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View Full Version : Pilot unaware of new airport, flies across India


Buster Hyman
25th Mar 2008, 03:47
March 25, 2008 - 10:29AM

A KLM flight headed for Hyderabad in India's south skipped its destination and flew across India because the pilot was unaware the city had a brand-new airport, a report said today.



The confusion occurred barely hours after the Rajiv Gandhi International Airport in the Hyderabad suburb of Shamshabad became operational after midnight on Saturday, with flights landing and taking off, said the Times of India.
The pilot of the KLM flight, which had taken off from Amsterdam, at first headed towards Hyderabad's old airport and was told by air traffic control the facility had been shut, the report said.
When directed to fly to the new airport, the unnamed pilot replied: "What's that?" and flew instead first to New Delhi, from where he took the plane to Mumbai after being declined permission to land, it said.
The plane had on board 230 economy and 13 business-class passengers when it approached Hyderabad at 1.45am Indian time yesterday. It had been due to fly out of Hyderabad to Amsterdam at 3.35am with more than 230 passengers.
The Times of India cited an anonymous source as saying the Dutch airline's pilot had been reluctant to land in Shamshabad because its headquarters in Amsterdam had not received a notice about the closure of the old and the opening of the new facility.
The new airport, built at a cost of more than $US600 million ($A650 million), opened for flights after a week's delay prompted by airline requests for more time to switch to the new facility and operational reasons such as shifting of equipment.
AFP

Geez...how much are you blokes paid again??? ;););):ouch::suspect:

powerstall
25th Mar 2008, 03:52
.... hmmm. i wonder what they talked about in their dispatch briefing.... :ok:

Buster Hyman
25th Mar 2008, 03:59
"Say...do you like my new watch?" :E

eticket
25th Mar 2008, 06:50
One wonders which HYD airport the return crew were waiting at?

Track Coastal
25th Mar 2008, 08:07
Plan the flight - Fly the plan.

CRM in KLM Hmmmm (wasn't a KLM fopar in 1977 the catalyst for CRM development?).

Hill Walker
25th Mar 2008, 13:35
Yes, 583 people killed in Tenerife, 1977 - and it happened on the runway. As well as CRM, it also led to greater emphasis on English as a common aviation language.

Remember being told some years ago about a 747 landing at St Athan having mistaken it for Cardiff International, not sure if this is true or even possible?

CathayBrat
25th Mar 2008, 17:52
Not quite, but heres the AAIB report!
http://www.aaib.dft.gov.uk/cms_resources/dft_avsafety_pdf_500078.pdf

Bravo73
25th Mar 2008, 19:35
I wonder if somebody had got around to updating their Aerads... :E

Ken Wells
25th Mar 2008, 20:55
Important information for the crew in question

http://www.eatanddrink.co.uk/menu/indian/indian_menu.asp


The Indian Restaurant Menu Explained
There is a lot of mumbo jumbo spoken about the Indian restaurant menu. We are led to believe that each dish is lovingly prepared to some secret recipe, known only to that particular chef. Read the menu and it will describe the virtues of any particular dish in a most evocative style. But there is one thing you can be sure of, most dishes in the typical Indian restaurant don’t vary much at all, other than in heat and the most prominent ingredients, such as the type of meat, fish or vegetable and possibly whether the sauce is lentil or cream based. This is not to say that the dishes are not enjoyable, but to cater in almost the ‘fast food’ market, that is the way they have to be.

So, every Indian restaurant will have its basic ‘curry gravy’ and every dish served will be a derivative of that sauce. The Indian restaurant chef is the master of exploiting that base to give us what we know as our favourite dish.

We have tried to demystify the Indian restaurant menu by explaining what individual items are and how they vary from each other. It is worth bearing in mind that spellings are not definitive as all the translations into the English language and alphabet have been done phonetically. So we might see Dhansak or Dansak, for instance.

B
BALTI

BHUNA

BIRYANI, BIRIANI
C
CHAPATTI
D
DHANSAK, DANSAK

DOPIAZA, DUPIAZA
J
JALFREZI, JALFRAZI, JHALL FRYZY, ZALI FREZI etc, etc.

K
KORMA, KURMA
M
MADRAS
N
NAN BREAD, NAAN
P
PHALL

PURI

R
RICE

ROGAN JOSH
S
SAMBER

SHAMI KEBAB

SHEEK KEBAB, SHEIK KEBAB
T
TANDOORI

TIKKA

TIKKA MASSALA
V
VINDALOO

bnt
25th Mar 2008, 22:48
Balti? You ask for one of those in a restaurant in India, they'll think you're going to be sick. It means "Bucket" in Hindi. :yuk:

When I lived in Natal, years ago, the Indian and Malay communities delighted in inflicting some of their most extreme dishes on us Westerners, and we went back for more. There's nothing like a Durban Madras Bunny Chow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bunny_chow) after a night out - puts hair on your chest. :E

Ken Wells
25th Mar 2008, 23:24
and thats just the women!





Balti is the name for a style of food probably first devised and served in Birmingham, England. The first written record of the term dates to 1984. [1] A number of restaurants in Birmingham have laid claim to inventing the Balti, but the true story of its origins is difficult to discover. The term was certainly in use in the late-1970s in South Birmingham.

The name Balti food has nothing to do with an ethnic group living in India and Pakistan who are also called Balti. These Balti people are Tibetan Muslims. The food 'Balti' is named after the pot in which it is cooked. Balti food is a Punjabi recipe and prepared mainly in the Punjabi way.

The food is a hot curry-style dish, most likely taking its name from the thick flat-bottomed steel or iron pot in which it is both cooked and served. Normally the balti is served with large naan bread; pieces of which are torn off by hand and used to scoop up the hot curry sauce from the pot. Side dishes and starters usually include onion bhajis, samosas, poppadums and creamy dips.

Balti combines the spices and ingredients of North Indian cuisine with the economics and efficiencies of Chinese cooking.

Blueskyrich
26th Mar 2008, 00:42
Oi you lot, you leave the balti alone!

I cannot tell you how many times that dear friend of mine has seen me through bad times.

As a born and bred Brummie, I'll not have a bad word said about our balti. :}:E

powerstall
26th Mar 2008, 01:59
now i'm really confused about this Balti.... :ooh: