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apaddyinuk
30th Apr 2008, 19:52
Hello all,

I was hoping some of you SLF with nippers may be able to tell me what airlines you have flown that provide an "Immediate Delivery" or "Deliver at Aircraft" service for your buggies after a flight where it must be placed in the hold.

Thanks a mill!

Eboy
30th Apr 2008, 21:18
United does it, and I think most other US airlines do. ANA definitely did at least up to a couple of years ago and I expect still does it today.

Sober Lark
30th Apr 2008, 21:29
Any BMI, EI flight into DUB excellent. FR not far behind. SQ J class at SIN you wait 15 mins.

Leezyjet
2nd May 2008, 21:28
VS do it at most stations too.

Why is it though that the SLF don't realise that as it has only taken them 30 seconds to walk to the a/c door and their buggy is not there, it may actually take a little longer to position equipment, open the hold door, unload the flaming things and then lug them up several flights of stairs which is why they actually have to wait up to 10 mins at the a/c side before they come up.

Some even don't bother waiting, so the buggy then has to go back down several flights of stairs, often by which time the rest of the bags have left meaning the buggy will then be very late to the baggage belt until someone can take it after the cargo has come off !!.

If you have a buggy in the hold and want it at the door - at least wait for it !!.

It is actually a hell of a lot of man power involved that delays offloading bags to get buggies to the gate - when you only have a team of 4 men and 2 of them have to lug the buggies up and down stairs, something has to wait !!.

:ugh:

Eboy
3rd May 2008, 10:42
Good point! Also, clarify on where you should wait. On the few U.S. carriers I have been on the waiting place is at the aircraft door. On ANA, we were told to wait in the gate area, and it was brought to us there.

red 7
3rd May 2008, 23:05
paddy.,

R u getting into areas you know nothing about again!
I know all you girls in the cabin would love to hold load the buggies then have them put on the jetty post flight
but I think you will find, it is not a BA decision, it is the Elf's of health and safety that prevents this at LHR.
If I have misjudged your reason for a conflicting post accept my apologies before your long explanation
cheers
tp

DeltaIndiaSierraPapa
4th May 2008, 18:35
I know that with BE we certainly try to...

Shunter
4th May 2008, 19:03
Another nice touch for parents who insist on flying with small children would be the provision of a complimentary rag, soaked in chloroform.

TightSlot
5th May 2008, 04:59
At some airfield where buggies/prams have to be manually carried up the airbridge external steps, there have been injuries caused to the staff involved - hence the involvement of H&S policy. Clearly, if the process involves a potential for injury, it cannot continue.

Don Coyote
5th May 2008, 07:47
bmi do bring buggies to the aircraft at LHR so I guess it is a BA decision rather than a BAA one!

Gibon2
5th May 2008, 09:25
My buggy experiences in the past six months or so:

Singapore Airlines, in ZRH, SIN, AKL and SYD: no problem at all, 5 or 10 minute wait, collected and delivered with a smile.

Easyjet, in GVA and various UK airports: no problem, friendly service, 5 minute wait at most.

Swiss, in GVA and ZRH: they collect it on boarding OK, but on arrival nobody has a clue what has happened to it. Spent 30 mins trekking around GVA being sent in circles by clueless cabin crew, ground staff and baggage handlers. Got the buggy in the end, after much cursing.

Air New Zealand, in AKL: utterly useless, unhelpful and incompetent. Made us check buggy in as hold luggage - when we protested, said they would lend us a buggy to get to aircraft. Once we had reluctantly parted with ours, it turned out there were no loan buggies available... well, my wife let 'em have it with both barrels, and they eventually found a buggy. In the meantime I quizzed the check-in supervisor about the AirNZ "no buggy" policy, as I hadn't seen anything about it when booking. It took her 20 minutes to find it on their own website - I asked what hope the poor customer has of finding the info, if senior customer service staff can't? She looked at me like I was talking martian ("I don't design the website", she pouted). They promised us another loan buggy would be waiting for us at disembarkation in SYD - it wasn't, of course.

Another AirNZ staff member explained something similar to what TightSlot mentioned about injuries carrying buggies up and down stairs - but, honestly, this has to be bollocks. All parents (some of whom are presumably airline employees) carry buggies up and down stairs constantly. The typical travelling buggy weighs 7 or 8 kg - i.e. about the same as any other piece of carry-on. SQ, EZY and Swiss staff handle them without complaint and apparently without injury - are they supermen/women?

