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Sikpupi
14th Mar 2008, 19:27
Hi... having been given an Electric Guitar a while back (second hand and probably not much good!)..I find that I can't really practice same without the usual moaning and spitting from the less talented (!) members of the household.

My question ..is can you buy a set of plug-in headphones that can replicate the sound direct to the ears without losing any quality. I have tried a set of headphones that I had for listening to the stereo but the guitar sound wasn't the same coming thru them when plugged into the amp. Am I missing a 'plug-in' piece needed to enhance the sound.

Any good recommendations????

Sikky

tony draper
14th Mar 2008, 19:47
You can get amplified head phones specifically for practice among the unmusical I've tried them but they seem pretty dead sounding and flat,I'm supprised you heard anything at all from your HI FI headphones, I wouldn't have though the straight output from the guitar would be enough to drive those type of headphones,most Amps have a headphone socket now that cuts out the speakers,my wee Vox Valvetronix Amp has one,and to be frank the sound on the headphones is better than the speakers produce,plus you still have the advantage of the digital effects built into most modern modeling Amps.
:cool:

Sikpupi
14th Mar 2008, 20:16
Tony... I actually did plut the headphones into the Amp. It was this sound that sounded 'odd' in that it sounded 'twangy' and distorted. I gave up then and put teh guitar back on the stand in teh corner of the room!!!

Beatriz Fontana
14th Mar 2008, 20:32
I have to admit that my good friends on Denmark Street in London have seen me right on these kind of things. Just make sure that the socket and plug sizes are compatible.

And keep the volume down on earphones in particular. I dont wish to come across as Mother Hen, that was merely the advice I was given by the shop - earphones can be much more damaging than headphones.

BigBoeing
14th Mar 2008, 20:32
my headphones sound great through a small Marshall amp. Alternatively I plug my hi fi headphones into the output from an effects pedal I have, this is much better if you have no room as you can replicate many different sounds/settings etc and don't need an amp.

Lancastrian
14th Mar 2008, 20:36
You should be able to get hold of a small practice amp which allows a jack input to bypass the speakers. Really need this as the preamp controls will allow you to adjust to the sound and volume you require. On trying this last time, could you have had the volumes to high sending the system into overdrive (gives sustain etc) just a suggestion as indeed its been a time since I had my own system of Gibson SG and Marshall setup.

tony draper
14th Mar 2008, 21:49
Yer I got a lot of fancy rack mounted kit now but I still like sitting with the headphones on plugged into the vox pruning and noodling on me Strat at the same time.
:rolleyes:

frostbite
14th Mar 2008, 21:59
What you need is a shed.

Ask Gingernut.

stevef
15th Mar 2008, 10:09
Sharp HP200 8 ohm headphones work fine on my G-DEC and Peavey amps. Two quid from a charity shop, four years ago.

Parapunter
15th Mar 2008, 13:49
Should be able to plug in & out of a puter these days too - get a bit of software & you can have all kinds of effects in your earholes.

Just dropped me 35 year old strat into the luthier for a neck respray, a refret & a new nut. It'll be rocking when I get it back!

pup150
15th Mar 2008, 17:57
Korg did a great bit of kit called a Toneworks. About the size of one of those old cassette walkmans. Plug your guitar in and your headphones , strap it to your belt and you can wander around wherever sounding like you are playing through a Marshall stack or whatever takes your fancy. Lots of other companies do similar units and not too expensive either.

vapilot2004
15th Mar 2008, 18:37
A piece of HiFi equipment with a magnetic phono input will work nicely.

tony draper
15th Mar 2008, 18:44
Nah dont try that ,amps for playing CDs records and such are not built to handle the high transient voltages a musical instrument produces, unless you have some sort of kit betwixt the guitar and HI FI Amp such as a V Amp,I know this because I blew up a perfectly good surround sound amp trying the guitar directly plugged into same.
:ooh:

Blacksheep
16th Mar 2008, 00:26
i use an ancient pair of Sony hi-fi headphones most of the time and they work very well - better than the speaker in my cheap, crappy amp actually. Its important - nay, essential - to ensure the impedance of your headgear matches that of your amplifier. Check the spec sheets for both bits of kit...

tinpis
16th Mar 2008, 03:20
Playing Electric Guitar with Earphones

Whats it sound like?
I used a pick in my day.:hmm:

vapilot2004
16th Mar 2008, 10:06
I suggested:
A piece of HiFi equipment with a magnetic phono input will work nicely.
Master Draper says:
Nah dont try that ,amps for playing CDs records and such are not built to handle the high transient voltages a musical instrument produces, unless you have some sort of kit betwixt the guitar and HI FI Amp such as a V Amp,I know this because I blew up a perfectly good surround sound amp trying the guitar directly plugged into same.


Ouch - I didn't know that. :O Perhaps if the HiFi was valve powered ?

bnt
17th Mar 2008, 22:07
Korg did a great bit of kit called a Toneworks. About the size of one of those old cassette walkmans.
I'll second the Korg Toneworks range: I have both Ampworks and Ampworks Bass boxes that are several years old, but still sound fantastic. Guitar or bass goes in one end, headphones (or hi-fi or mixing desk) at the other end - everything in between, including effects, amp or speakers, are emulated digitally. These days you might look at a Pandora PX5D, which is their current all-in-one desktop box, or the older (and cheaper) PX4D. I'd say you can't go wrong with one of those while learning.

PS: about using hi-fi phono inputs - that is, the input for a turntable, not a general Line input - I wouldn't bother. The results will be very bass-heavy because of the EQ. Line In is no good either: the guitar output is too low. Maybe if the guitar has active electronics on board, but even then it will be very boring.

tony draper
17th Mar 2008, 22:19
Anyway why bother? I had my first electric guitar for about a year before I got a Amp,if your learning even a solid body has enough volume played dry for you to hear yer mistakes and is mercyfull on other peeps in the room.
:uhoh:

DG101
17th Mar 2008, 23:11
I've known guitar twangers that used a plectrum, or sometimes steel finger extenders, or just plain calloused fingers at one end. And, although a capo is generally used at t'other end I have seen some people wot used a bottle neck to some effect.

But this is the first time I've heard of anyone play a guitar with earphones. Can you put a clip on YouTube? :ok: