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Cim Jartner
13th Feb 2008, 15:25
I have two (reasonably reliable) different definitions of QNE and was wondering if anyone knows the definitive answer.

The first states that is is 1013.2 - the standard pressure setting, used above TA.

The second states that is is the height indicated with the standard pressure setting set - used for approaches when landing on very high airfields (La Paz type heights!) where the local QFE would be off the clock of most altimeters.

Anyone know which is correct - I am tempted to think that it actually the latter but that the former has crept into common use to supply a Q-Code to SPS.

Thanks in anticipation.

CJ

BOAC
13th Feb 2008, 15:30
http://www.kloth.net/radio/qcodes.php

BelArgUSA
13th Feb 2008, 15:35
A QNE on an altimeter is (your choice) - when the Kollsman window is set at -
1013.2 hPa (mB), or
29.92 inches Hg, (in USA and Canada) or
760 mm Hg (old metric altimeters)
xxx
:)
Happy contrails

jb5000
13th Feb 2008, 15:45
I'm convinced it's what your altimeter would read at the threshold if 1013 was set.

So it would be in feet, rather than QNE xxxx mb.

jb5000
13th Feb 2008, 15:51
Oh, and I have no idea why it would be used! QNH would surely be the best option? Maybe it's when QNH is too high/low to be displayed on a standard instrument.

BDiONU
13th Feb 2008, 15:55
Oh, and I have no idea why it would be used! Maybe it's when QNH is too high/low to be displayed on a standard instrument.
Correct! You win tonights star prize! Most altimeters only operate between 950 and 1050Hpa.

BD

Spitoon
13th Feb 2008, 16:44
I've always understood it to be as indicated in BOAC's link, i.e. What indication will my altimeter give on landing at ... (place) at ... hours, my sub-scale being set to 1013.2 millibars (29.92 inches)? or On landing at ... (place) at ... hours, with your sub-scale being set to 1013.2 millibars (29.92 inches), your altimeter will indicate ... (figures and units).

But as CJ suggests, I suspect too suspect that QNE has become commonly used to represent SPS - I have heard it used in that way a good number of times.

james ozzie
14th Feb 2008, 09:58
As far as I have seen, no altimeter has a setting pointer painted in at standard - I cannot see why this should not be done - it would make setting & checking that little bit easier and reliable. It could be a little "dayglo" arrowhead.

Plenty of accidents traced in part to wrong altimeter settings, I think.