PDA

View Full Version : Third party


Blues&twos
22nd Mar 2008, 12:33
Something that I haven't been able to suss out - I'm the first party, the bloke who's just run into my car is the third party....who is the second party?

:confused:

ZH875
22nd Mar 2008, 12:48
The second party is 'the insurer'.

Just make sure you have lots of Doctors appointments for whiplash etc. :ok:

Whirlygig
22nd Mar 2008, 12:52
The insurance company is the second party.

Man drives into the back of you. Man is the first party, his insurance company is the second party as it is with them that he holds the contract and you, with a dented rear end, are the third party.

Cheers

Whirls

Slasher
22nd Mar 2008, 12:52
The 2nd Party is your insurer. He fleeces you and the 3rd
Party's 2nd Party, or the 3rd Party alone if the 3rd Party
doesnt have a 2nd. The 3rd Party's 2nd Party will fleece you
too unless your 2nd Party does it 1st.

sprocket
22nd Mar 2008, 13:16
It's about time we had a sensible reply on JB. :}

ZH875
22nd Mar 2008, 13:17
Well just have a Party.

tony draper
22nd Mar 2008, 13:38
So the party of the third part is the collider and the party of the first part collidee?
:confused:

MadsDad
22nd Mar 2008, 13:48
I am my party of the first part, my insurance company is the party of the second part and they are the party of the third part. On the other hand they are their party of the first part, their insurer is their party of the second part and I am their party of the third part. Which sounds like enough people for a good party.

(Although if one had had a collision with a well known actress she would presumably always have been the T.Hird party.)

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
22nd Mar 2008, 14:14
No. Some bloke what had been to a party, got pissed and heard there were some chicks at this other party, so he gets in his car and on the way over to the second party, he runs into you.

So the accident is usually between the first party and the second party and rarely involves a third party.

It's about time we had a sensible reply on JB.

glad to oblige.

shedhead
22nd Mar 2008, 16:51
all I know is that I never get an invitation to all these parties are they any good?

GGR
22nd Mar 2008, 17:08
motto of both above....... ''You play ball with us, and we'll shove the bat up your arse!'' ...............:ugh:

GGR

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
22nd Mar 2008, 17:58
Pedantic I know, but shouldn't that be 'OR'?

Sailor Vee
22nd Mar 2008, 18:52
Pedantic I know, but shouldn't that be 'OR'?No, otherwise they wouldn't be playing ball in the first instance.

I'm so confused, I don't know whether to scratch my watch or wind my balls.:rolleyes:

Blues&twos
22nd Mar 2008, 20:57
Fantastic. I love Jet Blast.

What if two persons of questionable parentage run into my hitherto unblemished vehicle? Does that make them a third party squared, or a 1.5th party each?

And what if the other prospective third party buggers off into the sunset at high speed trailing debris and broken glass? Does that alter the maths?

ThreadBaron
22nd Mar 2008, 23:51
Not excessively ... but the conveyor belt does!:}

The SSK
24th Mar 2008, 21:31
While third party more or less makes sense, I dislike the habit of talking about 'third countries' as in 'the EU is seeking a mandate to negotiate with Third Countries' (ie non-EU states).

mixture
24th Mar 2008, 23:41
The UK Contracts (Rights of Third Parties) Act has a quite nice summary definition of what a "third party" is .....

a person who is not a party to a contract

Therefore certain other definitions given here, such as :

So the accident is usually between the first party and the second party and rarely involves a third party.

Are incorrect.

When buying your insurance, you entered a contract with your insurance company. As far as your insurance company is concerned, there are two parties to the contract, you and your insurance company. Anyone else (whether a human or a body corporate) is therefore, by legal definition, a third party.

That's my 2p worth anyway .....don't quote me on it ! :cool:

mixture
24th Mar 2008, 23:56
Regarding ...

What if two persons of questionable parentage run into my hitherto unblemished vehicle?

You're unclear here.

Are you saying two cars run into you at the same time, or two individuals in one car ?

If the former, then they would be considered multiple third parties and would be dealt with in a similar fashion to a multi-car pileup on a motorway.

If the latter, then there would only be one third party .... the driver of the car that hit you. His insurance company would then cover other occupants of his car at the time of the accident.

All this assumes insurance cover has not been invalidated (e.g. by someone operating hire/reward on their private insurance).

Again, all IMHO and don't quote me on it !

Atlas Shrugged
25th Mar 2008, 04:48
Wasn't 3rd party a 90's rock band???

Here's how it works:

A third party is simply "someone else" - someone other than the first two parties (principals) to a contract or an agreement.

The contract or agreement is your third party motor vehicle insurance policy where one of the principals is the insurance company and another is the car owner.

If the car owner (you) damages a third party's (someone else's) car in an accident, the insurance company provides cover for the damage to the third party's vehicle.

Anyone else is A third party.


Another example may be a simple sales transaction.

The TP is someone not directly involved in the sale. The seller is the first party and the customer is the second party. However, a seller may employ a third party to perform specific function in relation to the sale or the product being sold such as a manufacturer employing a third party to package and distribute their product.

All a bit serious for JB

mixture
25th Mar 2008, 09:24
The only thing that might be worth clarifying here is that motor insurance tends to cover non-motor vehicle property damage too .....

http://uk.reuters.com/resources/r/?m=02&d=20070515&t=2&i=800144&w=&r=800144



Therefore

If the car owner (you) damages a third party's (someone else's) car in an accident

is really

If the car owner (you) damages a third party's (someone else's) property in an accident

Whether that property is a house / car / whatever shouldn't matter to your insurance company, who will provide cover under their terms up to the contracted level of cover.

But as Atlas said, all a bit serious for JB .... would suggest that if your interests in the matter go further than just pure curiosity, that you seek proper legal advice.

Binoculars
25th Mar 2008, 12:10
I thought this had all been sorted out decades ago by Groucho and Chico. The party of the first part......rip...... the party of the second part......rip

(You can't fool me, there ain't no sanity clause)......

Atlas Shrugged
26th Mar 2008, 00:35
I've got that on DVD somewhere!