that Britain experiencing a "Brain Drain" There is an exodus of educated, middle class professionals form the UK.

The ones that pay 40% tax. The ones that went to university and earned their profession. The ones that paid huge sums of money to become qualified (professional pilots definitely in that category). The backbone of civilised society. The UK government has done nothing to support these people so they are looking for better lives elsewhere. The imbalance is starting to show. These qualified professionals are being replaced by immigrants.

In the meantime, the rich continue to get rich. The UK is great place to live if you have a lot of money.

The poor get handouts from the government. And immigration is out of control. There is no excuse for poverty in the UK. It is a land of opportunity. All you need is bit of "Get up and go". The problem with me is that mine "Got up and went" along with half my pay packet every month.

What do I miss?
Heinz baked beans
Marmite
Branston pickle
Bangers

and BBC television. Still the best in the world.

charliegolf
30th Aug 2008, 11:25
It does seem to point to a particular British or English way of seeing their country!

I'd say English (save for v-tail, who I take it is English:ok:). I live in an ugly Welsh village (where i live, there are no Miss Marple type villages), left over from mining. Daughter well educated, degree in Physics.

Only the weather makes me want to move abroad.

As for America.....

Consultant pal visited Texas and caught up with a med school pal there, working in A&E. A gunshot expert.

"How many do you get here then?", says my pal.
"Oh bout 7 last year"
Shocked pal... "Only 7, I though you'd see hundreds!"
"No, only 7 shootings in the A&E last year". "About 11,000 brought in off the street last year".

Enjoy.

CG

redsnail
30th Aug 2008, 12:04
I flew into the UK April 01 to live. Still here. :)

The big fella flew in Aug 02. He's still here too!

Our lives have improved considerably since we both earn a pretty good salary AND we moved out of Luton.

Where you live does make a huge difference to the quality of life. Also, not having to stress about money too. :ok:

Both of us are Australian.

frostbite
30th Aug 2008, 12:31
"and BBC television. Still the best in the world."


Given their tendency to stuff the schedules full of repeats and repeats of repeats, if you returned and turned on the TV you would probably find you'd seen it before.

Charlie Foxtrot India
30th Aug 2008, 12:59
Hmm airship, I only wish emigrating to Australia on an independant migrant visa had been as easy as hopping on a scheduled flight, rather than spending several years in limbo (well, Jersey, where I was "J catagory, essentially employed") waiting for the wheels at the High Commission to turn...does that really make people like me the same as someone smuggled in illegally in the back of a truck?! Or maybe I misunderstood you? I certainly didn't get free anything when I got here.

And I am in my middle age feeling the permanent painful effects of a very badly managed broken leg by the NHS 30 years ago, hardly the standards I would go back to. Even though I did pay NI contributions for many years before leaving.

airship
30th Aug 2008, 13:25
CFI, the point that I was trying to make and have apparently failed to do so with much success was that:

We're all homo-sapiens, some of us have complete freedom to more or less live wherever we wish (either because of our nationality, expertise, wealth or family connections). For some, there are legal processes that have to be applied for and obtained, with varying degrees of difficulty. And then there are all the others. Who would not stand any chance of emigrating to another country by legal means. But they do, in their desperation, often at great risk to life and limb. And they mostly do it for precicisely the same reasons that everyone else who does so legally, does it (emigrates).

It may be self-evident that all men are created equal, but they're certainly not born that way...?! I was merely trying to instill a modicum of responsible behaviour from the "Bose-owning" crowd whose A/V systems sound and look so great that they wished everyone was as fortunate... ;)

goudie
30th Aug 2008, 15:23
Just read this on the BBC website. Bet a few of them came to the UK 'cos it's a great place to live and work!


thousands of Australian men in their 20s and early 30s have gone overseas either to travel or to work.


BBC NEWS | World | Asia-Pacific | Australia suffering 'man drought' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/7589382.stm)