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View Full Version : Stupidity knows no bounds


PanPanYourself
29th Dec 2006, 13:58
http://edition.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/europe/12/29/germany.tourist.reut/index.html

A 21-year-old German tourist who wanted to visit his girlfriend in the Australian metropolis Sydney landed 13,000 kilometers (8,077 miles) away near Sidney, Montana, after mistyping his destination on a flight booking Web site.
Wow :ugh: :ugh:

"I did wonder but I didn't want to say anything," Gutt told the Bild newspaper. "I thought to myself, you can fly to Australia via the United States."
Look I'm sorry, but there really is absolutely no excuse for this. How stupid do you have to be!? If you can't even spell the name of where you're going, then DON'T GO THERE! Sure, it could be a typo, but didn't you at least glance at your itinerary?? Or an atlas for that matter?? How this person survived to the age of 21 without eating paint is beyond me, darwin's laws no longer apply.

allan907
29th Dec 2006, 14:00
It was probably better in Montana

Foss
29th Dec 2006, 15:44
What's even more stupid is talking to CNN about it. I would have just said I meant to come here, I'm seeing friends. I'm of to Australia now, thank you, bye.
Not I'm on the wrong continent because I'm an idiot, I'd better talk to an international media operation, who will then talk to my mum, so the whole world knows I'm an idiot.
Verdammt. Wann geht der nachste Flug nach SYDNEY. SYDNEYand don't tell anyone please, sssh, I'll look stupid
Fos
Sorry if my German is rubbish.

Blues&twos
29th Dec 2006, 15:56
Easily done. I went to visit my Uncle Sydney over Christmas and ended up in Montana.

Helluva drive back to Oxfordshire.

PaperTiger
29th Dec 2006, 17:37
I doubt it was a "typo" - more likely selected from a drop-down box containing all the World's Si(y)dneys.

For a casual flyer, a stop in the US (Portland would be vaguely en-route) might not ring the alarm bells; Billings sure as hell should have done. But then, how many Germans would know that Billings is in the US, let alone exactly where ? :ooh:
Hope he enrolled in the FF program beforehand.

Huck
29th Dec 2006, 18:47
That's nothing- I've seen the same mistake made in the cockpit, choosing the wrong waypoint from the FMS database. Saw a guy turn towards Monterrey California (KMRY) instead of Myrtle Beach (KMYR) once....

G-CPTN
29th Dec 2006, 18:58
Don't you mean Monterey?
AFAIK, Monterrey is in Mexico . . .
. . . and it's MTY (but you knew that . . . )

Farmer 1
29th Dec 2006, 19:10
That's nothing- I've seen the same mistake made in the cockpit, choosing the wrong waypoint from the FMS database. Saw a guy turn towards Monterrey California (KMRY) instead of Myrtle Beach (KMYR) once....

I once had a similar experience. There was a difference of one letter in the idents - L instead of E. No idea how my (very experienced) copilot made the mistake.

The actual destination was a mere three miles or so away, while the other one was about 160 miles - in the opposite direction. He headed off in the right direction (he could actually see it on take-off, and had been there on numerous occasions). When I pointed out the gps display, he failed completely to understand his error. On a later day, I realised he never consulted the gps - just headed off in what he imagined to be the right direction.

It was the start of a long and trying day. Followed by many others.

Doors to Automatic
29th Dec 2006, 19:11
If a 3-man DC-10 crew can end up in Brussels rather than Frankfurt then anything is possible!!

pigboat
29th Dec 2006, 19:56
Two Brits ended up in Sydney, Nova Scotia instead of Sydney, Oz a couple of years ago. They changed planes in Halifax and boarded a Dash 8 for Sydney, which should have been a dead giveaway. :O

blue up
29th Dec 2006, 20:14
London GatWick code is EGKK. London Luton is EGGW. Near enough to each other that the FMC might not notice the error during Pos-init. Both have 08/26 runways.
Dunno why they decided on those particular codes.

