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View Full Version : Why are we Brits so aggressive?


Bus429
10th Dec 2006, 10:54
Last week, in a gimormous shopping centre in Weston Flavell, I tried to get past a guy slouching over his trolley in the middle of a moving walkway. Despite my saying "excuse me" several times, he refused to budge. As I squeezed past, I must have indicated my annoyance through body language, eliciting a polite "don't shake your f:mad: :mad: :mad: ing head at me".
Mrs 429 (Arinc) watched a Carlisle council officer receive a mouthful last week for merely asking a smoker to pick up their cigarette butt and put it in a bin. (Councils are finally beginning to crack down on litter-louts).:ugh:

Mercenary Pilot
10th Dec 2006, 11:01
Why are we Brits so aggressive? It could be because it feels like nobody (especially the current & previous governments) ever listens to the reasonable majority.

Unless your threatening to behead people, blowing up civilians, spraying cow sh!t on your local bank, shooting thieving gypsies, digging up and stealing bodies etc....nothing gets done (at least thats how it appears)!

ShyTorque
10th Dec 2006, 11:23
We are a frustrated nation, made so by those supposedly chosen by the majority to serve us. Don't blame me, I didn't vote for them.

We have lost our national pride (actually, we have allowed them to take it from us) and it shows. :*

tony draper
10th Dec 2006, 11:37
Behaving like yobs at all times and under all circumstances is the norm for certain age groups now, and its not restricted to one class.
Bring back the lash I say.
:E

Whirlygig
10th Dec 2006, 11:40
The agression is a manifestation of defensiveness. The guy knows he is in the wrong but doesn't have the guts to admit it and say "Sorry". I wouldn't say that it is peculiar to the British, I have seen this sort of reaction from all different nationalities; it comes from someone who can't be seen to be "weak" by admitting their actions were wrong.

Cheers

Whirls

tony draper
10th Dec 2006, 11:59
Nah its a generation thing, if two people of my generation accidently bumped into each other in the street you would spend ten minutes apologising to each other,nowadays with tthe new lot even if no violence results its the one with the loudest and foulest voice that wins the day.
:rolleyes:

Whirlygig
10th Dec 2006, 12:05
As noted on a couple of other threads, the worst "offenders" of this kind seem to be middle-aged (30 to 50 ish) and usually financially comfortable. I'm also of that generation so I don't know where it went wrong! Now. Who was it who said, "there's no such thing as society"? I do think a lot of attitude changes came about in the 80s where manners didn't get you anywhere because it was everyone for himself!

Cheers

Whirls

Bus429
10th Dec 2006, 12:37
Even that idiosyncratic of British traits - holding the door open for people - seems to have withered. Even when done, it often goes unthanked. Yesterday, I watched as an individual (a shopper) in WH Smiths held the door open for a succession of fellow patrons, not one of whom thanked him.

Bus429
10th Dec 2006, 12:46
Here is something apposite from today's Sunday Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/opinion/main.jhtml?xml=/opinion/2006/12/10/do1003.xml&sSheet=/opinion/2006/12/10/ixopinion.html)

None of the above
10th Dec 2006, 12:47
'Confrontation Culture' from the BBC site might prove of interest.

http://news.bbc.co.uk:80/1/hi/magazine/5012300.stm

In cases like this, the view of an outside observer is often worth reading.

Quote:

"Having just moved to the UK from the USA, I am amazed by the sheer aggression of the average person. I have encountered brief moments of verbal abuse through driving and shopping. This country has 'lost the plot' in manners.

Frances,

Chipping Campden"

TheDesertFerret
10th Dec 2006, 14:00
More than most I stick up for Britain when folk have a poke at it.

However, I concede the one aspect of modern Britain I deplore is anti social teenagers.

I would advocate extermination - but the problem with this solution is that the heinous little s?its have this habit of "growing up" eventually and turning into better people. Therefore I'd feel a tad guilty about my teen-o-cide solution.

So, upon reaching 13, can we ship all such young lads to some South Sea island only allowing them to return upon turning 18 when their hormones have died down a bit?

Juud
10th Dec 2006, 14:20
By all means cozy up with your comfortable teenophobic prejudices DesertFerret. And under no circumstance let reality get in the way of your chauvinist preconceptions.

Never mind the fact that research done on this subject shows that verbal abuse, rudeness and even physicall assault is predominantly committed by people between the ages of 30 and 50.

Far better to blame it on the young, we all know what useless tossers they are.
I couldn't agree more. :ok:

Jerricho
10th Dec 2006, 14:22
Ahh yes, one of the funniest things I ever heard on a regular basis was the good old "Come and have a go if you think you're hard enough!". I heard it at football games, cricket games, in a pub one evening when some drunk moron had tripped over himself and knocked over a table, was told to be careful and suddenly decided it was fight time.

Perhaps one of the most futile and least-taunting challenge that can come out of someone's mouth..........especially when the "challenger" weighs all of 130 lbs soaking wet.

TheDesertFerret
10th Dec 2006, 14:27
Is that true Juud?

Bloody 'eck. I'm seven years into your time window and I haven't levelled anybody in that period.

Maybe I should start a "Who wants a fight?" thread?

Maybe "Fight Club" was an intelligent film after all.

Juud
10th Dec 2006, 14:33
Ferret, yer a disgrace to the generation. :=
Go out and slug someone you pinko luvvie pacifist treehugger!
Before sunday dinner.
;)

Bus429
10th Dec 2006, 14:37
I was recently in Nigeria, where several people - all decent and polite - said they were ashamed of their country's reputation. They were very keen to point out that not all Nigerians are scammers/crooks/etc.
I feel inclined to speak of my own country in the same way, too. We are not all ignorant and violent but one certanly gets the impression there is a lot of it about.
I'm going to start looking for jobs overseas; please keep me advised of any vacancies.:ok:

Jerricho
10th Dec 2006, 14:50
You're not really supposed to talk about it Mr Ferret ;)

Sammie_nl
10th Dec 2006, 15:09
Ah, aggresive people aged 30 to 50 years.

It's all about the deception of adult life. When one realises that shopping and sitting in the same damn pub is the only thing you actually do for "going out", it tends to be a bit of a dissapointment for some. Instead of conceeding that they haven't lived up to their dreams they prefer to take it out on others.

Im Moving to the UK soon, I wonder if it's any different from Ireland or The Netherlands.

TheDesertFerret
10th Dec 2006, 16:11
Does beating one's self up count? I've been doing that for 37 years.

TBirdFrank
10th Dec 2006, 16:50
Well being outside that age bracket perhaps excuses me, but last night while out with friends at a favourite curry house, a party gets up to leave and a young lady around thirty or so - in the crush - leans back towards the wine fridge and surreptitiously removes one. All the time she was checking she wasn't being watched by the staff - major mistake - she should have ben watching the tables too - perhaps she took it for granted that public don't grass up public nowadays. Wrong luv!

I managed to attract the attention of the staff after a few minutes, but needless to say, she had done a runner while her friends - including her boyfriend - paid the bill.

That bill now included a bottle of wine!

At that point the other side of being a good citizen was brought firmly home when the restaurant owner points to me and says - "He saw her - you pay" Just what I wanted - a several percentage point increase in being found face down in the street later.

They must have paid as it all went quiet and the meal lasted a good hour and a half, so when we left they were probably about six pubs down the road - and we had no bar bill - which is typical of that eaterie!

But it does make you think that soemtimes there is a cost to standing up and being counted, but if you have standards - why should you drop them out of fear of the boorish or worse responses to which this topic refers :confused:

Loose rivets
10th Dec 2006, 16:51
Here, people call me sir, they smile warmly and agree with everything I say, even though they can't understand my brand of English...or even English.

My B-I-L came back here after a trip to the UK. "It's a surly little country." He said, and I wanted to protest...but how could I? It has become simply that.

So many kind, gentle people, but they're lost in a morass of neanderthals. One trip, I hadn't left the confines of LGW before witnessing two taxi drivers HAVING A FIGHT WITH THEIR CARS! It was over the one place left outside the arrivals doors. It got really nasty at one point.

"I'm home." I thought.

It's all about upbringing. So, no hope for improvement then.

Krystal n chips
10th Dec 2006, 17:33
But it does make you think that soemtimes there is a cost to standing up and being counted, but if you have standards - why should you drop them out of fear of the boorish or worse responses to which this topic refers :confused:


Why indeed should you drop personal and indeed basic social standards to comply with the threat of aggression which mainfests itself at any opportunity and environment it seems. Short answer is you don't.

Silje
10th Dec 2006, 17:50
hello,

i am surprised that you talk in such a bad way about your own people... when i went over to the uk just a few months ago, most people were very nice and not aggressive. even in london most people were really friendly. :ok:

except for one tiny little incident on the ferry (some bald headed, rather stupid looking guys wanted to beat us up- we were a group of german students, you know :ouch: ) england really made a good impression! ;)

best regards,

Silje!

tony draper
10th Dec 2006, 17:51
People of 30 to 50 Wirlygig, I agree, young folk. :E

Jerricho
10th Dec 2006, 17:51
i am surprised that you talk in such a bad way about your own people


You should hear them talk about Kiwis :E

innuendo
10th Dec 2006, 18:02
I don't think anyone has a monopoly on the situation, it seems that "Modern manners" is one more addition to the list of oxymorons.

Silje
10th Dec 2006, 18:03
You should hear them talk about Kiwis :E

kiwis?

http://www.nutranews.org/img/img_data/Kiwis.jpg


or these kiwis?


http://www.sailwhisper.com/logs/images_20050121/Kiwis.jpg


not sure what you mean, Jerricho. :\ :)

Jerricho
10th Dec 2006, 18:12
Sorry mate,

Kiwi = New Zealander.

Silje
10th Dec 2006, 18:45
Sorry mate,

Kiwi = New Zealander.

oh well.... i understand.:E

as so many people here say that the brits have become so rude, i realise there must be some truth in it... but it's certainly not only a problem in the uk! i hear so many stories about people who get beaten up for practically no reason! this occurs mostly in big cities like berlin or hamburg. bet this wasn't like that 30 or 40 years ago!


Silje

reynoldsno1
10th Dec 2006, 19:02
I have to admit one of the scariest things in the world is a Kiwi in a car ... our fatality rate is about 3x the UK ...

Whirlygig
10th Dec 2006, 19:17
People of 30 to 50 Wirlygig, I agree, young folk. :E
Tony, you say the nicest things ;)

Cheers

Whirls

C130 Techie
10th Dec 2006, 19:50
The problem is that we live in a society where it seems that you are no longer obliged to take responsibility for your actions. Because of this few people consider the consequences of their actions on other people.

I also agree with Whirlygig in that people would rather front up and be aggressive rather than simply put up their hand and admit that they are in the wrong.

We live in a sad and shallow society where everything seems to be easy come easy go.

RMC
10th Dec 2006, 21:07
You're all a bunch of dead heads....don't know what the f*$k you are talking about...take this:ugh:

TheDesertFerret
10th Dec 2006, 21:41
Eloquently put RMC.

Interestingly I live closer to Sutton than I would like and am keen to move away from the place.

Are you one of the local morons who keep vandalising my local station? If so, can you at least learn how to spell "bastard" properly?

ShyTorque
10th Dec 2006, 21:44
Tony, you say the nicest things ;)

Cheers

Whirls

Does a little over the half century still count as young? :O

Whirlygig
10th Dec 2006, 21:50
Are you asking me or Herr Draper? We might give different answers!

Of course, it depends how little!

Cheers

Whirls

con-pilot
10th Dec 2006, 21:53
Err, 9 years, 5 months and 19 days.

That's little, compared to the age of the earth. :uhoh:

ShyTorque
10th Dec 2006, 21:56
Either will do, but a lady's opinion is always most welcome.

Not exactly "little". All right - a little over a half....if you must have it broadcast.... :oh:

Jerricho
10th Dec 2006, 22:20
You're all a bunch of dead heads....don't know what the f*$k you are talking about...take this:ugh:

Come and have a go if you think you're hard enough...........

;)

Blacksheep
11th Dec 2006, 02:48
In my experience you find aggressive people everywhere in the world - and there never were any "good old days." Where I grew up people were generally polite. We gave up our seats to old folks on the bus, held doors open and were thanked etc. etc. But it wasn't uncommon to have someone offer to stick the nut on you at least a couple of times every day. Even back then it always seemed to be 30 to 50 year old men who did all the street fighting. With a couple of harridans egging them on. Stockton High Street is still the same most weekend nights, I hear.

I haven't had any really aggressive confrontations in UK recently. Maybe its the walk I developed in 1950s Teesside - all of us in the (relatively harmless and risk averse) Trent Street Mob walked like that as defensive strategy. I do notice a lot of impatience though; especially in shops and car parks. People are always in such a hurry. Why?

Loose rivets
11th Dec 2006, 03:15
Maybe its the walk I developed in 1950s Teesside - all of us in the (relatively harmless and risk averse) Trent Street Mob walked like that as defensive strategy.

One is intre-gued, just what sort of walk was it that you developed?:confused:

Blacksheep
11th Dec 2006, 03:37
A form of nonchalent swagger. I used to have to walk past "The Harrison's" house on my way to Connelly's corner shop and the Harrison twins would size you up as you passed. You had to be able to ignore them just the right amount. Its body language that says I'm not looking for trouble, but I'm not particularly bothered if it turns up.

Most useful when walking outside your own territory, there's a thin line - if you overdo it and look "tough" instead, you're saying "I'm looking for trouble" and someone will generally give you some. A childhood spent living on the wrong side of the tracks while avoiding violence leaves its mark on one.

I'm convinced that people on the receiving end of aggression are those who give off the wrong body language. I can spot a good bully target from far away - even gentle giants get picked on if they look gentle enough.

GANNET FAN
11th Dec 2006, 09:43
Even that idiosyncratic of British traits - holding the door open for people - seems to have withered. Even when done, it often goes unthanked. Yesterday, I watched as an individual (a shopper) in WH Smiths held the door open for a succession of fellow patrons, not one of whom thanked him.


Not totally withered. I still do it because I just think its bloody rude just to let the door slam in peoples faces. But you're right, most times you don't get thanked.

There's a road in Southfields, London that with cars parked one side means that its one way travel. Rather than get my wing mirror or worse broken when the obstruction (cars parked) is my side I stop and let apprcoaching cars go first. Almost, well at least 75% of drivers acknowledge with thanks.

However agression, bloody mindedness, selfishness, I know my rights and fcuk you Jack I'm all right attitude of some seem to be spreading more and more, especially in the cities.

Bo88ocks to them and to the rest of you, have a really happy Christmas

JC

Wyler
11th Dec 2006, 10:28
IMHO it is the sheer pace of life these days. Too many cars, crap roads, stupidly small parking places, long queues at Supermarkets where only one of the aisles is open. Doom and gloom is squirted into our homes 24/7 by either TV/Computer or telephone. Kids MUST have this phone, that PC etc etc, Xmas stats in Oct and Summer Holidays are advertised before it gets dark on Boxing Day. Credit is shovelled through your letter box on a daily basis and if you trip over at work you are a victim and need to talk to a lawyer.

The end result? Lots of stressed out people with very short fuses who explode at the tiniest little thing. It's almost an epidemic.

Luckily, in my part of the world we move a little slower so things like holding doors open is still greeted with a smile and a thankyou.

Personally, I find teeneagers crude but you have to look to the older generation to see sheer bad manners and rudeness.

We are, however, no worse than any other western nation. We just like to be very British and whinge about it in public.