BTW, for long haul travel with babies or toddlers, I heartily recommend SQ: cabin crew were outstanding - helpful, patient, efficient, always one step ahead of what our baby wanted/needed. In contrast, AirNZ might as well put up a "families not welcome" sign.

skydriller
5th May 2008, 20:38
At some airfield where buggies/prams have to be manually carried up the airbridge external steps, there have been injuries caused to the staff involved - hence the involvement of H&S policy. Clearly, if the process involves a potential for injury, it cannot continue.

How in gods name does anyone manage to injure themslves carrying a buggy?!?!?:rolleyes:

If my 5ft 45Kg petite wife can carry one about without hurting herself, then surely a big strapping baggage guy can!! HSE rules my ar$e!! More likely the airline staff just arent organised or cant be bothered....:suspect:

TightSlot
6th May 2008, 09:07
No, I'm sorry - it's true

Not all buggies are lightweight, not all baggage loaders are massive and the airbridge steps are not easy at the best of times.

I'm being careful here, and sticking to facts. Injuries have been caused - fact. How you interpret that is up to you: I'm not here to defend a policy or an airline. I'm simply offering this information as a contribution to the informed debate.

Tudor
6th May 2008, 18:41
If my 5ft 45Kg petite wife can carry one about without hurting herself, then surely a big strapping baggage guy can!! HSE rules my ar$e!! More likely the airline staff just arent organised or cant be bothered....

And how much does a child under the age of two weigh? Or is it a case of YOU can't be bothered carrying your own offspring a few hundred yards? Perhaps if some of these "parents" took less hand baggage and duty free on board they might have more hands free to look after their children. And no, before any of you start, I don't have children because I have CHOSEN not to have - why do some people expect the entire world to bend over backwards for them simply because they CHOOSE to have children.

apaddyinuk
6th May 2008, 19:54
Red...

Seriously, would you stay out of it and stop with the anticrew bull please! You clearly have no idea what you are talking about...apology accepted! Did I ever tell you I have worked on the ground for many years before I became the hand that feeds you?

Anyways,
Everyone, thanks a mill for your input!

skydriller
6th May 2008, 20:31
And how much does a child under the age of two weigh? Or is it a case of YOU can't be bothered carrying your own offspring a few hundred yards? Perhaps if some of these "parents" took less hand baggage and duty free on board they might have more hands free to look after their children.

You state you dont have children so you really dont understand the ammount of crap that absolutely does need to be carried with you as a parent with a baby or young child. Extra Duty free? You must be joking!! So you put the buggy in the luggage system and it doesnt arrive or is damaged - a buggy is a REQUIREMENT for a small child, not an option, you wouldnt put your laptop at the mercy of the T5s baggage system would you? A car seat is also a LEGAL REQUIREMENT, and often these are a part of the buggy, but at least these can now be hired (usually at an extortionate rate!) if you get a hire car and it all goes wrong in the baggage system....

You may be thinking "so why fly at all then, its your choice"....

.....And this is the choice we made as a family following the security clampdowns in the UK a couple of years ago. Its never easy to travel with a baby/child, but at least BA staff used to be very good at helping you out. Im sure they are still as helpfull as ever, however, the whole handbaggage/liquids restrictions have just pushed it such that we have chosen not to fly to the UK anymore as a family. Car & ferry/tunnel is way easier.

At least our shorthaul trips back to family in blighty can be driven and we used to fly it as a couple, I really feel for those parents that need to fly intercontinental, especially if alone.

SD..

DeltaIndiaSierraPapa
6th May 2008, 20:52
Another nice touch for parents who insist on flying with small children would be the provision of a complimentary rag, soaked in chloroform.

I do hope to God you are joking. Because if you seriously suggested to me, to my face, that I do that to my daughter I would punch you in the mouth. And no, that is not internet tough guy talk, THAT is fact!

Tudor
6th May 2008, 21:26
Skydriller

I'm not talking about checking your buggy in with your lugagge, I'm talking about the people who are incapable of making it from the aircraft to the baggage reclaim without their buggy. Just because I don't have children doesn't mean I don't know what accoutrements (or "crap" as you put it) parents have to travel with - I do have family and friends with children. However, speaking from personal experience, I have seen adults, travelling with young children, carrying four or five bags EACH onto the aircraft and then expecting the airline and ground staff to jump through hoops to ensure their buggy is delivered to the aircraft door. I have even seen some demand special assistance - this is reserved for people with mobility problems or disabilities who require assistance through no choice of their own. At the end of the day, if you can't carry it yourself then don't bring it on! That applies to children as much as it does to heavy handluggage.

skydriller
6th May 2008, 23:12
I have seen adults, travelling with young children, carrying four or five bags EACH onto the aircraft

Well, that wasnt in the UK in the last couple of years, what with the UK's idiotic baggage security rules - see my comment above about no longer flying into the UK.

