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View Full Version : Is it D.B. Cooper's parachute?


Tree
28th Mar 2008, 19:01
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/CRIME/03/26/cooper.chute.ap/index.html?section=cnn_latest

tony draper
28th Mar 2008, 19:27
Watched a documentary about the case recently, twer a bold and cunning plan seems to a lot of trouble for $200,000 ,I suppose that was a fair wack in the seventies.
:cool:

Sallyann1234
28th Mar 2008, 20:18
It'a not often I admire a criminal, but was always tempted to like this guy because of the ingenuity of the crime.

The 200 grand was quite shrewd - as you say it was a good sum then, and if he'd asked for 2 million they might have called his bluff and said no.

HN1708
28th Mar 2008, 20:19
Could be an interesting discovery and prove the theory i saw on a documenatary that he did survive and went on to do it a second time only to be killed in a shootout with the cops at a later date. Can't remember the guy's name though he had all the credentials being an ex-Green Beret and a pilot.

Very bold, imagine trying to get a parachute past airport security these days!

tony draper
28th Mar 2008, 20:26
Yer,think thats the same Doc I watched.:cool:

HN1708
28th Mar 2008, 20:45
http://www.bbc.co.uk/dna/h2g2/A24145490

BlueDiamond
29th Mar 2008, 01:27
What was that little rhyme that used to be around? Something like ...

They seek him here, they seek him there ...
With your pleasant smile
And your drop-out style,
D.B. Cooper, where did you go?

Brian Abraham
29th Mar 2008, 03:20
imagine trying to get a parachute past airport security these days
Don't know if the rules have changed recently but parachutes were specifically mentioned as permitted carry on items.

Spotlight
29th Mar 2008, 05:42
A cunning thing about the 200 G was that putting it together from the airlines days takings was achievable in Coopers timeframe.

henry crun
29th Mar 2008, 08:48
One report I read recently said that none of the bank notes had been presented; but given the number of US notes in circulation is it possible they could still be out there in use ?

5150
29th Mar 2008, 10:36
I remember FBI Files did a good two-part documentary on these hijacks.

Occasionally broadcast on Channel 5 (in the UK) and Discovery I think.

Well worth a gander . . .

G-CPTN
29th Mar 2008, 10:46
Was the aircraft pressurised and from what altitude did he jump? Would it be possible (presumably it was) to open the door despite the cabin pressure?Cooper also knew that the cabin need not be pressurised at 10,000 feet. Not pressurising the cabin prevented a turbulent exchange of air when he opened the aft stairway. The aft stairway was out of the way of the engines, so Cooper wouldn't be buffeted or sucked in when he jumped out. That Cooper knew the aft stairway could be opened at all—Mucklow did not—further displayed his careful research and planning

Wiley
29th Mar 2008, 10:48
I've carried a parachute on a civil passenger flight - (a 727, just like D.B. Cooper!) - and I have to say, it did earn us the odd bemused look from the other pax.

(Paxing Melbourne to Sydney with AN to pick up a brace of new Plastic Parrots from Bankstown - and there was no way any one of us was going to entrust our parachutes to the tender mercies of the AN baggage handlers!)

Spotlight
29th Mar 2008, 12:46
G-CPTN

The story goes of course that he gave a succinct brief to the pilots as to altitude and speed.

As is well known (supposedly) after this hijacking the rear airstairs of 727s were subsequently rendered incapable of extension in flight.

A strong school of thought has it that he would have launched himself into very turbulent air

Solid Rust Twotter
29th Mar 2008, 13:14
Plenty of others have done it. Some big skydiving boogies arrange a 727 for D.B. Cooper dives and there's no shortage of willing takers. No bumpier than stepping into the dead air off the back of the Herc before being swatted by the slipstream.

corsair
29th Mar 2008, 13:19
Not every 727 had a D.B Cooper flap or maybe they were removed later. Particularly non American 727s. It always used to amuse me when I saw one as it was a constant reminder of his feat. If he survived and flew in 727s again. It must have generated a wry smile.

joe two
29th Mar 2008, 13:47
Interesting, somehow I've always thought he brought his own parachute.
It must have been a big relief for him once the borrowed chute opened,
because he could not be sure about the parachute being tampered with.
Clever move, to ask for 2. Needing two good ones, one for a possible hostage.

By the way, if still in doubt if it is survivable, any skydiver can tell you that it isn't a big deal really,
The skydive community stopped doing it now I believe, but during the "boogeys" (skydive-festivals) in the 90's , there where many flights a day including jumps from a 727's tailgate.

chuks
29th Mar 2008, 19:47
Why bother looking for the parachute? Go looking for the money!

