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View Full Version : "Hypocritic oath"....or "Trust me, I'm a Doctor"


Krystal n chips
27th Mar 2008, 06:45
So, if the report is correct, your man here indulges in a little job creation for his colleagues, yet the ahem "august body" :mad: decides that basically, he's still ok to continue as a doctor......

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/coventry_warwickshire/7315531.stm

Why, I wonder, are the so called governing bodies of the professions, so reluctant to actually take punitive action when one of their own clearly demonstrates a form of behaviour that suggests he really shouldn't be anywhere near the public.

G-ZUZZ
27th Mar 2008, 07:03
Are you sure you don't mean the Hippocratic Oath?

Maybe this guy's a hypocritical oaf.

Mac the Knife
27th Mar 2008, 07:14
So if he had been an airline pilot you'd be calling for his ATPL to be pulled?

:ugh:

G-ZUZZ
27th Mar 2008, 07:28
what if he'd been a dispatcher or some kind of ground staff - they foul up all the time but no licence to pull. just sack him I suppose??

gingernut
27th Mar 2008, 10:42
Can I book him as a locum?

All joking apart, it does seem a little liberal, but I note we're not in possession of the full facts.

My own governing body seems to make some very bizzare decisions. (They once let a rapist back on the register.)

I'm not a violent man, I've been tempted to smack a few people, but havn't, but I guess there would be situations where I would have to, if pushed.

Should I lose my career if this happened?

chuks
27th Mar 2008, 11:09
There's a thing with renewing your medical when you have to report arrests for certain categories of crime and I think something like GBH might well see you grounded if you hold a pilot licence, yes. Drink driving will do nicely, for one, so why not a conviction for beating someone unconscious?

It is done on a case-by-case basis but I wouldn't be surprised to hear of someone having their ticket pulled for coming across as having a violent and ungovernable temper. I really wouldn't want to share a cockpit with someone who might fly off the handle like that. Well, it would be that or else use him to go liaise with ATC over the reason for the latest delay in getting start-up! Just sit there in the cockpit watching to see bodies fly out the windows of the AIS office; who among us hasn't entertained a fantasy about that one?

chornedsnorkack
27th Mar 2008, 11:17
The Oath of Hippocrates concerns good faith of a physician towards his customers. He must refrain from all evil in houses where he enters as a physicians - especially from seduction of men or women, freefolk or slaves.

This does not require a physician to remain celibate male virgin. He must refrain from seduction and other mischief only in the houses where he enters as a physicians - not in the houses where he enters as a guest, or where he enters as a burglar.

However, there is certainly a question of trust. If a physician is a violent thug in his private life, he may uphold his Oath, and refrain from harming his patients - but can you rely on his doing so?

charliegolf
27th Mar 2008, 11:36
So if he had been an airline pilot you'd be calling for his ATPL to be pulled?


If the victim was a passenger or crew member, yes!

CG

Tigs2
27th Mar 2008, 11:39
Why do we have a Hippocratic oath??? It is well known and written that Hippocrates learned everything he knew about medicine from the teachings and writings of a chap called Imhotep from ancient egypt. This man was a character that could be likened to Davinci. He (imhotep) was the father of medicine, not Hippocrates. As a further qualification to this genius, he was the first person to formally recognise the mathematical relationship between 5:4:3 and also 21/7. It was nothing to do with Pythagorus , he simply knicked it from Imhotep! (The great pyramids were built on a 5:4:3 ratio long before Pythagorus. So Doctors shoudl swear to an Imhotepic oath, not a Hippocratic oath.:ok:

Edited to add, I am in bed after a car crash and clearly have too much time on my hands:}:ok:

tony draper
27th Mar 2008, 11:48
From what I recall reading blokes like Hippocrates and Galen held up any progress in medicine for hundreds of years,so that Imhotep bloke was prolly a complete dolt at medicine as well, although one understands he was good wi sums
:)

Bus429
27th Mar 2008, 11:52
I'm impressed by the knowledge of PPruNers. Hipprocates and Galen! From a Geordie, too!:D

tony draper
27th Mar 2008, 11:54
One is not just a pretty face yer know.:suspect:
One once read a book.:rolleyes:

ThreadBaron
27th Mar 2008, 11:58
I'm not sure, Bus, why you are surprised.;)


One once read a book.

