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tom775257
7th Aug 2008, 15:05
Well yesterday a woman in her 80s reversed into the side of my BMW that I have had for 3 months... Her explanation was 'well I saw another car waiting for me so I hurried up and didn't see your car', a big black car is very visible in broad daylight.

I see piss-poor driving from all age ranges, but special points to the 80's-90s range for complete lack of spacial awareness and knowledge of the current rules of the road. While Ruth Kelly is considering an upper age limit for drivers due to the large numbers of accidents caused by over 80's, I think this is a silly idea, it could restrict some competent drivers, but I would like to see a cut-off at say age 80 with a driving test to continue holding the licence, and a two-yearly basic medical there after. I suspect there would be a very high failure rate.

I am in a foul mood after dealing with her incompetent car insurance company, the fact my nice new car will be fixed and painted by 'Impact Bros.' not Bayerische Motoren Werke and unfortunately the metallic black is a bitch to paint well, dealing with more jazz music than one man can handle and retain sanity whilst holding on the phone, incompetent car hire companies, having to pay to park at the airport, and hoping to reclaim from the insurance etc.etc.etc and now I have to fly a night Ibiza. :ugh: :mad:

uklocations
7th Aug 2008, 15:18
but I would like to see a cut-off at say age 80

Bet ya'won't say that when you're 79:)

AMEandPPL
7th Aug 2008, 15:30
I am in a foul mood . . . . . . . . . and now I have to fly a night Ibiza.

Not exactly the ideal definition of good CRM . . . . . . . . ?

old,not bold
7th Aug 2008, 15:39
P*$$ off, sunshine, especially if you really are 27 years old.

Because if you are, I see people your age every day driving with no awareness whatsoever of what's going on round you, no apparent desire for any such awareness, no awareness of abnormal conditions such as floodwater on the road (that one did a 180 on the M5 after going into the water at 80mph, while those of us wrinklies who realised it would be there before we even saw it drove round it), in short driving like the immature and inexperienced prats you are while, of course, telling yourselves that you are driving brilliantly while everyone else is an idiot.

So grow up, with your nice new BMW that I bet you drive incompetently because every 27-year old with one does, and ask yourself how bad your driving is instead of ranting on about other people.

And if you tailgate, as I bet you do because every 27-year old with a BMW does, and do that behind me at 90 I'll just touch the brake and watch you in my mirror trying to regain control, because you over-react as inexperienced people of your age always do.

You touched a raw nerve there! Upper age limit? Should be a lower age limit of 30, in my view.

(35 for pilots.)

Jimmy Macintosh
7th Aug 2008, 15:44
Slight side note on the repaint, go and find one of those sodium street lights (if they're still around) the orange light helps highlight any colour match discrepancies on the new paint which can be hard to tell in normal light.

forget
7th Aug 2008, 15:52
Just a wild guess here but I'd say that old, not bold is older than 27, younger than 80. :hmm:

419
7th Aug 2008, 15:55
Old, not bold,

You were doing fine up until this comment.

And if you tailgate, as I bet you do because every 27-year old with a BMW does, and do that behind me at 90 I'll just touch the brake and watch you in my mirror trying to regain control, because you over-react as inexperienced people of your age always do.

Admitting that you would deliberately act in a manner which you know could cause an accident, and could well injur or kill other road users who may be totally innocent of any dangerous driving doesn't help your argument one bit.

er340790
7th Aug 2008, 15:55
Met a guy last week who is 87 years old and drives each Summer from Vancouver to NW Ontario.

He said 'I've been driving since 1938.'

Yes, I can believe that all right......

AMEandPPL
7th Aug 2008, 16:04
Admitting that you would deliberately act in a manner which you know could cause an accident, and could well injure or kill other road users who may be totally innocent of any dangerous driving doesn't help your argument one bit.

Maybe not, got to be fair there . . . . . . . . BUT

what ELSE can you do when the "boy racer" in his BMW is practically inspecting the inside of your exhaust pipe ? Just tell me that.

goudie
7th Aug 2008, 16:14
what ELSE can you do when the "boy racer" in his BMW is practically inspecting the inside of your exhaust pipe ? Just tell me that


Pull over and let the pratt pass.