Kids today! What do they teach them in school, anyway?

pigboat
29th Mar 2008, 21:53
Go looking for the money!

Some kids found about six grand of it buried along some riverbank a few years ago.

Lon More
29th Mar 2008, 22:08
Bagful of money (http://www.allthelyrics.com/song/462299/) by Roger McGuinn of the Byrds is also about this IIRC

bnt
29th Mar 2008, 22:59
This has been some week for the finding of lost artefacts... we've had that pre-Edison audio, Jaco Pastorius's Bass Of Doom (http://www.bassplayer.com/article/jacos-1962-fender/mar-08/34267)... what's next - Lord Lucan turning up with Shergar?

tony draper
29th Mar 2008, 23:04
Hank Marvin,s first 1959 Fiesta Red Stratocaster is still adrift as well,someone pinched it from the back of a Van,summat that happened regularly to bands int olden days,be worth a few quid if it does turn up,ordinary common or garden 59 Strats go for 30 grand now.
:)
Then there is Harrisons missing Chronometer and the .45 caliber Luger.

Arm out the window
29th Mar 2008, 23:33
Yes, it was a buggger of a thing to get into, that van!

old,not bold
30th Mar 2008, 01:42
No bumpier than stepping into the dead air off the back of the Herc before being swatted by the slipstream.Pah, girl's school stuff.

Night jump from a Hastings sorted them out; one leapt at 800' trustingly into the stream of exhaust sparks churning in the propwash made worse by the turbulence from the jump speed angle of attack (and flap? I don't know) and right in front of the tailplane, which, as one stood in the door was well below one's feet to the left and appeared to be about to slice one in half as one exited.

Brian Abraham
30th Mar 2008, 05:01
The skydive community stopped doing it now I believe, but during the "boogeys" (skydive-festivals) in the 90's , there where many flights a day including jumps from a 727's tailgate
Still being done joe, out of DC-9's at Perris, FL230 or there abouts at some boogeys I believe.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=VG2sVLSippc&feature=related

Solid Rust Twotter
30th Mar 2008, 06:45
OnB

One refers of course, to the civvy jumps off the ramp of a C130. One's military jumps were from the side doors and while not as dodgy as the Hastings, one has lost a large lump of skin from one's face by slipping on the sill and progressing down and under the aircraft by means of scraping one's face along the rivets while desperately covering the reserve handle. Not as bad as breaking one's nose on the ledge exiting a Beverley (I think) through the hole in the floor, but still embarrassing and painful.


800'? Wuss.....:}

Krystal n chips
30th Mar 2008, 08:25
SWT......:hmm:

An interesting account and one that proves beyond all reasonable doubt that, with the possible exception of Mr Cooper, voluntarily jumping out of a serviceable aircraft should fall under a section of the Mental Health Act...........:D:E

corsair
30th Mar 2008, 16:21
Skydivers are mad but thanks to them I have a nice little job dropping them off again and again and again....................

old,not bold
30th Mar 2008, 20:15
Not as bad as breaking one's nose on the ledge exiting a Beverley

Hmmm....never did that, but I did catch my helmet on it and nearly broke the chin strap. Nearly throttled me too. The nice PTI was quite unsympathetic when we met later on that day. (You stupid c**t, I think were his words of appreciation for the feat.)

I disliked that particular way of disembarking more than anything else I have ever done.

chuks
30th Mar 2008, 20:45
I used to notice that little gizmo on the 727s, some kind of rotating element driven by a vane in the slipstream that would block the door opening in flight. It was one of those "not a lot of people know about that," sort of things.

Was it required or did just some of the operators fit it?

heli-cal
2nd Apr 2008, 06:35
The F.B.I. have just announced that the parachute in question is not believed to be the one used by 'D.B. Cooper'.

galaxy flyer
2nd Apr 2008, 21:41
Chuks

Was fitted to our Eastern Airlines 727s, but I don't know if it was FAA-required or not. More shutting barn doors and horses, to me.

GF

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
2nd Apr 2008, 21:53
Night jump from a Hastings sorted them out; one leapt at 800' trustingly into the stream of exhaust sparks churning in the propwash made worse by the turbulence from the jump speed angle of attack (and flap? I don't know) and right in front of the tailplane, which, as one stood in the door was well below one's feet to the left and appeared to be about to slice one in half as one exited.
Pah! Did you wear panties when you did that? :}

For a real jump, try doing a night four stack out of a 182. Just supposing you can actually find the other three AND the airport, docking is a little scary, especially if it's your first night CRW jump :=