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Mak
31st Jan 2008, 10:49
Hi,

Recently flew in a Rynair jet and noticed they sport some enormous wing tip stabilisers. I assumed these aren't there only so that they can carry the company logo so am curious to find out their purpose. I'm guessing it might improve short field performance but keen to hear what the experts think.

Thanks

Mak

HundredPercentPlease
31st Jan 2008, 10:52
Guess no more:

http://www.b737.org.uk/winglets.htm

Mak
1st Feb 2008, 16:41
thanks 100%

nosefirsteverytime
1st Feb 2008, 20:37
I always snigger passing the Ryanair maintenance hangar at EIDW. Typical Ryanair, built the shed for the older machines, the winglets add about a half metre either side, you can't get them in! :E

slapdash8
1st Feb 2008, 23:36
I always snigger passing the Ryanair maintenance hangar at EIDW. Typical Ryanair, built the shed for the older machines, the winglets add about a half metre either side, you can't get them in!

we used to have to remove ATP wingtips to get them into our shed. they are deceptively wide machines!

some sometimes forgot

ale_mcdowel
2nd Feb 2008, 20:49
This winglets are benefitial for induced drag producing a fuel savings icrease of 3% per each flight (average). Thats why are there for, not because it looks nicer ar anything like that, its all about the fuell baby!

Eagle402
2nd Feb 2008, 20:59
Interesting that the Boeing site makes no mention of the original Whitcomb/NASA research many many moons before the Boeing testing.

I always thought that the Whitcomb wingletted Lear's looked truly beautiful.

ray cosmic
2nd Feb 2008, 21:02
On the -700 they accoutn for the equivalent of some 2k thrust; therefore enginederates can be used more often; saving not only fuel but engine wear as well.

Liffy 1M
2nd Feb 2008, 21:48
I always snigger passing the Ryanair maintenance hangar at EIDW. Typical Ryanair, built the shed for the older machines, the winglets add about a half metre either side, you can't get them in!

Actually this hangar preceded Ryanair and its 737s. It was first used by a company called Avair, whose largest equipment was the Shorts 330. You can see the hangar in this 1982 photo:

http://www.airliners.net/photo/Avair/Short-330/0537241/M/

john_tullamarine
3rd Feb 2008, 23:05
Interesting that the Boeing site makes no mention of the original Whitcomb/NASA research many many moons before the Boeing testing

Research on wingtip devices goes back further .. when I was a student in the late 60s, E.D. Poppleton, at Sydney University, was active in investigating quite strange configurations as precursors to the simpler sails which ended up in the marketplace. At one stage I was looking at doing my undergrad thesis on such a device modelled on an F27 ... practical handling considerations in crosswinds would have made it impracticable as conceived .. but the thought was interesting ..