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bnt
19th Mar 2008, 00:01
The BBC is reporting (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7304004.stm) that Sir Arthur C Clarke has died, at his home in Sri Lanka, aged 90.

It's not a surprise, considering his age and chronic illness, but I'm still deeply saddened to see my favourite author, the last of the Big Three SF authors, leave us. :sad:

tony draper
19th Mar 2008, 00:21
Yer,shame heard it on Newsnight,I liked his early works,Fall of Moon Dust ect found his later stuff a bit optimistic,the aliens were alus to friendly, personally I go with the Hollywood version, I recons the aliens if they ever arrive will be of the stick to yer face and eat yer alive from the inside variety.
:(

White Bear
19th Mar 2008, 00:52
Deeply saddened to hear this news.
His unparalleled imagination entertained, educated, and encouraged me.
His ĎRendezvous with Ramaí was stunning sifi at its best.
Regards,
White Bear.

esmozz
19th Mar 2008, 00:55
I don't often post, but had to this time, A. C Clarke is one of the reasons I sit in the RHS of a 737 today, as a young boy I was completely inspired by his books, he was one of those that fed my fascination with flight as a child. I read and reread Islands in the Sky and Dolphin Island many times, was awed by the space battles in Earthlight and the mystery of the deserted alien cities in Rendezvous with Rama. Throughout my life Iíve read all his books many times and learnt more about the man and his life, and although as Iíve got older I think Iíve become jaded in my outlook I will never forget the majesty and excitement of the worlds Clarke brought to me as a child. I'm truly saddened he gone.

larssnowpharter
19th Mar 2008, 05:03
I had to look it up but I loved this quote from him:

"The greatest tragedy in mankind's entire history may be the hijacking of morality by religion."

Great writer; I loved his books. RIP and thanks for sharing.

TopBunk
19th Mar 2008, 07:08
A sad loss, but .... Sir Arthur C Clarke, 1907-2008
The BBC is reporting (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7304004.stm) that Sir Arthur C Clarke has died, at his home in Sri Lanka, aged 90.

Lasiorhinus
19th Mar 2008, 07:19
Easy explanation.

Time dilation. Time slows down as you approach the speed of light.

With the amount of time Sir Arthur has spent outside this solar system, it is feasible he has lived 90 years while the rest of us back on Earth have aged 99.

bnt
19th Mar 2008, 09:30
A sad loss, but ....

But what? His 90th birthday was last December 17th, making him just over 90 and 3 months when he died.

If you thought he was 91, please tell me you're not a pilot. :eek:

bnt
19th Mar 2008, 10:08
bnt,
Well, I'd noticed last night but wasn't going to mention that 2008-1907=101
OK, so why not just say so, instead of playing silly bloody games? I can fix it in 3 seconds if I know about it. :mad:

Forkandles
19th Mar 2008, 10:08
But what? His 90th birthday was last December 17th, making him just over 90 and 3 months when he died.

If you thought he was 91, please tell me you're not a pilot. :eek:

With an eye for detail like that, and a short fuse, please tell me you're not a pilot? :E

bnt
19th Mar 2008, 10:10
With an eye for detail like that, and a short fuse, please tell me you're not a pilot? :E
No I'm not. I'm just a guy who's upset that people are being :mad:ing pedants at a time like this. Do you understand what this thread is about? If you have nothing positive to say, just shut the :mad: up, OK?

powerstall
19th Mar 2008, 10:10
also heard that he passed away at age 90.... made me count and ponder on the value .... 1907-2008... hmm.. that's about 100 or over... what the ?!? :8

bnt
19th Mar 2008, 10:33
If I may drag this thread back on topic for a minute: Terry Pratchett has said some nice things about ACC to the BBC: link (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7304329.stm).
You got the impression you were dealing with a man who put some science into science fiction.

Snifferdog
19th Mar 2008, 10:36
http://www.b3tards.com/u/13b059438ec85bb15076/clarkdead.jpg

(nicked from www.b3ta.com)

Widger
19th Mar 2008, 11:01
He was not just a science fiction writer. He was the man who came up with the idea of geo-stationary satellites and invented the communications satellite in his article "extra terrestrial relay" in Wireless World magazine 1945 and I am informed by my Crab, that he also was involved heavily in the development of Precision Approach Radar, when he was a Radar Specialist in the RAF 1941-1946. A truely great man of vast intellect and a credit to his country of birth.

FOCUS magazine had an article on him in December 07.

tony draper
19th Mar 2008, 11:13
I enjoyed reading his essays which he published in book form,similar to Isaac Asimov's with whom he had a friendly rivalry for many years.
I recall one of his laws which impressed me
"A machine shall have no moving parts"

Hill Walker
19th Mar 2008, 11:18
He wrote a book titled 'Glide Path', which although fictional was based on his wartime experiences - it's very good. There was a good bit about getting involved in an airfield defence exercise and using the prototype PAR to spot the 'enemy' coming over the wire.

djk
19th Mar 2008, 12:15
No more Mr Sci-Fi

G-ZUZZ
19th Mar 2008, 14:55
OK, so why not just say so, instead of playing silly bloody games? I can fix it in 3 seconds if I know about it.

I think what he's saying is 108-07=101, not 91. Do you get it?

He was the man who came up with the idea of geo-stationary satellites

Google says this isn't true.