At the end of the day, if you can't carry it yourself then don't bring it on! That applies to children as much as it does to heavy handluggage.

Couldnt agree more.

BTW, ....accoutrements.....Nice:ok:......I just dont think the word does justice to the amount of stuff I've see Mrs SD pack for the mini SDs on a trip...

Tudor
6th May 2008, 23:25
You're right, I'm talking about over three years ago when I used to work as crew. I have nothing against children per se but just wish some parents would take a bit more responsibility for them rather than expecting others to do so. But I guess that applies to all areas of society and not just on an aircraft. Ah well...:hmm:

SLF3b
7th May 2008, 04:30
London Heathrow - Paris Charles De Gaulle (and return):

BA take at gate, deliver at carousel
AF take at gate, deliver at carousel
BMI take and deliver at gate

Guess who we used once a fortnight for nearly a year?

London Heathrow - Cairo

BA take at gate, deliver at carousel
Egyptair take and deliver at gate

Of thread:

Egyptair are also cheaper, have wider seats (A330 / 777 versus 747 in economy), subjectively better seat pitch (in economy), do not charge for excess baggage, refund almost the entire ticket price if you cancel, charge half BA to rebook and are not likely to use T5, strike or send your bag to Milan in the foreseeable future. BA have better food (buy sandwiches), entertainment (take gameboy, laptop or a book as appropriate) and booze (so what?).

Guess who we use?

You do not

deltayankee
7th May 2008, 11:11
Some airports loan you a buggy to get your offspring to the gate after you have checked in your own. If I remember right Stockholm Arlanda does this. They are pretty basic and not too clean but they are very helpful.

KL in AMS has delivered mine at the gate on landing, though I don't know if this is always the case. On one occasion I was waiting at the door to the steps when the crew disembarked. When I explained what we were waiting for the captain went down personally to get it for us.

About dangers to baggage handlers: frankly if you are not able to get a baby buggy up some stairs you should be looking at a different career path. Either that or they should hire single mothers to unload airplanes (they seem to have superhuman physical abilities).

TightSlot
7th May 2008, 19:26
A most extraordinary thread: Several of you appear to believe that another person being injured, or potentially injured, is a price worth paying for your personal convenience.

By all means, argue that facilities should be upgraded or solutions created one way or another. Blame airlines, or airports, or procedures and press for change - write, email, complain and get friends to do the same.

I have two children of my own, and know well the difficulties of travel with youngsters. I would hope never to display the level of callous disregard for others displayed by some contributors here, and would think twice before admitting to it, even in an anonymous forum.

Depressing stuff

deltayankee
7th May 2008, 20:51
Several of you appear to believe that another person being injured, or potentially injured, is a price worth paying for your personal convenience.


I don't believe that anyone wants anyone else to get injured, but I think many people find it hard to understand why trained professionals get injured doing something that ordinary parents do several times a day for years without harm. I often carry a buggy up several flights of stairs, sometimes also carrying the occupant in the other arm, and I have never managed to hurt myself.

13 please
7th May 2008, 20:57
It's not just a flight of stairs though. They're metal, narrower than stairs, so with a buggy, you would almost be sideways, the steps themselves are quite narrow, so you can't get a lot of your feet on. The whole thing is fairly steep and wobbly. And you've got the weather to contend with also. Not great in the wind and rain.

Tudor
7th May 2008, 21:53
I often carry a buggy up several flights of stairs, sometimes also carrying the occupant in the other arm, and I have never managed to hurt myself.

I often cross the busy road outside my house and have thus far managed not to get knocked over - it doesn't mean it won't happen does it?

Incidentally, whilst the baggage handlers are pi*!*g about running up flights of steps with buggys what about everybody else's luggage? Let's not forget that many airlines, particularly in the low-cost sector, operate with small baggage crews. But, hey, as long as your buggy is waiting for you the second you step off the aircraft then to hell with everyone else's luggage, they can just wait that bit longer...the tail wagging the dog methinks!

13 please
7th May 2008, 22:11
I'm a parent and have to agree with Tudor. If you get one of those very cheap, completely folding buggies, then they fit in most (if not all) of the overhead lockers.. Then it's not an issue. I know you can't put a very small/young baby in one of those if they can't hold their head up or sit up, But then there are other ways of carrying small babies...

Gibon2
8th May 2008, 10:18
Tightslot, unless some posts have been deleted here, I'm not sure what you are talking about. Nobody in this thread has shown any "callous disregard" for the safety of others (with the possible exception of the chloroform proposal, which I admit gave me a chuckle). I'm new here and no doubt it's not my place to criticise moderators, but your last post struck me as a rather unwarranted and unjustified interjection into what has so far been a lively and informative discussion of the pros and cons of various practices for managing buggies and travel with small children. We have had perspectives from those with children and those without, and some strong opinions have been aired, but all in the spirit of courteous debate and respect for others.

Nobody has suggested that airline staff be put at risk of injury for their own personal convenience. A number of posters, myself included, have questioned whether there is a genuine safety risk involved in delivering buggies at the gate. There are three reasons for doubt on this:

1. Many perfectly respectable airlines do it, with no trouble, at the same airports as the ones that do not. Why do they not perceive the same risk to their staff?

2. Most parents carry buggies up and down stairs daily, in all weathers, for years without injury. Buggies are designed to be carried easily and safely when folded - that's the whole idea.

3. Some airlines (BA was mentioned above) collect buggies at the aircraft door on boarding, but deliver at the carousel. Why is it not dangerous to carry buggies down the stairs, but is dangerous to carry them up?

If, as another poster mentioned, the stairs are metal, narrow, steep, wobbly, etc, then the safety problem is with the stairs, regardless of what is being carried on them. This should certainly be fixed, but has nothing to do with the buggy issue. If the stairs can be safely negotiated carrying a sportsbag, tool box or flightcase, they can be safely negotiated carrying a buggy.

But in the end it comes down to this: no airline is forced to offer a delivery-at-gate service for buggies, just as no airline is forced to offer reclining seats, meals, in-flight entertainment, or any other service for the convenience of their passengers. They choose to do so because they believe it is what passengers want, and will therefore help win their custom. (It is interesting that my own best buggy service experiences have been with a top-shelf traditional airline (SQ) and a famously stingy low-cost carrier (EZY).) Whenever I travel with my baby daughter, I will choose an airline that offers the delivery-at-gate service - and it would take quite a steep price difference to overcome the value (to me) of this convenience.

The only thing I ask is that airlines make their buggy policies clear at time of booking. Would it be so hard for a message to pop up when you book an infant ticket saying "We regret that buggies will have to be checked in" or whatever?

Tudor
8th May 2008, 10:31
Certainly the problem when I worked as crew was that we didn't have a buggy policy with regards to delivery of the buggy after landing. This probably isn't what you want to hear but, in my experience, it often depended on the ground staff's mood, flexibility and timescales as to whether buggys would be delivered to the door or not.

Also it may not be the case now but at LGW (and other BAA airports I would imagine) buggys were not allowed to be taken on the passenger buses so if we parked on a remote stand that required passengers to be shuttled to the terminal they couldn't take their buggys with them as the bus drivers wouldn't allow it.

So, unfortunately, in an ideal world it would be nice to give an answer in black and white (ie "You will / won't receive your buggy after landing) upon booking so that you could pack your handbaggage accordingly but as you can see it's not always that clear cut.

deltayankee
8th May 2008, 10:46
If, as another poster mentioned, the stairs are metal, narrow, steep, wobbly, etc, then the safety problem is with the stairs, regardless of what is being carried on them. This should certainly be fixed, but has nothing to do with the buggy issue


Well said Gibon2, you took the words from my fingers. This clarification about the wobbly stairs was actually a very useful addition to the thread because it explains the reluctance to carry buggies but at the same time reveals that the real problem is inadequate staircase design rules.

And I agree about clear policy. In my experience it seems to vary not only from airline to airline but also day to day, depending on who you ask. Hazy policy is annoying for the customer and also very frustrating for the customer facing staff who have to explain it every time.