I've had some sort of mental block over those two for a decade. I have to have a serious think before playing with Mr FMC. Strangely, I had trouble with left/right as a child but not with east/west.:O


Nice that East Midlands (EGNX/EMA) is called East Midlands again instead of Castle Donnington - Nottingham - Identity Crisis International:ok:

ShyTorque
29th Dec 2006, 20:24
Careful - there's only on "n" in Donington. (Europe Nottingham East Midlands Airport)
Rubbish in = Rubbish out. I nearly went to Biggin Hill instead of Sywell (EGKB/EGBK). But then again, I cross-checked and noticed. :ooh:

None of the above
29th Dec 2006, 20:38
Two Brits ended up in Sydney, Nova Scotia instead of Sydney, Oz a couple of years ago. They changed planes in Halifax and boarded a Dash 8 for Sydney, which should have been a dead giveaway. :O

Britons fly to 'wrong' Sydney (Monday, 5 August, 2002, 14:03 GMT 15:03 UK)

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/2172858.stm

Whirlygig
29th Dec 2006, 21:27
Careful - there's only on "n" in Donington.
Ah, but there's TWO "n'"s in Donnington Castle!

Donnington_Castle (http://www.berkshirehistory.com/castles/donnington_cast.html)

Cheers

Whirls

ExSimGuy
29th Dec 2006, 21:38
A couple of years ago, I was on a flight from Doha to Bahrain and the lass doing the "welcome" announcement was saying "Welcome to Gulf Air flight number . . . err . err . . ." (at which point I muttered, loudly "515") "err, 515, to, err . . um (me: "Bahrain") "Um, to Bahrain"

As we get off the 'plane I couldn't help myself "bloody glad the driver knew where we were going"

S'pose you can understand it with the number of sectors they have to fly in a day ;)

:ugh:

Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!
29th Dec 2006, 22:22
Put that on the Spotters Forum and someone will say "Flight 515 goes to Ridyah, not Bahrain - though on reflection flight 151 USED to go to Bahrain from 1972 up tio about 1985" :}



...allegedly

ShyTorque
29th Dec 2006, 22:40
Ah, but there's TWO "n'"s in Donnington Castle!
Donnington_Castle (http://www.berkshirehistory.com/castles/donnington_cast.html)
Cheers
Whirls
Well:
http://www.castledonington.net/CMS/
THEY ought to know where they live......
And of course some of us remember when the ATC callsigns were "Castledon Approach / Tower"....... :)
Take care at NNorwich, p.s. didn't that once begin with a "K" ;)

Whirlygig
29th Dec 2006, 23:30
Take care at NNorwich, p.s. didn't that once begin with a "K" ;)
RAF Horsham St. Faith - no "K"s there!

Cheers

Whirls

Brakes on
29th Dec 2006, 23:34
And what about the ambulance drivers from London who were supposed to go to a clinic in, yes, London, but ended up in Manchester (I think), because they followed their navigation equipment? Shouldn't they have noticed somewhere along the road?

Shaggy Sheep Driver
30th Dec 2006, 00:50
And what about the ambulance drivers from London who were supposed to go to a clinic in, yes, London, but ended up in Manchester (I think), because they followed their navigation equipment? Shouldn't they have noticed somewhere along the road?
They're from London. Probably never been north of the M25, so they just kept going thinking London was a 'big place'.
OK, really. I can't even begin to think how anyone could do that. Just how do you do that unintenionally?

"Err. We've just passed a turn off for Stoke On Trent. Is that in Essex? We've been going for more than 5 hours, the hospital we're going to is only 20 miles from where we started, and we've done over 200 already. Are you sure we're goin the right way?"

"Yeah, cous! These satnav fings are ded clever. Only 50 miles to go now - satnav ses so! Relax!"

Maybe there's more to it than was in the media? Or are they really that thick? Your life could be in their hands. :eek:

flugholm
30th Dec 2006, 01:16
Foss ---

Dein Deutsch ist nicht rubbish, dein Deutsch ist prima!

Foss
30th Dec 2006, 01:59
Thank God for that Flugholm.
Thought I'd got that wrong.
German for rugby - rugbyspiel
Rugby game? We know it's a game. Why not just rugby. Honestly, why complicate things.
Fos
Thanks for telling me I hadn't got it completely wrong ;)

Foss
30th Dec 2006, 02:09
Shemy
How do you get that 'b' thing. And if they want to play fussball let them.
Fos keyboard disadvantaged, oh, and IQ as well

flugholm
30th Dec 2006, 02:09
Don't take it personally, as
Fussball - Fussballspiel
Basketball - Basketballspiel
Billard - Billardspiel
Golf - Golfspiel
etc etc.

