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Loose rivets
16th Dec 2006, 23:07
I had no idea that this was so significant. One is off to buy some seaweed.




http://www.nytimes.com/2006/12/16/health/16iodine.html?_r=1&th&emc=th&oref=slogin

gingernut
16th Dec 2006, 23:13
Oh dear, I've just been to see the Panto in Derbyshire and me necks swelled up:hmm:

ExSimGuy
17th Dec 2006, 10:56
So let's get this right . . . . . .

Iodine in salt is good for you . . . . .

But salt is bad for you and you shouldn't use it . . . . .

so where the 1234 are you supposed to get the iodine from - does it somehow jump out onto you from the pack of salt that sits unopened in the kitchen :confused:

Bloody experts :uhoh:

(I'm a bloody brainy sod cos I use loads of salt - albeit iodized ;) )

Grainger
17th Dec 2006, 13:13
"I asked the waiter for iodine - but I dined all alone . . ."

tony draper
17th Dec 2006, 14:00
My generation ingested plenty of the stuff in sproghood, twer poured liberaly over scrapes scratches cuts and bruises,much screaming generaly ensued,prolly illegal to use it on kids now.
Never did us any harm.
:rolleyes:

G-CPTN
17th Dec 2006, 14:08
Iodine was discovered by Bernard Courtois in 1811. He was born to a manufacturer of saltpeter (potassium nitrate, a vital part of gunpowder). At the time France was at war, saltpeter, a component of gunpowder, was in great demand. Saltpeter produced from French niter beds required sodium carbonate, which could be isolated from seaweed washed up on the coasts of Normandy and Brittany. To isolate the sodium carbonate, seaweed was burned and the ash then washed with water. The remaining waste was destroyed by adding sulfuric acid. One day Courtois added too much sulfuric acid and a cloud of purple vapor rose. Courtois noted that the vapor crystallized on cold surfaces making dark crystals. Courtois suspected that this was a new element but lacked the money to pursue his observations.
However he gave samples to his friends, Charles Bernard Desormes (1777 - 1862) and Nicolas Clément (1779 - 1841) to continue research. He also gave some of the substance to Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac (1778 - 1850), a well-known chemist at that time, and to André-Marie Ampère (1775 - 1836). On 29 November 1813 Dersormes and Clément made public Courtois’ discovery. They described the substance to a meeting of the Imperial Institute of France. On December 6 Gay-Lussac announced that the new substance was either an element or a compound of oxygen. Ampère had given some of his sample to Humphry Davy (1778 - 1829). Davy did some experiments on the substance and noted its similarity to chlorine. Davy sent a letter dated December 10 to the Royal Society of London stating that he had identified a new element. A large argument erupted between Davy and Gay-Lussac over who identified iodine first but both scientists acknowledged Barnard Courtois as the first to isolate the chemical element.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iodine
Elemental iodine, I2, is deadly poison if taken in larger amounts; if 2-3 grams of it is consumed, it is fatal to humans.
In the United States, the Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) regards iodine and compounds containing iodine (ionic iodides, iodoform, ethyl iodide, and so on) as reagents useful for the clandestine manufacture of methamphetamine. Persons who attempt to purchase significant quantities of such chemicals without establishing a legitimate use are likely to find themselves the target of a DEA investigation.

Rainboe
17th Dec 2006, 15:54
Salt is a totally prohibited substance since one had a scrape with hypertension. Can't they put it somewhere else? The closest one gets to salt is boiling spaghetti in a little salted water!

G-CPTN
17th Dec 2006, 16:47
I too have greatly reduced my (knowing) salt intake since hitting 195/100BP. I USED to drench lamb chops with a goodly sprinkling of salt (both sides) before (healthily) grilling them to my delight, but I haven't sinned thus for many months. I also eschew salt whenever possible, and I HARDLY miss it.
Likewise I USED to be a consummate user of sugar (hot drinks were frequently saturated with solids remaining in the cup) until, whilst dwelling in Denmark, I succumbed to propaganda that sugar was injurious to one's health (a warning that was printed on every packet of sugar). Again, I have adapted to a life with much-reduced sugar and no longer drool after high-sugar confectionary. (Strangely, as an infant I didn't have a 'sweet tooth' and would rather have a piece of meat than a piece of cake or a sweet dessert.)
Due to my hypertension I have also ceased to imbibe caffeine (both coffee AND tea) though the cravings DO return whenever temptation exists. Whilst domiciled in Denmark, my office was equipped with a coffee-maker machine which I kept stoked with STRONG coffee, indeed when travelling I would get significant withdrawal-symptoms whilst waiting at airports for flights (once I realised the symptoms - shoulder 'cramps' - I was able to seek-out suitable doses). Of course, having adopted the Danish way of life at home we also had regular and frequent infusions of coffee available.

I've never been what one would call 'a smoker', though phases of Gauloises, Gitane and cigarillos during Uni were better described as affectations. After Uni I developed a taste for Henri Winterman's small (and large) cigars (and the odd ex-PX King Edward), until they became a casuality of the cost-reduction programme in 1969 for forthcoming marriage. Again, I've never really missed them (and after my lung disorders in 1990 and watching my father-in-law deteriorate and die from stomache-cancer - he smoked a pipe - I've been violently opposed to all smoking, especially passive smoking).

I've always been able to 'take-or-leave' alcohol, but never been a heavy drinker (even during parties or celebrations I was a mere moderate partaker) though I continue to enjoy an occasional bottle of wine or selected beers (drunk for ENJOYMENT) such as Staropromen, Budvar, Hoegaarden or weissen-beer. Some local-brewery 'real' ales are also enjoyable.

I've not had (proper) sex for approaching two years now. I cannot tell whether I would still enjoy the experience, or whether I would rate it as I now do my other once-craved indulgences.

Rainboe
17th Dec 2006, 17:06
The ones that really upset me there........can one really give up tea and coffee? I mean, be serious now! Iodine in tea bags- that's the way to do it.

tony draper
17th Dec 2006, 17:49
Don't worry Mr G-C, I think that kind of sex is quite legal now.:rolleyes:

Loose rivets
17th Dec 2006, 19:04
Only two years???!!! You lucky, lucky Baaaaaaastd!!

It takes my wife that long to get her Liberty bodice off. :}

reynoldsno1
17th Dec 2006, 19:46
r1jr eats dried seaweed (nori) as snacks - very nice it is too.... and loads of iodine

arcniz
17th Dec 2006, 20:33
I've not had (proper) sex for approaching two years now. I cannot tell whether I would still enjoy the experience, or whether I would rate it as I now do my other once-craved indulgences.

Perhaps you could discuss this question (confidentially) with a license professional.


Salt is a totally prohibited substance since one had a scrape with hypertension. Can't they put it somewhere else?

One believes you (and they) may put it anywhere the spirit moves.

Mixing iodine with seasoning salt is convenient commercially, reaches a universal audience, is chemically very compatible, and makes some sence because sea-salt naturally includes iodine anyway. Because iodine is an element with ionic bonding properties, it remains 'operational' and available from very many environmentally common chemical comibnations. My treasured old aviator's survival manual says a drop of iodine tincture in a litre of water will kill nearly all pathogenic organisms... much as chlorine does in the mains water supply... and certainly that level of concentration is not harmful in the drinking.... tho one may taste it some in even very dilute concentrations. Probably spot painting the skin is a suitable way to ingest maintenance quantities of I. You will know you are getting a bit too much if the outer third of your eyebrows vanishes... also a diagnostic sign of hypothyroidism.

Seaweed is a first-rate source for iodine and also a fine seasoning and flavouring ingredient for nearly all cooking. Flattened seaweed in thin sheets allows one to make fairly professional looking sushi rolls with hardly any skill at all. Flakes of same will work well in lieu of parsley.

Standard Noise
17th Dec 2006, 20:37
Get yerselves to Donaghadee in County Down and buy some Dulse (dried seaweed to you heathens), they sell it in wee paper bags for 10 bob. Good for you and sod the salt police!

MagnusP
18th Dec 2006, 15:04
If one requres iodine, then one should pop out and purchase a bottle or two of finest Islay malt. Pour. Enjoy.

teeteringhead
18th Dec 2006, 15:05
the vapor crystallized on cold surfaces making dark crystals...which you can then dissolve in ammonia .......:E

...what a little sh!t I must've been as a lad. I bet Drapes knows of what I speak...

The SSK
18th Dec 2006, 15:23
...which you can then dissolve in ammonia .......:E
...what a little sh!t I must've been as a lad. I bet Drapes knows of what I speak...

Nitrogen tri-iodide?
Gave some a tap once, it blew the hammer out of my hand and embedded it in the ceiling of our basement.

Loose rivets
18th Dec 2006, 16:52
You will know you are getting a bit too much if the outer third of your eyebrows vanishes... also a diagnostic sign of hypothyroidism.



One's Flabber is totally and utterly Garsted.:uhoh:


Is this true?....and if so, where can I find more info on this. Yes, One's outer-thirds have just...disappeared.

My 100/50 BP left me thinking I could larf at thems that fear salt. Ha ha, I went, but now it seems the joke is on me.

Is this fatal, or will I just spend the rest of my life looking as though my razor slipped...twice.

What is the prognosis? If I stop putting an entire pack of salt on all me dinners, will they grow back?

Concerned,

I M Shortofwiskers

arcniz
19th Dec 2006, 03:26
Rivets says

One's Flabber is totally and utterly Garsted.

Is this true?....and if so, where can I find more info on this. Yes, One's outer-thirds have just...disappeared.

My 100/50 BP left me thinking I could larf at thems that fear salt. Ha ha, I went, but now it seems the joke is on me.

Is this fatal, or will I just spend the rest of my life looking as though my razor slipped...twice.

What is the prognosis? If I stop putting an entire pack of salt on all me dinners, will they grow back?

Concerned,

I M Shortofwiskers

Hey Rivets. Glad to hear the eyebrow ting made a connection. Rather odd, eh? Probably there's some mollusk in the West Pacific, or submerged in silt along an African Coast, to whose progenitors we owe the oddities of eyebrow design and behavior.

Iodine, even in tiny traces, seems elemental to life itself. Rather like the trigger-pawl on a powerful weapon, a little tweak can have dramatic consequences. One may note iodine also is a critical secret ingredient in organic transistors and the other conductive-polymer related stuff which will eventually give us wall-size light-emitting tv screens.. should we be so lucky as to live long enough for that.

I suspect your eyebrows may be falling out because of that weirdly low BP. 100/50 ! When mine goes that low, as it sometimes does, I cautiously begin scanning for a soft place to land. Just possibly, one may need higher BP to keep the eyebrows inflated enough to hold the follicles in place. A theory, of course, just a theory.

Hypothyroid condition normally results from too little iodine, rather than too much. Being a hormone thing, multiple feedback loops likely regulate the thyroid's work in managing and modulating iodine and its derivatives.

The case where increased exposure to iodine causes the eyebrow symptom is probably an odd one. I have only seen it once, in a situation where someone was rinsing their sinusses with high trace-level iodine-laced fluids. Possibly the thyroid receives primary policy planning information from the digestive tract and so is confused when iodine appears in circulation without going through proper channels, leading to down-regulation of Thyroid Specific Hormone output (or some other sneaky trace substance from T) and thus the hypo case results from this odd manifestation of excess iodine.

If your eyebrows are doing the one-third off thing, probably 'tis the hypo case. Easy enough and not very expensive to do a blood panel & see what's happening, then probably some iodine supplements... or more nori in the diet.

Of course, a magic-marker or something from your wife's paint-shop can give you very similar effect, with rather less effort, and none of that messy chemistry.

(from memory it seems you may have better resources than I for searching these things... but failing that, a Google with 'thyroid' and 'eyebrow' should give you lots on which to feed.)

Blacksheep
19th Dec 2006, 04:11
Probably there's some mollusk in the West Pacific, or submerged in silt along an African Coast, to whose progenitors we owe the oddities of eyebrow design and behavior. Ah yes, the infamous Bearded Oyster. :)

The main symptom of iodine deficiency is goitre - an inflated thyroid gland. The lack of iodine causes the thyroid gland in the neck to enlarge in an effort to increase hormone output. It is common to many particular geographical regions with poor soil characteristics. In UK Derbyshire is one such location, but although the high incidence of goitre there is well known, there's never been any suggestion that Derbyshire folk are any less intelligent than the general UK population.

If you don't have an inflated thyroid gland, you're probably getting enough iodine from your normal diet and don't need supplements. Adding things to common food items is becoming a habit with the politically correct brigade - see the topic on adding folic acid to bread for example.

Loose rivets
19th Dec 2006, 04:47
Yes, one went straight to search mode as the Rivetess rarely wears makeup and one is feeling unsightly when out with old girlfriends. I don't have the pallid symptoms mentioned, or indeed any of the other problems...well there's one that is nagging in the background. Fascinating.

I had wondered if it was an infection, as I found myself scratching at the outer third more than a little. Guess what? I thought I would zap any micro-bug with....iodine.

For years, our family used decolorized iodine for everything...well almost. No teenage spots, no inflamed cuts...just another bottle of DI. Mine were the only teeth in the family that had suffered caries (self-inflicted when sweets came off ration) and before fluoride I had found that a touch of the stingy stuff would stop the decay...dead. Boots stopped selling it years ago and all my attempts as making it failed, so now, a few days looking like a negative of a Panda had to be accepted.

Funny about that pre-detection theory, it fits in with all sorts of things that I had wondered about. I even used to gargle with 1/5 Iodine / water mix. It worked wonders, killing the skin on which a virus had taken hold. By the time the virus had re-grouped, a lousy sore throat would have just become a stable culture bed, giving the immune system the information it needed and time to kick in. Oh dear. Shades of Madam Curie.

Well, at least...apart from the teenage spots, I only experimented on meself. At least 4/5ths of the family is normal.



We have a new member of the extended family. She is utterly gorgeous, 21 and bi-polar. Within a few moments of meeting her I noticed a very slight swelling on her neck. She had been prescribed all sorts of up-to-the-minute drugs, by some top (very expensive ) people. Not one had mentioned this symptom. Sometimes in a sea of data, the obvious is missed.

arcniz
20th Dec 2006, 17:05
I had wondered if it was an infection, as I found myself scratching at the outer third more than a little.


Then again, you could be a mite (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demodex_mite) allergic:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0e/Haarbalgmilbe.jpg

One has long used iodine in the manner you describe... to kill off unfriendly-looking things appearing on the skin. Is nice and portable and fairly well mummifies things without much other adverse effect... But one has only used the purple kind. How could it be decolored? Citrification, perhaps?

These days I mostly use peroxide - in dilutions ranging from rocket fuel to homeopathic. Nature's own way of saying "please die now" to invading, sick and unlucky cells.

Once narrowly averted summary orphanhood, around age 9, after having spilled a noticeably large quantity of colorful iodine on the back seat of my pa's newish Packard sedan, making a horrible ugly permanent dark splotch right in plain view on the light-colored fabric with a texture resembling woven straw. At the time one did not appreciate how truly pi**ed he must have been about it... but still it seemed to call for remediation, so one trotted out a little booklet with hundreds of neat chemical things - perhaps an adjunct to the Gilbert chemistry set - and discovered that combination with lemon juice could make iodine colour vanish. Darned if it didn't. Brought one's stock up nicely for a short while.. until the next such.

She is utterly gorgeous, 21 and bi-polar.
Like my first true love. What a fine experience! Seemed like hanky-panky at the Louvre, inside a hurricane.

dontpickit
20th Dec 2006, 17:56
There is a rather controversial theory that our primate ancestors at some point went downriver in Africa, reached the sea and became 'aquatic apes' consuming an iodine rich seafood diet. Iodine was necessary for large brain development... or so the theory goes.

tony draper
20th Dec 2006, 18:22
Yer, it explains why we lost all our body hair as well, luckily they decided they had had enough of splashing about before we developed scales.
:uhoh: :rolleyes:

Foss
20th Dec 2006, 18:29
Standard
Beat me to it. Well done.
Everyone, if you come to Donaghadee do not eat dulse, the seaweed. It is horrible. It is like eating a beach, well a rubbery chewy salty beach in a wee paper bag. Trust me on this. The Idiot wees on the beach. I also hate fish, which is unlucky since I live on the coast and am surrounded by fishing ports.

Don't use salt or take it any other time.
Stopped taking coffee, but I drink a lot of tea.
And if anyone approaches me with iodine for a wound, I will use resonable force to restrain them.
It really stings.
Fos big strong rugby guy who's scared of iodine

Loose rivets
20th Dec 2006, 22:24
In the days when our local Boots was run at a gentle pace by two genteel young chemists, one could discuss such matters without a queue of script waving frenzy-balls forming. They were sorry, but the decolorized iodine had been discontinued--probably because it was unstable...inasmuch as it gradually took on a colour again and had to be scrapped. They thought that ammonia was the trick, but they couldn't discover the secret of the mix.

It was a shame, cos the normal stuff is seriously dodgy with regard to spills. A car seat? Mmmm, serious that, but what concerns me is the tainting of white paintwork in the cabinet that it's kept in. It's almost as if it's radiating some deadly beam...the damage diminishing on the inverse square law. Here, we wrap it in plastic before putting it into the already slightly affected cabinet. Hopefully the plastic proves that it's only a gaseous leakage causing the problem.

I've been working on the car's A/C, and having flushed the system and poured compressor oil in the appropriate tube, I thought I'd better give the thing a few turns by hand before putting the gas in. This I did...then looked at said hand. "Why have I got one red glove and one white glove?" I mused. The vinyl was filling up with blood...looked quite fetching really. Doesn't anyone finish parts nicely these days? Anyway, today it felt fat and sore...one splodge of iodine and it's right as rain. Went into me bedroom and shut the door before yelping.