13 please
8th May 2008, 11:05
The stairs, we should just call them steps, are wobbly 'cos they're mobile, attached to the jetty.. As the the jetty moves, so the stairs moves. I think they're designed perfectly well for their purpose.. we're not even alowed to use them, we used to, now we're not. Next time you sit on the left hand side, further back than the door you boarded at, have a look outside and you may see what I mean. Different airports, different policies I guess.. That's about the only consistent fact in this business, everything is different..!!

Did you want the loader to bring up all 5 or 6 buggies together, or 2 at a time?

Most of the buggies (if not all) that come on ,already have baggage labels on them, they're supposed to be taken off at the door and hold loaded. However to try to be helpful, we sometimes, if we can, bring them on and put them in the wardrobes. This is where we are inconsistent, because sometimes we can't, we just don't have the space,because sometimes the wardrobes are full of, suprise surprise, jackets and coats of our premium passengers, which IS a policy of ours.

It's sometimes a lot easier to send buggies down because some gates have a slide so they're taken off at the bottom and hold loaded.

Gibon2
8th May 2008, 12:32
Did you want the loader to bring up all 5 or 6 buggies together, or 2 at a time?

Good question. If the loader is carrying 5 or 6 buggies together, I can certainly see a safety hazard. On SQ, a trip involving fully-loaded 777s and 747s, there were 6 or 7 buggies, which were brought up two at a time. We parents all waited patiently and chatted amongst ourselves ("thank xxxx that's over", etc).

On the European flights (A320, 737, Dash-8), there have only been one or two buggies aboard, so it hasn't been an issue.

I also wanted to point out, to those who enquired earlier, that a toddler can weigh up to 20kg, and wriggles a lot more than the average Samsonite (my 16-month-old girl weighs about 12kg). Remember it's not just the walk to baggage reclaim - there is often a lengthy wait in an immigration queue. Transit stops are another problem. And unlike the Samsonite, you can't just dump the little darling on the ground when you get tired lugging her about.

Tudor
8th May 2008, 13:58
We parents all waited patiently and chatted amongst ourselves

If only they all did...!

Leezyjet
8th May 2008, 15:26
Another AirNZ staff member explained something similar to what TightSlot mentioned about injuries carrying buggies up and down stairs - but, honestly, this has to be bollocks. All parents (some of whom are presumably airline employees) carry buggies up and down stairs constantly. The typical travelling buggy weighs 7 or 8 kg - i.e. about the same as any other piece of carry-on. SQ, EZY and Swiss staff handle them without complaint and apparently without injury - are they supermen/women?


Depends on the buggy and the amount of sh1t the parents leave in it, so it won't fold up properly - then half way down the very steep stairs decided it's going to open itself up - and having the buggy in one hand and holding on for life with the other - thats when it's dangerous !!. If I'm ever in that situation - guess which hand is letting go of what ;)

Those Mclaren buggies are probably the best we get regularly, even come with a shoulder strap for easier carrying, but I see no reason why any parent needs those buggies with the bicycle tyres on tme - what really is the purpose of them ?

Do you place your child in them at the top of a large hill and then let go ?. These things can weigh much more than 8kgs - more around 10-12kgs at a guess. These buggies are nothing more than a fashion statement - no doubt owned by the "Chelsea Tractor" brigade who just because then can - DO. Also doe the owners of these contraptions also realise that the air has to be let out of the tyres before they are loaded as happens with a real bicycle ? as I never see a pump to blow them back up again at the other end !!. :E

Gibon2,

If only everyone was like that. We took 12 buggies up the other day on 1 flight, and could hardly even get through the door for the scrum of parents trying to rip them out of our hands !!

:*

SLF3b
9th May 2008, 04:35
We used to have a double McLaren buggy and two sons, 30 and 6 months old respectively. My wife travelled with them on her own. Try getting from a remote gate in T4 to the luggage carousel without the buggy. Not easy.

I think the rickety stairs argument is a bit weak: if there is an airbridge, there are stairs for when it breaks. If the stairs are safe for a passenger carrying junior I would suggest they are safe for a loader carrying an empty buggy. There is no reason to carry the buggy up the airbridge access stairs.

If there is no airbridge you put the buggy at the bottom of the stair.

The argument about drivers not allowing buggies on the bus is fatuous: every public transport operator in the UK is required to carry buggies. A child in a buggy is less at risk on a bus than in mums arms.

So, once again, safety is used as an excuse for not doing something sensible and anyone who questions is accused of not caring about safety.

