PDA

View Full Version : Falkland Islands Oil


ORAC
9th Mar 2008, 09:45
Torygraph: Drilling for oil to start in Falkland Islands (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2008/03/09/wfalk109.xml)

The inhabitants of the Falkland Islands are preparing for a South Atlantic oil rush which they hope will make them among the richest people in the world.

After 10 years of frustrating delays since oil fields containing up to 60 billion barrels of "black gold" were discovered off the islands, oil companies are planning to start drilling within the next 12 months. The move follows the conclusion of lengthy, but successful, tests by geologists and significant cash injections by two major oil companies which plan to bring rigs to the islands by as early as autumn.

The companies with licences to drill in the area met in Edinburgh on Friday to brief officials from the Falklands' government on their progress, and preparations are under way in the South Atlantic to ensure that the islands can cope with sudden wealth............

Meanwhile the Argentine government, which still claims the "Malvinas", as it calls the islands, and their oil fields as its own, is also looking jealously at the situation. A spokesman said: "We reaffirm our backing for the legitimate rights of the Argentine Republic in the sovereignty dispute with Great Britain regarding the issue of the Malvinas."

Buenos Aires has accused London and the Falklands of reneging on an agreement in 1995 to co-operate over exploring offshore reserves, and of resisting its attempts to open talks on the issue. "The intransigence of Great Britain has not permitted that open and frank dialogue," the spokesman added.

The search for Falklands oil began in 1998, when a consortium of big companies drilled a cluster of six wells. Five showed the presence of oil, and one even brought it spurting to the surface.

It was estimated that the area might hold 60 billion barrels of oil - equivalent to the North Sea's estimated original reserves - all within the Falklands' "economic zone", which stretches 200 miles from its coastline........

John Eacott
9th Mar 2008, 09:53
The search for Falklands oil began in 1998

It started well before that. I flew the ferry crew from a drill rig off the south coast of NSW the day of the Falklands invasion, which had been drilling off the Falklands for 4+ months before the trans Pacific ferry. Ferry crew and exploration crew were 50% Argentines, who may just have mentioned the successful drill results to someone back home ;)

C130 Techie
9th Mar 2008, 11:13
If this is an accurate report then the Falkland Islanders will need to get a move on with their planned upgrade of roads and harbour facilities.

Whilst I was down there last summer I listened to the 'state of the nation' address given by the governor.

The increase in the tourist industry, consisting principally of cruise ships, is already causing logistics problems for the locals due to the long supply chain served by a single ship every 6 - 8 weeks. At present cruise liners are unable to dock and passengers have to be ferried ashore. A new deep water harbour is planned to alleviate this.

The single road between the International Airport at RAF Mount Pleasant and Port Stanley (35 miles) is largely unmetalled. The road can be extremely dangerous and is frequently closed, particularly during the winter months, due to high winds. Due to a number of fatalites all military vehicles using the road have speed limiters restricting them to 40 mph.

Kiwiguy
9th Mar 2008, 11:42
Well not a moment too soon because my wallet is tired over the arabs blackmailing supply all the time.

ORAC
9th Mar 2008, 12:25
Going back a long way (and I mean about mid 1980s), there was a company looking ahead to when the oil business moved in/built up. They wanted to start a regular service, weekly at the start and building up to daily, between MPA and South Africa.

They aim was threefold. They'd bring in fresh fruit, vegetables and meat. They'd take over running the air bridge meeting BA or other airlines at SA airports. And, more importantly as far as they were concerned, they'd fly the oil workers out on their 2/4 weeks off - and straight into the casinos and other attractions of Sun City etc.....

Still sounds like a good game plan to me......

C130 Techie
9th Mar 2008, 17:50
ORAC

The islanders are looking at an alternative/addition to the airbridge. Whilst the airbridge is functional, it is just that. Really only one class of seat more so now that the 747 has finished and the route is flown by a DC10) and no booze. The locals feel that as they are paying for their seats (£2K+) that they should be given the option of better seats, booze and a choice of food.

At present the only alternative to the airbridge is the weekly LanChile flight into Punta Arenas and Santiago.

The problem is that anything going into South America on a regular basis is going to upset the Argentinians, so whoever takes it on will need to be big enough to stand up to them. Maybe the South African option is a good alternative although I don't know what the flight time would be.

Noah Zark.
9th Mar 2008, 21:20
Well not a moment too soon because my wallet is tired over the arabs blackmailing supply all the time.

Kiwiguy
Here in the U.K. we are also being cleaned out by Gordon's bandits, diesel in my kneck of the woods selling at £1.13 a litre today!

BlueWolf
9th Mar 2008, 21:42
What's wrong with going to war for oil? I mean it's what we've always done; oil, gold, uranium, opium, spices, fish, whatever, it's always about money. Personally I'd rather have a war than not have any oil (admittedly it isn't me doing the war bit, maybe I'd feel differently if it was).

Diesel here this morning is $1.28 a litre, since everyone pays the same for a barrel of crude thanks to the good ol' world cartel system, most of what you're being ripped of for is, indeed, tax.

A2QFI
9th Mar 2008, 21:48
Idle thought at work today. The price of a barrel of crude oil, in $s, is about the same as the price, in UK pence, of a litre of unleaded. Have the figures always parallelled like this? I think not but probably someone here knows better!

speeddial
9th Mar 2008, 23:04
I remember reading on here a while ago, when oil was about $70 and everyone was shocked, that drilling for oil in the Falklands only became viable when the market price reached $100/barrel. Is there still any truth in that?

tony draper
10th Mar 2008, 00:00
And they can spell OIL,:rolleyes:

L'aviateur
10th Mar 2008, 00:14
Agree with C130 techie that the island needs a lot of upgrades; as a cruise ship driver visiting regularly; the idea of sending pax on 30 min tender rides in rough weather is awful (on several occasions we've left 1000 pax stranded due to weather), and we often leave the supermarkets with no food on the shelves (mainly salt n vinager crisps and english breakfast material).
The place doesn't have a lot going for it, so hopefully oil will give it something worthwhile!

rotornut
10th Mar 2008, 15:09
since oil fields containing up to 60 billion barrels of "black gold" were discovered off the islands
Well, that sounds impressive but it's a long process to establish proven reserves. In any case let's hope there is some economically recoverable oil there. I don't think Argentina can really threaten the islands after they got beaten up last time. Just put a Gurkha battalion on the islands and they won't even think of invading or causing trouble. ;)

frostbite
10th Mar 2008, 17:21
"I don't think Argentina can really threaten the islands after they got beaten up last time."


That might become famous last words.

C130 Techie
10th Mar 2008, 17:43
Frosty

It is of course possible but I hope they will not.

The Argentinians have stated on a number of occasions that they will not attempt to re-take the Falkland Islands by force. That said we are talking about politicians here and some particularly corrupt ones at that.

Argentinas economy is in a pretty poor state at the moment and there are a significant number of internal issues that require their attention. Do they have the capacity or will to mount an invasion at this time? Who knows. The area of concern has always been the smaller wildcat attack by a faction of the armed forces.

What worries me more is whether we have the capability given current military commitments to first of all defend the Islands against a full scale invasion and second whether we would subsequently be able to retake them if the worst happened.

The subject of Oil will inevitably spark renewed interest from the Argentinians with the inevitable sabre rattling and we can but hope that's all it will be.

BOFH
10th Mar 2008, 17:52
That said we are talking about politicians here and some particularly corrupt ones

There's another type?

BOFH

C130 Techie
10th Mar 2008, 20:39
BOFH

No you're right, sorry for stating the obvious.

frostbite
10th Mar 2008, 22:05
If I was Argentinian I would choose to have another go now. After all, who have we got left to send?

rotornut
10th Mar 2008, 22:36
A few Gurkhas, that's who. They scared the daylights out of the Argentines who were afraid to fight them.

tony draper
10th Mar 2008, 23:20
I remember sitting in a little Bar in BA,just me and a few locals,the lady behind the bar wanted to practice her English so she asks.
"Hey English! when do you put on the uniform of a soldier"
"We don't" replied I
old men at the tables cast puzzled glances at each other and joined the conversation.
"Hey Englishman how come you do not put on the uniform of a soldier,all our young men have to put on the uniform of a soldier"
One paused turned round and stared at em
"Because we have the Atom Bomb" spake I
eyebrows raised,unshaved chins nodded wisely at each other.
"Ah la the bomba atomeec"
Nobody bothered me after that.
We still have la bomba atomeec,they do not.:E

con-pilot
10th Mar 2008, 23:57
You know I read a novel a little while ago that had the plot of Argentina and China joining forces to start another war over the Falklands to wipe out what was left of the Royal Navy and to trick the US into attacking Iran by blaming a terrorist attack against Washington DC with a stolen former USSR nuclear weapon so that China could end up with all the oil. (Yeah I know, long reach.)

Hum, sounds like the first part is happening. :uhoh:

(Hey I didn't write the blasted book, just read it, wasn't that good anyway. :p)

tony draper
11th Mar 2008, 00:02
Why don't the Chinese just fake oil ? the feckers seem to be able to fake everything else, prolly including the Simvastin pill I just took.
:rolleyes:

airship
11th Mar 2008, 02:01
Great. Another chance for the numpties to start claiming we went to war for oil. :rolleyes: If it was advantageous to the government of the day that Britain went to war over an Argentine invasion of some desolate islands of no real consequence in the '80s in order to distract the attention of ordinary Britons from the very grave and serious consequences of Maggie's "remodelling of the UK economy" combined with a general wordwide economic recession...and the recent invasion of Iraq was really all about deposing a ruthless dictator and installing democracy, as opposed to taking everyones' minds off the greatest stock market crash since the great depression of the '30s...you'd be so right?! :}

Oil never has, or ever will be a reason for countries to go to war. :ok:
Unless that is, there's been a continuous war/s ever since we discovered oil is much more rare than once presumed, and most of it doesn't belong to us anymore...?! :{

BlueWolf
11th Mar 2008, 08:59
Oil never has, or ever will be a reason for countries to go to war

So why did everyone spend so much of WWII mired in North Africa then? Were they trying to secure control of the world's strategic sand reserves? :confused:

Juud
11th Mar 2008, 10:20
Nah Drapes, that´d be your Indians, not yer Chinese. ;)

According to a World Health Organisation report, 35 per cent of the fake drugs in the world are produced in India alone. (http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/articleshow/70340.cms)

tony draper
11th Mar 2008, 10:26
Were a prog on telly about fake drugs last night Madam Judd,tiz rather frightening,and as per the power that be are covering up the vast amount already sitting on shelves in our chemist shops and hospitals ,there is apparently no organisation tasks to investigate the purity of drugs once they are passed for use, leastwise the two organisations that one would think should be responsible keep passing the buck to each other.
:uhoh:

ford cortina
11th Mar 2008, 10:31
Maybe Maggie did go to war just to distract us.
Then again maybe not, it might have been a soveringty issuse.
To be fair what else could she do, if she had not gone to war, then she would have lost the next election to Labour, who themselves would have been removed by the very strong Commie's that were around then and maybe we all would be speaking russian now, comrades....
My high school english teacher thought the Argies went to war because of civil unrest in the country, so with no world cup to win, to keep the population in check, win back the Falkland Islands. I still like that even now over 25 years later.

Flap 5
11th Mar 2008, 11:47
Galtieri went to war to distract his people. Maggie sent the British forces down there to reinstate the islanders wishes. Probably the last time a politician did something right on a matter of principle.

