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pigboat
9th Mar 2008, 03:00
BOMBARDIER

ADVISORY WIRE
RFB789-23-1980


DATE: MARCH 26, 2006 PAGE 1 OF 2

FROM: BOMBARDIER BUSINESS AIRCRAFT CUSTOMER SUPPORT

SUBJECT: Windshield mounted lighted eye reference system balls (ERSB) used for pilot orientation and optimal seat position.

EFFECTIVITY: BD700-1A11 (9210 & SUBS)

PROBLEM: It has come to our attention that many operators in the field are misusing or unfamiliar with the proper use of their balls. The intent of this ADVISORY WIRE is to provide operational information and clarify some common misconceptions regarding the eye reference system balls (ERSB).

HISTORY:
The original ball system was developed by China Airlines Captain, Ting Ling to assist pilots with a reference seat position for low weather minimums or Category III approaches. It should be noted that the first successful CAT III approach was completed with Ting Ling balls. Even today there are approaches being flown all over the world with Ting Ling balls. Captain Ling originally had balls of steel but due to the interference with the magnetic compass Captain Ling switched to brass balls. Today’s balls are commonly made from synthetic materials and can be equipped with various options to include lighting and chimes. BOMBARDIER has recently developed a ball system with a 3-ring chime called the Dingle Ball. Ref: PN-754-11297DB. Some operators have opted for the NBAA system, which is No Balls At All. Regardless of the system you have installed it is important that each operator understand the proper maintenance and operation of their balls.

OPERATIONAL ISSUES:
It has been reported that many pilots are spending too much time adjusting their balls during critical phases of flight. Sighting your balls should require only a single adjustment, excessive manipulation should be avoided to prevent distraction and mechanical wear. Once a position is selected stick to it, remember your balls are only an aid; it doesn’t require balls to fly an approach. Some operators have adopted a policy of no ball adjustment below 10,000 feet. For those operators with lighted balls there are some considerations regarding CRM. The “Pilot Flying” when appropriate, should initiate the call “light my balls” the “Pilot Not Flying” should respond with “your balls are lit captain”. Common terminology can help prevent errors.

LIMITATIONS:
--Minimum operating temperature -25ºC (prevents blue balls issue).
--Avoid high temperature +40C & high humidity (prevents sweaty balls).


MAINTENANCE:
Your eye reference system balls (ERSB) require little maintenance. Occasional dusting of your balls or cleaning with a damp cloth should be all that is required. Do not use harsh detergents and avoid scratching your balls. Avoid touching your balls any more than absolutely necessary.
If your balls need replacement or mechanical adjustment we always recommend the use of a trained professional. You shouldn’t allow you balls to be handled by just anyone.

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

MY MAINTENANCE TECH HAS SUGGESTED SHAVING OUR BALLS TO ACHIEVE MORE PRECISE ALIGNEMENT; WILL THIS GIVE ME AN EDGE?
No, your balls were carefully designed and aligned during installation; any unauthorized modification will void your warranty.

I operate a GLEX for a major tobacco company and find that the heavy smoking has covered my balls with tar and nicotine, what is the best way to remove this goo?
Lightly scrape your balls with the BOMBARDIER silicon ball-scraping tool (SBST) PN2399-01-66BST to remove the heaviest build-up, then wipe with a damp cloth. Under no circumstances use steel wool on your balls.

Our GLEX is based in OMAN and exposed to high temperatures and strong sunlight, other than the 45ºC temperature limit is there any damage being done to my balls from the UV rays of the sun?

Your balls have been designed to endure many extreme conditions but extended exposure to UV can cause your balls to become brittle and loose their shine. I would recommend the use of the BOMBARDIER eye reference system ball sack (ERSBC), PN55-4-1BS.This specially designed cover will protect your balls from most extreme conditions.

I recently heard of a pilot losing his balls during an approach, is this possible?

This is very unlikely. The balls are securely mounted and unless they have been exposed to excessive handling or abuse it would be nearly impossible for them to come loose and roll about the cockpit. I suggest this may be just urban legend.


Wally Peters
Project Manager
Beneficial Balls Project
BOMBARDIER

Gulfstreamaviator
9th Mar 2008, 08:48
This way I can glow in the dark too.

Has any one else noticed that the HUD actually sees thru thin layers of outer clothing.

Just as the hostess to stand in front, (must be dark outside), and assist you to calibrate the unit.

Works every time.

glf

FlyMD
9th Mar 2008, 09:40
Glfaviator, you dirty old man you!

But I will of course try this out today on the Vnukovo tarmac, with the additional benefit that the outside temperature will cause a stiffening of the FANTI* !!




* FANTI: Flight Attendant Nippular Temperature Indicator :}

FlyMD

Sallyann1234
9th Mar 2008, 12:45
It's an entirely superfluous aid. Many of us can land perfectly with no balls at all.

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
9th Mar 2008, 15:32
True, I hear some people can land the aircraft as if it was flying down a groove.