Tudor
9th May 2008, 09:27
We used to have a double McLaren buggy and two sons, 30 and 6 months old respectively. My wife travelled with them on her own. Try getting from a remote gate in T4 to the luggage carousel without the buggy. Not easy.

No having children isn't easy, surely you knew that before deciding to have them? My point, which is being overlooked, is why should the delivery of your buggy take precedence over the delivery of all the other luggage? Correct me if I'm wrong but don't infants travel free of charge? And I take it there is no excess baggage charge for your double McLaren buggy? So this extra cost to the airline is no doubt passed on to the customer under the guise of an inflated ticket price. So not only do I subsidise your children's travel but I have to wait at the back of the queue for my bags which, believe me, are as important to me as your buggy is to you. Again, as I said, tail wagging the dog.


The argument about drivers not allowing buggies on the bus is fatuous: every public transport operator in the UK is required to carry buggies

The only thing that's fatuous is the above comment. I'm not sure if a complimentary bus operating airside comes under your consideration of "public transport operator" but I was merely explaining what the situation used to be at Gatwick. I wasn't justifying it or giving reasons for it; that is what the situation was (and perhaps still is?) and yes, it caused consternation for parents but I was illustrating that it wasn't possible to say "yes / no, you can collect your buggy upon landing".


A child in a buggy is less at risk on a bus than in mums arms

As most airport buses are of the open-plan variety I would imagine the (possibly tenuous) safety issue is what problems the buggy itself could cause rather than concern for the child...as I said not everything in the world revolves around parents and their children.

once again, safety is used as an excuse for not doing something sensible and anyone who questions is accused of not caring about safety

Pray tell SLF3b what were the other instances?

Finally it would be interesting to see how you would react if one of your little darlings were injured due to somebody not following correct safety procedures, no matter how "fatuous" they may have been. I'm pretty certain you'd be on the phone to your solicitor demanding "compensation!" quicker than it takes a baggage handler to carry a double McClaren buggy up some rickety airbridge steps!

Gibon2
9th May 2008, 13:40
These buggies are nothing more than a fashion statement - no doubt owned by the "Chelsea Tractor" brigade who just because then can - DO

Bwahahaha Leezyjet - you're on dead right on that. If it's any consolation, those idiots who insist on travelling with huge SUV-style buggies probably suffer even more than you. It is quite satisfying to watch some flustered fashion-victim parent struggle to fold up their monster buggy to get it through the x-ray machine, under the doleful glare of those in the queue behind them...

I have a story to cheer you up the next time a horde of impatient parents descends on you to tear their monster buggies out of your hands. There is a particularly fashionable and expensive brand of buggy called the Bugaboo. You see them everywhere in the posher parts of cities around the world. They're not that heavy, and I'll grudgingly admit they are quite nice to "drive" - but they do have the inflatable tyres. Worse still, they collapse into two separate parts: the chassis and the seat assembly. You can see where this is heading... in Sydney, waiting to board our SQ flight to SIN, I spotted a typical yuppie dad pushing his kid around in one of these. I thought - uh oh, poor buggy choice there, mate. Sure enough, 8 hours later, we left him on the airbridge in SIN, clutching one half of his Bugaboo in one hand, his kid in the other, trying to explain to a bemused Singaporean loader that there was another bit of his buggy, somewhere in the bowels of that 747.

Tudor, I agree with the thrust of much of what you say, but a couple of points need comment:

Correct me if I'm wrong but don't infants travel free of charge? And I take it there is no excess baggage charge for your double McLaren buggy? So this extra cost to the airline is no doubt passed on to the customer under the guise of an inflated ticket price.

You are wrong. Well, partly. On some airlines, infants do travel free on short-haul flights. But not, for example, on Easyjet, which charges 15 Euro (not sure if this is a set fee, or varies with the route). For long-haul, infants usually pay 10% of the adult fare - and this can certainly run to hundreds of dollars. Infants typically get a 10kg baggage allowance: I'm not sure if the buggy is supposed to be covered by this. Anyway, the point is that infants are in many cases covering the extra cost to the airline - and more. On long-haul flights, I would say that they are subsidizing you.

So not only do I subsidise your children's travel but I have to wait at the back of the queue for my bags which, believe me, are as important to me as your buggy is to you.

This in my view is the only reasonable objection to the delivery-at-door service, at least in theory. But I wonder if in practice delivering the buggies actually makes a noticeable difference to the time it takes to deliver the rest of the baggage. My reason for wondering is that Easyjet offer the service - yet they operate with very tight turnaround times and minimal handling staff. If getting a couple of buggies out really held things up for more than a few seconds, they simply wouldn't do it.