PaperTiger
7th Aug 2008, 16:24
Met a guy last week who is 87 years old and drives each Summer from Vancouver to NW Ontario.Damn, it doesn't take that long. Think I've seen him on the road though - 50kph all the way across Sask :ugh:

BC does have a re-test (http://www.tsfbcaa.com/content/documents/Driver_Re-Test.pdf) requirement, as does Québec. We also have nice Veterans' plates which are a different colour and serve as a warning to other drivers that an old [email protected] is approaching ;) .

UniFoxOs
7th Aug 2008, 16:30
Admitting that you would deliberately act in a manner which you know could cause an accident, and could well injur or kill other road users who may be totally innocent of any dangerous driving

Somehow I don't remember when tailgating at 90 became safe.

UFO

And PLEASE let's all stop calling them "accidents"

west lakes
7th Aug 2008, 16:31
what ELSE can you do when the "boy racer" in his BMW is practically inspecting the inside of your exhaust pipe ? Just tell me that.
What every advanced driving and defensive driving instructor in the UK will say.

Either what goudie said ( they're better off in front of you)

or

Increase your distance from the car in front (i.e. from the recommended 2 seconds behind the one in front to 3 or 4 seconds), gives you longer to react and reduces the chance of them hitting the back of your car - the sheer act of slightly slowing down to achieve this usually makes them pull back away from you as well.

Gertrude the Wombat
7th Aug 2008, 16:34
I am in a foul mood after dealing with her incompetent car insurance company
So don't.

(1) Get your car fixed at a dealer of your choice.
(2) Send the woman the bill.
(3) Sue if she doesn't pay it.

Her relationship with her insurance company is none of your business, you certainly don't need to talk to them ever or do what they say. (OK, the disadvantage of this approach is that you might have to finance the repairs and the hire car for a couple of months, but if you can afford a new BMW in the first place I will assume that's not a problem.)

Overdrive
7th Aug 2008, 16:39
old,not bold, you fell straight into the same trap as tom775257: ridiculous generalization.

Loose rivets
7th Aug 2008, 16:48
Mmmm...One has one of the hottest 4 door thingies there is, (haven't seen it for months, but I'm told it's still there.) however, it's a blooooooooooooody good job I didn't own it when I was younger. I mean, up to the age of 60. Total menace, me.

Just lately, I've noticed that my driving simply isn't as good as it was. I think partly because I no longer have quiet roads on to practice...dunno what to call it...optimumized making way, perhaps.

Shoemaker was given a simple reaction test on the box one night. He was averge, and what the psychologist was trying to get over, was that so much of what he did well, was because of anticipation. Learned reaction and conditioned reflex are what its all about.

BlueDiamond
7th Aug 2008, 16:57
... what ELSE can you do when the "boy racer" in his BMW is practically inspecting the inside of your exhaust pipe ? Just tell me that ...You take control of the situation. Either slow down carefully or pull over (whichever is appropriate to your country/driving conditions) and make him go past. This course of action removes the very real risk to yourself by putting you, your cars and passengers in a safer position, and putting the aggressive and threatening driver right where you can observe him clearly until he's out of your way.

I see piss-poor driving from all age ranges, So do we all. And, funnily enough, men from your age group are far more likely to be involved in a motor vehicle accident than those from any other category ... now I wonder why that might be? Possibly because no twenty seven year old man is ever going to concede that his driving is ever anything less than perfect.

419
7th Aug 2008, 17:02
Unifox,

The innocent drivers I was refering to were other road users. Touching your brakes with the sole intention to "watch you in my mirror trying to regain control, because you over-react as inexperienced people of your age always do", is not only stupid, it is downright dangerous.

I wonder how Old, not bold would feel if their intentionally attempting to cause a driver to lose control killed a family who just happened to be on the road at the same time.

tom775257
7th Aug 2008, 17:07
Well Old, not bold the government agrees with both of our points of view - wanting to increase the minimum age to drive, and also introduce an upper age limit because both groups have a higher accident rate per capita. I also agree with upping the minimum age...

Regarding my standard and style of driving, well they trust me with a 220 seater jet, I think I am mature enough to drive a car safely. Yes agreed, I will have less experience than an older driver, but I feel I am safe and I bet my increased reaction speed compared to older drivers can make up for some of my lack of experience ;). Also agreed you see a lot of poor driving standard from drivers of my age, in my car type, so what. To explain my car choice - well I plan to marry the missus and start a family soon, I figure this will be the only time in my life I will have enough income spare to get a 'luxury' car so why the hell not.

Please note I did say there shouldn't be a ban for over 80's, but a driving test. I fail to see how that is gross generalisation. I think it is quite sensible.

Regarding the other end of the scale, 17-21 year old drivers, well a car is a lethal weapon and these (guys especially) drive at high speed with little experience in often crap cars - a deadly incident in the making. How do you help this, no idea, raise the minimum age, zero points to start with, speed limiters in cars?? :cool:

I have reached a calm state after having arranged everything now, so things are looking up :ok:

ps thanks for the tip JM.

Earl
7th Aug 2008, 17:13
I remember 20 years ago riding with my father at the wheel, he was mid 70's.
Same situation, he drove always slow often 5 mph under the speed limit and was very careful.
When another driver would pass him irritated at this he would seem to get offended at the way the other drivers attitude and almost hitting the front of the car after passing him.
Really got under my skin, just wished he would speed up.
Some how now I understand this as I get older, more careful, tired of paying speeding tickets and don't seem to be in so much of a hurry as the younger years.
Don't knock them old folks so much, you will be there one day yourself, I see it beginning now and only 50.

Davaar
7th Aug 2008, 17:29
and do that behind me at 90

I am quite happy with that, but just so that I know, are you talking mph or years of age?

con-pilot
7th Aug 2008, 18:38
Too old, HA!

I'll have you lot know that today I just passed a Commercial Drivers License test in a truck and trailer at the age of 61, so there. I even had to back the dang thing up into a parking slot.






(If you're curious as to why a 61 year pilot needs a Commercial Drivers License it is due to my oldest son and a friend of his have started an Oil Field Service Company and I am going to help them get started. So all Ppruners in Oklahoma, Texas and other near states, watch out when on the Interstates. So now I is in the awl bidness. :p)

(Only part time though. Still available for aviation related activities.)

PaperTiger
7th Aug 2008, 18:46
what ELSE can you do when the "boy racer" in his BMW is practically inspecting the inside of your exhaust pipe ?You take control of the situation. Either slow down carefully...:ok: You can get a bumper sticker or plateholder to that effect - "The closer you get, the slower I go".

bucket_and_spade
7th Aug 2008, 19:10
Yep - there should be an OPC/LPC equivalent every few years for (all, not just the older) drivers!

One thing that really grips my s$$t is nervous, unpredictable, riddled-with-lack-of-awareness, way-below-the-speed-limit driving. Call me militant if you like but if you can't confidently and competently handle your car at the speed limit on the road you're on, you shouldn't be there.

Of course, saying all drivers over a certain age are incompetent is crap (everyone's different) but it IS fair to say that the vast majority of those fitting the description above fall into the much older age bracket. This shouldn't be a huge revelation as, like it or not, faculties show a trend to diminish in proportion to age.

Matt35
7th Aug 2008, 19:35
Driving ability should not be regarded neccessarily as ageist - any more than aviation should be?

Driver education is more relevant? In my 60s I got this report last year...by a London Met Class 1 Examiner