Don't try to apply logic to linguistics, Foss! It only leads so-and-so far... ;-)

Foss
30th Dec 2006, 02:26
I've mentioned this before on a previous thread, but I can understand German, or at least the most of it, but I've never studied it. Just watched it on TV. But my French is terrible, and I studied that.
Best word - heftpflaster. A band aid.
I was trying to remember the word for a steam train, but I'd have to look it up.
Fos

flugholm
30th Dec 2006, 02:46
Dampf = steam
Lok = lokomotive engine... so:
Dampflok = steam engine
Diesel-Lok = (Have a guess, folks!)
Zug = train
Dampfzug = steam train
Dampfmaschine = steam machine
Dampfer = steamer (hello, Mr Draper!)

And now Im going to bed!

Foss
30th Dec 2006, 02:59
Cheers Flugholm.
I was trying to look it up. I got as for which way is to the ski lift.
Good luck, good night.:)
Fos

Lon More
30th Dec 2006, 03:14
Blue Up asked London GatWick code is EGKK. London Luton is EGGW. Near enough to each other that the FMC might not notice the error during Pos-init. Both have 08/26 runways.
Dunno why they decided on those particular codes.
IIRC it goes back to the begining of ICAO and the AFTN
E Is for W. Europe
G Is for the UK
K or G Is for the circuit the airfields are on. P for Scotland, L for London area, though why those 2 aren't included in that I don't know. Must be a civil servant thing
The 4th letter just identifies the unit.
There can then be additional letters further identifying the recipient/originator e.g airline name and division. ATC TWR APP ACC
ICAO have a whole Doc. explaining it.

BlueDiamond
30th Dec 2006, 03:17
... and boarded a Dash 8 for Sydney, which should have been a dead giveaway.
Thanks for that, piggy!!! http://209.85.48.8/1889/52/emo/PMSL.gif coffee ... keyboard ...

Rollingthunder
30th Dec 2006, 03:19
Just use the IATA coding.

Death to possible confusion.

Stick to one standard.

flugholm
30th Dec 2006, 04:27
Lon More ---
Ah, another area where I tend to advise students to throw logics overboard asap!
EDDV = HannoVer
EDDW = Bremen an der Weser
EDDL = Dsseldorf is actually in Lohausen (not many people know that!)
EDDG = Mnster-Osnabrck is actually in Greven (not many people know that!)
EDDT = Berlin Tegel
EDDB = Berlin Schnefeld
EDDI = Berlin Tempelhof ist der schnste Flughafen der Welt
...and the ETxx (E = northern Europe, T= German military) series... no-one knows...
ETHC = People smoke dope in Celle-Wietzenbruch.
(The Dutch system is much easier to remember!)
(biiiig apologies for aviation content!)

ShyTorque
30th Dec 2006, 15:42
I can always remember these ones;
EGLL= London? London!
EGLC= London? City!
EGCC= Chav City.
EGBH= Boring holiday.
EGNF= NeverForpe.
EGBB= Brum, Brum!
EGHC= Here's Cornwall.
EGGW= Gopping weather.
EGTC= That's Cranfield.
Not forgetting:
EGBD= Bl**dy Derby.
EGFC= F***ing Cardiff.

PaperTiger
30th Dec 2006, 17:32
Blue Up asked
IIRC it goes back to the begining of ICAO and the AFTN
E Is for W. Europe.Northern Europe.

PaperTiger
30th Dec 2006, 17:36
Shemy
How do you get that 'b' thing.Click Start (bottom left usually), then Programs, Accessories, Character Map. Cursor on the thingy you want, click Select then Copy. It's now on your clipboard ready to be pasted thus:

G-CPTN
30th Dec 2006, 17:37
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ICAO_airport_code
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airports_by_ICAO_code
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_airports_by_IATA_code

Foss
30th Dec 2006, 17:40
Paper
Thank you very much . you can have my babies. I'd better go because I've been drinking champange. Cheers.
Fos

mad_jock
30th Dec 2006, 17:54
Foss

Have a look at this as well.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Alt_keycodes

very handy.

G-CPTN
30th Dec 2006, 18:19
# Change or add Keyboards

Microsoft Windows allows a number of different keyboard languages and layouts. Installation of the "typical", or "default" options provides capabilities for French, Spanish, and other Western European languages.

To change the keyboard languages and layout, click the Start button, then choose Settings, Control Panel, and Keyboard (or Regional and Language Options). Click the "Language" or "Input Locales" tab. Add a language and give it properties - one of which is the US-International English keyboard (see below). Use Apply to finish the process; the Windows installation CD is usually needed. The keyboard and multilanguage sections in Start - Help provide details.

For Windows XP click Details. For even more details, click Penn State.
For Windows 2000 click this Carnegie Mellon site;
(Many languages are already installed with Windows XP. For help, click Start/help, then type multilingual in the search box.)

* Keyboard layouts for many languages are available. However, they usually do not follow the "qwerty" layout and some characters, especially punctuation, will not correspond to those printed on your keys. Click here to see layout charts for several languages. Once the language keyboards are installed, using alt+shift or a designated variation rotates through them. Checking the Enable Indicator On Taskbar puts the default language on the taskbar. Click the taskbar language icon to switch to another language.

# The US-International English keyboard layout is installed as above (details) and has these features:

* It uses the following intuitive methods which work with most (or all) Windows applications, while keeping the familiar QWERTY keyboard. (e.g. French uses AZERTY with letters a/q and z/w interchanged)

* Press one of the five modifier keys ` ' " ~ ^ , then the letter to be modified.

( ' then a = , " then u = , ' then c = , etc. )
* Press the right alt key + another key. Examples:
right alt + , = (or ' + c)
+ ? =
+ ! =
+ c =
+ 5 = Euro currency symbol

for a complete chart and printer-friendly summary. :- http://www.starr.net/is/type/intlchart.html


# Note that this maintains the "qwerty" layout. However, each modifier key ` ' " ~ ^ must be followed by pressing the space bar if it is actually intended. The system is smart enough to accept words requiring an apostrophe, such as it's, without the space bar.

# To install both the US-International English keyboard layout and United States English:

* One can fool a Win 9X system by adding an unused language, such as Icelandic. Then change its layout to the US-International in the language properties or layout section.
* Windows XP allows both. Click Start, Settings, Control Panel, Regional...options, Languages, Details, Settings, Add. Set Input Language to English - United States. Set Keyboard layout/IME to United States-International. Press Apply and OK.


# If you are having punctuation key troubles such as your computer's quote and apostrophe key behaving strangely, the cause may be that your keyboard was accidentally set to the International English Keyboard. The solution is to reset it to a standard English or United States keyboard.

* Alt Key Codes (also called Alt number or altnum)
o Those who use only a few characters, but often and in many software applications, may prefer to keep the default United States English keyboard and memorize a few Alt key codes. This method uses the Alt key plus a four digit number entered via the numeric keypad, with Num Lock on. The modified letter appears after the keys are pressed and released. For touch-typers, the disadvantage is having to move their hands to the number pad on the right of the keyboard. Examples follow. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this works in every program, even in email and filenames.

o ALT + 0224 = ALT + 0225 =
o ALT + 0232 = ALT + 0233 = ALT + 0200 =
o ALT + 0242 = ALT + 0243 = ALT + 0241 =

for complete lists:- http://www.starr.net/is/type/altnum.htm


# Character Map

* This is useful for the infrequent accent or symbol. It is located at Start - Programs - Accessories - System Tools - Character Map (OR click Start, Run, and type charmap). After choosing a font, double click the desired character(s). After clicking Copy, return to your document and paste. Some fonts (such as Symbol, Webding, and Wingding) provide Greek, icons, arrows and symbols. This system may fail if a particular combination of keystrokes, as seen in the lower right of the window, has been reserved for another application.

Lon More
30th Dec 2006, 18:53
Paper tiger i stand corrected; only excuse was the time of posting caused brainfade
Flugholm The Dutch system is easier because there aren't so many of them. However they've mucked things about a bit for EHBK by changing it from Beek to Maastricht-Aachen Airport
IIRC was not ETxx for what my German teacher of more than 40 years ago used to call "der sogenannte DDR"?

flugholm
30th Dec 2006, 20:13
Lon ---

Nope -- if only it was so easy! ETxx is German military, no matter if east or west. I wonder how they ever got this through ICAO! :ugh:

G-CPTN
30th Dec 2006, 21:03
ICAO derivations were established in 1947, whereas DDR wasn't established until 1949.

flugholm
30th Dec 2006, 21:21
And the GDR only joined ICAO as a member in May 1990, less then half a year before it ceased to exist (although it adhered to ICAO rules when it suited them).

Ich bin ein West-Berliner! :p

G-CPTN
30th Dec 2006, 21:26
What happened to conglomerates such as Czechoslovakia and Yugoslavia?
The constituent countries now have their own designations. Was it ever thus?
Were the regulators clever enough to anticipate break-up of these regions into the current regions?

Anybody want a sugar sachet 'celebrating 40 years of the DDR' gleaned from a Stasi Sanitorium at Bad Berka (near Weimar) in 1991? We were served them with our breakfast . . .