Arthur C. Clark books were made into movies. My favourites are 2001, Rendevous with Rama, and Star wars and my favourite book was The Nine Billion Names of God.

The monkeys in 2001 are amazing. After the bit where they managed to run around in circles inside the space ship they organised boxes in the skylab space station and filmed astronauts doing the same thing once as a tribute to Arthur C. Clark.

Windy Militant
19th Mar 2008, 15:42
People tend to overlook his rather puckish sense of humor. His short stories often featured the most atrocious puns. Many's the pompus windbag that's been deflated by his acerbic wit.
The world will be a duller place without him.

Gainesy
19th Mar 2008, 16:33
Good obit in the Daily Telegraph
http://http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/news/2008/03/19/db1904.xml (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/news/2008/03/19/db1904.xml)

Widger
19th Mar 2008, 16:51
G_ZUZZ,

OK, not the first but he popularised it!

The idea of a geosynchronous satellite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geosynchronous_satellite) for communication purposes was first published in 1928 by Herman Potočnik (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herman_Poto%C4%8Dnik). The geostationary orbit (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orbit) was first popularised in a paper entitled "Extra-Terrestrial Relays ó Can Rocket Stations Give Worldwide Radio Coverage?" by Arthur C. Clarke (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arthur_C._Clarke), published in Wireless World (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_World) in 1945. In the paper, Clarke described it as a useful orbit for communications satellites. As a result this is sometimes referred to as the Clarke orbit. Similarly, the Clarke Belt is the part of space approximately 35,786 km above mean sea level (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mean_sea_level) in the plane of the equator where near-geostationary orbits may be achieved.

dusk2dawn
19th Mar 2008, 17:54
"In this universe the night was falling, the shadows were lengthening towards an east that would not know another dawn.
But elsewhere the stars were still young and the light of morning lingered: and along the path he once had followed, man would one day go again." (The City & The Stars)

pigboat
19th Mar 2008, 18:53
Daisy .. Daisy .. give ... me ... y o u r ..... a n s w e r ..... d .. o .. o...

RIP Sir. :(

GWYN
19th Mar 2008, 20:21
..........and a product of a Huish's Grammar School education.

RIP Sir Arthur.

Flugplatz
19th Mar 2008, 22:02
A Quality geezer

jumpuFOKKERjump
22nd Mar 2008, 14:24
Yes. The last of the big three from my teenage years. Wrote a letter to Isaac Asimov a while ago, and when looking for where to send it found he'd been dead a year or two. With him, Arthur and Robert Heinlen, thanks for making me think.

Arthur C. Clark books were made into movies. My favourites are 2001, Bit more complicated than that. The book says it is based on a screenplay by Stanley Kubrick. The film says the screenplay is based on a book by Arthur C Clark, but it was his short story first.

shedhead
22nd Mar 2008, 16:13
first read 2001 in 1973 read it all the way through in one go.
I'd forgotten about Earthlight until I started reading this thread,another cracking read!

aviate1138
22nd Mar 2008, 18:26
I worked on 2001 and saw ACC almost every day for 2 years. A gentle man with a soft accent and a massive talent. He found Stanley Kubrick hard going but then writers and directors rarely see eye to eye.

It was a privilege to have spent time in his company.

RIP Sir Arthur

wiggy
22nd Mar 2008, 21:11
Yep the evolution of "2001" was a bit complex and it certainly didn't start as Clarke's book.

It started as Clarke's short story called "the Sentinel" ....about an artifact being found on the moon, on top of a mountain ( not buried, in contrast to the film version).....As far as I remember the story it was surrounded by a force field. Mankind eventually got through the force field by using a nuclear device, which of course shattered the artifact....and at that point the story ends with comments about mankind, having tripped the alarm, will now have to wait for an answer..

That then morphed into the Kubrick/Clarke Screenplay, which Clarke then tided up into the novel...but even the novel and the film differ significantly - Saturn (novel) vs Jupiter, a transparent oblesk on ?Titan (novel) vs a black one in orbit...... I actually prefer the short story to the novel and the film but then I've got a short attention span.

Captain Speedbird
22nd Mar 2008, 21:42
G-ZUZZ, thanks for the tip on the book, Rendezvous with Rama is my all-time favourite fiction book. I must admit, I have never read The Nine Billion Names of God. I'm looking forward to it. The first Rama book just grabbed my imagination by the scruff of the neck as a young lad, and never let go. Reading that was so much better than any CGI movie extravaganza.

Slasher
23rd Mar 2008, 02:30
First Douglas Adams now Arty Clarke. :(

Viola
23rd Mar 2008, 23:24
I was going to quote the ending of The Nine Billion Names of God, as it is absolutely superb, but I won't now as it will spoil it for you Captain Speedbird.

ampan
23rd Mar 2008, 23:45
Very well-known down here in the Antipodes, mainly for his TV programs, with that unmistakable voice.

Have always assumed that he was the brother of Sir Kenneth Clarke, who presented that great BBC series 'Civilisation' in the early 70s. Is this true, or am I getting confused with the Attenboroughs?

Widger
24th Mar 2008, 13:10
I always thought 2010 was a far better film than 2001. I especially liked the braking manouvre around Jupiter and of course the delightful Helen Mirren. A very under-rated sci-fi.