SECTION ONE: USE OF CONTROLS
A) PREPARATION (CONTROLS, BRAKES ETC,) Full internal and external checks carried out in a disciplined manner.
B) STEERING: Smooth, gradual, unhurried "pull/push" method throughout test.
C) USE OF CLUTCH: Automatic gearbox.
D) GEARS: Good use of ratios with the automatic box.
E) USE OF BRAKES: Smooth and progressive
F) USE OF ACCELERATOR/THROTTLE: Smooth and progressive use, showed good Acceleration Sense.
G) USE OF MIRRORS: Mirrors used as often as necessary; fully aware of what was happening behind.
H) USE OF HORN: Not used during test, circumstances did not require.
J) VISIBILITY/CONSPICUITY: Clear screens, all necessary equipment used in poor weather conditions.
SECTION TWO DRIVING PERFORMANCE
K) MOVING OFF AND STOPPING: Correct use of safety measures in relation to both manoeuvres.
L) APPLICATION OF SYSTEM: Excellent, all phases of "System" in correct sequence, no detail omitted.
M) POSITIONING: Positioning at junctions, roundabouts and other hazards entirely satisfactory.
N) CORNERING: Excellent: correct lines, speed, accelerator balance and safety margins maintained throughout.
P) SIGNALLING: Correct signals given according to "System" as required.
Q) REACTION TO SIGNS AND OTHER HAZARDS: Seen in good time with correct response.
R) REVERSING: Not required as part of test.
T) PROGRESS: A pleasing use of pace and "flow".
U) OVERTAKING: Limited opportunities; candidate appeared to apply correct actions when considering the manoeuvre.
SECTION THREE: GENERAL ABILITY
V) DEPORTMENT: A relaxed driver - calm and confident.
W) CONSIDERATION AND RESTRAINT: Showed both virtues well on test.
X) USE OF SPEED: Made intelligent use of speed. Always related to view.
Y) TEMPERAMENT: Calm and relaxed style.
Z) VEHICLE SYMPATHY: Showed every possible care to the vehicle.
AX) OBSERVATION: Excellent, with good planning; used physical features to good effect.
BX) JUDGEMENT OF DISTANCE: Appeared to have a good appreciation of speed and distance in all situations.
CX) COMMENTARY: Excellent, missed little or nothing at speed or in traffic.
DX) CONCENTRATION: Good links between concentration and observation.
EX) MOTORWAY DRIVING: Showed a complete understanding of driving on multi-lane roads.
SECTION FOUR KNOWLEDGE
FX) HIGHWAY CODE: Good knowledge and understanding.
GX) MAINTENANCE: Good knowledge and understanding.
OVERALL COMMENTS
The candidate is an Observer with a local group and is a very keen driver to perfect his own driving skills. This was a very good professional drive over a very 'fussy' test route that needs total concentration for its entire route. The candidate has a superb knowledge and understanding of his automatic gearbox and gave one of the best demonstration drives using the auto box I have ever had.
An excellent, high standard drive.
RESULT: GOLD



(This grade is recognised as the highest driving award available to the public. It will be awarded only to the polished systematic driver, who displays a complete understanding and appropriate application of the principles outlined in Roadcraft. The candidate will display a confidence and ability throughout the whole test which leads the examiner to consider that, if given the opportunity the candidate has the potential with the basics already in place to do well on a police advanced course. The candidate's performance must be consistent throughout the whole of the test and so any lapses may result in a lower grade. Awards of this grade must therefore be reserved for the very best drivers.)

In case this appears self satisfied - I am going for a much tougher Test in December...if the Nurse brings my soup on time...

Matt.

C130 Techie
7th Aug 2008, 19:46
In the last week I have experienced some of the worst driving I have ever seen whilst driving to and from work. The examples show clearly that there bad drivers accross the age spectrum.

1. Encountered elderly lady overtaking a cyclist on a blind bend forcing me to take evasive action.

2. Youth undertaking me and the car in front which was slowing to turn right. The undertaking involved driving on the pavement. Same driver then proceeded to overtake 2 cars on a section of road with 2 solid lines.

3. Middle aged numpty in a Ford Focus overtaking going through a set of traffic lights in a 30 mph limit.

4. Old lady pulled onto the roundabout and then just stopped. No traffic coming from any direction other than behind her.

Finally last night a learner driver who clearlywas not ready to be out on the road in rush hour traffic. Driving at speeds of sometimes less than 20 mph on a busy A road and braking erratically. In this case the blame lies firmly with the driving intructor who clearly had no idea of the ability of his/her pupil and has probably done little for the pupils confidence given the reactions of other drivers on the road.

Oh and just to show that I don't claim to be perfect, apologies to the guy behind me who I must have worried when I accidentaly put the car in reverse instead of first whilst waiting at the traffic lights this morning. Fortunately not being a boy racer the error was noticed quickly before any damage was done.

The standard of driving in the UK is often poor and people seem to have little regard for road/traffic conditions or speed limits

green granite
7th Aug 2008, 20:03
One thing that pi$$es me off, which may or may not be relevant to this case, is backing out of a parking place and having drivers who weren't near when you started just ignoring you and driving across the back of you instead of waiting 30 secs or so, People who do that deserve to get their car bent.

lexxity
7th Aug 2008, 20:07
Especially the fcukwits doing 50mph down a residential road and beeping or swerving around cars reversing off their drives. Note residential, not main. One even threatend to come back and murder (his words) Mr L. Guy must have been doing 60mph and we have a blind bend at the bottom of the road.

old,not bold
7th Aug 2008, 20:28
Well now, Tom775257

I've cooled off a bit too, but ........


well they trust me with a 220 seater jet, I think I am mature enough to drive a car safely.

...it's news to me that single-pilot operations, perhaps from the RHS in your case, but perhaps not, at least in aircraft with 220 seats, have come into vogue, and.........

...regrettably a pilot qualification does not always prove maturity, as your first post suggested.

and I accept my admonishments from various people about "touching the brakes". You are all quite right, of course.

JennyB
7th Aug 2008, 20:32
What's the difference between a hedgehog and a BMW?

A hedgehog has it pricks on the outside...

DX Wombat
7th Aug 2008, 20:37
backing out of a parking place and having drivers who weren't near when you started just ignoring you and driving across the back of you instead of waiting 30 secs or so, People who do that deserve to get their car bent.Not at all. It is in fact YOU who deserves to have your car bent. You should be reversing INTO the space not out of it. Your vision, and therefore your spatial awareness, is impaired when reversing out. It is the lazy / incompetent / or both, driver who drives straight into a parking space. As the person driving out of the space it is YOU who should be waiting for the rest of the traffic to clear, they are travelling with the traffic flow whereas you are crossing it.

Chimbu chuckles
7th Aug 2008, 20:41
B) STEERING: Smooth, gradual, unhurried "pull/push" method throughout test.

I have been driving now just on 30 years...no accidents in the last 25...and yes I was a typical, but NOT extreme, version of a young male driver when I was a young male.

I have taught numerous people to drive. Brothers and sister, mates girlfriends years ago, and in the last few years my own daughter and our maid. They all passed their test first go...and passed WELL...and I quite deliberately REFUSED to teach them this method of cornering and would NOT allow them to do it...until they were nearing test standard and then I taught them 'just to pass the test'.

In my view it is a completely stupid habit that contributes to less than smooth cornering.

Hands at 10-2 and smoothly in - smoothly out in one fluid motion 95% of the time...in really tight low speed cornering there is not a damn thing wrong with 'crossing' hands or palming in my view. Reversing using that method is REALLY stupid .

Why do they insist on it, seemingly, throughout the western world?

CityofFlight
7th Aug 2008, 21:04
DX Wombat...I couldn't agree more about backing into spaces. Been doing it for the last 22 yrs. It's safer in every way. :ok::ok:

frostbite
7th Aug 2008, 21:43
Yes, always reverse in (where practical) - I was taught to do it while still a learner - it also means if you need to leave in a hurry, you can.

uklocations
7th Aug 2008, 21:48
Beware-any fecker wearing any sort of head garment.:)

Blues&twos
7th Aug 2008, 22:13
Oh yes. Reverse in every time. A good habit I picked up from my driving instructor and entirely reinforced when I was driving dustcarts. It makes life so much easier.

Avitor
7th Aug 2008, 22:25
Just keep yer bl**dy BMW out of the way of my Rover, or I will show you what a REAL bump looks like....:bored:

forget
7th Aug 2008, 22:27
Someone mention BMW drivers?
:cool:
http://i21.photobucket.com/albums/b270/cumpas/RTCY.jpg

ShyTorque
7th Aug 2008, 22:37
Tailgaters? I let them go past as soon as it's safe.

I've been driving for over 35 years. On a couple of occasions in that time I felt I needed to drive as if a life depended on it; in one case it was the life of my son on the line, who had been in a very serious accident. I was woken from my sleep by the police at 3 a.m. and informed "Just get there, asap!"

I assume that someone coming up unduly close behind me in a great hurry might be in a similar situation to that and let them go on their way. Whether or not that is the case, it diffuses my anger at their unsafe driving; after all, I'm not a traffic policeman and have no desire to be.

I also let them go for two selfish reasons. Firstly, I don't want to be involved in their accident. Secondly, as they accelerate past me, it takes the heat off me, as far as the occupants of the unmarked police car behind are concerned... ;)

Avitor
7th Aug 2008, 22:48
"Tailgaters? I let them go past as soon as it's safe".
======================================

I do too ST, they do not bother me either. I do *try* to stick to 70mph, after all it is the limit.

One should ask oneself, what will I do with the time I gain by risking a speeding fine and penalty points. :=

ShyTorque
7th Aug 2008, 23:01
One should ask oneself, what will I do with the time I gain by risking a speeding fine and penalty points.

