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QFcaptain
9th Aug 2008, 14:45
This is a time of shame and sorrow. It is not a day for politics. I have saved this one opportunity, my only event of today, to speak briefly to you about the mindless menace of violence in America which again stains our land and every one of our lives. It is not the concern of any one race. The victims of the violence are black and white, rich and poor, young and old, famous and unknown. They are, most important of all, human beings whom other human beings loved and needed. No one - no matter where he lives or what he does - can be certain who will suffer from some senseless act of bloodshed. And yet it goes on and on and on in this country of ours. Why? What has violence ever accomplished? What has it ever created? No martyr's cause has ever been stilled by an assassin's bullet. No wrongs have ever been righted by riots and civil disorders. A sniper is only a coward, not a hero; and an uncontrolled, uncontrollable mob is only the voice of madness, not the voice of reason. Whenever any American's life is taken by another American unnecessarily - whether it is done in the name of the law or in the defiance of the law, by one man or a gang, in cold blood or in passion, in an attack of violence or in response to violence - whenever we tear at the fabric of the life which another man has painfully and clumsily woven for himself and his children, the whole nation is degraded. "Among free men," said Abraham Lincoln, "there can be no successful appeal from the ballot to the bullet; and those who take such appeal are sure to lose their cause and pay the costs." Yet we seemingly tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity and our claims to civilization alike. We calmly accept newspaper reports of civilian slaughter in far-off lands. We glorify killing on movie and television screens and call it entertainment. We make it easy for men of all shades of sanity to acquire whatever weapons and ammunition they desire. Too often we honor swagger and bluster and wielders of force; too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of others. Some Americans who preach non-violence abroad fail to practice it here at home. Some who accuse others of inciting riots have by their own conduct invited them. Some look for scapegoats, others look for conspiracies, but this much is clear: violence breeds violence, repression brings retaliation, and only a cleansing of our whole society can remove this sickness from our soul. For there is another kind of violence, slower but just as deadly destructive as the shot or the bomb in the night. This is the violence of institutions; indifference and inaction and slow decay. This is the violence that afflicts the poor, that poisons relations between men because their skin has different colors. This is the slow destruction of a child by hunger, and schools without books and homes without heat in the winter. This is the breaking of a man's spirit by denying him the chance to stand as a father and as a man among other men. And this too afflicts us all. I have not come here to propose a set of specific remedies nor is there a single set. For a broad and adequate outline we know what must be done. When you teach a man to hate and fear his brother, when you teach that he is a lesser man because of his color or his beliefs or the policies he pursues, when you teach that those who differ from you threaten your freedom or your job or your family, then you also learn to confront others not as fellow citizens but as enemies, to be met not with cooperation but with conquest; to be subjugated and mastered. We learn, at the last, to look at our brothers as aliens, men with whom we share a city, but not a community; men bound to us in common dwelling, but not in common effort. We learn to share only a common fear, only a common desire to retreat from each other, only a common impulse to meet disagreement with force. For all this, there are no final answers. Yet we know what we must do. It is to achieve true justice among our fellow citizens. The question is not what programs we should seek to enact. The question is whether we can find in our own midst and in our own hearts that leadership of humane purpose that will recognize the terrible truths of our existence. We must admit the vanity of our false distinctions among men and learn to find our own advancement in the search for the advancement of others. We must admit in ourselves that our own children's future cannot be built on the misfortunes of others. We must recognize that this short life can neither be ennobled or enriched by hatred or revenge. Our lives on this planet are too short and the work to be done too great to let this spirit flourish any longer in our land. Of course we cannot vanquish it with a program, nor with a resolution. But we can perhaps remember, if only for a time, that those who live with us are our brothers, that they share with us the same short moment of life; that they seek, as do we, nothing but the chance to live out their lives in purpose and in happiness, winning what satisfaction and fulfillment they can. Surely, this bond of common faith, this bond of common goal, can begin to teach us something. Surely, we can learn, at least, to look at those around us as fellow men, and surely we can begin to work a little harder to bind up the wounds among us and to become in our own hearts brothers and countrymen once again.

Killer Loop
9th Aug 2008, 15:16
Brilliant but have I missed the point? Kennedy speech before he was shot. City Club Of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, April, 1968.:uhoh:

Chimbu chuckles
9th Aug 2008, 15:51
I'll think you'll find if you study the history of assassins that, while they rarely achieve their particular aim (no pun intended) they nearly always have far reaching effects.

Is there a place in our world for violence?

Absolutely.

Imagine the world we would live in if Hitler had been assassinated in 1938?

Or if the Brits had successfully assassinated Mugabe in the 80s (they did try unsuccessfully)

Or if someone took out Pol Pot?

The list goes on and on.

The origin of the word 'Assassin' comes from an ancient tribe that lived in what is now northern Iran over 1000 years ago. They were extraordinarily successful. And no they did NOT take Hashish as the myth suggests. Anyone who has ever smoked a joint would know that the only thing they could murder straight after is a pizza.

Every western Govt (except maybe Australia/NZ) uses political murder as part of there foreign policy. Certainly every UN permanent member.

In fact there should be a lot more of it...nothing focuses the mind of a dictator like not knowing when someone will reach out and 'touch' them.

In fact the only trouble with its use as a political tool is the '**** up' factor...and there is not a politician or intelligence agency that is immune from that.

vapilot2004
9th Aug 2008, 21:10
Mit Paragraphen: :ok:
This is a time of shame and sorrow. It is not a day for politics. I have saved this one opportunity, my only event of today, to speak briefly to you about the mindless menace of violence in America which again stains our land and every one of our lives.

It is not the concern of any one race. The victims of the violence are black and white, rich and poor, young and old, famous and unknown. They are, most important of all, human beings whom other human beings loved and needed. No one - no matter where he lives or what he does - can be certain who will suffer from some senseless act of bloodshed. And yet it goes on and on and on in this country of ours. Why?

What has violence ever accomplished? What has it ever created? No martyr's cause has ever been stilled by an assassin's bullet. No wrongs have ever been righted by riots and civil disorders. A sniper is only a coward, not a hero; and an uncontrolled, uncontrollable mob is only the voice of madness, not the voice of reason.

Whenever any American's life is taken by another American unnecessarily - whether it is done in the name of the law or in the defiance of the law, by one man or a gang, in cold blood or in passion, in an attack of violence or in response to violence - whenever we tear at the fabric of the life which another man has painfully and clumsily woven for himself and his children, the whole nation is degraded.

"Among free men," said Abraham Lincoln, "there can be no successful appeal from the ballot to the bullet; and those who take such appeal are sure to lose their cause and pay the costs." Yet we seemingly tolerate a rising level of violence that ignores our common humanity and our claims to civilization alike.

We calmly accept newspaper reports of civilian slaughter in far-off lands. We glorify killing on movie and television screens and call it entertainment. We make it easy for men of all shades of sanity to acquire whatever weapons and ammunition they desire. Too often we honor swagger and bluster and wielders of force; too often we excuse those who are willing to build their own lives on the shattered dreams of others.

Some Americans who preach non-violence abroad fail to practice it here at home. Some who accuse others of inciting riots have by their own conduct invited them. Some look for scapegoats, others look for conspiracies, but this much is clear: violence breeds violence, repression brings retaliation, and only a cleansing of our whole society can remove this sickness from our soul.

For there is another kind of violence, slower but just as deadly destructive as the shot or the bomb in the night. This is the violence of institutions; indifference and inaction and slow decay. This is the violence that afflicts the poor, that poisons relations between men because their skin has different colors. This is the slow destruction of a child by hunger, and schools without books and homes without heat in the winter. This is the breaking of a man's spirit by denying him the chance to stand as a father and as a man among other men.

And this too afflicts us all. I have not come here to propose a set of specific remedies nor is there a single set. For a broad and adequate outline we know what must be done. When you teach a man to hate and fear his brother, when you teach that he is a lesser man because of his color or his beliefs or the policies he pursues, when you teach that those who differ from you threaten your freedom or your job or your family, then you also learn to confront others not as fellow citizens but as enemies, to be met not with cooperation but with conquest; to be subjugated and mastered.

