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Jesters
11th Dec 2006, 15:24
We've just brought our 8week old Cocker Spaniel home, she is absolutely gorgeous and great fun. However, whenever we leave her alone for even a minute she yelps and whines, she seems to work herself up and will not calm down. Do anyone have any tips to ease her out of this??:confused:

Its fine being with her during the day and we're trying to spend small periods of time away from her so she can get used to it, but she just seems very distressed by the whole thing!!!:(

This is only day 2 of the whole experience and i understand this may continue for a while but we wanna make sure we have a good method to train her out of it!!!

tony draper
11th Dec 2006, 15:28
Best thing with a new pup if you crave peace at night when you go to bed pick her up and lie her on the pillow beside you, all they need is to feel a warm body beside em,after all she has just been dragged away from her mum and siblings.
:rolleyes:

rugmuncher
11th Dec 2006, 15:29
Stick a golf ball in her mouth and secure with gaffa tape.

Was recommended to me by the local humane society and really works.

If you put some marmite on it first they really don't mind at all!

:ouch:

GANNET FAN
11th Dec 2006, 15:32
With great respect to Mr.Draper (one of the more erudite posters) that's the worst thing you can do. Its on a par with taking your very young child into bed with you to get it to sleep. They love it and make as much noise when you have to "wean" them out of that habit. Same with dogs. Drives you demented for a while but it will eventually quieten down. Patience!

sled dog
11th Dec 2006, 15:34
Wrap a hot water bottle in a small blanket and place in her bed , it will remind her of Mum.

airborne_artist
11th Dec 2006, 16:14
Agree with sled. For added Mum-effect, pop in an old-style clock that ticks. The regular beat mimics Mum's heartbeat, it is said.

Civis
11th Dec 2006, 16:57
Agree with AA, SLED and GANNET,
Apologies to Tony but " In yer bed " raises a juvenile delinquent if yer not prepared to having them there permanently.

Establish a "HER PLACE" ~ open door kennel during day & closed door at night with the wrapped hot water bottle and wrapped ticking clock. Don't give in. Make sure you use the word Kennel whenever you put her in so she understands it's her place. This will be invaluable in the future if you have company or are traveling by air or auto.

Can't recommend highly enough the book series by Richard Wolters:
Gun Dog, Water Dog, Family Dog, etc.
Even if she's just a family pet his perspective on dog pyscology and basic manners / training commands are invaluable. How you handle and treat her in the near future will determine her lifelong behavior. She's still a puppy with short attention span but Wolters spells it all out.
Sad Caveate: some dogs are just " not the best of the bunch " and if so and you get attached then you'll have to live with them.

Edit to add, don't reward bad behavior ~ with dogs or people!

Best wishes, C

slim_slag
11th Dec 2006, 17:02
Buy a crate and ask a proper dog trainer how to use it.

Don't take it to bed, that sort of thing will get you on Dog Borstal.

frostbite
11th Dec 2006, 17:09
Agree, Mr Draper is soooo wrong on this one.

Try to get her a largeish (chewable!) fluffy toy which can be used as a 'comfort blanket' when you're not around.

tony draper
11th Dec 2006, 18:25
One has raised three Jack Russels thusly,one admits yer Jack Russel is not as other dogs,after a while they prefer to sleep alone and one finds oneself sleeping curled up on the floor.
:rolleyes:

Whirlygig
11th Dec 2006, 18:26
Sounds like pup is suffering from "separation anxiety" and it will be a slow process to get her out of it. Try googling for it - went through this process with my mother's hound.

Try leaving her for random periods through the day and varying in length. When you return, ignore her initially. If you don't make a fuss about leaving and returning, she won't (hopefully).

If you leave her to go outside and put on your coat she will associate the coat with you leaving her. So wear your coat in the house a few times!

Cheers

Whirls

Jesters
11th Dec 2006, 18:41
Thanks for the replies guys. I'm pretty sure if we let her in the bed then she would never get out again!!

Out of interest, those who have experienced similar problems, what sort of timescale did your pups work to? Are we talking days or weeks??:uhoh:

Whirlygig
11th Dec 2006, 18:46
I should think with a puppy, it'll be more weeks than days. In my mother's case, the dog was a rescued greyhound and that took months; quite a few months! You'll need to be patient. And so will your neighbours!

Cheers

Whirls

Rick Storm
11th Dec 2006, 18:49
You sure going to have problems with this puppy, 8 weeks is too short a time to be separated from the bitch, jezz.....The puppy is hardly weaned. I take it you bought the puppy from a newspaper ad?

Nani
11th Dec 2006, 18:54
Buy yourself a medium size dog crate.

You must feed and water her only in the crate and nowhere else.Even her tidbits/goodies must be placed in the crate. Soon it will become her den as every dogs needs a place to call home.:)
At nights,you can place the crate next to your bed facing you where she can see you,when she whines do not try to comfort her by talking back since in her mind, this act translates into "whining isn't that bad".

G-CPTN
11th Dec 2006, 18:56
Nobody has mentioned allowing her some items of clothing/bedding with 'your' smell on it (such as a 'used' pillowcase) for her bed. Then you leave her for short, but increasing periods during the day, getting her used to being on her own, yet 'realising' that you WILL return. Try to keep these absences low-key so as not to make them seem like significant separations (for example, leave her in the house when you hang-out the washing instead of having her always to heel. It's NICE to have her always with you, but doesn't help when you HAVE to leave her. Try to establish her independence. Establishing her own dedicated space is helpful, with a cage or fenced-off area within which she has her bed, water and selection of toys. Fasten her into this area for periods during the day (even when you are nearby and visible, but also make a point of popping-out into another room where she can't SEE you, but maybe can HEAR you or where you have a radio or somesuch making a noise. IGNORE her cries, and DON'T make a fuss of her when you return (she will consider this as a reward for her whimpering). Don't prolong the 'torture' for too long, but pop back into sight occasionally (without any remark either way - praise or chastisement - just IGNORE her during your return visits).
It sounds complicated, but it just requires a couple of weeks of 'subterfuge' - it will be extra work at first, but will save you time later when you can leave her without her getting upset.

The same can be done with leaving her in the car (if you ever intend to take her with you but might have to leave her when shopping or visiting friends. Fasten her into the car whilst you get on with jobs around the garden or garage or wherever she can (at first) see you, but extend the periods when you are out of sight. Again, give her something to sit/lie on that is 'hers', maybe even giving her (and leaving her with) a few biscuits (just a FEW!) or a healthy treat or chew.

DON'T be tempted to add 'turning on the radio' (either in the car or in the house) unless you want this to become a permanent feature of your/her life.

She has to realise that YOU are the top dog (and not her) and once she settles (and you can leave her and she doesn't whimper and cry but settles down to play or sleep, THEN you can reward her with a treat (NOT chocolate or sweet, but a plain dog biscuit or some 'mixer') when you return to stay.


In extremis, get a cat as a companion for the dog. (Another dog would do if you can borrow one from a friend or neighbour - provided it's learned to be left on its own, otherwise you'll just get TWO howling hounds.)

flower
11th Dec 2006, 19:04
You can buy from good per stores a microwave heated cushion a little more practical with puppies with very sharp teeth, also the ticking clock or the radio on very low works.
It is interesting that you managed to get an 8 week old puppy as the law has changed and puppies have to stay with the mothers now until 12 weeks old as I understand it.

Lots of love and perseverance but the best real bet would have been to have got 2 puppies.

Foss
11th Dec 2006, 19:19
Put the dog in the living room and lock the door.
Lock all the other doors and get in the car and move house. But leave the dog behind.
'Ha who are you going to whine to now, eh, hmm, well?'

Instead of moving house you could try a radio, and it's best bed. The radio is just voices, and the bed's, well bed. Then try and leave the dog on it's own for longer periods. Dog hears people talking, and it's in bed. Happy.
Well most of the time.
Letting it into your bed can be fun, because you can spend the next fifteen years shouting BAD DOG BAD DOG GET OUT OF MY BED.
It becomes a mantra.

I've heard about that clicking clock thing Airborne mentioned, and the hot water bottle thing, both on good account, that they work.

But why do we punish ourselves, it's a dog. 'I am so terribbly sorry managing director, I have to leave this meeting early, I have to buy an old fashioned alarm clock and a hot water bottle and a blanket, a fluffy one. And some biscuits.'
Not going to look good is it. You're going to look like you should be in a loony bin.
Fosthe clock/radio thing does work

Howard Hughes
11th Dec 2006, 19:33
Buy yourself a medium size dog crate.
You must feed and water her only in the crate and nowhere else. Even her tidbits/goodies must be placed in the crate. Soon it will become her den as every dogs needs a place to call home.:)
Dogs do not like to eat, nor crap for that matter where they sleep, these must be totally seperate areas. Also don't fall into the trap of many TV animal experts of rewarding your dog with food, you willl find you have far more success by rewarding with kindness and affection. Do something good get a pat, tummy rub or play ball, do something bad, get a stern NO and a tug on the choker.

The other mistake many people make is scolding their dog hours after it has done something wrong (ie: when you get home from work and find a hole....), a dog only understands if you catch it in the act! Otherwise they just understand they are getting into trouble. To scold it, grab it by the scruff of the neck and twist whilst saying a stern NO! If it yelps and rolls over to submit, you have done the job, it sounds mean I know, but this is how its mother would discipline the dog.

Good luck with it all dogs truly are mans best friend!(man the species, not man the gender):ok:

G-CPTN
11th Dec 2006, 19:43
We've just brought our 8week old Cocker Spaniel home, she is absolutely gorgeous and great fun. However, whenever we leave her alone for even a minute she yelps and whines, she seems to work herself up and will not calm down. Do anyone have any tips to ease her out of this??:confused:
Its fine being with her during the day and we're trying to spend small periods of time away from her so she can get used to it, but she just seems very distressed by the whole thing!!!:(
This is only day 2 of the whole experience and i understand this may continue for a while but we wanna make sure we have a good method to train her out of it!!!
Re-reading the original post there is no mention of what happened at night. Did puppy miraculously abandon her yelping and settle-down to sleep? Or was she ALREADY permitted into the inner-sanctum of the bedroom? One hopes not, as, I believe that THAT behaviour will have to be unlearned. My cousin's husband slept downstairs on the sofa for three months when they got a dog so that the beast wouldn't feel 'alone'. It was also to avoid 'messages' being left in the house, as he would let the dog out whenever it roused itself during the night.

Foss
11th Dec 2006, 19:45
What's a dog crate? And don't say it's a crate for a dog.
Fos waiting for sarcasm

G-CPTN
11th Dec 2006, 19:48
http://www.trenigens.com.au/shop/html/images/crate.jpg

Alternatively you can restrain the pooch to a specific area by using a fireguard or sections of wire netting or fencing or some barrier to restrict the hound from wandering too far (and reaching things to damage).
As has been stated, it creates a 'domain' which the creature should come to consider as its own.

Too late for Idiot I'm afraid!

Jesters
11th Dec 2006, 19:58
She's got a dog crate, and is very happy to sleep in there as long as we are in the room when she goes to sleep!!!

The crate is downstairs in the kitchen, we decided before we got her that she isn't going to come upstairs. Last night she yelped for a fair while, but we left her, i woke at 3am and she was whining away but i'm not sure if it had been continuous, woke again at 6am and again she was making noise. But we were expecting that. The thing we werent expecting so much was the noises during the day when she is alone and awake for any amount of time.

She seems unhappy going to sleep without some company nearby, but we indulged her obsession with my socks and put one in her cage just now and she went straight to sleep nuzzled into it (she must be desperate!!).

To answer the questions about where we got her from, it was a friend who is a KC registered breeder and taking your pup at 8 weeks is as recommended by the Kennel Club, the RSPCA and the BASC.

We're crossing fingers about tonight!!!

Fos - Maybe we could bring her round to keep Idiot company until she has quietened down??

frostbite
11th Dec 2006, 20:04
Wouldn't have mentioned punishment in this context, but as someone already has...

Quite right about only 'caught in the act' - dogs live in 'now' and have next to no recollection of their recent misdeeds.

Only physical punishment I have ever meted out is a swat with a stiff forefinger on the nose.

G-CPTN
11th Dec 2006, 20:04
We've always had a 'bed' for our dogs (and NOT one of those soft-padded beds which just get dirty and smelly, either a basket or a hard plastic 'basket' into which you can put some soft bedding that can easily be machine-washed or refreshed/renewed when necessary.
http://ec2.images-amazon.com/images/P/B000EDWI62.02._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V57516147_.jpg

Whirlygig
11th Dec 2006, 20:40
Firstly Rick, there is only one Whirlygig (and even if there were more, we wouldn't be sharing a bed!) and secondly, I'm not really a dog person and certainly don't believe in letting animals in the bedroom. Perhaps someone else on these pages could indulge you? :E

Cheers

Whirls

Foss
11th Dec 2006, 20:44
Group
Just looking at that pic of the bed made me laugh in a nervous kind of way.
'Right you, bed. bed time, bed. BED.'
Idiot:'You are mean to me. As part as my cunning revenge, I will eat this bed thing.'
Next morning, one chewed bed, and a chewed wall.
'My darling, Idiot has eaten part of the wall, well in all fairness only the plasterboard bit IT ONLY STOPPED ONCE IT HIT CONCRETE.
How did we not hear that, and there's there's little or no debris, so it's full of dog bed plastic and plasterboard.'
Idiot: 'Woo? I don't know how that happened. Biscuit? Walk?'

Jesters, you've enough on your hands without Idiot.
Dog training: Throwing a dog under a train.
Fos

Rick Storm
11th Dec 2006, 20:45
I take it it's a NO then?

Jesters
11th Dec 2006, 20:55
Fos - your stories fill me with.......(thinks - 'what is that emotion i'm feeling').....well it was comfortable distance gloating prior to yesterday......now its slow release fear!!

P.s. with the new waste management rules, you are going to have to dispose of that gysum based waste responsibly when it is deposited from the other end!!!:E

fernytickles
11th Dec 2006, 23:04
Would your breeder friend have any suggestions? To be honest, as its only 48 hours since she left the only "family" she's ever known for what is currently a scarey new world, I wouldn't be too worried meself. Having said that, we just got a dog a month ago and I worry continuously whether I'm doing the right thing, so I guess it goes with the territory (and mine's already a teenager rescue dog, so less of the training/chewing issues - so far!)

Also, read, read and read as much as you can lay your hands on - the library and the internet are great resources, of course. As evidenced on here, lots of people have varying opinions, so the more you can read and learn, the easier it will make it for your puppy to train you and the quicker you will learn to behave the way she likes you to behave ;)

Nani
12th Dec 2006, 02:09
To scold it, grab it by the scruff of the neck and twist whilst saying a stern NO!


Howard Hughes,

Picture of my dogs,they live with my sheep. Dog in front weights 67kg and measures 83cm at the shoulder,female in the back weights 56kg and stands 79cm at the shoulder. When I have to correct them,I just call their names with a different tone. Stops both dead on their tracks.
I also have working Border Collies,never had to lay a finger on them either. ;)

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v236/iwillard/12-07-2006031607PM.jpg

PS: Idiot stories goes so well with morning coffee,thanks Foss.

fernytickles
12th Dec 2006, 02:52
This is ours on her first evening - lap(top) dog

http://photos1.blogger.com/blogger/7369/301/320/dog.jpg

Jesters
12th Dec 2006, 08:47
Well it seems the sock may have done the trick (for the night at least) as she slept relatively soundly last night. She howled at 6am but that soon stopped after she heard the loo flush and she went back to sleep again.

Fingers crossed for the daytime!

She has now started lulling us into a false sense of security that the very initial stages of toilet training are working. She leaves no solid presents for us on the floor and was so very excited about going outside this morning that she was almost leading me briefly into the garden as soon as we were up to fertilise the lawn!:D

I'm sure she is waiting for the right moment, when we expect it least!:E :*

slim_slag
12th Dec 2006, 08:59
I wouldn't even let the dog in the bedroom, never mind the bed. Only the top-dog gets to roam over the whole territory and letting the hound know he is banned from certain areas keeps him in his place.

We put the hound's bed downstairs near a back door in the utility room. That way he knows that if anybody attacks he gets eaten first which keeps him in his place. Top dog sleeps on top of the hill, bottom dog sleeps at the bottom. He is allowed to bark if anybody comes onto the property, but has to be quiet when we tell him.

A dog who knows his place is a happy dog and a happy dog means happy owners.

You should crate the puppy for six months at least until he has learned not to chew things he shouldn't and has learned his place. Go to a proper dog trainer sooner rather than later and get him (and you) trained. The chances are you will end up getting conflicting advice so go to somebody who is recommended.

The only punishment we mete out is isolation from teh pack, but you have to do it very quick, within a second or two or the hound will associate the punishment with something else he did e.g you calling him over to punish him. Get a clicker and reinforce positively.

Some of the dog stories on here could be solved by proper training of the owner.

flower
12th Dec 2006, 09:01
It may sound daft but as your Puppy does it's business being No1s or No2s then choose a word that you wish associated with it.
For example when my dogs were puppies I used the word Quickly as they peed, they associate that word with it and know when you say it to them that it is time for that.
Yes it does really work and even now they are 6 1/2 when i use the two words Quickly or Hurry Up they know they have to do their business.

Really congratulate them when they do their business outside, say nothing if they do it on the paper and if you catch them doing it inside not on the paper loudly say the word NO.
Both dogs were fully house trained both day and night by 12 weeks old using this method

GANNET FAN
12th Dec 2006, 09:27
My Lab had beanbag with "her" blanket on top. Perfect for her.

Jesters, its been said above about giving her sometyhing to chew on, folded up tights or similar. So much better that furniture or other household bits which can get demolished when you go out and leave her, in a "that'll teach you for leaving me behind" statement. Had that a few times

CTBEyes
12th Dec 2006, 09:44
jesters - please check your pms

Gainesy
12th Dec 2006, 10:03
If you go the ticking clock route (it does work) do ensure that the alarm is not accidentally set for 02.40.:uhoh: :{

Mrs G used to sit watching TV and holding Jet in her arms when he was a pup, she now quite regularly gets flattened by 60-70lb of Labrador wanting a cuddle. :)

What they pick up as a pup, both good and bad, stays with them.

Foss
12th Dec 2006, 10:31
Slim slag
Thanks for the hint. I've been training dogs for quite a while. But the current one is particularly stupid. Cheers mate, your opinion means a lot to me.

Nini
Those look like Shetland ponies, not dogs, good luck, may God go with you;) .
Fos

keithl
12th Dec 2006, 10:34
Jesters - it sounds as though time may be doing the trick, but did you know there are electric plug-in thingies which release some sort of comforting smell? I don't know what they're called - I'll find out if you're interested - but it worked for our puppy and we got it from the Vet.

slim_slag
12th Dec 2006, 10:48
What's that about then Foss? As I said, what I say about dogs could be considered bad advice by others, and as I said, jesters should go see a proper dog trainer sooner rather than later.