It would have been much easier for the Argentines to maintain a hold on the Falklands at that time. We had just one small ship (Endurance) and little else at the time. It would be much harder now.

airship
11th Mar 2008, 14:37
Maggie sent the British forces down there to reinstate the islanders wishes. Just like Hong Kong later on then - get real...?! :rolleyes:

Sailor Vee
11th Mar 2008, 14:54
We only rented Hong Kong, hope your house isn't lease hold!

airship
11th Mar 2008, 15:00
Surely everyone is on a lease-hold? Man lives 3 score years and 10. Countries may live a little longer. But where are the Pharoahs, the Roman empire, the Phoenicians today...? Where are the dinosaurs?! :uhoh:

S'land
11th Mar 2008, 15:07
Sorry Sailor Vee, but if I remember correctly the situation was that we owned Hong Kong (the island), but leased Kowloon, Lantau Island and New Territories.

It was only the "leasehold" that expired. We could have kept hold of Hong Kong proper as it was ceded to the UK under the Treaty of Nanking.

ORAC
11th Mar 2008, 15:19
It was only the "leasehold" that expired. We could have kept hold of Hong Kong proper as it was ceded to the UK under the Treaty of Nanking. Unsustainable, the island was/is unsupportable for water, power, food etc etc without the rest. I was, I am afraid, all or nothing. And with the lease running out, we had the short end of the stick.

Besides, the majority of the inhabitants of ong Kong wanted, under the right conditions, to go back to being part of China. Capitalists maybe, but also Chinese and proud of it.

The say not be able to be said of the Falklands. Though, if they had maintained their good neighbour policy and cheap schooling for the islanders, the Argentines might have turned that round. But they didn't, and they blew that opportunity for several generations....

S'land
11th Mar 2008, 15:30
ORAC:
Agreed that Hong Kong on its own is unsupportable. My point was that Hong Kong was British territory, not leased.

Still a great place to visit.

pigboat
11th Mar 2008, 15:31
Where are the dinosaurs?!

Check out the title of this thread again. ;)

airship
11th Mar 2008, 15:34
Gosh, I do believe that our ORAC might have had just one too many this lunchtime - in view of all the grammatical errors and mis-spelling in his last post? Welcome to the club ORAC?! :ok:;)

However, Unsustainable, the island was/is unsupportable for water, power, food etc etc without the rest. I was, I am afraid, all or nothing. That doesn't stop a whole legion of modern states from existing - take the middle-east for example, they couldn't possibly feed their populations without importing food or making their own water out of seawater. Granted, they have lots of oil, but so was HK also the principal export conduit of the bulk of Chinese manufactures at the time.

Or maybe all the rhetoric just stops dead when it's a formidable adversary involved (like China would have been)... :rolleyes:

ORAC
11th Mar 2008, 16:26
Gosh, I do believe that our ORAC might have had just one too many this lunchtime Chance would be a fine thing. One beef slice and a tuna sandwich. :{

airship
11th Mar 2008, 17:24
Beef and tuna, together in a sandwich?! That's an interesting combo - if I were in UK I'd insist on a generous dose of fiery horse-radish. But since I'm in France, I think a healthy dose of Dijon moutard would suffice hust as well. I'm going to try it next time I have leftovers from a roast boeuf...

But will it instantly transform me into some form of neocon, that is my worry...?! ;)

Impress to inflate
12th Mar 2008, 03:38
Back to the oil thing, are you sure the drill rig didn't hit the fuel tanks of the Belgano lying on the sea floor. You could run the Falklands for years on the fuel left in there.

I was a kid when the Falklands war was happening, it seemed to bring the whole country together. My be another good bust up would re-unite the country again or has Gordon got smaller balls than Maggs.

tinpis
12th Mar 2008, 04:07
My be another good bust up would re-unite the country again or has Gordon got smaller balls than Maggs.

Helmand not exciting enough for ya? :hmm:
Join up.