Leezyjet
9th May 2008, 14:31
The extra cost to the airlines works out about 30/flight to have the buggies carried to the gate. This is what one handling agent charges at LHR.

Over the course of a year that is a hell of a lot of money being paid out for a service that only benefits a few.

:ouch:

Tudor
9th May 2008, 21:38
Gibon2, I stand corrected, I thought I may have been a little wide of the mark there!

When you say easyJet offer the service do you mean they officially offer it or that every time you've travelled with them you have received your buggy at the gate? The reason I ask is because they are the outfit I used to work for and this was something we were very hit and miss about - as I said it depended on a number of factors such as the airport, which stand we were parked on, the dispatcher etc

Incidentally I did find that informing passengers that they may not receive their buggies at the door as they boarded the aircraft seemed to pre-empt most problems - the problems occured when passengers expected the buggies to turn up and they didn't. Either way I always asked the dispatcher if they could be brought up especially if a lone parent was travelling with kids as, despite what I said earlier, I do appreciate it can be a struggle.:)

Gibon2
10th May 2008, 16:02
When you say easyJet offer the service do you mean they officially offer it or that every time you've travelled with them you have received your buggy at the gate?

Tudor, looks like you're right - I've just been lucky. The extract below is from the easyJet website FAQ - you can take the buggy to the door, but no promise about when and where you get it back:

"Pushchairs, buggies, and travel cots can be taken right up to the aircraft steps and/or door, where they will be taken by cabin crew and stored in the hold. You can however check it in with your baggage at check-in, if you wish to do so. Full size, non-collapsible prams cannot be accepted for travel.Pushchairs, prams and travel cots do not form part of the baggage allowance and therefore no fee will be charged."

SLF3b
11th May 2008, 18:12
Tudor,

To answer your questions:

I knew having children would not be easy but decided to perpetuate the human race. Having read your post, it is reassuring to note you decided not to.

My children travelled on company supplied full fare tickets with a baggage allowance. So junior was subsidising your drinks, newspapers, food, carry-on, obesity etc.....

I would respectfully suggest that unloading half a dozen buggies would not materially delay delivery of your (admittedly precious) luggage.

The airside bus is not complementary - it is included in the ticket price. If, as you say, buggies are not allowed on buses at Gatwick by the bus drivers this gives an interesting perspective on who runs the airport.

As explained above, there is no reason why buggies have to be carried up rickety airbridge stairs - there is a full specification stair case right next to them.

I would suggest that a child in a buggy on a bus is less likely to injure someone than a hot shot executive swinging his 25 kg carry on and duty frees.

I like to live in a society where a little care and consideration is shown for ones fellow man, and am prepared to accept the overall cost to society of doing so. One day, you will be old, tired or ill and may appreciate these little courtesies. Until then, please wait patiently for your luggage!

Tudor
12th May 2008, 00:46
So junior was subsidising your drinks, newspapers, food, carry-on, obesity etc.....

Aaahh, so you recognise me then...;)

If, as you say, buggies are not allowed on buses at Gatwick by the bus drivers this gives an interesting perspective on who runs the airport.

Don't be obtuse. You know full well what I meant, the drivers are (or were) merely following the guidelines / rules they have been issued with. No doubt, for doing that, someone such as yourself would deem them 'jobsworths'. If you're quite happy for someone to break their neck for your convenience you'd probably have no qualms about them losing their job for it.

One day, you will be old, tired or ill

And which of these categories do YOU fall under?


I like to live in a society where a little care and consideration is shown for ones fellow man

So do I my friend and I think my posts on this subject have been balanced and fair-minded if not concilatory. You may not agree but then this is the beauty of messageboards; being able to discuss one's differences in a civilized manner without resorting to personal abuse...your remark about my not perpetuating (eh?) the human race notwithstanding:)

By the way, I do give up my seat on buses to pregnant women, I will always endeavour to assist someone (usually always a female) with a pushchair struggling with a door or attempting to navigate steps but DO NOT get me started on 'parent and child' spaces in the supermarket car park...

Eboy
12th May 2008, 22:33
Small children not being as able as adults, let's have the airport authorities provide wheelchair service for children throughout the airport and to and from the door of the aircraft as they do with the disabled. Parents can then check their strollers as luggage and no strollers get carried up or down jetway stairs.