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View Full Version : What happens to people in supermarkets?


one dot right
10th Dec 2006, 10:32
Have just been shopping to get bits for a nice family sunday lunch, you know the one, the mythical sit at table,discuss world affairs, compliment the cook etc.

Wander along the checkouts looking for an empty-ish one, spot woman with solitary bunch of spring onions on belt-yipee, this won't take long, line up behind said woman and start unloading trolley onto belt. "er, excuse me" says a voice behind me "but she's just reserving a place for us,that's my wife" says a bloke with overflowing trolley, "oh" says I "didn't realise you could do that" and I was about to meekly give up my place to him when he shoved his trolley,deliberately i'm sure, into the back of my 4 year old daughter to move her out of his way!

Well, that was it, i'm ashamed to say, my following actions were less than gentlemanly and i'm not proud of them, but suffice to say they found another checkout fairly quickly.

What makes people think they can behave like this? I'm not talking about twenty somethings, these people were in their late thirties-ish. I would have been annoyed about the 'reserving' thing but WTF makes people think they can ram small children with a shopping trolley?

Rant over.

Buster Hyman
10th Dec 2006, 10:45
He was lucky to get out of there alive! ESPECIALLY IF HE DID IT TO MY KIDS:mad:

Good onya!:ok:

G-CPTN
10th Dec 2006, 11:30
One is eager to hear more of your modus operandus, one-dot-right.
I've NEVER encountered such behaviour, though would resist with maximum force if a 'refusal' failed to embarrass and a "tough cookies" didn't dissuade.
Unless, of course, it was Mr T . . .

ShyTorque
10th Dec 2006, 11:41
Hope you did the gentlemanly thing and insisted on her going through the checkout with her spring onions........ ;)

I once made a heinous mistake at a checkout :\ . I inadvertently went through a "cash only" till and then produced a chequebook to pay, shock, horror! I was suffering from 'flu and was even more dull than usual whilst shopping. The bloke behind me, presumably a businessman by his attire, started creating a fuss. He immediately laid into the checkout lady as if it was her fault! I pointed out to him that it was my fault, not hers (it was only then I noticed the "Cash only" sign six feet above my head). I also pointed out that I would be as quick as I could be. He then lost it and insisted that the manager was brought. I told him to shut up or I would wait for him in the carpark where we could "discuss it further". I quickly handed over my cheque, apologised to the harassed cashier and went outside, waiting by the door.

He saw me waiting there and turned sharp left, exited by the entrance and legged it to his car!

one dot right
10th Dec 2006, 11:48
Hope you did the gentlemanly thing and insisted on her going through the checkout with her spring onions........


Er, actually,no. I was so incensed about the ramming episode I picked up her spring onions,stuffed them in hubbys' trolley and pushed his trolley backwards into him as hard as I could, then told him if he tried that again he'd better call the police cos i would wait for him outside. They wandered off muttering about calling the manager etc.:mad:

frostbite
10th Dec 2006, 11:51
Can't speak for others, but as soon as I get in there, a red mist descends and I want to get out asap!

Retail therapy - what the hell's that?

Foss
10th Dec 2006, 12:47
I love the death-ray looks you get when you put that plastic divider thing on the conveyor belt behind someone at checkout. Then they move their stuff along about a quarter of an inch forward, then another death-ray look.
As if I'm about to steal their bloody groceries, like come on.

Trolleys abandoned across an aisle while some eejit woman goes to the fish counter, and then has a chat, 'I says to him, I said, you know I said blah blah.'
So you move the trolley.
'Scuse me, scuse me, that's my trolley yer moving,' from the fish counter.
Option 1. Beat her to death with a can of sweetcorn.
Option 2. 'Oh sorry, I was just trying to get past.'

Fos I prefer wee village shops

HOGE
10th Dec 2006, 13:12
Quoting Foss ..."I love the death-ray looks you get when you put that plastic divider thing on the conveyor belt behind someone at checkout. Then they move their stuff along about a quarter of an inch forward, then another death-ray look.
As if I'm about to steal their bloody groceries, like come on."


I suppose technically, since they haven't yet paid for the items, they are not their groceries. :confused: So I suppose you could help yourself to anything that took your fancy.

Standard Noise
10th Dec 2006, 13:35
I don't bother with all that divider nonsense, If the person in front of me wants to put one on the conveyor, that's up to them. If the person behind me wants to, then likewise. But if it goes through and is rung up on my bill, then it belongs to me.
We get LV's from the company and they're a pain in the arse. I've handed them over and had the checkout assistant look blankly at me, call the supervisor and then ring them up one by one. One bloke behind me started huffing and puffing at the time it took to ring them up. Well, he was put in his place with a loud remark in my best Belfast lilt, summat to do with placing his trolley where the sun don't shine.

All I can say One Dot, is that you were remarkably restrained.

frostbite
10th Dec 2006, 14:36
The thing that really p1sses me off are the people who happily push their trolley around while they shop, then tow the bl00dy thing behind them when going through the checkout!

That means they block the 'lucky' person (and it's always me!) behind them from unloading on to the conveyor until they have paid and gone.

Foss
10th Dec 2006, 14:52
Norn Iron lilts do come in handy sometimes, 'Ahm taking ye to a plaice for a beayting if ye done get thon trolley outa tha whey, ye hallion ye.'

That's in my head though (scary).
Once I'm in a big supermarket my IQ drops by about a hundred, which leaves me in the minuses, as I wander around muttering, 'What was it I was meant to get, what was it?'
Then bloke tactic. You look at the shopping list written by someone else, but keep it in the palm of your hand so no one else sees that you don't know what your doing.
Ha. I've outsmarted all the housewives. I'm a metrosexual, see, I can buy ciabatta. I think, oh I don't know, it could be flat bread or something, God knows.
Peanut butter, biscuits, coffee, a loaf, so I don't starve, some sweets for the Idiot to steal, then the horror of four million women reversing out of a carpark at once.
It's always fun.
Fos

Rollingthunder
10th Dec 2006, 15:02
Dunno. I'm always out in the parking lot slashing at least two tyres of the folks illegally parked in handicapped spaces.

TheDesertFerret
10th Dec 2006, 15:07
Is this an appropriate point in time to position the question "why do so many women (not all, of course) seem to express their surprise when they are informed to stump up some cash to pay for the groceries they've merrily shipped through the till and dutifully bagged?".

We've all seen the extraordinary "oh crikey" embarrassed delaying scrambling through purses to stump up the pecuniary settlement. What the F**k were you expecting?

Why do women (who otherwise are generally switched on and "with it") do that?

Willows
10th Dec 2006, 15:52
Then bloke tactic. You look at the shopping list written by someone else, but keep it in the palm of your hand so no one else sees that you don't know what your doing.
Ha. I've outsmarted all the housewives. I'm a metrosexual, see, I can buy ciabatta.

:D :{

Hahaha. Post of the week!

Tolsti
10th Dec 2006, 16:08
My local ''express'' little supermarket has had 2 of those self checkout machines installed. Now that they have sorted out the credit/debit card security issue I use it every time. It's only one person at a time and so many people figure that it's too complicated for them and stand in line 10 deep to be served by a human.
In and out in minutes... leaving a row of gaping halfwits looking like something out of Little Britain.... now wheres the ''smug bast**d'' smilie??

SLFguy
10th Dec 2006, 16:52
My local ''express'' little supermarket has had 2 of those self checkout machines installed....
Ooh we've them 'n all. Unfortunately, they don't like me...
"Place item in bag"
Well hang on a mo, I've only just pitched up and haven't started yet.
"Remove scanned item"
Still haven't done anything.
"Select produce code"
Eh?
"Select produce code"
Now it appears I have T*sc*s only individually bar coded carrot - this is gonna be fun.
"Place Item....."
zap - bar code reader strikes, (causing goto loop malfunction)
"Seek assistance"
Mate - this auto till is farked, I think it was me scanning the carrots.
Assistant: Our carrots don't have bar codes.
Me: Wots this then
Ass: That's a flat screen TV.
Me: Eh?
Ass: Look - the till display says it's a flat screen TV - you'll need to speak to someone in electrical.
"Place item in bag"
It's Dolly on the check out for me from now on..

Krystal n chips
10th Dec 2006, 17:22
The introduction of electrified cattle pens ( roof optional ) adjacent to the Mother and child parking areas would alleviate a lot of problems in supermarkets-----wot ? :E

As would a dedicated aisle for "very self important business people who simply have to conduct intense mobile phone calls whilst holding up the queue" :yuk:

Another aisle, for stupid people, ie those who cannot read "10 items or less " or "hand carts only" would also help.

My career in the retail sector never really took off----strangely :E

Chesty Morgan
10th Dec 2006, 17:40
Ever since I started shopping on line I've never had the urge to violently attack someone with a bag of frozen chips...ahhh bliss!

lexxity
10th Dec 2006, 18:38
On line delivery is the way forward people.

One Dot you were very restrained, I think there would have been blood if it had been me. What an absolute sh1t.

reynoldsno1
10th Dec 2006, 18:50
I love the death-ray looks you get when you put that plastic divider thing on the conveyor belt behind someone at checkout
Fuuny how s/market etiquette changes around the world - In NZ the person infront usually puts the divider on the belt, and the person behind usually says thank you ... speeds the whole thing up .....:confused:

Foss
10th Dec 2006, 18:55
That's because you're upside down and do everything backwards.
Fos

one dot right
10th Dec 2006, 18:57
Well thanks for the support everyone,really. I thought I was just being my normal intolerant self, clearly not!

Foss: As ever, witty, concise, and I just wish I could put things as well as you.

Edited to say Foss typed that while I was doing this, as if to make my point.

Kestrel_909
10th Dec 2006, 20:55
Shopping in supermarkets, I feel like a ball boy in a tennis match or someone playing dodge-ball. Certainly have to have yer wits about ye, lock aim on the target produce, look left, look right, mad dash towards targeted item, retrieve and place in trolley.

Why do people insist on stopping in the middle of the aisle and then standing to one side of their trolley, leaving a 2ft gap for me to get through...barstewards! Or those who stop at the end of the aisle blocking it.

Then there are the morons who are far too superior to follow the normal pattern of starting at the door and working from left-right and decide to start at the far end and work backwards.

There are a few nice un's from time to time that I 'befriend' during my shopping excursion, as we meet in each aisle again and again, usually going the opposite direction. :(

frostbite
10th Dec 2006, 21:37
You certainly meet some humourless types.

I am well over 6' tall and, one day, a couple of young females were trying to get something off the top shelf. "Could you help please?" one of them asked, so I retrieved the item for them.

"You women are all the same", I said, "Only want me for my body!".

Instead of the gales of laughter I expected, there was just an awkward silence as they shuffled away.

Buster Hyman
10th Dec 2006, 22:59
Well...you dont want laughter when offering your body now do you?

Foss
10th Dec 2006, 23:53
Could be worse, you've been sent out by the darling dearest to buy rubbish of some kind. Walking through the car park you catch the eye of a fetching young girl.
'Hello' 'Hello'
'Cold isn't it' 'Yes it is.'
'I'm very intelligent you know. I've a nice car.' 'So you do.'
After 5 minutes of frenzied rattling of a trolley, during which young girl has run off you then have to shout out, 'Does anyone have a small child who knows how to unlock this f***ing trolley because I don't seem to know how to do it. And it's eaten a pound coin.'
Alright, I didn't shout it out, I muttered it to myself.
Haven't even got through the doors yet.
Fos

Deano777
11th Dec 2006, 00:06
one dot

Well done for being so restrained, if he had done that to my daughter he would have swallowed his trolley whole.
To be honest I cringe when the wife & I go shopping, she is a nightmare, she doesn't care about anyone, if their trolley is in the way she'll move it right in front of them, if their shopping is spread on the conveyor she get's the divider and shoves it forward, I certainly try and make myself as small as possible.
One of my pet hates in supermarket car parks are those that park in the parent & child spaces when they haven't got any children.
If I have to wait for the missus and I have the trolley I try to park where I think nobody will want to shop, but even if the gangway is virtually empty you can bet someone wants to get where you are waiting, I'm like "But they're dog baskets love, surely you didn't come here to buy a dog's basket" grrrrr

Blacksheep
11th Dec 2006, 01:57
My major problem when shopping in UK is getting glared at while I'm bagging up. I always forget I'm in England where you're expected to bag everything yourself, so after paying I turn round and find a heap of naked groceries in front of me and a beligerently impatient British shopper with just a bunch of spring onions or a bag of ciabatta behind me.

In the civilised world the checkouts have a 'bagger-up' who does it for you. Still, they're already on the slippery downslope. At one time, if you spent more than fifty bucks, they took it all out to the car park and stowed it in your car boot for you as well.

Loose rivets
11th Dec 2006, 02:33
One of my pet hates in supermarket car parks are those that park in the parent & child spaces when they haven't got any children.
"But they're dog baskets love, surely you didn't come here to buy a dog's basket" grrrrr

Do you always go grrrrr when you talk about dog baskets?:}

Standard Noise
11th Dec 2006, 08:35
Car parking at the supermarket ('super', wrong adjective surely? 'F*&king b*#tard Tesco shop' would be better.), mmm, yes, you know it's always puzzled me why perfectly reasonable people who have driving licences and well maintained vehicles are capable of following road signs on public thoroughfares, but the minute they get into a supermarket car park, they think they're starring in an episode of Wacky Races and can't seem to understand any of the signage. There's nothing like meeting some tw4t in a beemer going the wrong way to save himself a few seconds and seeing the look on his boat when he realises that the Discovery ahead of him is actually going the right way...................and not planning to stop!

verticalhold
11th Dec 2006, 08:41
On line shopping is a bit difficult with my schedule, but my local Tesco is open 24 hours. The pleasure of finishing on a late and then doing the shopping in an empty supermarket has to be experienced to be be believed. No snotty kids, no horrendous queues, lots of good offers and the veg is as fresh as at any other time.

They also have singles nights I discovered where you can coyly meet the eyes of some poor saddened spinster who lives the same empty lifestyle as you do.:{

If I had been one dot there would have been a very serious incident. Well handled that man:ok:

Bus429
11th Dec 2006, 08:55
Ah, Blacksheep, supermarkets in the UK now offer to bag up for you. However, I feel that the checker-outer on the NMW with a queue of (potentially aggressive) customers waiting should not have the burden of bagging to contend with. Still, the service at SupaSave wasn't bad.:ok:

stevef
11th Dec 2006, 09:59
I was in a Corte Inglese superstore yesterday, battling my way through hundreds of Spanish Christmas shoppers and rampaging kids. I happened to slipstream an exasperated trolley-pushing Brit muttering the most obscene Anglo-Saxon oaths while he shunted his way through the groups of gossiping families blocking the aisles. Quite made my day. Totally agreed with him.
:^)

mazzy1026
11th Dec 2006, 10:17
Ever since I started shopping on line I've never had the urge to violently attack someone with a bag of frozen chips
Better with a full box of Birds Eye 100% frozen beef burgers - much more momentum :p

GANNET FAN
11th Dec 2006, 14:17
Slightly dozy one morning in Tesco shopping with the missus, wasn't paying attention and thought the blonde in front of me with her back turned was her, and muttered "want to play hide the sausage later".

I just had time to stutter "woops sorry wrong person" as fortunately her indoors came round the aisle and saved the day, before sexual harrassment charges and heaven knows what else would have occurred.

Re-entry
11th Dec 2006, 14:47
Thread drift.
Was at huge queue for X-ray/metal detector at airport. Finally get there and bloke in front starts folding his jacket, arranging bags, searching bag for mobile, emptying pockets, putting make-up on..... I just had a carry-on so plonked it on the conveyor and started walking through.
'Hey, I'm next.' he complained.
Managed to restrain myself, just.

futurshox
11th Dec 2006, 14:49
As a Brit getting used to American supermarkets, I have observed the following:
The trolleys have fixed wheels at the back which make them a bugger to steer, you have to shunt them sideways everywhere. UK trolleys have four-wheel steering, it's much easier.
The aisles are narrower, so you cannot stand anywhere at all without being in someone's way.
People bag your shopping, but all the baggers here are obviously paranoid about the tensile strength of plastic as they have an alarming tendency to use one bag per item. I really don't need 364000 shopping bags, thankyouverymuch.
Strange food (my fault for being a crap cook, I don't know what to do with half of it). But what's the deal with tomato puree only coming in cans, eh? I want a squeezy tube!
On the plus side, Whole Foods and Central Market are amazing stores, they make Waitrose look like Aldi...

the_flying_cop
11th Dec 2006, 15:31
As would a dedicated aisle for "very self important business people who simply have to conduct intense mobile phone calls whilst holding up the queue" :yuk:



There was a certain pilot who worked here and was banned from pprune. I have heard horror stories of him phoning a colleague with loud voice asking if HIS aircraft was ready for HIM, and had the engineers sorted out x y z, and HE was going to be flying as soon as HE entered the premises blah blah blah. all above done in very loud booming 'im sooo important' type voice.


after a short time chap on other end of the horn wonders wat all the beeping and general background noise was.....

turns out he was in the q at supermarket trying to 'big himself up' with important aerobabble. didnt seem to realised wat a complete k-stick he was makin of himself.

what a tool ( these sorts should be issued with ASBO's -)!
TFC

eticket
11th Dec 2006, 15:59
A few years ago now I was in T**co and approached the hand basket only checkouts to pay. One had a long queue and at the other were two women unloading the contents of a totally full trolley onto the conveyor belt. Me thinking that this was not really on uttered some pointed coughs which were studiously ignored. Follow ups involving coughing and loud tuts also ignored. I was stumped though when they eventually got to the bottom of the trolley and revealed the two hand baskets that they had managed to wedge in sideways - the looks of triumph on their faces!

Have you ever been shopping and part way round walked off with someone elses trolley by mistake? OK only me then. :O

On the subject of supermarket violence has the person ahead of you in the checkout queue, buying some rope and chain, ever turned out to be a murderer buying their supplies? Happened to someone I know.

lexxity
11th Dec 2006, 17:44
I'm adding post offices to the list of "places where people turn bad". I had to go to the PO to send off come Christmas presents today. The queue, as you can imagine, was huge and doing a full loop of the building. Ok, no problem as all the counters were manned and it was moving realtively quickly. So I join the queue and feel a shoving on my side. I turn round and some old bid is trying to squeeze past me. I glared at her and she says "oh, are you in the queue?" I pointed out the big loop of people to her and went back to people watching. All the way round she is stood, literally, either on my heels or shoving her shopping into the back of my knees!:eek:

I was very restrained because she was an old lady, but come on people, where did you expect me to go?

Newforest
11th Dec 2006, 18:51
I was very restrained because she was an old lady, but come on people, where did you expect me to go?

Behind her, dispensing a little Christmas charity?;)

Foss
11th Dec 2006, 19:37
My local post office is terrible for being a local hub of the community.
One old lady at the counter' how are you, are you well, ahhh I seen wee Jim the other day, wha? wha? I can't hear you through that screen. How's Jean doing, is she alright, I heard she was poorly. Aye, my grandson's in America now. Isn't the weather dreadful today, the wind would blow right through you.'

Please just buy a stamp and leave. Please.

Fos grumpy

frostbite
11th Dec 2006, 20:13
Recently stood behind a real grumpy old [email protected] in the PO - he complained loudly all the way to the head of the queue.

When he arrived at the counter to tax his car, he had to fish in his pockets for all the documents and he hadn't even started writing his cheque before he got there!

G-CPTN
11th Dec 2006, 20:37
I don't believe the FSL has a car . . .

Polikarpov
11th Dec 2006, 20:54
Supermarket carparks really are very odd places. It seems that when within their confines the slightest contact with light drizzle, or maybe even a mild gust of wind, is fatal. Or at least one would think so to see the bad tempered car ballet that ensues in the front third of the carpark in any sort of inclement weather.

I usually just head for the back and spend an extra fifteen seconds walking (as opposed to three or four minutes going forward, back, round, swearing and gesticulating at other drivers to improve my position). Still, each to their own.

The disabled parking spaces near the front of the store also make for interesting viewing. At our local T*scos they should replace the "disabled" sign with one saying "Used luxury marque lot".

eal401
12th Dec 2006, 06:28
In my neck of the woods (Leyland) we have a HUGE Tesco Extra that really does qualify for Hell on Earth! Firstly, it's always, always packed solid and secondly the management are absolutely hopeless at stock ordering. When my mother-in-law visited from Russia, I joked that we should take her there to remind her of the good old Soviet days of empty shelves!

Fortunately, a new Morrisons has opened in town. This has a number of benefits.

It's nice and big

Most of the bleating sheep still flock to Tesco, so even now, it is not overly busy

The car-park is designed in such a way that disabled spaces, parant and child spaces and normal spaces are all within easy access of the main entrance.

phnuff
12th Dec 2006, 12:09
Well done on your self control mr orginal poster - had someone shoved a trolley into the phnufflet, I would have completely lost it.
Slight drift
The thing which really pi$$es me off in supermarkets is when you get to the checkout and about 50% are working all with huge queues. What they are in effect saying is 'stuff you mr/mrs customer, your time is not worth as much as the extra profit which we will make by having too few checkout staff'.
On a number of occassions, I have left a half full trolley in an aisle and walked out in effect saying 'stuff you supermarket, your extra profit will not cover the cost of the rapidly warming food in my trolley'
Of course, I still have to queue somewhere else :(

Foss
12th Dec 2006, 12:46
Small wee local shops
The downside is they know everything about you.
'Ahh, hello Fos how are you. Awful day. Usual Times is it. Cigars? How's that dog doing.'
'It's tied up somewhere, very tightly.'
'There's some nice Christmas cards in, take a look.'
edge towards the door. edge towards the door.
Run like the wind for the car. No sweets. Go Back. Yes thankyouvery much bye.
Go Home.
They probably know my blood group.
Fos

phnuff
12th Dec 2006, 13:13
Small wee local shops
The downside is they know everything about you.


Ah but so do the supermarkets !!

"Do you have a clubcard sir??"

They don't run these type of schemes for our benefit, they just want to profile customers and chuck offers for all kinds of similar products.

Standard Noise
12th Dec 2006, 13:41
"Do you have a clubcard sir??"

"Not with me" say I, as I'm wondering why they think I want to use a clubcard if I've only spent 1.03, I'm not that desperate for points!
They're little automatons with no idea of independant thought ie if I don't hand over my card, then it means I haven't got it, but that didn't occur to you cos you're not allowed to think, are you?

And that wee man that stands in the car park taking your reg number (lots of tightwads in Wells park in Tesco to avoid the 40p/hour parking charges) so if you're there more than two hours they can ticket/clamp you. Last time he took my reg no, I told him to take my phone number cos if the car's there longer than two hours it means some f**ker's nicked it.

Blacksheep
13th Dec 2006, 00:37
When they ask for your club card, raise your eyebrows, lean forward, stare into their face and say "Que??" like Manuel from Flowery Twats, er Fawlty Towers.... They can't get rid of you quick enough.

I spy
13th Dec 2006, 03:28
one dot


One of my pet hates in supermarket car parks are those that park in the parent & child spaces when they haven't got any children.

I do it deliberately. Why?? Why not? Why should I be discriminated against, just because I make a conscious decision not to contribute to an already overpopulated world? Why is it that I must walk further in the pouring rain just because I'm not an incubator and haven't spawned?

Handicapped persons carparks are a completely different kettle of fish - they didn't choose to become disabled. People who decide to have children have made a choice. Wear it, and don't plead that "it's all so hard going shopping with the children *sniff*" You chose to have them. I choose not to. Why should you get it easy when I don't? It's called discrimination with a capital "D"

Buster Hyman
13th Dec 2006, 03:36
Well, if they got drunk, drove, pranged the car & the result was a disability, then can I take their car park?

I spy
13th Dec 2006, 04:06
Well, if they got drunk, drove, pranged the car & the result was a disability, then can I take their car park?


If they did it deliberately, then yeah - don't see why not. I doubt many would choose to deliberately maim themselves for life just in order to get a few perks.....oh, hang on, I'm on a pilot forum here, ain't I?

Hmmm, amass huge debt, maybe instruct for a few years earning peanuts and having students try to kill you on a semi-regular basis, spend next 5 years of your life in umbukakumbukta-west and it's surrounds earning peanuts to fly crapped out twins (if ya lucky) to get some precious time, dole out another small fortune to get more endorsements to maybe fly something half decent, move to somewhere slightly more salubrious to get even more hours,then spend the equivalent of the deposit on a house to get a 737 endorsement, spend the next 10 years waiting for someone more senior to die/retire/get retrenched so you get that coveted l/h seat in a jet, then spend the rest of your life paying all the debt off.......just so you can get ID90 for yourself and a few family members.

OK, I'll retract that statement about maiming yourself for life just to get a few perks.......:)

eal401
13th Dec 2006, 06:38
Why should you get it easy when I don't?
So you do not have kids, yet feel qualified to comment on how "easy" it is to have them?

I see you parking in a parent and child space with no kids, whether mine is with me or not, you'll have a nice big key scratch down the side of your car. Or my trolley might just go "out of control" while I'm pushing it past and *bang*.

:mad:

Choxolate
13th Dec 2006, 07:06
So you do not have kids, yet feel qualified to comment on how "easy" it is to have them?

I see you parking in a parent and child space with no kids, whether mine is with me or not, you'll have a nice big key scratch down the side of your car. Or my trolley might just go "out of control" while I'm pushing it past and *bang*.

:mad:
An excellent example to all of us of responsible parenting. And we wonder this country is going to the dogs.

Krystal n chips
13th Dec 2006, 07:18
[QUOTE=eal401;3015087]Fortunately, a new Morrisons has opened in town. This has a number of benefits.
It's nice and big
QUOTE]

I wouldn't get too enthuiastic about this. Once you've queued for a few hours waiting for the abacus technology to reckon up the cost of your goods, the staff talking to each other and chewing gum whilst serving--in theory that is--customers, sub-standard produce---the veg has a shelf life of about 1 day and the meat is "variable" :yuk: , a selection of food that is about as far removed from healthy eating as it's possible to get and probably the worst level of customer service of any of the chains, the option to return to Tesco's et al will be quite appealing----in contrast. Then you can play dodgems with the staff of course. Other chains manage to restock the shelves off peak----at Morrison's the SOP is to drag pallets around and stock shelves with complete indifference to the fact that customers are actually present!!!. Good wines and spirit's selection and a decent fish range however. Morrison's consistently score at the bottom of every independent analysis of the product ranges----not surprising really.

I spy
13th Dec 2006, 07:29
So you do not have kids, yet feel qualified to comment on how "easy" it is to have them?
I see you parking in a parent and child space with no kids, whether mine is with me or not, you'll have a nice big key scratch down the side of your car. Or my trolley might just go "out of control" while I'm pushing it past and *bang*.
:mad:

You have misinterpreted my words. I didn't say "it was easy to have kids". I stated that in my opinion that just because people have children, they do not qualify for "specially designated' parking spots that are closer to shopping areas. ie. "easier" access. Totally different from your interpretation.

I have no doubt whatsoever that having chidren is far from easy, based on many years of observation/experience with other people's children.

I do not envy people wih children - far from it. I have a multitude of reasons that I choose to remain child-free. So does my husband, thank god!

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 07:53
Quote:
Originally Posted by eal401
So you do not have kids, yet feel qualified to comment on how "easy" it is to have them?
I see you parking in a parent and child space with no kids, whether mine is with me or not, you'll have a nice big key scratch down the side of your car. Or my trolley might just go "out of control" while I'm pushing it past and *bang*.
An excellent example to all of us of responsible parenting. And we wonder this country is going to the dogs.
Nope,disagree entirely, eal401 has got this absolutely right. It's the irresponsibility of people like I spy that have the country in the state it is. Lack of respect for authority, rules are for little people etc etc-arrogant
pr1ck!

lexxity
13th Dec 2006, 08:43
Don't feed the troll people. People like I-Spy are just looking for a fight, ignore him and he may go away.

FYI - the parent and child spaces are wider because it's difficult to get a child strapped into their car seat if the space is narrow.

Krystal n chips
13th Dec 2006, 08:50
FYI - the parent and child spaces are wider because it's difficult to get a child strapped into their car seat if the space is narrow.

A good case for roof racks then ? ;) :E

lexxity
13th Dec 2006, 08:52
LOL, but that would be even more difficult. Ever tried lifting 22lbs above your head and balancing on tiptoes at the same time?;) :p

Buster Hyman
13th Dec 2006, 09:01
Kids getting out also swing their doors wide, regardless of the proximity of the next car....Hmmmm...okay, go ahead & park there Troll boy!:E

ORAC
13th Dec 2006, 09:12
American supermarkets are great, big selection, good service, but.......what is it with Americans and coupons. Pages of the bl**dy things in the papers, then when the biddy in front gets to the check out she fumbles through her bag for about 5 minutes and pulls out a wad about as thick as a copy of War and Peace - then slowly goes through it finding those for the store/food she needs.

I never bothered, lifeīs too short already. I never bother with store cards either. The minsicule saving isnīt worth the personal intrusion.....

The SSK
13th Dec 2006, 09:13
Small wee local shops
The downside is they know everything about you.
'Ahh, hello Fos how are you. Awful day. Usual Times is it. Cigars? How's that dog doing.'
'It's tied up somewhere, very tightly.'
'There's some nice Christmas cards in, take a look.'
edge towards the door. edge towards the door.
Run like the wind for the car. No sweets. Go Back. Yes thankyouvery much bye.
Go Home.
They probably know my blood group.
Fos

My local supermarket knows me pretty well.
'no beer today?'

Mrs SSK got stabbed by a nutter in there once.

Krystal n chips
13th Dec 2006, 09:15
[QUOTE=lexxity;3017235]LOL, but that would be even more difficult. Ever tried lifting 22lbs above your head and balancing on tiptoes at the same time?;) :p[/QUOTE
Yep........ fitting various lumps to Speys :{ over the years--and in the howling wind / rain / snow-----cue sympathy for Line Engineers at this point :) ;)

Buster Hyman
13th Dec 2006, 09:16
Mrs SSK got stabbed by a nutter in there once.
Right after they told him there was no beer right?

Tigger4Me
13th Dec 2006, 09:33
Only just found this thread. Brilliant, but a word of warning for anyone heading for Spain. Certainly round these parts of rural Andalucia it is considered quite normal for the old dears to enter a supermarket, pick up a basket, put in a couple of items and then place it on the floor in the chekout queue while they continue shopping. It is beholden on the person behind the basket to move it forward while the old biddy continues back and forth adding to the basket. They have it down to a fine art and always seem to finish shopping just as their basket finds its way to the front of the queue. And the other shoppers? Well they accept it as normal... The alternative for these old dears is that if they only want a couple of items then they just walk straight to the front of the queue claiming some ancient Spanish right no doubt.

On the parent/toddler parking debate. I can understand the need for these extra wide spaces; after all I wouldn't want my car damaged by some sprog throwing his car door open onto mine. I would also get very upset if, as a parent with toddler, I found all the spaces taken up by the likes of ISpy. But why is it necessary to place these priviliged spaces as near the store doors as possible? Presumably the parents are able to walk else they could use the blue badge spaces. Site the parent/toddler spaces away from the doors and the problem is solved as the lazy, I'm better than you, super marque drivers will leave them well alone resorting to the disabled spaces, taxi stand or customer pick-up zone instead.

XXTSGR
13th Dec 2006, 09:36
Yep........ fitting various lumps to Speys :{ over the years--and in the howling wind / rain / snow-----cue sympathy for Line Engineers at this point :) ;)Errr - I notice it didn't happen yet...? :E

Foss
13th Dec 2006, 11:09
Bloke problem solving
'Hello sir, do you have a clubcard?'
Well yes I do, it's in my wallet somewhere, but I don't think I'll ever, ever, reap any benefits from it, and I can't be bothered looking through my wallet for it because I'm only spending about a fiver.
'No, I don't have a clubcard.'
Fos just give me my stuff please, thankyou

Groundgripper
13th Dec 2006, 11:54
The worst thing about our vast local Tesco super-shed is the huge number of employees trundling round the store pushing trollies the size of a block of flats for their on-line customers. They seem to congregate especially round the fruit and veg section, outnumbering all the real shoppers.

I think it's a conspiracy designed to make us all so fed up with trying to navigate round them that we shop on-line as well. Unfortunately for them, I've seen how "carefully" they select the produce so I'll continue to shop for myself, thank you very much.:E

GG

eal401
13th Dec 2006, 12:14
they do not qualify for "specially designated' parking spots that are closer to shopping areas. ie. "easier" access.
Why not?

Or, as others have stated, would you prefer that I park next to you in a normal space and repeatedly slam my door against your car whilst I get my daughter out?

It is funny how you believe you have more right to park near the door than me.

arrogant pr1ck!
Actually one dot right, if you look at the posts a bit closer, you'll find that "arrogant c*nt" would be technically more accurate.

Oh and Krystal, sorry, but how you've described Morrisons is exactly what ours is NOT like and exactly what Tesco is like!

frostbite
13th Dec 2006, 12:16
Somerfield had a (short-lived) customer card where you could only take advantage of the special offers if you had one.

This was soon scuppered by the checkout staff who would happily use their own card if you didn't have one, or, people like me who found it still worked when you had ditched the registration form.

Kirstey
13th Dec 2006, 14:16
Why not?
Or, as others have stated, would you prefer that I park next to you in a normal space and repeatedly slam my door against your car whilst I get my daughter out?
It is funny how you believe you have more right to park near the door than me.
Actually one dot right, if you look at the posts a bit closer, you'll find that "arrogant c*nt" would be technically more accurate.
Oh and Krystal, sorry, but how you've described Morrisons is exactly what ours is NOT like and exactly what Tesco is like!


Looks like Supermarkets, Post Offices AND internet forums are places that see the worst of people!

In truth there is no benefit from parking your offspring up near the supermarket.

And to if you want to park in the disabled spots let me quote Ricky Gervais

"It's ups and downs, a relationsip with a disabled person.. the sex is shit, but you can park right next to Tescos!"

yakker
13th Dec 2006, 14:26
My friend always parks in the 'parent and child' slot when he takes his mother to the supermarket. His mother is 91 and he is 60, as he says, no mention of age.

XXTSGR
13th Dec 2006, 15:51
In that case, I would suggest he is perfectly entitled so to do, as his mind clearly is that of a child. Anyone who says they don't understand the concept of "parent and child" parking or why disabled parking slots are there is either terminally stupid - in fact, too stupid to be behind the wheel safely, or is a liar.

Choxolate
13th Dec 2006, 16:05
In that case, I would suggest he is perfectly entitled so to do, as his mind clearly is that of a child. Anyone who says they don't understand the concept of "parent and child" parking or why disabled parking slots are there is either terminally stupid - in fact, too stupid to be behind the wheel safely, or is a liar.
Whoa!!
Please explain why a perfectly normal person who has a child should have preferential parking to anybody else? I accept the reservation of spaces for the disabled as there is a NEED.
However my late father at the age of 87 with moderate mobility problems (but not enough to be officially disabled) has to give way to a perfectly healthy mother of 30 with a six year old child. Why?? What is the special need?
Just interested, as I do not believe I am terminally stupid.

yakker
13th Dec 2006, 16:18
Steady XXTSGR, I would suggest it is easier to get a 6 year old in and out of a car than a 91 year old, especially when being helped by a 60 year old son, rather than a 26 year old Mother.
I'm with Choxolate on this one.

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 16:25
Whoa!!
Please explain why a perfectly normal person who has a child should have preferential parking to anybody else? I accept the reservation of spaces for the disabled as there is a NEED.
However my late father at the age of 87 with moderate mobility problems (but not enough to be officially disabled) has to give way to a perfectly healthy mother of 30 with a six year old child. Why?? What is the special need?
Just interested, as I do not believe I am terminally stupid.
Preferential parking no, I agree, i'm able bodied, as are the kids.On this point i'll agree wholeheartedly. But as previously mentioned kids throw open doors into other cars. And before the "i'd never let my child behave like that" brigade(who never have any kids) get on their high horse, you can't stop a 2 year old, they really don't know any better, in fact they're doing well just to open the door!
By all means move us further from the door,I agree with you that the elderly, disabled, or otherwise infirm have far more need than us to be close to the door,but even when they move us away,some knob without kids will always find an excuse to park in parent and toddler spaces. Cos they're pr1cks like I Spy.

under_exposed
13th Dec 2006, 16:33
kids throw open doors

Would child locks help?

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 16:50
Would child locks help?
Not really. You still need to open the doors fully to get the little treasures in and strapped into their car seats (mandatory due to nanny state) and any unsuspecting I Spy type car will reap the benefits:E

Grainger
13th Dec 2006, 16:50
the "i'd never let my child behave like that" brigade . . . you can't stop a 2 year old . . . Funny, I remember (just) being a child and my parents had no problem in explaining to me how I should or shouldn't behave.

It wouldn't be an acceptable excuse for a dog-owner to simply state that they were incapable of controlling their animal, so why is it different for a parent with a child ?

And why does not having offspring make someone a "knob" ?

XXTSGR
13th Dec 2006, 16:53
How many people here have tried to manoeuvre a child aged <5 in and out of a car seat and car into a pushchair ("stroller" to our US cousins) or one of those shopping trolleys equipped with baby seats with the sort of limited space available in standard parking slots? Hence the need for "Parent and Child" spaces.

Yes, a child is sometimes easier than a 91-year old. I am also in favour of disabled parking spaces. Anyone who regularly carries someone like that is entitled to a blue badge and to park in "Disabled" spaces. What they are not entitled to do is park in "Parent and Child" spaces.

Anyone not suitably disabled or hampered by children or chair-bound grannies can damn well walk the extra distance.

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 16:56
Grainger,do you have kids?

And the fact they don't have kids doesn't make them a knob, the fact that they feel entitled to park in a parent and toddler space does!

Grainger
13th Dec 2006, 17:11
Well if they are going to damage adjacent cars, you've put forward a convincing case as to why parents with children shouldn't be allowed to park in one of the ordinary narrow spaces.

What I don't see is the argument the other way round.

And not that it's anyone's business but I wouldn't choose to have children unless I were capable of making adequate provision and taking full responsibility for them - just as I wouldn't choose to own a dangerous dog, leopard or whatever unless I could keep it under control and not inconvenience other people.

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 17:17
Hmmm , single and bitter I see.

Grainger
13th Dec 2006, 17:22
Hmmm, judgemental and still no rational argument, I see.

Maybe you'd like to call me some names again for a bit.

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 17:24
And not that it's anyone's business but I wouldn't choose to have children unless I were capable of making adequate provision and taking full responsibility for them - just as I wouldn't choose to own a dangerous dog, leopard or whatever unless I could keep it under control and not inconvenience other people.




Probably best that you don't, your expectations are unrealistic at best and fanciful at worst. people(and children ,despite being threatened,as i'm sure yours would be,with dire punishment) make mistakes. Get used to it!:mad:

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 17:35
Maybe you'd like to call me some names again for a bit.

Er, maybe you'd like to explain where I called you any names. Many are suitable i'm sure!

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 17:42
Oh, no, I get it now ,you're that other idiot I spy masquerading under another name but you forgot you were doing it. Ha Ha, what a silly billy!:D

Kaptain Kremen
13th Dec 2006, 18:27
As a parent of a tiddler i am pleased to have a little extra space around the car to get her in and out safely AND not risk hitting next doors car with my door or pram. It irritates me when my car is scratched and don't want to risk doing it to someone else.
Anyone taking this space needlesly isn't helping and pushes parents into standard spaces where the above is more likely. Also, despite what we all think, it's the supermarkets choice and their rules.
HOWEVER, it's not fair to push everyone else further away, there's no reason why a healthy parent/toddler combo can't park further back, not at the front door, and have the bigger spaces there. Kind've a compromise.
My two cents, please don't kick me, not in front of the little one!

Grainger
13th Dec 2006, 19:37
Thanks Kremmen for that voice of reason and compromise.

Er, maybe you'd like to explain where I called you any names.Fair enough - I actually quite enjoy the walk and have never parked in one of those spaces, so I'm prepared to accept that the "knob" and "prick" were not aimed at me.

In the spirit of fair play, I'm also willing to accept that, technically speaking, the (inaccurate, but never mind) "single and bitter" comment is an attempted insult, rather than name calling.

So you're right. You didn't call me any names. Kinda spoiled the effect with the "silly billy!" thing though didn't you ? You haven't called me names, but couldn't resist a (rather weak) shot at the end :rolleyes:

As for "Probably best that you don't" [have children, presumably] - you might want to reflect on whether using playground euphemisms for male genitalia to refer to people with whom you disagree is a suitable role model for your offspring.

"threatened,as i'm sure yours would be,with dire punishment" What are you talking about ? If you are seriously suggesting that the only way you can think of to bring up children not to run riot is "dire punishment" then it's not me you should be worried about.

So we've agreed that if children are going to damage other people's cars then it's best if they are kept separate. Have you a rational argument for preferential treatment or just more insults ?

one dot right
13th Dec 2006, 19:55
No,no,no,no,no, lexxity has already told me not to feed trolls and it's high time I took some well needed advice.Thanks Lexxity!

ShyTorque
13th Dec 2006, 20:19
All this griping about parking spaces amuses me at the same time as thinking "how sad". Get a life, folks. Surely there's bigger things in life to worry about?
At my local supermarket the spaces for parent and child are no closer to the shop entrance than any other. I've got four kids, do I qualify to park if one or all of them is with me? Am I not "allowed" to park elsewhere? If a child-free driver has a Transit, a big four by four or a Toyota Previa, would you rather he squeezed the van into a too narrow spot next to your car, blocking full door opening and inconvenience both drivers and risking vehicle damage? I doubt it. Or should he take up the remaining two "normal" parking slots across the way?
As for the childless experts telling folks how to bring up their kids; the child-less wife of an ex-colleague of mine was a midwife and she knew it all. She always had some comment how there was a better way to deal with kids, especially with regard to discipline and how always to speak to them like small adults and reason with them, etc, blah.
A few years later I met up with them as my guests. They were visiting our officer's mess, complete with their "new" young son who took great delight in running round the place during lunch, throwing snooker balls across the floor and causing great disruption. Her token attempt at reasoning with him obviously wasn't having much effect so without much further ado, she dragged the little 'erbert by the collar into the corridor where a resounding "Thwack", followed by a yell was heard by all present. She had learned that reality didn't always measure up to ideals or a theory when it comes to kids! She knew why I was grinning at her, and she shook her head while she muttered something about a picture being worth a thousand words. ;)

Whirlygig
13th Dec 2006, 20:24
So. Having children means you're an expert and not having children means you know nowt. OK, I understand. That's obviously why the country is full of beautifully behaved, well-mannered, non-dysfunctional children. :hmm: :rolleyes:

Cheers

Whirls

I spy
13th Dec 2006, 20:56
HOWEVER, it's not fair to push everyone else further away, there's no reason why a healthy parent/toddler combo can't park further back, not at the front door, and have the bigger spaces there. Kind've a compromise.
My two cents, please don't kick me, not in front of the little one!

My point exactly. Thank you. I was specificially referring to "preferential" treatment. If this sort of arrangement existed, then I would call it a fair scenario and abide by not parking in a such a space.

I am not a troll, nor a pr#ck, nor a c*nt, despite what you may believe. If that is all you can muster in the way of insults, (and it would appear directly linked to the issue of me not having children and therefore somehow being "lesser" of a person with associated "lesser morals") then it reflects on you as a person, not me.

I have not once slagged off anyone here or resorted to name calling. I had an opinion and expressed it. Some people disagreed with me but had to resort to petty name calling in the process, instead of engaging in intelligent, reasoned debate. That's sad.

On that note, I am driving out of here (that's because even though I am a mere female, I CAN actually reverse park a car) and going home.

I spy, returning to channel 16

Foss
13th Dec 2006, 20:59
Toddlers
My ex had a sister with a toddler, who then became a four-year-old instantly, and because of my wierd hours I got to look after it, sorry, him, quite a bit because his parents were working 9 to 5.
We fed the ducks, had coffee (well orange for him) in coffee shops.
Walks round town and all that.
I spent the whole time petrified he was going to jump in the river or dive under a bus. I don't know how parents do it day in day out.
wee shite you're going to give me a heart attack, stop it
Fos caring possible father

Grainger
13th Dec 2006, 21:32
spat-etteCheers, Whirls - just about sums it up !

You've gotta admit that "single and bitter" was a pretty shrewd character assessment, though . . .






. . . can't think of anything I'd like better than a single malt and a pint of bitter at the moment. ;)

Um... lifting...
13th Dec 2006, 21:36
. . . can't think of anything I'd like better than a single malt and a pint of bitter at the moment. ;)

Ah, a Caledonian boilermaker... well, if you're going to do it, you might as well do it correctly!:ok:

curmudgeon
13th Dec 2006, 22:02
HOWEVER, it's not fair to push everyone else further away, there's no reason why a healthy parent/toddler combo can't park further back, not at the front door, and have the bigger spaces there. Kind've a compromise.

Good plan. What with all the childhood obesity around, it will do the kids good to have a bit more exercise.

Buster Hyman
13th Dec 2006, 22:37
Well, there's plenty of interesting perspectives here. From what I'm seeing, I guess the theme here is that we don't respect the authority of a private company to designate parking for its own customers. "What about me? I wanna park up the front!" so you do. You don't like their rules, so you break them...and this is right?:confused: Go to any shopping centre during the day & the predominant shopper is parents with pushers. Why shouldn't the shopping centres encourage their "regular" customers?

Well its true, no name calling could adequately describe some of you better than you have already revealed yourself!

allan907
14th Dec 2006, 00:05
When does a "child" cease to become a child? Is it when they cease to require transference to a pushchair; when they cease to throw open the car door (18??); when they legally become responsible for criminal acts; when they attain voting age; when rooting them ceases to become a criminal act; when they can talk; when they can walk; when they commence school; when they finish school - just when does one lose an "entitlement" to use the 'parent and child' parking slot???

Thank goodness they are a rarity in Oz (parking spots for kids that is)

con-pilot
14th Dec 2006, 00:41
That is one problem we don't have in the US. There are no reserved parking places for mothers with children. However, we do have our share of 'handicapped' parking places.

However, my pet peeve is people who shove their way into the 10-15 under items checkout lanes. Then I am standing behind them with 3 items and they give me a dirty look. I would say that the majority of these people are women, sorry, yes women. Usually around the ages of 35 to 45 and least 50 pounds overweight.

Oh, by the way, race has nothing to do with these women.

ChampChump
14th Dec 2006, 04:28
'Tis a sad society: one occasionally tells those with well-behaved (used to be normal?) children in such places what a pleasure it is to see, then feels guilty for being rather patronising, but all because one is too flippin' scared to tell all the others with gruesome sprogs what horrors they are....

SyllogismCheck
14th Dec 2006, 08:56
Crikey, what a storm in a teacup! That said, there's something I take umbrage with here.

If you're one of those who is incapable of extracting your child from or installing it to its car seat without fully opening the car door, and who intends for any car they suspect to be inappropriately parked in a parent and toddler space to 'reap the benefits' of your deliberately caused damage, dings and scratches by way of you intentionally opening your doors into them, surely those spaces aren't serving their intended purpose anyway. Otherwise, how could both the fully open door you require and the 'accidental' damage occur simultaneously? :rolleyes:

So then, if there isn't room in those spaces to open the door fully anyway, by your own descriptions of your needs you must be unable to get your child in or out even when parked in one. Otherwise it must be that the bit about damaging cars 'accidentally' on purpose is just a lot of hot air being needlessly expelled from over-puffed chests. It can't be both now, can it?

There is of course a third possibility. That being that if there isn't room to open the doors fully, as you claim it's essential you do, in those dedicated spaces without the risk of damaging other legitimately parked vehicles (a risk which must be present to warrant the talk of vigilante style action to deliberately damage those vehicles assumed to be illegitimately parked), you do the decent thing and not risk inflicting such damage on other parents' vehicles by parking in the invariably totally empty areas furthest from the store entrance, where you and yours can fling the doors about to your hearts content without anyone else suffering the consequences.

Afterall, surely parking in a space, wider than usual or not, where the door your child is liable to fling open will cause damage to another's property is just as selfish as people parking inappropriately, only in with an added degree of permanence.

Wyler
14th Dec 2006, 09:04
Sorry, this is off thread but I really need to get it off my chest.

What the f**k is wrong with people in airport departure lounges. The announcement is made that boarding will be done by row numbers. Irrespective of what is called out there is a stampede for the gate. Don't you people realise that

a. You have a seat.:ugh:

b. The frigging plane will not go without you.:ugh:

Likewise, when you are boarded, you wait and wait until eventually the one remaining smug, arrogant frequent flier deems to come on board at the very last minute.

:mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: :mad: the lot of them. Morons. :* :*

God, that's better.

Ref supermarkests. I HATE being stuck behind old people who take FOREVER to pack their three lousy items and insist on engaging anyone withing 5 metres in a pointless conversation about the bloody weather.

Wow, I feel great.:D :D

Tigger4Me
14th Dec 2006, 10:03
You will love the two that I overheard in WH Smiths Whyler:

PA: Would the remaining two passengers for flight... blah... blah... blah

Her: Come on we'll have to go.

Him: I'll go when I'm bloody ready. They'll wait.

When, oh when will airlines start shutting the doors in the face of such arrogant :mad: s.

As an airport transfer rep, on the inbound to the airport when running through departure procedures I always make the points raised by Whyler to my pax adding that everyone will get away a lot quicker if they remain seated until their row/cabin section is called forward for boarding. I often wonder if anyone actually listens.

verticalhold
14th Dec 2006, 11:20
Back to the post office for a mo;

Off to the post office to tax the car. Only time availlable in the day was lunchtime. Stand in queue, shuffle forward, stand in queue, shuffle forward, start to feel hungry, shuffle forward, stand in queue, start to worry about catching scurvey from being away from fresh fruit for so long, stand in queue.

Suddenly realise I'm at the front of the queue. "Cashier number seven please" comes the voice (could go up to ten but only three are manned/womaned) Old biddy is leaving cashier number seven as I arrive at the window and hand over papers and payment. Mind disappears to the sandwich shop and is choosing my lunchtime repast when suddely I'm pushed out of the way. Its the old biddy back shoving me aside and starting to ask questions of the cashier. Cashier says "I'm dealing with this gentleman you'll need to queue up again" Old biddy ignores her, "excuse me" say I "this lady is dealing with me if you don't mind and I would like to be dealt with as quickly as possible." Her response was to push harder and raise her voice at the cashier, she accidentally kicked my briefcase and broke the catch. When I remonstrated she claimed she had not kicked the case. My temper went and sadly any dignity I had left. She went to the back of the queue after I threatened to kick her through the front window of the post office, called her an ugly old harlot and told her to Eff Off.

Supermarkets, the Post Office and department stores seem designed to take away our patience, rob us of human spirit and leaves us screaming in frustration. Looking through this thread I can see normally mild, wise and funny people losing their tempers. this is an internet thread for f:mad: s sake. what are we all like in the real situation?

G-CPTN
14th Dec 2006, 11:25
Standing in the queue for the ATM (cash machine) at the Bank, the elderly lady ahead of me turned and asked me if I would check her balance.
I gave her a shove and she fell over . . .

verticalhold
14th Dec 2006, 11:37
G-CPTN you are always here and relied upon for light relief:ok: :ok:

Grainger
14th Dec 2006, 12:03
Back to the post office for a mo;The counter staff in our local post office seem to have had a visit to the British Rail charm school.

The guy at the next window to me this morning asked for a V55/5 Form.

"What's it for ?" the woman asked, suspiciously.

Well hang on love, he's not asked you for a chainsaw or a gallon of strychnine. It's a post office and he's asked for a specific form by name - what do you think he's going to do with it ?

He explained that it was for registering a vehicle.

"Is it a V6 ?"

"No - I asked for a V55/5 "

"We don't have those"

Hats off to the guy for keeping his cool. No wonder they have to be protected with those glass windows.

Groundbased
14th Dec 2006, 12:46
Post offices will all be closed down soon so that resolves that issue.

Next.

Wyler
14th Dec 2006, 12:48
My wife went to the Post Office yesterday to post our crimbo cards. She got all the stamps (about 30) and went to the little counter where you are supposed to stick them on. This old boy came up and asked her to hurry up because he had to catch the post. She went as fast as she ould but after about a minute he actually pushed her and tried to knock the cards onto the floor.
My wife, who works on a geriatric ward at the local Infirmary, was about to retire gracefully when she recognised him. She told him, very quietly, that if he did not go away, everyone in the shop would know about the dreadful state of his underpants. He left. :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

I love this woman.

phnuff
14th Dec 2006, 13:02
Its not just in airport/supermarkets/Post Offices people seem to leave their brains at home. I commute into London by train, and every day, use the tube. The number of times people who clearly don't travel to London much (Northerners!!), come out of the tube stairs at Kings Cross and rather than moving a few feet forward and consulting the departure board, stop dead, is staggering. Behind them x hundred regular commuters, all hacked off from the experience known as traveliing on the Underground and rushing for the commuter experience forced upon them by First Capital Connect, suddenly have to find their way around a couple of dullard whippet fanciers who are confused as to why their local 1 train per week station is not shown on the board.

AGGGGGGGHHHHHHH

Wyler
14th Dec 2006, 13:04
Oh yes, and another thing. Prat southerners who like to stereotype. := := :*

phnuff
14th Dec 2006, 14:11
Oh yes, and another thing. Prat southerners who like to stereotype

Only where appropriate:}

Krystal n chips
14th Dec 2006, 15:34
A touch of thread drift here----re the Post Office. Listening to one A. Darling MP ( tipped to be Gobbling Gordons successor it seems and please note ) who was explaining the reasons Post Offices will be closed--due to lack of custom it seems. Being a politician, he clearly has the memory span of a stuffed ferret---as he duly informed the world that, pensions are now paid into Bank accounts unlike previously--just one teeny point here. It was a Gov't directive this would be the case you cretin !!!---and that everybody now uses the internet to tax their cars ---er, no, not with the cock-ups the DVLA / C produce sunshine and, becasue we all use e-email now, fewer letters are posted :confused: --so that's the reason the Post Offices have to close.

BoĢĢ%cks !!

And on the subject of the DVLC, they have served a notice of intended prosecution on my father for not submitting a SORN notice---the car was scrapped this year and he died in February. See you in court then ! :E


Sorry about that little drift. :p

Foss
14th Dec 2006, 15:54
It was a cold and stormy night, well 4.00pm ish, and I wanted to buy the paper.
There is a very elderly man dottering about on a stick in the newsagents, with his wife
They get in front in the queue.
They want to pay by switch.
'WHAT'S YOUR NUMBER' Wife to hubby.
'WHAT?'
'WHAT'S YOUR NUMBER. WHERE'S YOUR CARD.'
'WHAT CARD, WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT.'
This is all shouting, if you hadn't guessed. They're pretty much deaf.
'THE BLUE ONE, THE BLUE ONE.'
'YOU HAVE THE NUMBER.'
'NO I DON'T.'

Right, that's me, I going to be here until Christmas.
Fos