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iws
13th Mar 2008, 17:31
Anyone seen the new weather warning system that has just appeared on the Met Office Web pages?

It seems that now we can not only have Severe Weather but also Extreme Weather.:confused:

It might just be me, but I find the new definitions less easy to understand than the old ones.

Why does everything have to suffer from this creeping complexity?

Krystal n chips
13th Mar 2008, 18:53
Extreme weather.........:{.....lets look at the term another way.

The Beaufort scale is far too complex for any intrepid News reporter to grasp...and anyway, most have probably never heard of it!

Likewise with the various forms of temperature measurements and rainfall measurements. However, if they see the word "extreme".....dah, dah !.....they can understand this and thus duly prepare themselves for yet another Oscar winning performance as they state the obvious to the Nation who will duly be watching enthralled as to their bravery :rolleyes:

As for introducing complexity in other areas of life, well as human beings we like to think we are educated and developed hence the more complex we can make a process or operation, the more we can demonstrate as much. Take the humble can opener for example....most are complex works of engineering and duly fail the first time they are thrown at the wall in despair ;)...unlike the HM Gov't version which is dead simple and lasts for years....as mine has. :ok:

frostbite
13th Mar 2008, 19:06
Probably get Quantum Weather Conditions next - that's another word they like (and fail to understand).

Whirlygig
13th Mar 2008, 19:45
That'll be the quantum packets of rain drops which behave like a wave!!!

Cheers

Whirls

G-CPTN
13th Mar 2008, 20:58
I like it when they use the word phenomenal.
That gives a certain impact to the elements that even extreme fails to convey

Foss
13th Mar 2008, 22:08
Friend did a classic rewrite on the weather reports.
The earthquake, 'Over to our reporter. How many dead bodies have you seen, it must be terrible. Is it? Well?'
'Ah, it registered as 0.0001 on something.'
'I'm sorry you, you're breaking up, emergency services have not been able to recover any bodies.'
'Ahh, not as such. A chimney fell down somewhere.'

The gale, reported.
'Gales are lashing (why do gales lash, seamen get lashed, anyway the coast in Northern Ireland. How is the devastation there?'
'Well it was windy last night, but the treacherous deadly gale force winds seem to have, well gone.'
'You mean the met office has lost the storm?'
'Not exxxactly.'

I think Beaufort was a mate of Fitzroy, resisiting the urge to Goggle it, 'cause that's cheating.

Fos scale for winds.
1. You can smoke a cigar.
2. Idiot won't leave the house.
3. Flags move.
5. You get proper waves.
6. Halyards start whining more than the crew. You don't even ask, get a storm sail ready.
7. People start hoking out life lines. Lifejackets suddenly appear like Mr Benn, as if from nowhere.
8. Briefly ponder how the living crap you are going to lift a liferaft which weighs the same as a baby elephant onto deck. Sudden interest in knives, plyers, strobes and the radio.
9. 'This is really stupid'.
10. 'I want my mummy, get me the radio, and no I'm not doing foredeck.'
Force 11 onwards. Rent-a-ghost yourself back to shore.
Fos

tony draper
13th Mar 2008, 22:24
Bah!! I seen winds in me time yers wudden believe.:rolleyes:
http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a194/Deaddogbay/HamnavoenorthofHoy.jpg

G-CPTN
13th Mar 2008, 23:32
Fos scale for winds.
1. You can smoke a cigar.
2. Idiot won't leave the house.
3. Flags move.
5. You get proper waves.
6. Halyards start whining more than the crew. You don't even ask, get a storm sail ready.
7. People start hoking out life lines. Lifejackets suddenly appear like Mr Benn, as if from nowhere.
8. Briefly ponder how the living crap you are going to lift a liferaft which weighs the same as a baby elephant onto deck. Sudden interest in knives, plyers, strobes and the radio.
9. 'This is really stupid'.
10. 'I want my mummy, get me the radio, and no I'm not doing foredeck.'
Force 11 onwards. Rent-a-ghost yourself back to shore.
FosBrilliant piece of literary skill. :D

Beatriz Fontana
13th Mar 2008, 23:34
Whey hey! It's the panic scale that the US so adores! Hang on, I've seent his type of thing somewhere before...

http://www.heady.co.uk/rm/terror_warning_new.jpg

G-CPTN
13th Mar 2008, 23:44
The basic facts of the Beagle's visit bear retelling. The first suggestion that the ship might visit the Galapagos was made by her captain, Robert FitzRoy, to Admiral Beaufort, Hydrographer to the Royal Navy,and:- Admiral Robert Fitzroy of H.M.S. Beagle fame wrote of Admiral Sir Francis Beaufort, "All honor to Beaufort, who used and introduced this succinct method of approximation by scale..."
(From:- http://www.islandnet.com/~see/weather/history/beaufort.htm )

Thread drift:- At the start of the voyage Darwin was twenty-two; he had some experience of collecting beetles and small sea creatures, and was fast developing a strong interest in geology, but he saw himself rightly as a novice in all other areas of natural history. His plan for the Beagle voyage was twofold to continue his own investigations of geology and marine invertebrates, and to collect specimens of other organisms that might be new to science, for experts to examine and describe on the Beagle's return to England.
The Beagle was in the Galapagos for five weeks, from 15 September to 20 October 1835, and made a series of charts which were still in use by mariners in the 1940s. Darwin spent about nineteen days ashore, on Chatham Island (now San Cristobal)
During the eight days Captain FitzRoy spent surveying the coast, Darwin made five landings, starting on Wednesday 16 September near what is now Puerto Baquerizo Moreno
The Beagle sailed next to Charles Island where Darwin spent three days exploring and collecting 'all the animals, plants, insects and reptiles from this Island'
On 29 September the Beagle reached Albemarle Island and the next day the ship anchored in the inlet Darwin knew as Blonde Cove, now Tagus Cove. Darwin landed on 1 October to examine the volcanic terrain. As on Charles Island, he collected plants and animals,
On 8 October she reached James Island, and Darwin was able to go ashore with his servant Syms Covington, the Captain's servant Harry Fuller, and the ship's surgeon Benjamin Bynoe, for a stay of nine days while the Beagle returned to Chatham and Charles for water and provisions.
During their time on James Island, Darwin explored inland and collected specimens with help from the others, and from 12 October to the Beagle's departure on 18 October, he made a number of entries in the field notebook
(From:- http://darwin-online.org.uk/EditorialIntroductions/Chancellor_Keynes_Galapagos.html )

Point being that Charles Darwin's 'teachings' were based on relatively short surveys by a young man.

arcniz
14th Mar 2008, 08:44
Better it creeps than gallops.