I usually use it trying to get to work on time....

In the face of ever more arbitrary speed limits, more roadworks given to the cheapest bidder hence minimum overtime worked to get them finished in a reasonable time, lower driving standards from people who see driving as a born right and hence give it insufficient attention, less consideration given to others (e.g. never mind if it's your right of way - I'm coming past that vehicle parked on my side of the road on your side of the road and will pretend you're not there so that you do my braking for me) more accidents and road congestion as a result, etc, etc.

James 1077
7th Aug 2008, 23:12
Just as an aside - and not getting into the "too old to drive" debate - you can tell her insurance company to "eff off" and that you will get it repaired by BMW if you can show that the other driver was negligent. You do not have to accept the repair company that they tell you to use if the accident was not your fault and the other driver was negligent.

Her insurance company will tell you that you can't; but ignore them and tell them that you will sue the lady directly in the small claims court for the cost of "returning your car to its original condition".

You should find that they come around to your point of view reasonably quickly.

More info about 13 questions down in this column (entitled "Campaign for"): Honest John's agony column - Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/motoring/main.jhtml?xml=/motoring/2008/06/07/mrjon107.xml)

TBirdFrank
7th Aug 2008, 23:41
Late Spring - Father and son killed on the M6 in an early morning same direction RTA, due to their vehicle being literally driven over by young Range Rover driver

Last Sunday morning - Father and son killed on M60 in identical fashion by Audi 4WD trying the same maneouvre. Would you believe that the arrogant sxxt jumped out of his wrecked black gangsta machine and started threatening to kill people around him - even though he already had two on the score sheet! I hope they lock him up and throw away the key!

The police cameras had noted the speeding cars long before these accidents but nothing had been done.

Yesterday a 50 minute police chase seeking to check driving documents ended in a death - so blues and twos isn't always the answer

Could not the matrix signs have been lit up with ABC123 we are on to you - slow up, or be slowed up??

Just a thought - oh and Lexxie - daughter of mine - reversing out is always illegal - in an accident you would lose the high ground straight off - even if the other driver is the arrogant Beamer prat I saw head up your road at about 50 in his silver 3 series a while ago

tom775257
8th Aug 2008, 02:52
Wow BMW drivers are really not liked! I suspect if I was reporting the damage to my new Nissan Micra the thread might be somewhat different.

To answer the suggestion that I might have something to do with the cause, well the car was locked, legally parked with me over a mile away from it at the time.

I standby my first post, old not bold, perhaps your maturity could be brought into question by your response just as much as my first post. You answered that way because you were emotional due to a perception I made an offensive post (agreed the piss poor comment was too emotive). Well I was upset too because through no fault of mine, I am having a large amount of extra hassle that I don't need in the middle of the busy summer flying season and also something I have saved up for after working bloody hard for years has been damaged (I was driving a ancient Peugeot 306 until May) . It doesn't make me an immature dangerous car driver or airline pilot.

My final thought, as it seems to spark so much offense by even suggesting testing after 80 (even though the government want to revoke the licence after 80), I guess the solution would have to be 10 yearly prof checks on everyone. That way no one can get offended...

<<James 1077>> Thanks for the details. Yes the other driver has admitted liability already.

Whirlygig
8th Aug 2008, 07:36
Could not the matrix signs have been lit up with ABC123 we are on to you - slow up, or be slowed up??
Like your style TBird :ok: Name and shame! Easy enough to rig up as well!

I guess the solution would have to be 10 yearly prof checks on everyone. That way no one can get offended...An excellent idea but not for egalitarian reasons but because everyone slips into bad habits and roadcraft has change over the years.

Cheers

Whirls

Avitor
8th Aug 2008, 07:46
tom775257

"Wow BMW drivers are really not liked! I suspect if I was reporting the damage to my new Nissan Micra the thread might be somewhat different".
=======================================================
Not a bit of it! Keep pushing the fact that you run a beamer, that is no problem but try to lay off re-writing the licensing law around your choice of motor.

You see! You have it the wrong way round. :=

Matt35
8th Aug 2008, 08:02
Just joking - honestly...


http://i25.photobucket.com/albums/c73/VFC/BMW_Options.jpg

Matt.

