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SpringHeeledJack
30th May 2008, 11:54
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/asia-pacific/7426950.stm

You have to wonder how this can happen in this day and age, especially when you take into account just how small most property is in Japan due to land prices and that's not forgetting them in general not being built of bricks, but wood/metal/plastics. Either the man was deaf or otherwise occupied not to have heard her at night or when he was home during the day :eek:

That will no doubt help to explain how as a child i was convinced that there was a bogeyman in the wardrobe in my bedroom... :hmm:


Regards


SHJ

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
30th May 2008, 12:43
the southern city of Fukuoka.Must be an April Fool's story

Blacksheep
30th May 2008, 13:32
...convinced that there was a bogeyman in the wardrobe in my bedroom... We had a bogeyman in the cupboard under the stairs. He used to snaffle our home-made pickled onions and smoke Mam's cigarettes. I think he's still there, but we don't live there anymore.

Eboy
30th May 2008, 13:58
Japan has a homeless problem as do all countries and it is getting worse due to job losses. In Japan, though, being poor and homeless carries a particular shame. The country does not have the charitable organizations or government support for the poor to the extent that, say, the UK or US do because of that shame.

SpringHeeledJack
30th May 2008, 14:29
Japan has a homeless problem as do all countries and it is getting worse due to job losses. In Japan, though, being poor and homeless carries a particular shame. The country does not have the charitable organizations or government support for the poor to the extent that, say, the UK or US do because of that shame.

Seems it's ALL about losing face and shame in Japan :(

I remember during my time in Japan when i would go running in parks in the mornings that there was a whole sub-culture of people living 'rough'. They were mostly men, though some women and all over 50 at a guess. They lived in their own tents that were large and orderly (with specific areas for specific uses, as at home), close to each other, yet with enough space for privacy. It seemed as if they were tolerated by the authorites and left alone so long as they caused no problems in the wooded edges of the parks.

I'm just amazed that this lady was able to live for a year in this closet without his nibs finding traces. The little mice that sometimes invade SHJ Towers leave traces, so a matress and smells and hair and......:yuk:


Regards


SHJ

VAFFPAX
30th May 2008, 16:51
Jack, I wouldn't be surprised if she washed and kept herself neat for much of the year that she lived there... it's only when she went for the food that he noticed.

S.

G-CPTN
30th May 2008, 17:02
So how did she survive without food? (or did she leave and return each day?)
Do Japanese homes have locks?

arcniz
30th May 2008, 18:07
The unknown lady living in a closet gives a whole new meaning to the concept of "hidden" overhead.

Reminds one of an interesting period in my 20's when one must have seemed highly marriageable -- to the casual (or desperate) observer. Ladies - mostly young but some well into the ticking-clock zone - would do the camel's nose trick -- just settling into a sort of residence at my place, unbidden and unannounced. Since I was away most of the time and largely distracted for the rest, it was a passably good tactic for the short term. My pets always appreciated the extra food and attention, so I did not casually turn down offers to "stop by and feed" them. There formed a standing circle of visitrixes - who actually seemed to get along rather well together - that ran a sort of virtual second life in my home & made certain the fridge and cabinets did not contain spare food or drink that might go bad.

Eventually this sort of relationship breaks down though -- like when one forgets a phantom resident's birthday and she has a fit, claiming new and higher ground in the process. My greatest mistake was to stop forgetting things like that.

airship
30th May 2008, 18:50
That is not all that the Japanese 'hide in their closet'.

According to this BBC report (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/6734157.stm), more than 30,000 Japanese commit suicide (if not exactly hara-kiri) annually. To give that figure some perspective, that is the equivalent of say 600% of all those that die from road accidents in the UK every year. Or 5 times the number of lives lost in road accidents in France (traversed every summer by incompetent, drunk or otherwise incapacitated holiday-makers) from all over Europe.

The 57 year old house owner obviously found the 58 year old Ms. Tatsuko Horikawa unattractive, or at least felt sharing a disused closet with 'an older woman' would be beyond the pale. :sad:

Imagine a country that is purportedly the world's leading manufacturer of high-tech electronic gadgets for our entertainment. A country with a public debt at least 4 times that of the UK's, approaching 160% of GDP, an ageing population, minimal immigration and holding the world's most important rice stocks (rice that they were obliged to buy and stock in order to protect their own farmers originally), which if released even gradually onto world markets would result in the price of rice worldwide going down by at least 50% the day after...

Japan's a strange country. All I know for certain is that Japanese manufacturers of silicone-based sex toys use only the highest quality materials. Whilst Chinese-made copies might be a fraction of the price, the original Japanese-produced versions allow you to go on and on and on, for years... ;):O

Beatriz Fontana
30th May 2008, 19:20
airship...

the original Japanese-produced versions allow you to go on and on and on, for years...


Do they make high quality batteries to go with them? :O

airship
30th May 2008, 19:31
I recommend Duracell (wherever they're produced)... ;)

SOPS
30th May 2008, 20:46
Did the lady in the closet have sex toys?

The SSK
30th May 2008, 21:11
I'm sorry, I'll read that again.

... a friction of the price.

We have a loft accessible through a hatch in the upstairs ceiling. If ever I have to go up there, maybe once every two months, I make absolutely certain that the hatch cover is properly seated, yet every time I go back to it the hatch is ever so slightly askew. Mrs SSK never touches it. I know there are squatters up there but they make no noise and no mess and don't seem to steal anything so live and let live. I guess the Polish cleaning lady must have let them in.

frostbite
30th May 2008, 22:38
Sounds like 'The Borrowers' have made it upstairs, Mr SSK.

G-CPTN
31st May 2008, 00:32
I know there are squatters up there but they make no noise and no mess and don't seem to steal anything so live and let live.I believe Anne Frank managed a similar escapade . . .