Foss
12th Dec 2006, 10:55
I take it back.
I thought you were having a dig at me over Dog's life diaries.
Looks like not.
Fos :O

flower
12th Dec 2006, 11:18
Mrs G used to sit watching TV and holding Jet in her arms when he was a pup, she now quite regularly gets flattened by 60-70lb of Labrador wanting a cuddle. :)
.

Me too, but if one of the hounds wants a cuddle so does the other one, a Lab and a Springer at the same time is certainly interesting :O

gelderen
12th Dec 2006, 11:23
She's got a dog crate, and is very happy to sleep in there as long as we are in the room when she goes to sleep!!!

The crate is downstairs in the kitchen, we decided before we got her that she isn't going to come upstairs. Last night she yelped for a fair while, but we left her, i woke at 3am and she was whining away but i'm not sure if it had been continuous, woke again at 6am and again she was making noise. But we were expecting that. The thing we werent expecting so much was the noises during the day when she is alone and awake for any amount of time.

She seems unhappy going to sleep without some company nearby, but we indulged her obsession with my socks and put one in her cage just now and she went straight to sleep nuzzled into it (she must be desperate!!).

To answer the questions about where we got her from, it was a friend who is a KC registered breeder and taking your pup at 8 weeks is as recommended by the Kennel Club, the RSPCA and the BASC.

We're crossing fingers about tonight!!!

Fos - Maybe we could bring her round to keep Idiot company until she has quietened down??

Don't forget that you dog is just 8 weeks old and just taken away from his mother and sibblings. He has no idea what's going on and he feels alone. That's very normal for a young pup. Some get over it very fast, with some it can takes months. The reason for that is that a dog is pack animal. Without the pack a dog will never be able to get food and therefore he will die. No matter how small they are that is imprinted in his brain.

The key is to gain his trust. He needs to know that you are comming back! A full night alone downstairs in a place he doesn't know yet is too long imho. You can start with moving around a corner where he can't see you but can still hear you, when that's ok then move out of the room for litterally 2 seconds. Do that 10 times a day and built that up to 10 minutes alone downstairs where he can't see you but still hear you in the other room. After that is ok start with going out the door for very short times. At night I would or sleep with him downstairs for a week or so and slowly move your matras out the door where he can hear you but not see you. Or let him sleep upstairs. My 2 dogs sleep upstairs with us Not on the ned though :=) and they don't bother me at all. As soon as we go to bed they go to their dog beds.

It can also work to give him something to distract him from the fact that he alone. A kong for instance works mirracles in some cases. and as mentioned something that smells like you can work very well. It can also work to make a cd with noises around the house. Just tape yourself having dinner conversation and moving around the house. You can play it on repeat when you leave the house.

Just a few tips:
- don't assume your dog gets things fast. Just because he understands how to sit today doesn't mean he understands it tomorrow.
- An adult, intelligent dog reaches a maximum intellect comparable to a 4 year old child.
- your dog will learn to accociate brillantly. neighbors car driving up + news tune comming on TV = dinner. Your dog does not know how to tell the time ;)
- be consistant. A dog doesn't understand that during summer is is allowed on the couch but when he's wet he isn't.
- read a good book. John fisher for instance has written several great books.

Good luck and enjoy your dog! When guided well they are extremely rewarding animals.
Best regards,
Eelco

Jesters
12th Dec 2006, 12:57
She's going to the vet tomorrow for a general checkup, so we'll ask his thoughts on it then. We're not expecting her to settle quickly and suddenly be fantasically behaved, we're just nervous about getting it right. Neither of us has had a puppy on their own before, only with older dogs, so it is slightly new ground!

Here are some photos of the little noise monster:

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r85/jesters10/SANY0541b.jpg

http://i142.photobucket.com/albums/r85/jesters10/SANY0549b.jpg

tiggerific_69
12th Dec 2006, 13:33
she's gorgeous! youre lucky to get a golden/sandy one as i believe theyre hard to come by,lots of long waiting lists etc.my nan has a 2yr old cocker,he's mental!