We learn, at the last, to look at our brothers as aliens, men with whom we share a city, but not a community; men bound to us in common dwelling, but not in common effort. We learn to share only a common fear, only a common desire to retreat from each other, only a common impulse to meet disagreement with force.

For all this, there are no final answers. Yet we know what we must do. It is to achieve true justice among our fellow citizens. The question is not what programs we should seek to enact. The question is whether we can find in our own midst and in our own hearts that leadership of humane purpose that will recognize the terrible truths of our existence.

We must admit the vanity of our false distinctions among men and learn to find our own advancement in the search for the advancement of others. We must admit in ourselves that our own children's future cannot be built on the misfortunes of others. We must recognize that this short life can neither be ennobled or enriched by hatred or revenge.

Our lives on this planet are too short and the work to be done too great to let this spirit flourish any longer in our land. Of course we cannot vanquish it with a program, nor with a resolution. But we can perhaps remember, if only for a time, that those who live with us are our brothers, that they share with us the same short moment of life; that they seek, as do we, nothing but the chance to live out their lives in purpose and in happiness, winning what satisfaction and fulfillment they can.

Surely, this bond of common faith, this bond of common goal, can begin to teach us something. Surely, we can learn, at least, to look at those around us as fellow men, and surely we can begin to work a little harder to bind up the wounds among us and to become in our own hearts brothers and countrymen once again.

Fantome
10th Aug 2008, 00:04
A Preach for any Commercial Pilot and reader


Funny heading, QF captain. It's a speech long on rhetoric and emotion. But of course lacking in any rigorous analysis of violence, codes of warfare, the killing of murderous tyrants such as Hitler. Some men and women of deep compassion and peace, who thought themselves lifelong consciencious objectors, modified their opinions when Hitler began the Blitz.

The perfectability of man may be an illusion, but the study of pathways, that is philosophy, is more rewarding than glazing over to a sermon. And as often said, inculcating the virtues begins in the home, extends into the community and whatever so-called culture maybe we live in. Whether or not it is a given, and understood instinctively, we can but do our own little against whatever odds.

BlueDiamond
10th Aug 2008, 01:19
Thanks for that, Vapilot ... I took one look at that huge, indigestible lump of text and couldn't be bothered reading it. Paragraphs make it Soooooooo much easier!! :ok:

Now ... why are you reprinting a forty year old speech for us, QFcaptain?

Re-entry
10th Aug 2008, 01:20
Thanks vapilot for paragrahenizing that for us.

It sounds more and more like some shite obama would come out with to ensure the democrats lose another unlosable presidential election.

sisemen
10th Aug 2008, 02:16
Every western Govt (except maybe Australia/NZ) uses political murder

Wrong! Krudd the Dud's taxes are killing me :(

vapilot2004
10th Aug 2008, 02:55
Bluey and Re-entry, reformatting was my only way through that sea of letters as well and I did not want that small effort to go wasted on the mere likes of me. :}

It sounds more and more like some shite obama would come out with to ensure the democrats lose another unlosable presidential election.

And a laughable election loss at that, should it happen.

vapilot2004
10th Aug 2008, 03:19
As it turns out, a large part of that speech originally written by RFK was read by brother Edward M, at the funeral service for Robert in June 1968. An audio archive of the entire eulogy from the JFK library is available here (http://www.jfklibrary.org/Asset+Tree/Asset+Viewers/Audio+Video+Asset+Viewer.htm?guid={C401261F-591C-4388-AEDA-C7D64FBD03AE}&type=Audio) if you have the patience and stomach for it.
Run time is a little under ten minutes.:eek:

brickhistory
10th Aug 2008, 13:37
I wonder if Dewar's will be providing the eulogy at Ted's impending final resting ceremony?

Loose rivets
10th Aug 2008, 14:18
Kennedy speech before he was shot. City Club Of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio, April, 1968.:uhoh:


Mmmm, put me in mind of the police captain at the podium...just before the un-zipping noise.:E