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Yani Yani
6th Jan 2008, 12:29
In the US they are 8nm wide. What about rest of the world ? Do they differ in width ? Terminal airways ( STARS/SIDS ) more narrow than oceanic ? Or are they not classifies as airways ?...where can I find info ? Looked in Jepps but found no info.

5milesbaby
6th Jan 2008, 14:13
In the UK airways (FL245-) are 10nm wide and upper air routes (FL245+) are just a centreline of which to be classed as on the route the a/c has to be within 5nm either side, so basically a 10nm lane again.

GlueBall
6th Jan 2008, 19:17
Well . . . at FRA you'll risk a SID noise violation if you're more than 300 meters off centerline. :ooh:

Agaricus bisporus
6th Jan 2008, 19:33
Ten miles.

Next?

londonmet
6th Jan 2008, 23:08
OK,

Agaricus bisporus seeing as you're so knowledgeable and helpful how long's a piece of string?

L Met

cribble
7th Jan 2008, 08:55
:rolleyes: Oh to be young again, Agari, and be so certain....
Yani
Yes, the dimensions do change. Ther following, for example, from the Canadian AIP (on line)
2.7.1 Low Level Airways
Controlled low level airspace extends upward from 2 200 feet AGL up to, but not including, 18 000 feet ASL, within the following specified boundaries:
VHF/UHF Airways: The basic VHF/UHF airway width is 4 NM on each side of the centre line prescribed for such an airway. Where applicable, the airway width shall be increased between the points where lines, diverging 4.5˚ on each side of the centre line from the designated facility, intersect the basic width boundary; and where they meet, similar lines projected from the adjacent facility.
LF/MF Airways: The basic LF/MF airway width is 4.34 NM on each side of the centre line prescribed for such an airway. Where applicable, the airway width shall be increased between the points where lines, diverging 5˚ on each side of the centre line from the designated facility, intersect the basic width boundary; and where they meet, similar lines projected from the adjacent facility.
Have a look at the AIP of the country that controls the airspace you are interested in. It may be a time-consuming task, and you may not get the answer, but you will learn some stuff on the way.
I lost my link to the ICAO docs on the Danish Government website, but you may find good info there.

JEP
7th Jan 2008, 09:34
http://dcaa.slv.dk:8000/icaodocs/

Dan Winterland
7th Jan 2008, 14:37
20km in China. (10.8nm)

1xxxxx1
8th Jan 2008, 16:13
20km in China ? are you sure;)

Because last time coming from Korea we flew an off set of R1 (1NM to the right of track / airway) but were firmly advised by Chinese ATC to follow the airway routing correctly!

With RVSM and soon than RNP0.0 letís hope nobody ever makes a mistake and the TCAS works!

I think that the airway in China is 0NM

Dan Winterland
9th Jan 2008, 15:45
Yes, in most cases. Some are narrower, for example the airway running up te east coast is only 10km from the centreline on the Taiwan side. Since RVSM has been introduced, Chinese ATC has been a bit more keen on tracking even telling pilots to apply offsets. All airspace in China is controlled and flight outside airways not often granted. as the majority is controlled by the military.