... and could probably write one too!

phnuff
27th Mar 2008, 12:01
Yes, for sure the Hippocratic Oath was meant. The "Hypocritic oath" applies to politicians as in "Trust me, I'm a Politician" :{

Tigs2
27th Mar 2008, 12:10
Mr D
One thinks that we should sit one day and quaff some ale and talk about all things intellectual (b******s). I am glad to have met someone on as an intellectually higher plain as myself.
:ok:

chuks
27th Mar 2008, 13:02
You must be a Geordie too? I only ask becos it be "plane" as in "flat surface" and not "plain" as in, "She was only a fireman's daughter but her face was cause for alarm!"

We had a guy who murdered his wife, twice, but then he was a German, not a Greek or even an Egyptian. Come to think of it, he was a helicopter pilot so that doesn't count.

Tigs2
27th Mar 2008, 13:06
Chuks
Now thats funny!!:D:D serious!

Farmer 1
27th Mar 2008, 13:51
We had a guy who murdered his wife, twice

You'd think she'd learn after the first time.

Mac the Knife
27th Mar 2008, 15:33
"It is well known and written that Hippocrates learned everything he knew about medicine from the teachings and writings of a chap called Imhotep...."

Really? Not by me it ain't. Citations please (not the Readers Digest).

Even tho' I've got a copy of it on my office wall (a nice one from the Plantin Moretus Museum in Antwerp) I never swore it and neither did 99.99% of physicians for the last 2000 years. Not that it's a bad set of principles mind, just that I wish folks would stop imagining that we all stand there in bathsheets and swear by Apollo.

:ok:

Mac

PS: Would you really lose you ATPL for beating the crap out of your neighbour? Somehow I doubt it.

Tigs2
27th Mar 2008, 15:44
Mac
I am excited that I might have taught you something. Do a little research about Imhotep, and get back to me. he was a clever fellow, especially as a surgeon!!

Bus429
27th Mar 2008, 16:28
Tony

One is not just a pretty face yer know.
One once read a book.

Was it VIZ?:ok:

Salusa
27th Mar 2008, 16:38
I wish he was my Doctor. Have you seen his picture??!

I could then at least smirk when he tells me I need to lose weight.

Did he leather that other chap 'cos he threatened to swipe his pies?

I feel so much less guilty about my newly developing moobs after seeing an astute member of the medical profession in such a peak of physical perfection.

er340790
27th Mar 2008, 17:07
Nik Mann was told his assault was contrary to the aims and ideals of the medical profession.

Mac the Knife
27th Mar 2008, 19:52
Alas Tigs2, you haven't taught me anything that I didn't know. Several years ago I presented a paper on Imhotep (c2667 BC - c2648 BC) at one of our medico-historical gatherings so I know something about him. There is no doubt that he was for his time a skilled physician and may even merit Osler's sobriquet of the real father of medicine. His authorship of the Edwin Smith Papyrus (which is a very short trauma handbook) written in 1700BC (you can read it at http://www.touregypt.net/edwinsmithsurgical.htm ) is conjectural.

To claim that Hippocrates "..learned everything he knew about medicine from the teachings and writings of a chap called Imhotep...." is plainly false, though there is no doubt that Egyptian medical lore influenced the early Greek physicians The Hippocratic Corpus of some seventy early medical works is a considerable advance on what little specific we know of Imhotep's medical teachings. Even a cursory reading of for example, his treatise on Fractures
(which you can read at http://classics.mit.edu/Hippocrates/fractur.html) makes that clear.

I have no quarrel with either Imhotep or Hippocrates, both of whom were seminal figures in the history of medicine, but to assert that Hippocrates was merely a follower of Imhotep is incorrect.

Mac

Tigs2
28th Mar 2008, 02:42
Mac
Thank you. I (sincerely) bow to your knowledge. Ok I admit it you are right:{:{:{