ExSp33db1rd
8th Aug 2008, 08:02
Post # 29
regrettably a pilot qualification does not always prove maturity, as your first post suggested.

" I told my Dad that I wanted to be a pilot when I grew up, he said I couldn't do both."

ExSp33db1rd
8th Aug 2008, 08:42
Tom775257 Aged Drivers age limit.

Be VERY careful. NZ has recently removed the 80 yr. old drivers test on Human Rights / Ageist grounds, but kept the medical requirement.

I still hold a Class 1 Aircrew medical, and occasionally re-licence a now 83 yr. old pilot who learned to fly at 10, forged a birth cert. to gain a PPL at 14, re-forged it to join the Air Force at 18, flew everything that was around in the WW II Pacific War, crop dusted in DC-3's ( and Tiger Moths ) ferried aircraft single pilot from the USA to NZ etc. etc. etc. flew his wife at the exact minute of their wedding 60 yrs. previously on their 60th anniversary.

It's experience and proficiency that counts. My local road looks like a graffiti artist has been at work, with 'doughnut' and 'wheelie' black tyre marks from the young hooligans ( polite word ) that think they know everything. My neighbour has promised to stretch razor wire across the road from tree to tree one black night.

Re-testing only proves the mechanical skills, not the mental, which is the real problem.

My 16 yr old Daihatsu Charade accelerates to 100 kph ( NZ limit ) fairly briskly, goes when I ask it to, stops when I tell it to, runs on the smell of an oily rag and with the back seat totally removed becomes a very acceptable 2 seater station wagon that transports my nav. bag and goggles and motor fuel for my VW engined Microlight aircraft comfortably and gives me a good excuse not to pick up hitch-hikers. The paint no longer matches in many areas due to being parked under trees in all weather, and the radio stopped working years ago. Who cares ?

I've been through the BMW phase and succesfully passed out the other side.

green granite
8th Aug 2008, 09:31
Not at all. It is in fact YOU who deserves to have your car bent. You should be reversing INTO the space not out of it. Your vision, and therefore your spatial awareness, is impaired when reversing out. It is the lazy / incompetent / or both, driver who drives straight into a parking space. As the person driving out of the space it is YOU who should be waiting for the rest of the traffic to clear, they are travelling with the traffic flow whereas you are crossing it.

What a load of complete and utter bollocks. Most of the parking spaces at our local supermarket are angled and on one-way roads, it is not possible to back in. (I was not talking about main roads in my original post.)

Also you get the syndrome where you pull passed a parking place to back into it and someone immediately drives into it frontwards.

Loose rivets
8th Aug 2008, 22:23
I'll be serious for a moment.

Three kids in a small newish car in Essex. High as kites...leaping around, hooting with laughter and beeping the car's horn. 'Hello', the driver says to me as I carry me shopping in the carpark. She's glowing -- red faced with whatever it is in that skinny tin. Red What?

She's 18 if a day, and not unlike one of the kids I tried to save at a serious RTA 30 years ago. So much blood in the road, and so hard to get my car in the way of late night pub traffic. The longest 20 mins of my life...bath stained with a tidemark of blood. Well, you know the stories, hundreds of them.

Get back to host's home. Quite by chance she describes same thing with grand-daughter.

These kids go manic. How the heck can this stuff be leagal?

Keef
8th Aug 2008, 23:39
Age-related tests for drivers? 40 years ago I thought it was a very good idea. Now, I'm not so sure.

lexxity
9th Aug 2008, 20:28
Oh Daddy of mine the highway code says this:

201
Do not reverse from a side road into a main road. When using a driveway, reverse in and drive out if you can.


So not illegal at all. :E

tom775257
10th Aug 2008, 18:39
Well excellent, another person has now hit my car - this time the back after being parked in a city overnight (legally correctly parked), this time no insurance details. Two people crash into my car while parked in one week :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad:

C130 Techie
10th Aug 2008, 19:13
Tom

They say that these sort of things happen in threes (if you're superstitious). :rolleyes:

tom775257
10th Aug 2008, 19:48
Well fingers crossed someone will crash into me and write off the car, so I will get a new one :uhoh:

traveler
10th Aug 2008, 20:03
Why would anyone buy a new car ??

forget
10th Aug 2008, 20:32
Why would anyone buy a new car ??

Sh.................................ush. :ugh: